1879 Baltimore

City: 
Baltimore
President: 
Jas. E. Williams
Listed in YMCA Yearbook for Date: 
1879
Organized Date: 
1877
MD
5
Secretary: 
H. Washington
Type: 
City
Members: 
30

1878 St Louis

City: 
St Louis
President: 
St Clair Davis
Listed in YMCA Yearbook for Date: 
1878
Organized Date: 
1877
MO
4
Secretary: 
P.H. Murray
Type: 
City
Members: 
0

1878 Richmond

City: 
Richmond
Listed in YMCA Yearbook for Date: 
1878
President: 
Dr. J.C. Ferguson
VA
3
Secretary: 
W.H.L. Combs
Type: 
City
Members: 
10

1878 Fulton

City: 
Fulton
Listed in YMCA Yearbook for Date: 
1878
SC
2
Type: 
City
Members: 
215

1878 Charleston

City: 
Charleston
President: 
C.R. Holman
Listed in YMCA Yearbook for Date: 
1878
Organized Date: 
1866
SC
1
Secretary: 
Wm. Cambell
Type: 
City
Members: 
25

New Libraries Website Launched

Since May, we've been working to redesign the University Libraries web presence, with the focus on you, the user. Our goal has been to improve search functionality and enhance personalization, and throughout the redesign process we received ideas from many users. As of August 15, our new homepage is live, with highlights including:
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  • A central, tabbed search function, giving you ready access to the various catalogs and databases available to find books, articles, video, music, maps, and more.
  • Course resources tab featuring the new Library Course Pages, which are dynamically generated for each course to bring together relevant resources tailored for specific subjects, including reserve readings.
  • Login feature that displays your checked out books, saved journals and databases, recommended resources, and current course pages on their respective tabs (see image at right for example).
  • Ask a Librarian tab, with multiple options to connect with us, including live chat and contact information for the librarian in your discipline.
  • Today's building hours listed prominently, along with a link to all hours and locations.

Surveys and usability testing have generated positive early reviews, including: "It does a good job of focusing on the things that are important." "Easier to navigate than the old system. The hours and location feature is perfect." "Love the new homepage!!! Much more user friendly and efficient! Thanks!" "I really like the tabs." "I did notice there was a lot of effort to give me some people that I could address. As soon as I logged into horticulture, there was Julie, my librarian. I felt encouraged to contact her." Additional developments are planned, including enhancements to the MNCAT catalog (read more about these upgraded features). We hope you'll help us continue to improve the site by completing a brief survey to share your feedback.

 

Watch a video overview of the new site:

Featured from the Collection

Convento y Hospital de Refugio, Lima, Peru

Account Book, Convento y Hospital de RefugioAccount Book, Convento y Hospital de Refugio

Manuscript Account Book, 85 leaves. September 1723 - June 1793

This 18th-century account book contains monthly totals of accounts payable and receivable for the convent and hospital, plus details of monies received from rents and benefactions (donations). Also included are records of patients (often indigent, among them present and former enslaved persons), the length of their stays, and the cost of their treatment and maintenance. Two audits from the Padre Prefecto also appear in the folio.

Officially known as the Convento y Hospital de Santa Toribio de Refugio de Incurables de la Religión Bethlehemitica de la Ciudad de Lima, “Incurables” was run by the Bethlemite order. The order was founded in the mid-seventeenth century by Pedro Betancourt, and eventually operated small hospitals in present-day Mexico and a number of Latin American countries, including Peru. Incurables served as a convalescent hospital for patients to whom other hospitals would not provide care, though Spaniards were also treated there. The brothers collected rents from land on the island of Callao, as well as rent from a house on Trinidad Street and a store (pulperia). The Sisters of Mercy took over the hospital in the mid-nineteenth century, a product of the appropriation of Church property during the independence period.



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