A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography:

Below are items recently added to A Holmes & Doyle Bibliography (also known as "The Supplement").  Randall Stock—a fellow Sherlockian from California—suggested that this type of listing would be a useful addendum to the Supplement as another way to track new additions to the bibliography.  I am thankful for his suggestion.   New items will be presented in monthly installments.  Sometime near the end of each month these entries will be “dumped” into the larger bibliography.  As always, I am open to comments and suggestions that will make this research tool more useful.

 

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AUDIO/VISUAL

1.  25 Mystery Classics. [Hallandale, FL]: Global Acess Entertainment, 2010. Visual Material 2 videodisc.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in.  25 movie classics collectors edition; Best of the best collectors edition; DVD.  2 double-sided DVD".   //

 

2.  Batman, the Brave and the Bold. Volume 4. Neutral Bay, N.S.W.: Warner Bros. Entertainment Australia [distributor], 2010. Visual Material 1 videodisc (DVD) (ca. 88 min.).

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.  PAL ; Region 4.  "Y27338".  Originally broadcast on Cartoon Network as episodes of the television series in 2009.  Copyright DC Comics and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.  Audience: Rated: PG. // "Nothing will stop Batman from cracking a case ... not even history! "Bats" swoops back to 19th century London and partners with the original World's Greatest Detective Sherlock Holmes to save an innocent man from death. But their victory destroys another amn, creating a ghostly villain to join the Dark Knight's Rogue Gallery. Back in the future, Batman meets Equinox, battles the immortal caveman Kru'll and transits through space to save an alien planet from an oppressive general. Meanwhile, fellow DC Super Hero Blue Beetle needs guidance on a teenage crush, Aquaman needs a jug and Booster Gold needs a life lesson, all reminding Batman why he prefers to work alone!" --Container.

 

3.  Case Closed, One Truth Prevails. Movie: The Phantom of Baker Street. [Fort Worth, TX]: FUNimation Productions, 2010. Visual Material 1 videodisc (110 min.).

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. DVD, region 1, widescreen presentation; Dolby Digital stereo., NTSC.  Based on the comic books created by Gosho Aoyama.  Audience: Rating: 13UP; rating on container: TV-PG.  Japanese version: produced by TMS Entertainment ; producers, Michihiko Suwa & Masahito Yoshioka ; directed by Kenji Kodama ; English version: FUNimation Productions, Ltd. ; producers, Carly Hunter, Justin Cook. // The game is afoot! Conan Edogawa may look like he's only in elementary school, my dear Watson, but he possesses perhaps the keenest eye for detail of any living detective. His latest case finds him trapped in a virtual recreation of 19th century London and pitted against none other than Jack the Ripper. To save his friends, Conan must follow in the footsteps of his hero, Sherlock Homes, and crack a case that's gone unsolved for over a hundred years.

 

4.  The Crucifer of Blood. Burbank, CA: Distributed by Warner Home Video, 2010. Visual Material 1 videodisc (103 min.).

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. DVD; region 1; Dolby digital 2.0; widescreen. Based on the play by Paul Giovanni.  Originally released as a motion picture in 1991. Participants: Charlton Heston, Richard Johnson, Susannah Harker, John Castle, Clive Wood, Simon Callow, Edward Fox. Audience: Not rated.  Turner Pictures presents an Agamemnon Films production ; in association with British Lion ; written, produced and directed by Fraser C. Heston. Director of photography, Robin Vidgeon ; editor, Eric Boyd-Perkins ; music, Carl Davis. // A treat for Sherlock Holmes fans: A maharajah's treasure, the British soldiers who stole it and swore a blood oath of secrecy, and 30 years later, the consequences: death. Is the treasure cursed? Or is a very human murderer at work? Only one man can unravel the mystery, Sherlock Holmes.

 

5.  De speurneuzen. [Amsterdam]: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, 2010. Visual Material 1 dvd-video (71 min.).

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- kleur, geluid, breedbeeld. Walt Disney Classics ; 29. 4 talen gesproken waaronder Nederlands, 5 talen ondertiteld waaronder Nederlands/ Videoversie van de tekenfilm: Verenigde Staten : The Walt Disney Pictures, cop. 1986. prod. by Burny Mattinson ; dir. by John Musker ... [et al.] ; [Nederlandse versie met medewerking van Lisa Boray ... [et al.]. //

 

6.  Great Detectives Anthology. [s.l.]: A&E Home Video ; New York : New Video, 2010. Visual Material 12 videodiscs (ca. 1601 min.).

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. DVD.  Release date: Oct. 5, 2010.  Bonus features: biographies of Agatha Christie and the casts ; index of Marple and Poirot stories; Sherlock Holmes: the great detective bonus documentary.  Participants: Peter Cushing, Joan Hickson, David Suchet. // There's a murderer on the moors. Terror on the train. Villains in the village! Only the world's greatest deductive minds can save the day. Fortunately, Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple are together, for the first time ever, to confront their most confounding cases.

 

7.  The Great Mouse Detective. [s.l.]: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, 2010. Visual Material 1 videodisc (ca. 74 min.).

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. Disney DVD; DVD, region 1, widescreen (1.78:1, enhanced) presentation; Dolby Digital 5.1 surround. Originally produced as a motion picture in 1986.  Based on the children's book series, Basil of Baker Street by Eve Titus and Paul Galdone.  Bonus feature: So you think you can sleuth? -amusing, animated look at the history of detective work through the ages with a crime-solving challenge.  Participants: Voiceovers: Vincent Price, Barrie Ingham, Val Bettin.  Audience: MPAA rating: G ; CHV rating: G.  Music, Henry Mancini ; story adapted by Pete Young ... [et al.] ; editors, Roy M. Brewer, Jr., James Melton ; art direction, Guy Vasilovich. // The story of a clever little hero on a great big adventure. Join the Sherlock Holmes of Mousedom on a heroic journey unraveling clues through London.

 

8.  The Search for Sherlock Holmes. [S.l.]: BFS Entertainment & Multimedia Limited, 2010. Visual Material 1 videodisc (149 min.).

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. DVD, widescreen. Release date: Oct. 26, 2010.  Participants: David Hayman. // A fascinating investigation into the enduring appeal and real-life inspiration behind Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. Presented by actor and director David Hayman.

 

BOOKS

1.  Accardo, Pasquale J. Diagnosis and Detection : the medical iconography of Sherlock Holmes. Rutherford : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press: London, 1987.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 25 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 134-136) and index.  Also issued online. //

 

2.  Baig, Barbara. How to be a Writer : building your creative skills through practice and play. 1st ed. Cincinnati, Ohio: Writer's Digest Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm.  Beginnings. What is writing practice (and how do I do it)? -- Starting the journey -- Waking up the content-mind : the basic practices -- A writer's powers. Creativity -- Memory and expertise -- Observation -- Imagination -- The subconscious -- Curiosity -- The Sherlock Holmes school of writing -- Moving towards readers. Tools for developing your material -- Your relationship with readers -- Telling stories -- Voice -- A few words on words -- Required writing. Do I have to write that? -- Getting it written -- Staying on the path. Walking the writer's way -- A writer's bookshelf.  Includes bibliographical references and index. //

 

3.  Baker, Abbey Pen. In the Dead of Winter. Cambridge, [England]: Irregular Special Press, for Baker Street Studios Ltd., 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm.  Pastiche featuring a daughter of Sherlock Holmes./ "A Myrl Adler Norton mystery"--cover.  //

 

4.  Barnes, Alan. Sherlock Holmes on Screen : the complete film and TV history. 5th, Rev. and updated ed. Richmond: Reynolds & Hearn, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Previous ed.: 2008. //

 

5.  Barrett, Tracy. The 100-year-old Secret. 1st Square Fish ed, (Sherlock files). New York : Square Fish ; Harrisonburg, Va. : Distributed by R.R. Donnelley, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., map ; 20 cm. // Xena and Xander Holmes, an American brother and sister living in London for a year, discover that Sherlock Holmes was their great-great-great grandfather when they are inducted into the Society for the Preservation of Famous Detectives and given his unsolved casebook, from which they attempt to solve the case of a famous missing painting.

 

6.  ———. The Case that Time Forgot. 1st ed, (The Sherlock files). New York: Henry Holt and Co., 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 22 cm. // Xena and Xander Holmes, an American brother and sister who are living in England, use clues from their ancestor Sherlock Holmes' casebook when they are asked by a classmate to find an ancient Egyptian artifact that has been missing for many years.

 

7.  Brown, Barry S. The Unpleasantness at Parkerton Manor : a novel, (Mrs. Hudson of Baker Street series). Santa Fe: Sunstone Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

8.  Brown, Kent R., and Arthur Conan Doyle. The Hound of the Baskervilles : a comic thriller starring Shirley Holmes and Jennie Watson. Woodstock, lL: Dramatic Pub., 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm.  adapted and dramatized by Kent R. Brown ; inspired by the novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. // Sherlock Holmes and his faithful sidekick. Dr. John Watson, have left on an extended holiday throughout Europe, leaving their nieces--Shirley Holmes and Jennie Watson--to keep an eye on the famous flat at 221B Baker Street. Shirley, studying logic, and Jennie, studying medicine, are busy preparing for upcoming exams when there's a knock on the door ... Shirley and Jennie follow the trail of evidence and intrigue until, at last, they are confronted by the ravenous Hound itself!

 

9.  Brunsdale, Mitzi. Icons of Mystery and Crime Detection : from sleuths to superheroes. 2 vols, (Greenwood icons). Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 27 cm.  v. 1. Batman: the Herculean detective -- James Bond: the byronic spy -- Father Brown: the clerical sleuth -- Charlie Chan: "the first nonwhite popular detective" -- Agatha Christie: creator of Hercule Poirot, the foreign sleuth, and Miss Jane Marple, the elderly sleuth -- Inspector Clouseau: the detective as buffoon -- Columbo: the disheveled detective -- Dragnet: television's most famous police drama -- Nancy Drew: the girl detective -- Jessica Fletcher: the mystery writer snoop -- Mike Hammer: a very imperfect, far from gentle knight -- Dirty Harry: the vigilante cop -- v. 2. Tony Hillerman : creator of ethnic detectives Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee -- Alfred Hitchcock : cinemas master of suspense -- Sherlock Holmes : the genius detective -- Inspector Jules Maigret : the gallic gumshoe -- Philip Marlowe : the detective as knight errant -- Perry Mason : the legal sleuth : Edgar Allan Poe : The father of detective fiction -- Dorothy L. Sayers : creator of Lord Peter Wimsey, the aristocratic sleuth -- Sam Spade : the hard-boiled private eye -- Dick Tracy : the first comic strip police detective hero -- Nero Wolfe : the armchair sleuth -- Zorro : the masked avenger.  Includes bibliographical references and index. //

 

10.  Capuzzo, Mike. The Murder Room : the heirs of Sherlock Holmes gather to solve the world's most perplexing cold cases. New York: Gotham Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm.  Contents: The connoisseurs of murder -- The man who got away with murder -- The knights of the Café Table -- A little child shall lead them -- Cops and robbers -- The man who saw dead people -- Shades of the dark knight -- Guardians of the city -- Cold eyes from the past -- On the trail of the assassin -- Death of a B-girl -- The visual detective -- The man with the bad stomach -- On the trail of the warlock -- The reluctant knight errant -- The perfect mass murder -- The mask of the invisible man -- The return of Vidocq -- The gathering of detectives -- Busted -- The detective of souls -- The death artist -- Dreams of Morpheus -- A case they can't let go -- The butcher of Cleveland -- Imploring God -- The end of the affair -- Catch me if you can -- The case of the shoeless corpse -- The case of the prodigal son -- The sage of Scotland Yard -- Think therefore on revenge -- Murder in the cathedral -- What I want to hear are handcuffs -- The consulting detectives -- Take me to the psychopath -- The stranger in Biddle House -- City of brotherly mayhem -- Wrath sweeter by far than the honeycomb -- The worst mother in history -- The boy who never died -- The eight babies called "it" -- Murder in triplicate -- From heaven to hell -- The descent -- In the world which will be renewed -- "Congratulations, you've found your killer" -- Interrogation -- The haunting of Mary -- The case of the missing face -- The killer angels -- The ghost -- The ninth circle of hell -- Death in the time of bananas -- The miracle on South Street -- Knights of the round tables.  Includes bibliographical references. // Documents the efforts of the Vidocq Society, an elite trio of gifted investigators, to solve such notorious cold cases as those of JonBenet Ramsey, the Butcher of Cleveland, and Jack the Ripper, and details their work with the world's top forensic specialists.

 

11.  ———. The Murder Room : the heirs of Sherlock Holmes gather to solve the world's most perplexing cold cases. Waterville, ME: Thorndike Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- The connoisseurs of murder -- The man who got away with murder -- The knights of the Café Table -- A little child shall lead them -- Cops and robbers -- The man who saw dead people -- Shades of the dark knight -- Guardians of the city -- Cold eyes from the past -- On the trail of the assassin -- Death of a B-girl -- The visual detective -- The man with the bad stomach -- On the trail of the warlock -- The reluctant knight errant -- The perfect mass murder -- The mask of the invisible man -- The return of Vidocq -- The gathering of detectives -- Busted -- The detective of souls -- The death artist -- Dreams of Morpheus -- A case they can't let go -- The butcher of Cleveland -- Imploring God -- The end of the affair -- Catch me if you can -- The case of the shoeless corpse -- The case of the prodigal son -- The sage of Scotland Yard -- Think therefore on revenge -- Murder in the cathedral -- What I want to hear are handcuffs -- The consulting detectives -- Take me to the psychopath -- The stranger in Biddle House -- City of brotherly mayhem -- Wrath sweeter by far than the honeycomb -- The worst mother in history -- The boy who never died -- The eight babies called "it" -- Murder in triplicate -- From heaven to hell -- The descent -- In the world which will be renewed -- "Congratulations, you've found your killer" -- Interrogation -- The haunting of Mary -- The case of the missing face -- The killer angels -- The ghost -- The ninth circle of hell -- Death in the time of bananas -- The miracle on South Street -- Knights of the round tables.  Includes bibliographical references. // Documents the efforts of the Vidocq Society, an elite trio of gifted investigators, to solve such notorious cold cases as those of JonBenet Ramsey, the Butcher of Cleveland, and Jack the Ripper, and details their work with the world's top forensic specialists.

 

12.  Chabon, Michael. Maps and Legends : reading and writing along the borderlands. San Francisco [Calif.]: McSweeney's Books, 2008.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 23 cm.  Trickster in a suit of lights: thoughts on the modern short story -- Maps and legends -- Fan fictions: on Sherlock Holmes -- Ragnarok boy -- On daemons & dust -- Kids' stuff -- Killer hook: Howard Chaykin's American Flagg! -- Dark adventure: on Cormac McCarthy's The road -- The Other James -- Landsman of the lost -- Thoughts on the death of Will Eisner -- My back pages -- Diving into the wreck -- Recipe for life -- Imaginary homelands -- Golems I have known, or, Why my elder son's middle name is Napoleon. // A series of linked essays in praise of reading and writing, with subjects running from ghost stories to comic books, Sherlock Holmes to Cormac McCarthy. Throughout, Chabon energetically argues for a return to the thrilling, chilling origins of storytelling, rejecting the false walls around "serious" literature in favor of a wide-ranging affection.

 

13.  Chabon, Michael, and Toshiyuki Kurohara. Sharokku homuzu saigo no kaiketsu, Shincho bunko. Tokyo: Shinchosha, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 16 cm.  Final solution. Japanese.  Saigo no kaiketsu.  Kurohara Toshiyuki yaku. //

 

14.  Champlin, Tim. Deadly Season. Bath: Gunsmoke, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 20 cm.  Originally published: Unity, Me.: Five Star, 1997. // In 1880s San Francisco, detective Fred Casey teams up with visiting detective Sherlock Holmes to solve a murder in Chinatown. A tale of opium smuggling.

 

15.  Doyle, Arthur Conan. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, (Kennebec Large Print perennial favorites collection). Waterville, ME: Kennebec Large Print, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm.  A scandal in Bohemia -- The red-headed league -- A case of identity -- The Boscombe Valley mystery -- The five orange pips -- The man with the twisted lip -- The blue carbuncle -- The speckled band -- The engineer's thumb -- The noble bachelor -- The Beryl coronet -- The copper beeches. //

 

16.  ———. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, (Arcturus classics). London: Arcturus, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

17.  ———. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, (Fireside series; Qualitas classics). Calgary: Qualitas Pub., 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm.  Originally publ.: London : G. Newnes Ltd., 1892. //

 

18.  ———. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Vancouver, BC: AD Classic/Engage Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm.  A scandal in Bohemia -- The Red-Headed League -- A case of identity -- The Boscombe Valley mystery -- The five orange pips -- The man with the twisted lip -- The adventure of the blue carbuncle -- The adventure of the speckled band -- The adventure of the engineer's thum -- The adventure of the noble bachelor -- The adventure of the beryl coronet -- The adventure of the copper beeches.  First published by George Newnes Ltd. in 1892. //

 

19.  ———. The Complete Brigadier Gerard Stories. Edinburgh: Canongate, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

20.  ———. The Complete Sherlock Holmes. Lexington, KY: Sherlock Holmes Collection, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 26 cm.  A study in scarlet -- The sign of four -- The hound of the Baskervilles -- The valley of fear -- The adventures of Sherlock Holmes -- The memoirs of Sherlock Holmes -- The return of Sherlock Holmes -- His last bow.  Four novels and four short story collections in one volume. //

 

21.  ———. Exploits of Brigadier Gerard. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

22.  ———. The Extraordinary Cases of Sherlock Holmes, (Puffin classics). London: Puffin, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 18 cm.  Introduced by Jonathan Stroud. //

 

23.  ———. The Hound of the Baskervilles. Lexington, KY: Sherlock Holmes Collection, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm. //

 

24.  ———. Lost World. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

25.  ———. The Maracot Deep and Other Stories. Newcastle: CSP Classic Texts, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

26.  ———. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, (Dover thrift editions). Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. //

 

27.  ———. The Mystery of Cloomber. Mineola, NY : Dover; Newton Abbot : David & Charles [distributor], 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- With a new introduction by Mike Ashley. //

 

28.  ———. Sherlock Holmes : his greatest cases, (Pocket classics). London: White's, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

29.  ———. Songs of the Road. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

30.  ———. Spiritualist Pamphlets. Newcastle: CSP Classic Texts, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

31.  ———. War in South Africa. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

32.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, Chaz Brenchley, and Felix Bennett. The Lost World. North American ed, (Real reads). New York: Skyview Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 21 cm.  Includes bibliographical references.  retold by Chaz Brenchley ; illustrated by Felix Bennett. // In this retelling, Professor Challenger leads an expedition to explore an isolated plateau rising above the Amazon jungles where they discover dinosaurs, primitive ape-men, and prehistoric monsters-Publisher.

 

33.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Lorne Dixon. Hound : Sherlock Holmes and the curse of the Baskervilles. Winnipeg: Coscom Entertainment, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

34.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, Ian Edginton, and Ian Culbard. A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel. A Study in Scarlet. London: SelfMadeHero, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 25 cm. Adapted from the original novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle ; illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard ; text adapted by Ian Edginton. //

 

35.  ———. A Study in Scarlet : a Sherlock Holmes graphic novel. New York: Sterling Pub. Co., 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- chiefly col. ill. ; 25 cm. Being a reprint from the reminiscences of John H. Watson, M.D., late of the Army Medical Department -- The country of the saints. Illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard ; text adapted by Ian Edginton. // Graphic novel adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery in which Dr. Watson first meets Sherlock Holmes and the two locate their apartment at 221B Baker Street in the midst of a case that spans two continents.

 

36.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Pauline Francis. The Hound of the Baskervilles, (Essential classics). London: Evans, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Retold by Pauline Francis. //

 

37.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, Vincent Goodwin, and Ben Dunn. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Adventure of Abbey Grange, (The graphic novel adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Graphic planet). Edina, MN: Magic Wagon, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-47). Adapted by, Vincent Goodwin ; illustrated by, Ben Dunn. // Retold in graphic novel form, Sherlock Holmes investigates what appears to be a murder committed during a burglery.

 

38.  ———. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Adventure of the Dancing Men, 9The graphic novel adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Graphic planet;). Edina, MN: Magic Wagon, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-47).  Adapted by, Vincent Goodwin ; illustrated by, Ben Dunn. // Retold in graphic novel form, Sherlock Holmes investigates the appearance of some strange drawings.

 

39.  ———. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Adventure of the Empty House, (The graphic novel adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Graphic planet). Edina, MN: Magic Wagon, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references.  Adapted by Vincent Goodwin ; illustrated by Ben Dunn. // Retold in graphic novel form: After being presumed dead for three years, Sherlock Holmes returns to solve the mystery of a card-player who has been shot.

 

40.  ———. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Adventure of the Norwood Builder, (The graphic novel adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Graphic planet). Edina, MN: Magic Wagon, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-47). Adapted by, Vincent Goodwin ; illustrated by, Ben Dunn. // Retold in graphic novel form, Sherlock Holmes investigates the case of a solicitor accused of murder.

 

41.  ———. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Adventure of the Red-Headed League, (The graphic novel adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Graphic planet). Edina, MN: Magic Wagon, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-47).  Adapted by, Vincent Goodwin ; illustrated by, Ben Dunn. // Retold in graphic novel form, Sherlock Holmes investigates a bizarre case involving a red-haired pawnbroker and his employer who has disappeared.

 

42.  ———. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Adventure of the Speckled Band, (The graphic novel adventures of Sherlock Holmes; Graphic planet). Edina, Mn: Magic Wagon, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-47).  Adapted by Vincent Goodwin ; illustrated by Ben Dunn. // Retold in graphic novel form, Sherlock Holmes comes to the aid of a client whose sister's dying words referred to a mysterious speckled band.

 

43.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Kelley Jones. Sherlock Holmes. Volume 2. San Diego, CA : IDW; London : Diamond [distributor], 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 23 cm.  The valley of fear -- The adventure of the noble bachelor -- The yellow face -- The Greek interpreter -- The sign of four.  artist, Kelley Jones. //

 

44.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, Kelley Jones, and Jay Fotos. The Valley of Fear & Other Sherlock Holmes Stories, (Sherlock Holmes). San Diego, CA: IDW, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 23 cm. The valley of fear -- The adventure of the noble bachelor -- The yellow face -- The Greek interpreter -- The sign of four.  Illustrated by Kelley Jones ; colors by Jay Fotos. //

 

45.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, Alberto Laiseca, and Jorge León Burgos Funes. Estudio en escarlata ; y, El signo de los cuatro, (Sherlock Homes). Madrid: Nowtilus, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm.  Study in scarlet. The Sign of Four. Spanish.  [edición de Alberto Laiseca ; traducción, Jorge León Burgos Funes]. //

 

46.  ———. Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes, (Sherlock Homes). Madrid: Nowtilus, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm.  Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Spanish.  [edición, Alberto Laiseca ; traducción, Jorge León Burgos Fune]. //

 

47.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, J. R. Parks, and Vinod Kumar. The Hound of the Baskervilles. Delhi : Campfire; London : Frances Lincoln [distributor]: London, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Adapted by J.R. Parks ; illustrated by Vinod Kumar. //

 

48.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, Martin Powell, and Daniel Pérez. The Hound of the Baskervilles : a Sherlock Holmes mystery, (Graphic revolve). Oxford: Raintree, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Originally published: Minneapolis, Minn.: Stone Arch; London, Raintree, 2009.  Retold by Martin Powell ; illustrated by Daniel Perez. //

 

49.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Jules Verne. Adventure Stories, (Read-along books). New York; London: Priddy, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- The lost world -- Treasure island -- Around the world in eighty days.  Compact disc.  Touch-and-feel book.  Adapted from the classic stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson and Jules Verne. //

 

50.  Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Shafquat Towheed. The Sign of Four, (Broadview editions). Peterborough, Ont.: Broadview Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- port., map ; 22 cm.  Includes bibliographical references: p. 215-218.  Edited by Shafquat Towheed. //

 

51.  Doyle, Steven, and David A. Crowder. Sherlock Holmes for Dummies, (For dummies). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes index. //

 

52.  Drew, Bernard A. Literary Afterlife : the posthumous continuations of 325 authors' fictional characters. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., Inc., Publishers, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm.  Contents: Action and adventure. Edgar Rice Burroughs -- Michael Crichton -- C.S. Forester -- H. Rider Haggard -- Gary Jennings - W.E. Johns -- William W. Johnstone -- Jim Kjelgaard -- Alistair MacLean -- Patrick O'Brien -- Baroness Emmuska Orczy -- Sax Rohmer -- Barry Sadler -- Sapper -- Russell Thorndike -- Edgar Wallace -- Johann David Wyss -- Dornford Yates -- Classics (18th century and earlier.) Anonymous (Beowulf) -- Miguel Cervantes -- Geoffrey Chaucer -- John Cleland -- Daniel Defoe -- Henry Fielding -- Homer -- Alain-René Lesage -- Matthew Lewis -- Christopher Marlowe -- Murasaki Shikibu -- Samuel Richardson -- William Shakespeare -- Jonathan Swift -- Cao Xuequin -- Classic (19th century.) Edwin A. Abbott -- Louisa May Alcott -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton -- Anton Chekhov -- James Fenimore Cooper -- Charles Dickens -- Fyodor Dostoyevsky -- Alexandre Dumas -- George Du Maurier -- George Eliot -- Thomas Hardy -- Nathaniel Hawthorne -- E.T.A. Hoffman -- Thomas Hughes -- Victor Hugo -- Henrik Ibsen -- Henry James -- Charles Kingsley -- Rudyard Kipling -- D.H. Lawrence -- Gaston Leroux -- Charles Maturin -- Herman Melville -- Edgar Allan Poe -- George Sand -- Sir Walter Scott -- George Bernard Shaw -- Mary Shelley -- Robert Louis Stevenson -- Harriett Beecher Stowe -- August Strindberg -- William Makepeace Thackeray -- Leo Tolstoy -- Anthony Trollope -- Ivan Turgenev -- Mark Twain -- Lew Wallace -- Edith Wharton -- Oscar Wilde -- Classics (20th century.) James Agee -- James Robert Baker -- Samuel Beckett -- Henry Bellamann -- Max Brand -- Albert Camus -- Raymond Carver -- William Frend De Morgan -- Daphne Du Maurier -- Ralph Ellison -- William Faulkner -- F. Scott Fitzgerald -- Alex Haley -- Ernest Hemingway -- James Hilton -- Franz Kafka -- Bernard Katz -- Jack Kerouac -- Jack London -- Malcolm Lowry -- Thomas Mann -- Horace McCoy -- Amanda McKittrick -- Grace Metalious -- Margaret Mitchell -- Vladimir Nabokov -- John O'Brien -- Kyle Onstott -- Boris Pasternak -- Richard Powell -- Mario Puzo -- Harold Robbins -- J.D. Salinger -- Michael Shaara -- Robert Neilson Stephens -- Jacqueline Susann -- Angela Thirkell -- Walter C. Urr -- Helen Van Slyke -- David Foster Wallace -- Robert Penn Warren -- Evelyn Waugh -- Thomas Wolfe -- Crime and mystery. Cleve F. Adams -- Margery Allingham -- William Ard -- H.C. Bailey -- Earl Derr Biggers -- John G. Brandon -- Heron Carvic -- William J. Caunitz -- Raymond Chandler -- Leslie Charteris -- G. K. Chesterton -- Agatha Christie -- Wilkie Collins -- Arthur Conan Doyle -- Cyril Connolly -- John Creasey -- Elizabeth Daly -- August Derleth -- R. Austin Freeman -- Emile Gaboriau -- Erle Stanley Gardner -- Bruce Graeme -- Patrick Hamilton -- Dashiell Hammett -- Thomas W. Hanshew -- Chester Himes -- Edward D. Hoch -- E.W. Hornung -- Delfried Kaufmann -- Ross MacDonald -- Stuart Palmer -- Ellery Queen -- Craig Rice -- Virginia Rich -- Elliott Roosevelt -- Rebecca Rothenberg -- Lawrence Sanders -- John A. Saxon -- Dorothy L. Sayers -- Georges Simenon -- Charles Merrill Smith -- Mickey Spillane -- Richard Stark -- Rex Stout -- Murray Thomas -- Arthur W. Upfield -- S.S. Van Dine -- Cornell Woolrich -- Espionage. Edward S. Aarons -- Desmond Bagley -- John Buchan -- Erskine Childers -- Ian Fleming -- Robert Ludlum -- Eugene Vidoccq -- Fantasy and horror. V.C. Andrews -- Robert Lynn Asprin -- Algernon Blackwood -- Marion Zimmer Bradley -- Avram Davidson -- David Gemmell -- Robert E. Howard -- Robert Jordan -- Robert Kornwise -- Richard Laymon -- Fritz Lieber -- H.P. Lovecraft -- Michael McDowell -- A. Merritt -- Andre Norton -- Mervyn Peake -- John William Polidori -- M.P. Shiel -- I. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt -- Bram Stoker -- J.R.R. Tolkien -- Manly Wade Wellman -- Cherry Wilder -- Austin Tappan Wright -- Humor. E.F. Benson -- Hugh Foulis -- George Grossmith -- Joel Chandler Harris -- Thorne Smith -- P.G. Wodehouse -- Juveniles (19th century). William Adams -- Horatio Alger, Jr. -- Helen Bannerman -- Lewis Carroll -- Oliver Optic -- Anna Sewell -- Johanna Spyri -- Juvenile (20th century). Robert Arthur, Jr. Wilbert Awdry -- Enid Bagnold -- J.M. Barrie -- L. Frank Baum -- Ludwig Bemelmans -- John Bellairs -- Enid Blyton -- Margaret Wise Brown -- Frances Hodgson Burnett -- Julie Campbell -- Matt Christopher -- James Oliver Curwood -- Jean de Brunhoff -- Dr. Seuss -- Walter Farley -- Rachel Field -- Louise Fitzhugh -- Don Freeman -- Kenneth Grahame -- Hardie Gramatky -- Johnny Gruelle -- Hergé -- Anthony R.M. Hodges -- Caroline Emilia Jacobs -- Ezra Jack Keats -- Eric Knight -- Rae Lambert -- Hugh Lofting -- Betty MacDonald -- Ellen MacGregor -- A.A. Milne -- Lucy Maud Montgomery -- Jack O'Brien -- Robert C. O'Brien -- Scott O'Dell -- Peggy Parish -- Eleanor H. Porter -- Beatrice Potter -- H.A. and Margaret Rey -- Dorothy Richards -- Frank Richards -- J.K. Rowling -- H.L. Sayler -- Richard Scarry -- Dodie Smith -- Margaret Sutton -- Albert Payson Terhune -- Barbara Euphan Todd -- Edith Van Dyne -- Charles Spain Verral -- Gertrude Chandler Warner -- Kate Douglass Wiggin -- Laura Ingalls Wilder -- Poets. Samuel Taylor Coleridge -- Emily Dickinson -- William Henry Drummond -- Robert Frost -- Joyce Kilmer -- Archibald Lampman -- Clement Clarke Moore -- Banjo Paterson -- Sylvia Plath -- Ernest Lawrence Thayer -- Henry David Thoreau -- Walt Whitman -- William Wordsworth -- Pulps. Lars Anderson -- Bertha M. Clay -- Maxwell Grant -- Kenneth Roberson -- Grant Stockbridge -- Romances. Jane Austen -- Charlotte Brontë -- Emily Brontë -- Georgette Heyer -- Grace Livingston Hill -- Science Fiction. Douglas Adams -- Isaac Asimov -- Alfred Bester -- Pierre Boulle -- Arthur C. Clarke -- Jo Clayton -- Brian Daley -- Philip K. Dick -- Robert Heinlein -- Frank Herbert -- Craig Hinton -- L. Ron Hubbard -- C.M. Kornbluth -- Walter M. Miller -- Philip Nowlan -- George Orwell -- H. Beam Piper -- Alex Raymond -- Eric Frank Russell -- E.E. "Doc" Smith -- A.E. van Vogt -- Jules Verne -- Kurt Vonnegut -- Stanley F. Weinbaum -- H.G. Wells -- John Wyndham -- Robert Zelazny -- Westerns. Burt Arthur -- B.M. Bower -- Max Brand -- Ralph Compton -- Hal Dunning -- Brian Wynne Garfield -- Zane Grey -- Marshall Grover -- William W. Johnstone -- Karl May -- Johnston McCulley -- Jon Messman -- Clarence E. Mulford -- Charles Portis -- Norman McLeod Raine -- Les Savage, Jr. -- Oliver stranger -- Fran Striker -- Jonas Ward -- Owen Wister.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 335-341) and index. // "This reference book describes literary pastiches in which fictional characters have reappeared in new works after the deaths of the authors. It includes series that have continued under a deceased writer's real or pen name, undisguised offshoots issued under the new writer's name and posthumous collaborations in which a deceased author's unfinished manuscript is completed by another writer"--Provided by publisher.

 

53.  Estleman, Loren D. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes. 1st ed, (Further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. //

 

54.  Faye, Lyndsay. Dust and Shadow : An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson. 1st Simon & Schuster trade pbk. ed. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- map ; 22 cm. //

 

55.  Fleischman, Sid. Sir Charlie : Chaplin, the funniest man in the world. 1st ed. New York: Greenwillow Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 27 cm.  The boy in the blue velvet suit -- Bleak houses -- Life in the booby hatch -- Life with father -- Poster boy -- On becoming invisible -- Enter, Sherlock Holmes -- Don't mug too much -- A red nose -- The tipsy gentleman -- A comedian amid the orange groves -- The galloping tintypes -- The lens louse -- Mable, the movie star -- Opus one: the sleepwalker -- Charlie and the ten grand rumor -- Chaplin and the cross-eyed man -- The millionaire tramp -- Dawn on Sunset Boulevard -- A marriage of mayflies -- Where's Charlie? -- Room service -- The eternal washtub -- Deja woes -- Dancing around the stake -- Silence spoken here -- The impertinent gesture -- Five francs a glance -- The red flag -- Welcome to Tomania -- The phantom Jew -- The cockney cad -- Throw the rascal out! -- So long, Charlie -- Takes and mistakes -- Brimstone in the air -- Sir Charlie -- A life in concrete.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 258-260) and index.  Audience: 9-13 // A Newbery Medalist presents one of the most compelling rags-to-riches stories of modern times, in this biography of the legendary Little Tramp, Charlie Chaplin. Includes archival prints and photos.

 

56.  Galvan, Jill Nicole. The Sympathetic Medium : feminine channeling, the occult, and communication technologies, 1859-1919. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm.  Introduction: Tuning in to the female medium -- Sympathy and the spiriting of information In the cage -- Securing the line : automatism and cross-cultural encounters in late Victorian Gothic fiction -- Du Maurier's media : the phonographic unconscious on the cusp of the future -- Telltale typing, hysterical channeling : the medium as detective device -- Literary transmission and male mediation.  Includes bibliographical references and index. // "The nineteenth century saw not only the emergence of the telegraph, the telephone, and the typewriter but also a fascination with seances and occult practices like automatic writing as a means for contacting the dead. Like the new technologies, modern spiritualism promised to link people separated by space or circumstance; and like them as well, it depended on the presence of a human medium to convey these conversations. Whether electrical or otherworldly, these communications were remarkably often conducted - in offices, at telegraph stations and telephone switchboards, and in seance parlors - by women." "In The Sympathetic Medium, Jill Galvan offers an analysis of the rise of the female medium in Great Britain and the United States during the Victorian era and through the turn of the century. Examining a wide variety of fictional explorations of feminine channeling (in both the technological and supernatural realms) by such authors as Henry James, George Eliot, Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker, Marie Corelli, and George Du Maurier, Galvan argues that women were often chosen for that role, or assumed it themselves, because they made at-a-distance dialogues seem more intimate, less mediated." "Two allegedly feminine traits, sympathy and a susceptibility to automatism, enabled women to disappear into their roles as message-carriers. Anchoring her literary analysis in discussions of social, economic, and scientific culture, Galvan finds that nineteenth- and early twentieth-century feminization of mediated communication reveals the challenges that the new networked culture presented to prevailing ideas of gender, dialogue, privacy, and the relationship between body and self."--Book jacket.

 

57.  Gilbert, Paul D. Sherlock Holmes and the Giant Rat of Sumatra. London: Robert Hale, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

58.  Grann, David. The Devil and Sherlock Holmes : tales of murder, madness, and obsession. London: Simon & Schuster, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm.  "Any truth is better than indefinite doubt". Mysterious circumstances -- Trial by fire -- The chameleon -- True crime -- Which way did he run -- "A strange enigma is man!". The squid hunter -- City of water -- The old man and the gun -- Stealing time -- "All that was monstrous and inconceivably wicked in the universe". The brand -- Crimetown U.S.A. -- Giving the "devil" his due. // Collection of the journalist's articles previously published in varous periodicals in slightly different form.  Includes 'A Reporter at Large: Mysterious Circumstances' (about the death of Richard Lancelyn Green reprinted from The New Yorker.

 

59.  Grant, Barry. Sherlock Holmes and the Shakespeare Letter. Sutton: Severn House, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

60.  ———. The Strange Return of Sherlock Holmes. Sutton: Severn House, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm. // When James Wilson retires from journalism, he decides to settle down in a small Welsh town with a roomate, a Mr. Cedric Coombes, and at first thinks little of his new friend's eccentric behavior. But he can't shake the feeling that he knows him from somewhere else. As Coombes displays his astonishing deductive prowess, and becomes embroiled in the police investigation of the bizarre death, and apparent murder, of a man in a bathtub, Wilson, or should we say Watson, begins to wonder just who this Coombes really is.

 

61.  Greenberg, Martin Harry, Jon L. Lellenberg, and Daniel Stashower. Sherlock Holmes in America. London: Robinson, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

62.  Gruesser, John Cullen. A Century of Detection : Twenty Great Mystery Stories, 1841-1940. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., Publishers, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Introduction. The invention of modern detection -- The murders in the rue morgue / by Edgar Allan Poe -- The purloined letter morgue / by Edgar Allan Poe -- The gold-bug morgue / by Edgar Allan Poe -- Who is the thief? / by Wilkie Collins -- The stolen white elephant / by Mark Twain -- The blue cross / by G. K. Chesterton -- A scandal in bohemia / by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The adventure of the speckled band / by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The adventure of the final problem / by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The stolen cigar case / by Bret Harte -- The long arm / by Mary Wilkins Freeman -- The ninescore mystery / by Baroness Orczy -- Missing: page thirteen / by Anna Katharine Green -- A jury of her peers / by Susan Glaspell -- The false burton combs / by Carroll John Daly -- The road home / by Dashiell Hammett -- Murder at the automat / by Cornell Woolrich -- Talma gordon / by Pauline Hopkins -- He knew / by Chester Himes -- The birthmark / by Ralph Ellison.  Includes bibliographical references and index.  Edited by John Cullen Gruesser. // "Appropriate for the general reader and the student, this wide-ranging anthology of mystery stories provides a chronological and thematic survey of early detection fiction. Six thematic categories foreground the genre's fluidity and evolution, with selections presenting detectives in an array of nationalities, genders and sexual orientations, socioeconomic classes, political points of view, and ethnic and racial backgrounds"--Provided by publisher.

 

63.  Halperin, Jim, and Hector Cantú. Collectible Movie Posters : illustrated guide with auction prices. Atlanta, GA: Whitman Pub., 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.  Introduction -- The top 100 collectible movie posters (1. The bride of Frankenstein -- 2. Dracula : one sheet -- 3. The black cat : one sheet -- 4. Flying down to Rio : one sheet -- 5. Frankenstein : one sheet -- 6. The phantom of the Opera -- 7. The mad doctor -- 8. Freaks -- 9. Son of Frankenstein -- 10. The black cat : half sheet -- 11. Hollywood -- 12. Wings : one sheet -- 13. King Kong : one sheet -- 14. Stagecoach -- 15. Baby face -- 16. Son of Kong -- 17. The bride of Frankenstein : half sheet -- 18. Dracula : title lobby card -- 19. Snow White and the seven dwarfs -- 20. Wings : one sheet -- 21. Ye olden days -- 22. Werewolf of London -- 23. The Klondike Kid -- 24. The thief of Bagdad -- 25. The pride of the clan -- 26. The raven : half sheet -- 27. Mad love -- 28. The hunchback of Notre Dame -- 29. The whoopee party -- 30. Grand Hotel -- 31. Citizen Kane : one sheet -- 32. Babe comes home -- 33. Love before breakfast -- 34. Moon over Miami : three sheet -- 35. The bride of Frankenstein : title lobby card -- 36. Dracula : lobby card -- 37. Mickey's nightmare -- 38. The black cat : half sheet -- 39. Londres despues de media noche (London after midnight) : poster -- 40. La signora de Shanghai (The lady from Shanghai) -- 41. The war of the worlds -- 42. Citizen Kane : half sheet -- 43. The meller dreamer -- 44. Metropolis -- 45. The wolf man : insert -- 46. Casablanca : half sheet -- 47. The eagle -- 48. Frankenstein : three sheet -- 49. King Kong : one sheet -- 50. The grapes of wrath -- 51. It happened one night -- 52. Another fine mess -- 53. The rescue -- 54. Moon over Miami : one sheet -- 55. Londres apres minuet (London after midnight) : poster -- 56. The Benson murder -- 57. Hawaiian holiday -- 58. Gilda -- 59. Dracula : one sheet -- 60. Frankenstein : title lobby card -- 61. Scarface -- 62. Magician Mickey -- 63. Modern times -- 64. The champion -- 65. Things to come -- 66. The outlaw -- 67. The adventures of Sherlock Holmes -- 68. The adventures of Robin Hood : six sheet -- 69. The Broadway melody -- 70. The raven : one sheet -- 71. Son of Frankenstein : title lobby card -- 72. The Cocoanuts : insert -- 73. Mickey's pal -- 74. Violent is the word for Curly -- 75. Duck soup -- 76. The black pirate -- 77. M -- 78. The Benson murder case -- 79. Flying down to Rio : midget window card -- 80. Casablanca : two-folio -- 81. Flying down to Rio : two sheet -- 82. The wayward canary -- 83. Casablanca : one sheet -- 84. Creature from the Black Lagoon -- 85. The wolf man : one sheet -- 86. The wolf man : half sheet -- 87. Gold diggers of 1933 -- 88. Faust -- 89. The Cocoanuts : lobby card -- 90. The raven : title lobby card -- 91. Mickey Mouse stock poster one sheet -- 92. Casablanca half sheet -- 93. The phantom of the Opera : insert -- 94. The adventures of Robin Hood : three sheet -- 95. This gun for hire -- 96. The adventures of Robin Hood : one sheet -- 97. Godzilla -- 98. Attack of the 50 foot woman -- 99. The Oregon Trail -- 100. Lonesome ghost) -- Appendix A. Most popular stars ; Appendix B. Releases by year ; Appendix C. Number of posters by studio ; Appendix D. The studios ; Appendix E. the Laemmle legacy.  "The top 100 rarities"--Cover./ Includes bibliographical references (p. 207) and indexes.  Jim Halperin and Hector Cantu, editors ; foreword by Sara Karloff. //

 

64.  Jacobs, Earle W. The Grimpen Mire Affair : A Sherlock Holmes Tale As Related by His Good Friend Dr. Watson. [S.l.]: Authorhouse, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

65.  Jeffers, H. Paul. The Stalwart Companions, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. //

 

66.  Jones, Jeannette Eileen, and Patrick B. Sharp. Darwin in Atlantic Cultures : evolutionary visions of race, gender, and sexuality, (Routledge research in Atlantic studies). New York: Routledge, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm.  Introduction : the descent of Darwin in Atlantic cultures / Jeannette Eileen Jones and Patrick B. Sharp -- Strange birds : Friedrich Nietzche, Djuna Barnes, and queer evolution / Robert Azzarello -- "Sexual selection" and the social revolution : anarchist eugenics and radical Darwinism in the United States, 1850-1910 / Jesse F. Battan -- The birds and the bees : darwin's evolutionary approach to sexuality / Kimberly A. Hamlin -- Love in the age of Darwinian reproduction / Mark B. Feldman -- Victorian birdsongs : sexual selection, gender, and Darwin's theory of music / Laura M. Bolt -- Rise and fall : degeneration, historical determinism, and William Faulkner's Absalom! Absalom! / Christy A. Cannariato -- What is it? : difference, darwin, and the Victorian freak show / Lindsey B. Churchill -- The mocking meme : popular Darwinism, illustrative graphics, and editorial cartooning / G. Bruce Retallack -- Selective affinities : Darwin's theory of evolution in adventure novels by Jack London and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle / Herbert Klein -- Simians, Negroes, and the "missing link" : evolutionary discourses and transatlantic debates on "the Negro question" / Jeannette Eileen Jones -- Evolution in the backlands : Brazilian intellectuals and the development of a nation / Gildo Magalhães Santos -- The evolution of the West : darwinist visions of race and progress in Roosevelt and Turner / Patrick B. Sharp -- Darwinism in Spanish America : union and diversity in José Rodó and José Vasconcelos / Adriana Novoa -- The miseducation of Henry Adams : fantasies of race, citizenship, and Darwinian dynamos / John P. Bruni.  Outgrowth of a panel, "Darwin and contested definitions of race, gender, and nation in Gilded Age America and today," organized for the 2006 American Studies Association Conference in Oakland, Calif. Cf. acknowledgments./ Includes bibliographical references and index.  edited by Jeannette Eileen Jones and Patrick B. Sharp. // Includes "Selective affinities : Darwin's theory of evolution in adventure novels by Jack London and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle" by Herbert Klein.

 

67.  King, Laurie R. The Beekeeper's Apprentice, or, On the Segregation of the Queen. London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Originally published: New York: St. Martin's, 1994; London: Collins Crime, 1996. //

 

68.  ———. The Game, (A Mary Russell novel). London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Originally published: 2004. //

 

69.  ———. The God of the Hive. London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

70.  ———. The God of the Hive : a novel of suspense featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. New York: Bantam Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 1st ed. map ; 25 cm.  // Maintaining tenuous contact only by means of coded messages and cryptic notes with her husband, Sherlock Holmes, and with Holmes' young granddaughter in her safekeeping, Russell will have to call on instincts she didn't know she had as the famous husband and wife sleuths are pursued by a killer immune from the sting of justice.

 

71.  ———. The God of the Hive : a novel of suspense featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. Large print ed, (Thorndike Press large print mystery; A Mary Russell novel). Waterville, ME: Thorndike Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- map ; 23 cm. // Maintaining contact by cryptic notes with her husband, Sherlock Holmes, and with Holmes' young granddaughter in her safekeeping, Russell will have to call on instincts she didn't know she had they are pursued by a killer immune from the sting of justice.

 

72.  ———. The Language of Bees, (A Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mystery). London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Originally published: 2009. //

 

73.  ———. The Language of Bees. Large print ed, (A Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mystery). Bath: Camden, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Originally published: London: Allison & Busby, 2009. //

 

74.  ———. The Language of Bees : a Mary Russell novel. Bantam Books trade paperback ed. New York: Bantam Books Trade Paperbacks, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- map ; 21 cm.  Originally published in hardcover: [New York] : Bantam Books, 2009.  Includes excerpt from the author's book: The god of the hive. // A young painter asks for help when his wife and child go missing. Mary finds herself on the trail of a very dangerous killer, one whom Sherlock might be protecting for reasons known only to him.

 

75.  ———. Locked Rooms, (A Mary Russell novel). London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Originally published: 2005. //

 

76.  ———. Locked Rooms : a novel of suspense featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. Bantam Books trade pbk. ed. New York: Bantam Books Trade Paperbacks, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. Originally published: New York : Bantam Books, 2005. //

 

77.  Knight, Stephen Thomas. Crime Fiction Since 1800 : detection, death, diversity. 2nd ed. Basingstoke [England]; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm.  Beginning detection. Before detection ; Enter the detective ; Realistic police ; Edgar Allan Poe's initiative -- Developing detection. Early English detection ; Sensation ; Gaboriau and the 1870s-1990s ; Detective apotheosis : Sherlock Holmes -- After Sherlock Holmes. Enter death ; Scientific detectives ; Ironic anti-heroes ; Low-level detection ; Women on the case -- Forming the clue-puzzle. Had they but known ; How golden was the age? ; Golden royalty : Agatha Christie ; American gold ; English variations ; Supporting cast ; Themes and explanations -- American versions. Origins and attitudes ; Hammett's initiative ; Chandler's variation ; Other American crime writers ; The crime novelists ; The 'Tough Guy' abroad -- Continuity and diversity. After the 'Golden Age' in Britain ; The private eye modernised ; Other continuities ; The psychothriller ; Police procedurals -- Diversifying gender. Towards feminist detection ; Feminist detection in America ; Feminist detection around the world ; The lesbian detective ; Male gay detection -- Diversifying race and ethnicity. Black male detection ; Black female detection ; Other ethnicities -- Diversity : postmodernity, body, city. Postmodern crime fiction ; Generic violence to city and body ; Urban collapse ; Serial killers.  Previous ed.: published as Crime fiction, 1800-2000. 2004.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-298) and index. //

 

78.  Kronzek, Rochelle. All-time Favorite Detective Stories. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- The hands of Mr. Ottermole / Thomas Burke -- The purloined letter / Edgar Allan Poe -- The red-headed league / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The avenging chance / Anthony Berkeley -- The absent-minded coterie / Robert Barr -- The problem of cell 13 / Jacques Futrelle -- The invisible man / G. K. Chesterton -- Naboth's vineyard / Melville D. Post -- The gioconda smile / Aldous Huxley -- The yellow slugs / H. C. Bailey -- The genuine tabard / E. C. Bentley -- Suspicion / Dorothy L. Sayers.  Edited by Rochelle Kronzek. //

 

79.  Kuchta, Todd. Semi-detached Empire : suburbia and the colonization of Britain, 1880 to the present. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., map ; 24 cm.  Semi-detached empire -- Reverse colonization in The War of the worlds -- Sherlock Holmes and the case of the Anglo-Indian -- Outposts of progress: Joseph Conrad's suburban speculation -- Beyond the abyss: degeneracy and death in the Edwardian suburb -- Ressentiment and late-imperial fiction -- George Orwell and the road to West Bletchley -- Epilogue: "In the blood and not on the skin".  Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-254) and index. //

 

80.  Kurland, Michael. Sherlock Holmes : the American years. 1st ed. New York: Minotaur Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm.  Foreword / by Leslie S. Klinger -- Introduction / by Michael Kurland -- Inga Sigerson weds / by Richard A. Lupoff -- My silk umbrella : a Mark Twain story / by Darryl Brock -- The old senator / by Steve Hockensmith -- The American adventure / by Gary Lovisi -- The sacred white elephant of Mandalay / by Michael Mallory -- The curse of Edwin Booth / by Carole Buggé -- The case of the reluctant assassin / by Peter Tremayne -- Cutitng for sign / by Rhys Bowen -- The English señor / by Marta Randall -- The stagecoach detective : a tale of the golden West / by Linda Robertson. // This collection of ten original stories brings light to one of the least examined periods in the life of the great detective--his time in the former colonies, the United States, when he is a young man not yet set upon his course in life and in his famous lodgings at 221B Baker Street.

 

81.  Lane, Andy. Death Cloud, (Young Sherlock Holmes). London: Macmillan Children's, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 20 cm. //

 

82.  ———. The Red Leech, (Young Sherlock Holmes). London: Macmillan Children's, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

83.  Mack, Tracy, and Michael Citrin. The Final Meeting. 1st ed, (Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Irregulars). New York: Orchard Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 20 cm. // Master detective Sherlock Holmes sets an elaborate trap to capture the wicked Professor Moriarty and dismantle his criminal organization, but Moriarty has his own plans.

 

84.  Madsen, Diane Gilbert. Hunting for Hemingway : a DD McGil literati mystery. 1st ed. Woodbury, MN: Midnight Ink, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm.  Includes excerpt from author's next book: The Conan Doyle notes. //

 

85.  McGregor, Rafe. Eight Weird Tales. Large print ed, (Linford mystery series). Leicester: Thorpe, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm. // A curious woman investigates the dark secrets harboured within the ancient chapel of a ruined signal station. An antique ivory hunting horn will spell the downfall of Professor Goodspeed. Meanwhile, an eldritch voice draws a lonely man ever closer to the drowned town of Lod... Eight short tales, each directly inspired by a master of the mysterious or supernatural - Arthur Conan Doyle, H.P. Lovecraft, Anthony Hope, or M.R. James - which will send chills down your spine...

 

86.  Milne, A. A. The Red House Mystery. Large print ed. Oxford: Isis, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm. // "The next moment Antony saw it. A man was lying on the floor at the far end of the room, his back towards them. A man? Or the body of a man?"Far from the gentle slopes of the Hundred Acre Wood lies The Red House, the setting for A. A. Milne's only detective story, where secret passages, uninvited guests, a sinister valet and a puzzling murder lay the foundations for a classic crime caper. When the police prove baffled, it is up to a guest at a local inn to appoint himself "Sherlock Holmes" and, together with his friend and loyal "Watson", delve deeper into the mysteries of the dead man.

 

87.  Moore, Graham. The Sherlockian. 1st ed. New York: Twelve, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

88.  Moore, Leah, John Reppion, and Aaron Campbell. Sherlock Holmes. Runnemede, N.J. : Dynamite Entertainment; London : Diamond [distributor]: London, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- writers, Leah Moore, John Reppion ; artist, Aaron Campbell. //

 

89.  Morrell, David, and Hank Wagner. Thrillers : 100 must-reads. 1st ed. Longboat Key, FL: Oceanview Pub., 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm.  Welcome to the world of thrillers / by David Hewson -- One hundred must-read thrillers / by David Morrell, Hank Wagner -- Theseus and the Minotaur (1500 B.C.) / Lee Child -- Homer's The Iliad and the Odyssey (7th century B.C.) / William Bernhardt -- Beowulf (between 700 and 1000 A.D.) / Andrew Klavan -- William Shakespeare's Macbeth (1605-1606) / A.J. Hartley -- Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719-1722) / David Liss -- Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or, The modern Prometheus (1818) / Gary Braver -- James Fenimore Cooper's The last of the Mohicans (1826) / Rick Wilber -- Edgar Allan Poe's The narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838) / Katherine Neville -- Alexandre Dumas' The count of Monte Cristo (1845) / Francine Mathews -- Wilkie Collins's The woman in white (1860) / Douglas Preston -- H. Rider Haggard's King Solomons mines (1885) / Norman L. Rubenstein -- Robert Louis Stevenson's The strange case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde (1886) / Sarah Langan -- Anthony Hope's The prisoner of Zenda (1894) / Michael Palmer -- Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) / Carole Nelson Douglas -- H.G. Wells's The war of the worlds (1898) / Steven M. Wilson -- Rudyard Kipling's Kim (1901) / Tom Grace -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The hound of the Baskervilles (1901) / Laura Benedict -- Joseph Conrad's Heart of darkness (1902) / H. Terrell Griffin -- Erskine Childers's The riddle of the sands (1903) / Christine Kling -- Jack London's The sea wolf (1904) / Jim Fusilli -- Baroness Emma Orczy's The scarlet pimpernel (1905) / Lisa Black -- Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan of the apes (1912) / W. Craig Reed -- Marie Belloc Lowndes's The lodger (1913) / James A. Moore -- John Buchan's The thirty-nine steps (1915) / Janet Berliner -- E. Phillips Oppenheim's The great impersonation (1920) / Justin Scott -- Richard Connell's "The most dangerous game" (1924) / Katherine Ramsland -- W. Somerset Maugham's Ashenden, or, the British agent (1928) / Melodie Johnson Howe -- P.G. Wodehouse's Summer lightning (1929) / R.L. Stine -- Edgar Wallace's King Kong (1933) / Kathleen Sharp -- Lester Dent's Doc Savage : the man of bronze (1933) / Mark T. Sullivan -- James M. Cain's The postman always rings twice (1934) / Joe R. Lansdale -- Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca (1938) / Allison Brennan -- Agatha Christie's And then there were none (1939) / David Morrell -- Eric Ambler's A coffin for Dimitrios (1939) / Ali Karim -- Geoffrey Household's Rogue male (1939) / David Morrell -- Helen Macinnes's Above suspicion (1941) / Gayle Lynds -- Cornell Woolrich's "Rear Window" (1942) / Thomas F. Monteleone -- Vera Caspary's Laura (1943) / M.J. Rose -- Kenneth Fearing's The big clock (1946) / Lincoln Child -- Graham Greene's The third man (1950) / Rob Palmer -- Patricia Highsmith's Strangers on a train (1950) / David Baldacci -- Mickey Spillane's One lonely night (1951) / Max Allan Collins -- Jim Thompson's The killer inside me (1953) / Scott Nicholson -- Ernest K. Gann's The high and the mighty (1953) / Ward Larsen -- Jack Finney's Invasion of the body snatchers (1955) / James Rollins -- Hammond Innes's The wreck of the Mary Deare (1956) / Matt Lynn -- Ian Fleming's From Russia, with love (1957) / Raymond Benson -- Alistair MacLean's The guns of Navarone (1957) / Larry Gandle -- Richard Condon's The Manchurian candidate (1959) / Robert S. Levinson -- Len Deighton's The IPCRESS file (1962) / Jeffery Deaver -- Fletcher Knebel & Charles W. Bailey's Seven days in May (1962) / James Grady -- Lionel Davidson's The rose of Tibet (1962) / Milton C. Toby -- Richard Stark's (Donald E. Westlake's) The hunter aka Point blank (1962) Duane Swierczynski -- John le Carré's The spy who came in from the cold (1963) / Denise Hamilton -- Wilbur Smith's When the lion feeds (1964) / W.D. Gagliani -- Evelyn Anthony's The rendezvous (1967) / Sandra Brown -- Michael Crichton's The Andromeda strain (1969) / Josh Conviser -- James Dickey's Deliverance (1970) / Terry Watkins -- Frederick Forsyth's The day of the jackal (1971) / F. Paul Wilson -- Brian Garfields's Death wish (1972) / John Lescroart -- David Morrell's First blood (1972) / Steve Berry -- Trevanian's The Eiger sanction (1972) / Lee Goldberg -- Charles McCarry's The tears of autumn (1974) / Hank Wagner -- Peter Benchley's Jaws (1974) / P.J. Parrish -- William Goldman's Marathon man (1974) /Hank Wagner -- James Grady's Six days of the condor (1974) / Mark Terry -- Jack Higgins's The eagle has landed (1975) / Zoë Sharp -- Joseph Wambaugh's The choirboys (1975) / James O. Born -- Clive Cussler's Raise the Titanic! (1976) / Grant Blackwood -- Ira Levin's The boys from Brazil (1976) / Daniel Kalla -- Robin Cook's Coma (1977) / CJ Lyons -- Ken Follett's Eye of the needle (1978) / Tess Gerritsen -- Ross Thomas's Chinaman's chance (1978) / John D. MacDonald's The green ripper (1079) / J.A. Konrath -- Justin Scott's The shipkiller (1079) / Lawrence Light -- Robert Ludlum's The Bourne identity (1980) / Linda L. Richards -- Eric Van Lustbader's The ninja (1980) / J.D. Rhoades -- Thomas Harris's Red dragon (1981) / Bev Vincent -- Jack Ketchum's Off season (1981) / Blake Crouch -- Thomas Perry's The butcher's boy (1982) / Robert Liparulo -- Tom Clancy's The hunt for red October (1984) / Chris Kuzneski -- F. Paul Wilson's The tomb (1984) / Heather Graham -- Andrew Vachss's Flood (1985) / Barry Eisler -- Stephen King's Misery (1987) / Chris Mooney -- Nelson DeMille's The charm school (1988) / J.T. Ellison -- Dean Koontz's Watchers (1988) / Lee Thomas -- Katherine Neville's The eight (1988) / Shirley Kennett -- Petrer Straub's Koko (1988) / Hank Wagner -- Johns Grisham's The firm (1991) / M. Diane Vogt -- R.L. Stine's Silent night (1991) / Jon Land -- James Patterson's Along came a spider (1992) / Mary SanGiovanni -- Stephen Hunter's Point of impact (1993) / Christopher Rice -- Johns Lescroart's The 13th juror (1994) / Karna Small Bodman -- Sandra Brown's The witness (1995) / Deborah LeBlanc -- David Baldacci's Absolute power (1996) / Rhodi Hawk -- Gayle Lynds's Masquerade (1996) / Hank Phillippi Ryan -- Lee Child's Killing floor (1997) / Marcus Sakey -- Jeffery Deaver's The bone collector (1997) / Jeffrey J. Mariotte -- Dan Brown's The Da Vinci code (2003) / Steve Berry.  Includes index.  [edited by] David Morrell and Hank Wagner. // Through essays contributed by modern thriller writers such as David Baldacci, Lee Child, Sandra Brown, and many others, this book explores 100 works of suspense from the ancient world to modern times.

 

90.  Nolan, William F. Dark Dimensions. 1st ed. Bonney Lake, WA: Darkwood Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm.  Horror at Winchester House -- Getting along just fine -- Descent -- Vampire dollars -- At the 24-hour -- Zachry revisited -- Child's care -- The man who stalked Hyde -- The pelican's brother -- A woods encounter -- To be with Amy -- Stabbed by Rob -- What love is this? -- The death of Sherlock Holmes. //

 

91.  Peacock, Shane. The Secret Fiend, (The boy Sherlock Holmes). Toronto, Ont.; Plattsburgh, NY: Tundra Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- map ; 20 cm.  Awards: A Junior Library Guild selection. // 1868, London: When Sherlock's friend Beatrice appears at his door late at night, claiming to have been attacked by the Spring Heeled Jack--a fictional, fire-spitting character from the Penny Dreadfuls--Sherlock assumes she's lying. Soon, however, the Jack attacks again--and Sherlock is on the case.

 

92.  ———. Vanishing Girl, (The boy Sherlock Holmes). Toronto, Plattsburgh, NY: Tundra Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 20 cm. // When a wealthy young girl vanishes as if by magic in Hyde Park, Sherlock is once again driven to prove himself. The world will come to know him as the master detective of all time.

 

93.  Penzler, Otto. Fangs, (The vampire archives). New York: Vintage Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 18 cm.  Introduction / Otto Penzler -- Down among the dead men / Gardner Dozois, Jack Dann -- Drink my red blood / Richard Matheson -- The hound / H.P. Lovecraft -- The parasite / Arthur Conan Doyle -- The giaour / Lord Byron -- The master of Rampling Gate / Anne Rice -- The vampire maid / Hume Nisbet -- Special / Richard Laymon -- A week in the unlife / David J. Schow -- Princess of darkness / Frederick Cowles -- The girl with the hungry eyes / Fritz Leiber -- The room in the tower / E.F. Benson -- Carmilla / Sheridan Le Fanur -- The sad story of a vampire / Erick Stenbock -- Necros / Brian Lumley -- Human remains / Clive Barker -- The stone chamber / H.B. Marriott Watson -- The werewolf and the vampire / R. Chetwynd-Hayes -- Aylmer Vance and the vampire / Alice and Claude Askey -- The drifting snow / August Derleth.  "The stories in this book were originally published as part of The Vampire Archives in the United States by Vintage Books ... in 2009"--T.p. verso.  Edited and with an introduction by Otto Penzler. // Presents an anthology of twenty works about vampires, including contributions by H.P. Lovecraft, Anne Rice, Richard Laymon, and Clive Barker.

 

94.  Phillips, Gene D. Some Like it Wilder : the life and controversial films of Billy Wilder, (Screen classics). Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm.  From Berlin to Hollywood : the early screenplays -- Champagne and tears : Ninotchka, Midnight, and Ball of fire -- New directions : The major and the minor and Five graves to Cairo -- The rise of film noir : Double indemnity -- Through a glass darkly : The lost weekend and Die todesmühlen -- Wunderbar : The emperor waltz and A foreign affair -- Dark windows : Sunset Boulevard -- Barbed wire satire : Ace in the hole and Stalag 17 -- Fascination : Sabrina and The seven year itch -- Light up the sky : The spirit of St. Louis and Love in the afternoon -- Remains to be seen : Witness for the prosecution -- The gang's all here : Some like it hot -- Love on the dole : The apartment -- Love on the run : One, two, three and Irma La Douce -- Grifters : Kiss me, stupid and The fortune cookie -- The game's afoot : The private life of Sherlock Holmes -- The perfect blendship : The front page and Avanti! -- Twilight years : Fedora and Buddy buddy -- Epilogue : a touch of class.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 367-416) and index. // "One of the most accomplished writers and directors of classic Hollywood, Billy Wilder (1906-2002) directed numerous acclaimed films, including Sunset Boulevard (1950), Sabrina (1954), The Seven Year Itch (1955), Witness for the Prosecution (1957), and Some Like It Hot (1959). Some Like It Wilder: The Life and Controversial Films of Billy Wilder provides an overview of a filmmaking icon." "Author Gene D. Phillips departs from the traditional biography, offering new insights into the acclaimed director's professional and private life. In preparation for the book, Phillips conducted personal interviews with Wilder and other key players from the legendary director's life and times."--BOOK JACKET.

 

95.  Roberts, Barrie. The Man from Hell, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. //

 

96.  Roberts, S. C. Adventures With Authors. Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm.  Undergraduate -- Publishing and soldiering -- Post-war Cambridge -- Secretary to the Syndics -- Pembroke in the Nineteen-Twenties -- Johnsoniana -- Science a best seller -- Histories and historians -- Poets and critics -- Play-acting -- A miscellany of authors -- Light and shade in the Nineteen-Thirties -- Varieties of war-time experience -- Vice-Chancellor -- At home and abroad -- More Johnsoniana -- Sherlock Holmes -- Max -- Films and libraries -- Emeritus.  "First published 1966. This digitally printed version 2010"--T.p. verso./ "Paperback re-issue"--P. [4] of cover./ Includes index. // "'S.C.' was known as a vivid raconteur and mimic; more formally he was recognized as a publisher of skill and distinction, who graduated to become Master of his college and Vice-Chancellor of his university and to receive a knighthood. ... [H]e joined Cambridge University Press as 'assistant secretary' in 1911, served four war years as a lieutenant in the Suffolk Regiment, with a wound at Ypres, and three years after his return was appointed Secretary (or director) of the Press. His adventures and achievements in that capacity are the subject of the main part of this book. ... His 'Adventures' contain, first, a rich collection of his 'stories'. ... [T]hey offer a series of insights into human nature, especially in the notoriously delicate relationship between author and publisher. Roberts' 'Authors' include Jeans and Rutherford, Dover Wilson and Granville Barker, Housman and de la Mare and many others. Secondly, the book is a record ... of the way of life of a major university as it evolved from the Victorian to the modern mode"--P. [4] of cover.

 

97.  Robertson, Michael. The Baker Street Letters. Large print ed, (Thorndike Press large print mystery). Waterville, ME : Thorndike; Bath, England : Chivers, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm.  Cover title: The Baker Street letters, a mystery. //

 

98.  Rzepka, Charles J., and Lee Horsley. A Companion to Crime Fiction, (Blackwell companions to literature and culture). Chichester, U.K.; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 26 cm.  From The Newgate calendar to Sherlock Holmes / Heather Worthington -- From Sherlock Holmes to the present / Lee Horsley -- Criticism and theory / Heta Pyrhonen -- Crime and the mass media / Alain Silver, James Ursini -- Crime fiction and the literary canon / Joel Black -- The Newgate novel and the police casebook / Lauren Gillingham -- From sensation to the Strand / Christopher Pittard -- The "classical" model of the golden age / Susan Rowland -- Early American crime fiction : origins to urban gothic / Alexander Moudrov -- The "hard-boiled" genre / Andrew Pepper -- The pursuit of crime : characters in crime fiction / Carl Malmgren -- Crime, forensics, and modern science / Sarah Dauncey -- The police novel / Peter Messent -- Noir and the psycho-thriller / Philip Simpson -- True crime / David Schmid -- Gangs and mobs / Jonathan Munby -- Historical crime and detection / Ray B. Browne -- Crime and the spy genre / David Seed -- Crime and the gothic / Catherine Spooner -- Feminist crime fiction and female sleuths / Adrienne Gavin -- African-American detection and crime fiction / Frankie Bailey -- Ethnic postcolonial crime and detection (Anglophone) / Ed Christian -- Crime writing in other languages / Sue Neale -- Postmodern and metaphysical detection / Patricia Merivale -- Crime and detective literature for young readers / Christopher Routledge -- Crime in comics and the graphic novel / Arthur Fried -- Criminal investigation on film / Philippa Gates -- William Godwin (1756-1836) / Philip Shaw -- Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) / Maurice Lee -- Wilkie Collins (1824-1889) / Andrew Mangham -- Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) / John Hodgson -- Raymond Chandler (1888-1959) / Leroy Panek -- Agatha Christie (1890-1976) / Merja Makinen -- James M. Cain (1892-1977) / William Marling -- Dorothy L. Sayers (1893-1957) / Esme Miskimmin -- Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) / Jasmine Hall -- Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) / Alicia Borinsky -- Chester Himes (1909-1984) / Stephen Soitos -- David Goodis (1917-1967) / David Schmid -- P.D. James (1920- ) / Louise Harrington -- Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) / Bran Nicol -- Elmore Leonard (1925- ) / Charles J. Rzepka -- Sara Paretsky (1947- ) / Malcah Effron -- Walter Mosley (1952- ) / John Gruesser -- Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980) / Nick Haeffner -- Martin Scorsese (1942- ) / Mark Desmond Nicholls -- John Woo (1946- ) / Karen Fang.  Includes bibliographical references and index.  edited by Charles J. Rzepka and Lee Horsley. //

 

99.  Saberhagen, Fred. The Holmes-Dracula File. 3rd Tor ed. New York: Tor Fantasy, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 17 cm. //

 

100.  ———. Seance for a Vampire, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. // "Wealthy British aristocrat Ambrose Altamont hires Sherlock Holmes to expose two suspect psychics. During the ensuing seance Altamont's deceased daughter Louisa reappears as a vampire - and Sherlock Holmes vanishes. With time running out, Watson feels he has no choice but to summon the only one who might be able to help - Holmes's vampire cousin, Prince Dracula..."--Back cover.

 

101.  Scott, Charles. Problems Solved : the Bizarre Adventures of an Environmental Sherlock Holmes. [S.l.]: Iuniverse Inc, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

102.  Shaw, Murray, M. J. Cosson, Sophie Rohrbach, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Sussex vampire, (On the case with Holmes and Watson). Minneapolis: Graphic Universe, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- chiefly col. ill., col. map ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 47). Adapted by Murray Shaw and M.J. Cosson ; illustrated by Sophie Rohrbach ; from the original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. // Retold in graphic novel form, Sherlock Holmes investigates a report of a young wife sucking the blood from her infant son. Includes a section explaining Holmes's reasoning and the clues he used to solve the mystery.

 

103.  Smajic, Srdjan. Ghost-seers, Detectives, and Spiritualists : theories of vision in Victorian literature and science, (Cambridge studies in nineteenth-century literature and culture). New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm.  Contextualizing the ghost story -- The rise of optical apparitions -- Inner vision and spiritual optics -- 'Betwixt ancient faith and modern incredulity' -- Visual learning : sight and Victorian epistemology -- Scopophilia and scopophobia : Poe's readerly flâneur --Stains, smears, and visual language in The moonstone -- Semiotics vs. encyclopedism : the case of Sherlock Holmes -- Detective fiction's uncanny -- Light, ether, and the invisible world -- Inner vision and occult detection : Le Fanu's Martin Hesselius -- Other dimensions, other worlds -- Psychic sleuths and soul doctors.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 238-255). // "This is an original study of the narrative techniques that developed for two very popular forms of fiction in the nineteenth century - ghost stories and detective stories - and the surprising similarities between them in the context of contemporary theories of vision and sight. Srdjan Smajic argues that to understand how writers represented ghost-seers and detectives, the views of contemporary scientists, philosophers, and spiritualists with which these writers engage have to be taken into account: these views raise questions such as whether seeing really is believing, how much of what we 'see' is actually only inferred, and whether there may be other (intuitive or spiritual) ways of seeing that enable us to perceive objects and beings inaccessible to the bodily senses. This book will make a real contribution to the understanding of Victorian science in culture, and of the ways in which literature draws on all kinds of knowledge"--Provided by publisher.

 

104.  Springer, Nancy. The Case of the Gypsy Good-bye, (An Enola Holmes mystery). New York: Philomel Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm.  Awards: A Junior Library Guild selection. // After fourteen-year-old Enola Holmes seeks the missing Duquessa Del Campo in the seedy underbelly of nineteenth-century London, she finally reaches an understanding with her brothers Sherlock and Mycroft.

 

105.  ———. The Case of the Peculiar Pink Fan, (An Enola Holmes mystery). New York: Sleuth Puffin, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm.  Originally published: New York : Philomel Books, 2008. // While fourteen-year-old Enola Holmes endeavors to save her friend Lady Cecily Alistair from an unwelcome arranged marriage, she meets with some assistance from her older brother, Sherlock, and interference by the eldest, Mycroft.

 

106.  Sussex, Lucy. Women Writers and Detectives in Nineteenth-century Crime Fiction : the mothers of the mystery genre, (Crime files). Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 23 cm.  Includes bibliographical references and index. // "This book is a study of the "mothers" of the mystery genre. Traditionally the invention of crime writing has been ascribed to Poe, Wilkie Collins and Conan Doyle, but they had formidable women rivals, whose work has been until recently largely forgotten. The purpose of this book is to "cherchez les femmes," in a project of rediscovery"--

 

107.  Thomas, Donald. Sherlock Holmes and the Ghosts of Bly And Other New Adventures of the Great Detective. New York: Pegasus Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

 

108.  ———. Sherlock Holmes and the King's Evil : and other new adventures of the great detective. 1st Pegasus trade paperback ed. New York: Pegasus Books, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm.  The case of the tell-tale hands -- The case of the king's evil -- The case of the Portuguese Sonnets -- The case of Peter the Painter -- The case of the Zimmerman telegram.  Originally published: New York : Pegasus Books, 2009. // Five original tales inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's iconic character feature Holmes taking on such challenges as the famed siege of Sydney Street, a planned German invasion of America, and a supernatural curse.

 

109.  Victor, Daniel D. The Seventh Bullet, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

                NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. // Sherlock Holmes' desire for a peaceful life in the Sussex countryside is dashed when true-life muckraker and author David Graham Phillips is assassinated, leaving behind little clues as to why he was murdered. The pleas of his sister draws Holmes and Watson to the far side of the Atlantic, where a web of deceit, violence and intrigue unravels as they embark on one of their most challenging cases.

 

PERIODICAL ARTICLES

1.     "Acquisitions" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 8.
Notes gifts to the Collections from Christopher and Barbara Roden (a copy of their latest publication, The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe); Dale Ahlquist, President of the American Chesterton Society, and his donation of a copy of Sherlock Holmes Meets Father Brown and His Creator; Dr. William A. S. Sarjeant, M. Bt, and his gift of several items during his visit; and Daniel Morrow's gift of several journal clippings and articles regarding Sherlock Holmes and radio.

2.     "Acquisitions" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 10.
Notes recent additions to the Collections including donations from Caroline Bryan, Steve Clarkson, Don Hobbs, Charles Press, Allen J. Heiss, Doug Wrigglesworth, Les Klinger, and Ed Christenson.

3.     "Eve Titus Update" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 7.
Notes Eve Titus's investiture in the Baker Street Irregulars in 1993 as "Young Master Rucastle" along with two photographs.

4.     "Remembrances" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 8.
Notes the contributions made by donors in supporting the Sherlock Holmes Collections, either in honor or in memory of special persons.

5.     "Remembrances" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 12.
Listing of those who have given gifts to support the Collections in honor or memory of special persons.

6.     "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 8.
Notes the visit of Dr. William A. S. Sarjeant to the Collections in April, along with a photograph from his visit.

7.     Bergquist, John. "50 Years Ago" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 3.
Some notes and observations on Gavin Brend and the 1951 publication of his My Dear Holmes, "the most complete 'biography' of Holmes to date.".

8.     Blau, Peter E. "From One Collector to Another" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 1, 6.
Discusses the acquisition and gift of a rusty paperclip, now set in a paperweight, that once belonged with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's papers.

9.     Buck, R. Creighton. "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon" The American Mathematical Monthly vol. 87, no. 5 (May, 1980): 335-345.
"Let me begin by clarifying the title 'Sherlock Holmes in Babylon.' Lest some members of the Baker Street Irregulars be misled, my topic is the archaeology of mathematics and my objective is to retrace a small portion of the research of two scholars....".

10.     Dent Jr., George W. "Stakeholder Governance: a Bad Idea Getting Worse" Case Western Reserve Law Review vol. 58, no. 4 (Summer2008, 2008): 1107-1144.
The article explores the traditional objections to stakeholder governance along with other trends which should influence thoughts about such governance in the U.S. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...My students know that one of my favorite allusions is the story Silver Blaze, in which Sherlock Holmes solves a crime in part by noting the dog that did not bark. The dog's silence showed that the intruder was an insider; had it been an outsider, the dog would have barked. It is interesting in this case to notice the dogs that are not barking. Professor Greenfield touts his proposal as beneficial to employees. If he were right, we should see groups of employees forming firms and hiring capital...." The footnote for this passage (note 37) reads: "When Holmes refers to 'the curious incident of the dog in the night-time,' Inspector Gregory says, 'The dog did nothing in the night-time.' Holmes replies, 'That was the curious incident.' Arthur Conan Doyle, Silver Blaze, in 1 The Complete Sherlock Holmes 335, 347 (Doubleday & Co. 1930) ( 1893).".

11.     Jaffe, Audrey. "Detecting the Beggar: Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry Mayhew, and "The Man with the Twisted Lip"" Representations no. 31, Special Issue: The Margins of Identity in Nineteenth-Century England (Summer, 1990): 96-117.

12.     Johnson, Timothy J. "An Update From the Collections" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 5.
Notes attendance at various conferences between March and the beginning of the Holmes conference in June.

13.     ———. "An Update From the Collections" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 9.
Reflections on the attention given the exhibit "The Basic Holmesian Library" by the media, conference attendees, and other visitors. An update on current book cataloging and other activities is also given.

14.     Jury, Louise. "Conan Doyle's Manuscripts Reveal a Meticulous Chronicler." The Independent (London), December 2, 2004. 22.
"Recently acquired papers and manuscripts belonging to Sherlock Holmes's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, reveal him to be a meticulous chronicler of the minutiae of his life. He detailed seances he attended, the books he read, the cricket matches he played in (including bowling out W G Grace), the number of words he wrote and what he was paid in a series of notebooks which are part of a treasure trove of more than 2,000 documents obtained by the British Library this year....".

15.     Kleiner, Israel. "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History" ISIS: Journal of the History of Science in Society vol. 95, no. 3 (09, 2004): 465-466.
Reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History," edited by Marlow Anderson, Victor Katz and Robin Wilson.

16.     Koenig, Helmut. "In Search of Sherlock Holmes." The Toronto Star, March 17, 1995. G25.
"...Even today, more than a century later, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's creation - hero of 56 stories and four novels - seems almost a living presence. Sherlock Holmes embodies the spirit of that London of long ago. And with a little imagination and some research, today's visitor can follow the sleuth on his rounds through labyrinthian ways of the capital....Be advised when tracking down sites from the adventures, however. Names have been changed. Others may never have existed. The Alpha Inn? The White Eagle Tavern? Oft-mentioned Saxe-Coburg Square? Directions can be misleading. Distances and timing are not always accurate....".

17.     Large, Tim. "Sherlock Holmes Alive and Well in the East." The Daily Yomiuri (Tokyo), August 5, 2000. 1.
"One woman is an authority on Sherlock Holmes and toilets. Another will tell you 'Hound of the Baskervilles' is brimming with allusions to illicit sex. A botanist from Sapporo, having scoured Sherlock Holmes stories for vegetable references, has isolated 59 varieties of Victorian-era plant life. Welcome to the world of Japanese Sherlockiana. Like their counterparts internationally, Holmes devotees in Japan have one thing in common: a near-obsessive fascination with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's brilliant and eccentric detective, and the milieu he inhabited at the turn of the century....".

18.     Marchand, Philip. "Holmes' Creator made a Great Watson the Young Conan Doyle Got His Start Penning Magazine Stories Based on Blood and Thunder Popular Fiction Conan Doyle." The Toronto Star, January 13, 1996. K14.
Review of Michael Coren's biography of Doyle. "Not long after Arthur Conan Doyle published the first of his Sherlock Holmes stories in 1887, he met Oscar Wilde at a literary dinner party in London. Oddly enough, as Michael Coren notes in Conan Doyle, his biographical study of the Scottish author, the two got on famously....Such a significant character could not have come from the brain of an insignificant man, and Coren, a noted broadcaster and print journalist living in Toronto, underlines just what a fascinating and multifaceted character Arthur Conan Doyle was. To be sure, Doyle was nowhere near as brilliant as G. K. Chesterton, or as accomplished a fiction writer as H. G. Wells, the subjects of Coren's two previous biographies. But Coren has chosen for his third biography a man whose life, embodying so many of the confusions and passions of an era, exceeds in interest both Chesterton's and Wells'....".

19.     Mawdsley, Ralph D., and J. J. Cumming. "Plagiarism litigation trends in the USA and Australia" Education & the Law vol. 20, no. 3 (09, 2008): 209-234.
In this article we explore the increasing complexity of plagiarism litigation in the USA and Australia. Includes a passing reference to Holmes in footnote 100. The note reads: "The distinction between original and non-original author contributions is recognised in the Copyright Act and in court decisions. See 17 U.S.C. section 103(b) and Musto v Meyer, 434 F.Supp. 32, aff ’d mem., 598 F.2d 609 (2d Cir. 1979), holding that copying of an 'idea' as opposed to 'the expression of an idea' as to Sherlock Holmes' cocaine addiction was not protected.".

20.     Mayers, Adam. "Let's all Help Give this Dog some Bite." The Toronto Star, January 9, 1995. C1.
"In The case of Silver Blaze, a Sherlock Holmes mystery about a missing race horse, the great detective turns to Dr. Watson and asks him to take note of the dog that didn't bark in the night. We might all be asking ourselves the same question of the Consumers' Association of Canada, the watchdog we expect to bark on our behalf, about everything from cable television to local phone rates to car insurance premiums....".

21.     McKuras, Julie. "50 Years Ago" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 3.
Focuses on a file in the John Bennett Shaw Collection labeled "Conan Doyle Signature Hoax" involving a mystery that took place in Shrewsbury in 1915 and apparently went unnoticed until 1951.

22.     ———. "The Basic Holmesian Library" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 1, 5.
Some observations on John Bennett Shaw's "List of 100" and the exhibit based on Shaw's list that was displayed during the conference "2001: A Sherlockian Odyssey". Includes seven photographs from the exhibit and visitors during the conference including Les Klinger, Jon Lellenberg, Richard Lancelyn Green, and Dan Posnansky.

23.     ———. "Musings" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 4.
Some observations on the writers and articles in this issue of the newsletter.

24.     ———. "Musings" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 11.
Reflections on the contents and writers in this issue of the newsletter.

25.     ———. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 7.
Notes visitors to the Collections, including students in the Summer Enrichment Program of the Minneapolis Public Schools ("The Doolittle Detective Agency"). One member of the class, Joseph Anderson, is the great-great-grand nephew of Dr. Joseph Bell. Includes four photographs of visitors.

26.     Miller, Steve. "100 Years Ago" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 2, 6.
A brief profile of G. K. Chesterton and his thoughts on Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes as contained in an essay published in 1901.

27.     Rauff, James. "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History" Mathematics Teacher vol. 98, no. 5 (Dec2004, 2004): 364-365.
Reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History," edited by Marlow Anderson, Victor Katz, and Robin Wilson.

28.     Rodgers, Marion Elizabeth. "A. Conan Doyle." The Washington Times, December 16, 2007. B6.
Review of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters byJon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower, Charles Foley. "Even if you are not a member of the Baker Street Irregulars, that popular society of Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts, you will find this collection of previously unpublished letters from Holmes' creator fascinating reading. For while much is known about Holmes - 'the world's most famous man who never was' - less has been revealed about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, whose life rivaled that of any fiction. As a physician, sportsman, war correspondent, military historian, crusader for social justice and spokesman for spiritualism, his days were full of drama....".

29.     Sampaio, Maria De Lurdes. "The Disquiet of Archaeology: Fernando Pessoa's Detective Writings" Portuguese Studies vol. 24, no. 2 (12, 2008): 128-167.
"In this article I aim to demonstrate that Fernando Pessoa's interest in detective fiction is not marginal to the so-called 'major' works but is deeply rooted in his concern with epistemological questions and his obsession with 'abnormality' (crime, madness, degeneration...)." Unknown reference to Doyle or Holmes.

30.     Seskus, Tony. "Did Sir Arthur Turn His Hand to Real Murder on Dartmoor?" Daily Mail (London), September 11, 2000. 32.
"Its demonic appearance and massive, slavering jaws struck terror into the hearts of the unfortunate Baskerville family, providing Sherlock Holmes with one of his most famous cases. But real-life detectives have now been drafted in to investigate claims that the man who provided the inspiration for The Hound of the Baskervilles was murdered by Holmes's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Author Rodger Garrick-Steele claims Edinburgh-born Doyle stole the story from Victorian journalist Bertram Fletcher Robinson, who was denied any recognition for his work. Mr Garrick-Steele 58, a psychologist who spent 11 years researching his latest book, claims Doyle then murdered his 36-year-old friend to prevent the truth coming to light....The Sherlock Holmes Society dismissed the poisoning theory as 'complete bunkum' but Doyle expert Christopher Frayling, rector of the Royal College of Art, said: 'If the evidence is properly sourced, I cannot wait to read it.'".

31.     Sexton, David. "Borat Goes to Baker Street." The Evening Standard (London), July 4, 2008. Section: A, 12.
"Sacha Baron Cohen is some kind of genius. But it still seems improbable that he is going to play Sherlock Holmes in a new comedy film. How's that going to work?...".

32.     ———. "Spoofs and Dupes Radio." Sunday Telegraph (London), April 28, 2002. 11.
All the Knoxes loved jokes and spoofs, as Penelope Fitzgerald shows in her wonderful joint biography of them, The Knox Brothers, just republished. As boys, for example, they wrote a letter to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, denouncing inconsistencies in the Sherlock Holmes stories and including five dried orange pips, in allusion to the threatening letter in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Later, Ronald Knox expanded the joke into an essay called "Studies in the Literature of Sherlock Holmes", a parody of Biblical scholarship in which he pretended to detect, from careful study of the text, that some of the stories must be fictitious inventions by a drunken Watson. Conan Doyle was delighted by the spoof and wrote to Ronald Knox to thank him. Nowadays we're rather more sensitive. Or so it would seem from the first programme, called Panic in the Streets, in a new series, The History of Fear (Radio 4, Monday), presented by the feminist historian, Joanna Bourke. On January 16, 1926, Father Ronald Knox (as he was by then) went into a studio in Edinburgh and delivered a talk over the air called 'Broadcasting from the Barricades'. An introductory statement explained that the talk was a work of humour and imagination and would be illustrated with 'sound effects', then a novelty. Knox proceeded to describe a riot of the unemployed in central London as though it were happening in real time. Parliament and the Savoy Hotel were blown up and the Minister of Traffic was hanged from a lamp-post. Meanwhile, an assistant in the studio produced crashes and bangs and even the sound of breaking glass. The broadcast took in many listeners, and Father Knox was much reprimanded in the press....".

33.     Shannon, Sarah. "BBC's Elementary Guide to the Creator of Sherlock Holmes." The Evening Standard (London), August 13, 1999. 20.

"The creation of detective fiction's most famous hero, Sherlock Holmes, is to be chronicled in a new BBC drama starring Charles Dance. Blood Line, which begins filming on Monday, will study the little known story of Arthur Conan Doyle's friendship with his tutor at Edinburgh University, the pioneer forensic pathologist, Dr Joseph Bell. Dr Bell's skills of deduction are thought to have inspired Conan Doyle to invent his pipe-smoking detective. As the young student worked for the doctor he observed his astute analyses of patients' appearances....".

34.     Shaw, John. "Last Chapter in Strange Case of the Literary Detective." The Times (London), July 11, 1995. Section: Home News, 1.
"A fascination with Sherlock Holmes, which turned a schoolboy into a literary detective, will lead to a Pounds 70,000 book sale in London this month. Stanley MacKenzie became a world authority on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional detective and his collection of first editions, reference books and papers is regarded as the finest in Europe. As an honorary member of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, Mr MacKenzie, who lived in west London and died aged 82 earlier this year, had been consulted frequently by playwrights and film-makers. The material he collected will now be sold at Sotheby's on July 24....".

35.     Shelby, Joyce. "Brooklyn People in Profile." Daily News (New York), January 11, 1999. Section: Suburban, 2.
"Pam McAllister says she isn't that big a fan of mysteries, but she has loved Sherlock Holmes since she was a teen. 'He's a real free spirit. When he wants to sleep, he sleeps. When he gets engrossed in a mystery, he throws himself into it. But in the middle of it, if he wants to go to the opera, he goes to the opera.' With Dick Riley, McAllister recently co-wrote 'The Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Sherlock Holmes.' While researching the book, McAllister said, she uncovered a world of facts and fans....".

36.     ———. "Metro People in Profile." Daily News (New York), January 12, 1999. Section: Suburban, 3.
"Pam McAllister says she isn't that big a fan of mysteries, but she has loved Sherlock Holmes since she was a teen. 'He's a real free spirit. When he wants to sleep, he sleeps. When he gets engrossed in a mystery, he throws himself into it. But in the middle of it, if he wants to go to the opera, he goes to the opera.' With Dick Riley, McAllister recently co-wrote 'The Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Sherlock Holmes.' While researching the book, McAllister said, she uncovered a world of facts and fans....".

37.     Sheldon, Deborah. "Is this the Best Joke in Britain?; a Study Says Yes." The Mirror, December 20, 2001. 24.
"Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson go camping and pitch their tent under the stars. During the night, Holmes wakes his companion and says: 'Watson, look up at the stars and tell me what you deduce.' Watson says: 'I see millions of stars, and even if a few of those have planets, it's quite likely there are some planets like Earth, and if there are a few planets like Earth out there, there might also be life.' Holmes replies: 'Watson, you idiot. Somebody stole our tent....Heard the one about how the joke that was voted Britain's funniest...The Sherlock Holmes gag came top in a laughter experiment involving 10,000 quips. Nearly half of those quizzed said the old joke got them laughing the loudest - which doesn't say much about the others. The study, by Dr Richard Wiseman from the University of Hertfordshire, was the largest ever on laughter psychology....".

38.     Sherwin, Adam. "Case of the Ideal Holmes show." The Times (London), May 30, 2003. Section: Home News, 13.
"BBC Two is to screen a 19-year-old ITV drama series to fill a gap in its schedules. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, starring Jeremy Brett, was first shown by ITV in 1984. In a highly unusual deal the BBC has bought the 13-part series from Granada International as a Saturday afternoon staple. A second series based on Sherlock Holmes, and previously screened by ITV, is also expected to 'cross the floor'....".

39.     Sherwood, Claudia. "The Dreadful Fete of Conan Doyle." The Observer, July 6, 1997. 8.
"The great detective himself would no doubt have described it as a three-pipe problem. Why is the world dotted with statues of Sherlock Holmes while there is none to his creator? The anomaly may soon be corrected as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, general practitioner, spiritualist and the man behind the world's most famous detective, realises his final vocation - as a marketing opportunity. Just as Rochester has reclaimed Dickens, Chawton cherishes Jane Austen and the Brontes have put Howarth on the map, a town is now trying to harness the commercial potential of Holmes. But it is not Edinburgh, where he studied, or Southsea, where he practised, but the apparently unexceptional East Sussex town of Crowborough. A Sherlock Holmes Festival culminating this weekend in a Victorian street fair and crime-writing bonanza at his former home, Windlesham Manor, is forging ahead....".

40.     Simon, Jane. "We Love Telly: Holmes Sickness; Pick of the Day the Strange Case of Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan." The Mirror, July 27, 2005. 39.
"His death made headline news. But what prompted Arthur Conan Doyle to kill off Sherlock Holmes at the very height of the fictional detective's popularity? As David Pirie's dark, gripping, feature-length drama suggests, Holmes sprang from the most troubled secret corners of Doyle's mind....".

41.     Sims, Michael. "Beyond Baker Street; Remembering Conan Doyle Only as the Inventor of Sherlock Holmes is a Crime." The Washington Post, January 27, 2008. Section: Book World, T9.
Review of The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, by Andrew Lycett (Free Press. 557 pp. $30) and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley (Penguin Press. 706 pp. $37.95).

42.     Sirant, Zenya. "Man of Mystery." National Post (Canada), December 15, 2007. TO4.
"Zenya Sirant discovers the secret to hawking whodunits with J.D. Singh, owner of detective-novel bookshop Sleuth of Baker Street, which recently celebrated its 25th year of business on the same Bayview block.".

43.     Smith, Alexander McCall. "Implausible, Inconsistent, Unforgettable." The Times (London), December 23, 2006. Section: Features, 6.
"By the normal rules of detective fiction, Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories should have been an abject failure. Everything about their creation was wrong. The author's heart was never in the enterprise--he disliked his principal character and very pointedly disposed of him. The resulting disappointment among Holmes's fans left Conan Doyle unmoved, even if he eventually relented; as far as he was concerned, getting Holmes out of the way would enable him to continue with what he really wanted to do--to write historical novels....".

44.     Smith, Godfrey. "Godfrey Smith Column." The Sunday Times (London), April 10, 1994. Section: Features, no page citation.
"In all the welter of anniversaries we're passing through, one notable in our annals has been overlooked. Exactly 100 years ago last Tuesday, Sherlock Holmes came back from the dead. It's hard now to realise quite how traumatic his demise after an epic struggle with Moriarty, the Napoleon of crime, at the Reichenbach Falls had been. Men were seen going about London with black mourning bands....".

45.     Smith, Lewis. "'Curse of Conan Doyle' Strikes Holmes Expert in Pounds 2m Challenge." The Times (London), Apr 13, 2004. 8.
The body of Richard Lancelyn Green was discovered when police broke into his home in Kensington, London. He was one of the foremost authorities on Conan Doyle and had concerns about the eventual destination of a Pounds 2 million collection of the author's papers that he felt should go to the British Library but which are instead due for auction....".

46.     ———. "The Mysterious Death of the Conan Doyle Expert." The Ottawa Citizen, Apr 24, 2004. A.12.
"The world's foremost authority on the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes was found strangled on his bed after trying to stop a $5-million auction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle papers. In a mystery that would have had [Holmes] reaching for his violin, Richard Lancelyn Green was discovered in his locked millionaire's apartment surrounded by his own Conan Doyle collection....".

47.     ———. "Puzzle of Holmes Expert's Death by Garotte Unsolved." The Times (London), Apr 24, 2004. 7.
The world's foremost authority on the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes was found garotted on his bed after trying to stop a Pounds 2 million auction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle papers....'There was to be a sale of certain books and documents belonging to the late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,' Dr [Paul Knapman] said. 'There's no doubt Mr Green thought it shouldn't go ahead. He was very anxious these documents should go to the British Library. I'm going to record an open verdict but in doing so I would not wish to stress the importance of any conspiracy theories.'...".

48.     Soupcoff, Marni. "Friday Zeitgeist." National Post (Canada), July 18, 2008. A12.
"I know the deerstalker is a hunting hat with earflaps, and I know it's primarily associated with fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, but I'm not sure why people have been Googling it so much lately. The best guess I can offer is that the hat owes its renewed prominence to the limited imaginations of reporters sharing the news that Robert Downey Jr. will play the role of Sherlock Holmes in a future movie....".

49.     Spring, Greg, and Michael Schneider. "Hollywood notes. (Cover story)" Electronic Media vol. 18, no. 32 (08/09/99, 1999): 34.
Reports on developments related to television broadcasting in the United States as of the week of August 9, 1999. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...Fox Kids Network has announced its fall 1999 Saturday morning lineup, which consists almost entirely of new series. The morning kicks off at 8 a.m. with the new series 'Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century.'".

50.     Starkey, Gabrielle. "Murder Rooms: The Dark Origins of Sherlock Holmes." The Times (London), March 27, 2004. 57.
"The third instalment of this brilliantly dark series--based on the premise that Arthur Conan Doyle's professor, Dr Joseph Bell...was the original Sherlock Homes--is also the strangest. The plot revolves around an Ancient Egyptian mummy discovered in a museum which, when unwrapped, turns out to contain a fresh corpse the perfect Holmes-style mystery.".

51.     Stashower, Daniel. "100 Years Ago: Is "S.S.T." the Love-child of Bigfoot?" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 2, 8.
Comments and observations on the article "Is Doyle a Plagiarist?" in a 1901 issue of The University of Virginia Magazine by an anonymous author, S. S. T., that "presents his readers with the assertion that Conan Doyle has plagiarized the essential elements of the character of Sherlock Holmes from Poe’s fictional sleuth, C. Auguste Dupin.".

52.     Stasio, Marilyn. "Elementary, My Dear Mr. Conan Doyle." The New York Times, May 14, 2000. 13.63.
"Well, it seems that Sherlock Holmes was a real person, after all. His name was Dr. Joseph Bell, a legendary medical diagnostician who taught at the Medical School of the University of Edinburgh when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle enrolled there in 1878 as a medical student. In fact, Dr. Bell chose the young Conan Doyle to be his clerk -- a devoted-slave position that entailed emptying the bloody buckets after an autopsy, trotting after the master on the forensic cases he handled for the Edinburgh police department, and writing down the brilliant principles of criminal deduction that would later issue from the lips of the immortal Sherlock Holmes. If it's proof you want, tune in to 'Murder Rooms: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes,' a two-part film...".

53.     Stefaniuk, Walter. "Fuel Costs Sky High." The Toronto Star, December 17, 1996. A7.
Passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "In an old movie, my hero Sherlock Holmes was using a flashlight. Were flashlights readily available in days of horse-drawn carriages? The dry-cell flashlight, patented by an electrical novelty company in the United States, appeared on the market in 1898....".

54.     ———. "Sales Tax Burden." The Toronto Star, June 20, 1996. A7.
Passing reference to Doyle, Holmes, and Watson. "In Sherlock Holmes stories, what was Dr. Watson's first name? Dr. John Watson....".

55.     Stewart, Helen. "The Strange Case of Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle." Sunday Times (London), July 24, 2005. 51.
Review of The Strange Case Of Sherlock Holmes And Arthur Conan Doyle (BBC). "'If the authors are to be believed,' says the screenwriter David Pirie, 'then the three great gothic archetypes -Sherlock Holmes, Frankenstein and Dracula -were just pieces of silliness, mere nothings.' Sir Arthur Conan Doyle always claimed that the Sherlock Holmes mysteries did not amount to more than a party trick...It is the circumstances of Holmes's birth and death that lie at the heart of Wednesday's drama. The ingenious screenplay joins the author as a young man of 33, just two years after he achieved success with his stories, and already determined to kill off his most famous creation. 'It was a remarkable act of literary savagery,' says Pirie, 'and I believe it proves that there were deeper roots to the character than Doyle claimed.'...The execution, however, is disappointing, largely because of the irritating insistence of the director, Cilla Ware, on shooting Henshall through shrubbery, random vases of flowers and blazing sunbursts, all of which lends the production a sweetly dreamy quality somewhat at odds with the nightmarish reality. The 90- minute film significantly flags halfway through, but those viewers who sit tight will be rewarded with a pleasingly Holmesian twist.".

56.     Stoffman, Judy. "There's Still Smoke in Sherlock's Pipe." The Toronto Star, April 30, 2005. Section: ARTS, H02.
A short profile and review of Caleb Carr's The Italian Secretary.

57.     Sveum, Richard J. "From the President" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 2 (June, 2001): 4.
Notice of the triennial conference, "2001: A Sherlockian Odyssey - A Journey Among the Shaw 100", to be held June 29 to July 1, 2001.

58.     ———. "From The President" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 4.
A brief report on the June 30, 2001 annual membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections including the announced goal of establishing an endowed curatorship in honor and memory of E. W. McDiarmid.

59.     ———. "Library Receives Maiwand Jezails Artifacts" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter vol. 5, no. 3 (September, 2001): 1, 4.
Notes the donation by Richard D. Lesh, BSI, of souvenirs of the June 2, 2001 Maiwand Jezail dinner in Omaha, Nebraska to the Holmes Collections. Also provides additional information on Professor Lesh and the Maiwand Jezail scion society. Includes a photograph of Lesh and the author at the dinner.

60.     Sweet, Matthew. "Books: Old Enemies Unmasked; Matthew Sweet Finds Out what the Great Detective was really Up to in Tibet." The Independent (London), October 29, 2000. 68.
Review of The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes by Jamyang Norbu.

61.     Szadkowski, Joseph. "Holmes Game a Bit Elementary." The Washington Times, July 20, 2008. M18.
Review of computer game "Lost Cases of Sherlock Holmes" (Legacy Interactive, single CD-ROM for PC or Intel-based Macintosh computer systems, $19.99). "The title requires junior proteges of the legendary literary character work through 16 cases by deciphering a variety of visual puzzles. This fun, casual gaming experience set in Victorian England offers environmental conundrums and the use of reasoning, observation and memorization to quickly isolate evidence and suspects and solve a crime. Unfortunately, the presentation is definitely elementary, dear Watson. (I couldn't resist.) This is not a third-person action-adventure game, folks....".

62.     Tayler, Christopher. "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Christopher Tayler Detects Plot Holes, Red Herrings and Thin Jokes." The Sunday Telegraph (London), January 1, 2006. Section: SEVEN, 38.
Review of Les Klinger's New Annotated Sherlock Holmes and Nick Rennison's biography of Holmes. "...But unless you're a fully paid-up member of the Baker Street Irregulars, both of these books reveal more about the spending power of the subculture they're aimed at than they do about Watson, Holmes and their creator. Klinger's high-end three-volume edition will set you back at least 70 quid, which, judiciously spent, could pay for the authoritative, non-Sherlockian Oxford paperbacks as well as a second-hand copy of Stevenson's The Suicide Club - which has an even better Mormon interlude than A Study in Scarlet - and maybe a copy of Raffles, The Amateur Cracksman.".

63.     Taylor, Bill. "Hidden Highway of Hertfordshire Beckons." The Toronto Star, June 3, 2000. L14.
Passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...Still, the precipitation doesn't hurt the sinister atmosphere. You can see how such sensitive souls as Oldfield and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (who convinced himself that there were fairies at the bottom of his garden) could be moved to creativity. Doyle was a frequent visitor to the area and is said to have based one of his best Sherlock Holmes stories, The Hound Of The Baskervilles, on the ghostly canine that was known (though its real name was probably Woofums) either as the Hound of Hell or the Black Dog of Hergest....".

64.     Taylor, DJ. "Sherlock Holmes is More than a Brand Name." The Independent (London), August 31, 2004. 33.
"We should be grateful, in a landscape crowded out with the likes of Big Brother and TV's Naughtiest Blunders 14, that any literary classic gets dramatised for the small screen these days. Even so, I was slightly alarmed to discover the BBC's intentions with regard to its latest remake of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's immortal Sherlock Holmes. The attempt to return Baker Street's cadaverous, cocaine- injecting sleuth to the forefront of the public consciousness is to be called The Return of Sherlock Holmes, and the choice of Rupert Everett as the leading man is, according to the pundits, sure to upset the diehard fan....".

65.     ———. "Under Investigation." Sunday Times (London), February 13, 2000. 39.
Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. by Daniel Stashower. "...Teller of Tales is a highly competent recapitulation of most of the known facts about Conan Doyle - possibly a bit too enthusiastic about the spiritualist fixation, which could have been done at half the length. As an attempt to see him in the round, Stashower's study is never less than interesting. And yet, however thoroughly put through his paces, however cunningly introduced to aspects of the modern dressage, you fear that its subject turns out to have been a one-trick pony after all.".

66.     Teeman, Tim. "Sherlock Holmes." The Times (London), December 11, 2004. 11.
"The Conan Doyle estate has given its approval to a novel called The Italian Secretary by Caleb Carr, author of The Alienist, in which two royal servants die, with echoes of the murder of a confidante of Mary, Queen of Scots 300 years earlier.".

67.     Terr, Stephen. "Millennium Memories: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Evening Times (Glasgow), January 3, 2001. 10.
Very brief biographical sketch of Doyle.

68.     Thomas, Scarlett. "Paperbacks: For Fans of Playstation Or Even Sherlock Holmes ; Number9dream by David Mitchell Sceptre Pounds 6.99." Independent on Sunday (London), April 21, 2002. 17.
Passing reference to Holmes.

69.     Thompson, Michael. "Clumsiness: why isn't it as easy as falling off a log?" Innovation: The European Journal of Social Sciences vol. 21, no. 3 (09, 2008): 205-216.
Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...They need to back off from elegance--single definitions of problem and solution, clear separation of facts and values, reliance on optimization, etc. -- so as to be able to listen to 'other voices.' And to do that they are going to need methods that will tell them when some of these voices that they should be listening to are not being heard -- a bit like Sherlock Holmes and 'The Dog That Did Not Bark'!...".

70.     Thomson, Ian. "The Detective's Dark Side Ian Thomson Delights in Conan Doyle's Masterpiece, 'the Hound of the Baskervilles'." The Daily Telegraph (London), December 30, 2006. Section: BOOKS, 23.
An appreciation for the novel and other observations on Doyle and Holmes. "...Doyle's troubled relationship with his creation was fraught with dark, father-son undercurrents, and was far from elementary. What other fictional detective has become so charmingly real to his readers as the occupant of 221b Baker Street? The revival of Sherlock Holmes is a treat. Meanwhile, a spectral bogey hound continues to prowl the Baskerville moors, reappearing to each new generation of Holmes readers as the Fido from hell.".

71.     Tracey, David. "Tibetan Sherlock Shakes Up the Movement." The International Herald Tribune, March 28, 2002. 18.
Portrait of the Tibetan writer Jamyang Norbu. "...Welcome to the real world of refugee politics. Norbu knows it from the inside out, starting with his decision in 1962 to run away from school to join a group of CIA-financed Tibetan guerrillas fighting China. It sounds like fodder for some of the thrills he visits on his heroes in 'The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years,' but Norbu chuckles at the real-life experience....".

72.     Trump, Simon. "Murderer of the Baskervilles: British Author Claims Sherlock Holmes' Creator Committed Murder to Cover Up Fact that He was Helped by another Writer. Simon Trump Reports." The Ottawa Citizen, September 10, 2000. A9.
"It is a mystery worthy of Sherlock Holmes himself. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the fictional detective, has been accused of betraying a fellow author to conceal the true authorship of one of his greatest works. Rodger Garrick-Steele, a writer from Dawlish, Devon, has spent 11 years researching a new book on Conan Doyle's relationship with Bertram Fletcher Robinson, a journalist and the largely unsung co- author of The Hound of the Baskervilles. He claims Mr. Conan Doyle colluded with his publishers to deny Mr. Fletcher Robinson recognition for devising the plot and supplying much of the local detail....".

73.     Tweedie, Neil. "Vengeful Butler is Prime Suspect in Holmes' Last Case." The Daily Telegraph (London), February 15, 2001. 12.
"It was a whodunnit worthy of fiction's greatest detective. The crime library of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes, vanishes with a treasure map shortly before his death only to resurface on the far side of the Atlantic in the hands of an American collector. Was it the work of the author himself, or could it have been the final revenge of the butler he dismissed? The mystery of the 79 books came to occupy the finest minds in Scotland Yard and the FBI when the British enlisted the help of J Edgar Hoover to establish who had stolen the raw material for the adventures of literature's most famous sleuth. The story, contained in Scotland Yard files released at the Public Record Office yesterday, began in June 1946, when Insp Symes of the Metropolitan Police CID was visited by Sir Arthur's sons, Denis and Adrian....".

74.     Utechin, Nick. "The Immortal Sherlock." The Times (London), January 17, 2004. 2.
"How could a beaky pedant in a funny hat have held the world in thrall for so long? Nick Utechin offers some clues. Sherlock Holmes is 150 this year. It is more than a century since he caught a hansom from Baker Steet on his last adventure. And yet, somehow, this quintessentially English literary invention has become a worldwide phenomenon. On February 5, for example, his fans will gather in 604 cities and 45 countries as far apart as Austria and Vietnam, Hungary and Lebanon. It is a ceremony that is repeated somewhere every month, on an agreed day, when devotees discuss the object of their shared passion -"the best and the wisest man", in the words of his dedicated partner, Dr Watson....".

75.     ———. "It's Elementary, My Dear." The Scotsman, June 28, 2000. 14.
Some observations on Holmes parodies and pastiches. "There's a famous 'Punch' cartoon of a giant Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - who died 70 years ago next week - sitting puffing contentedly with his head in the clouds and down at his feet an austerely midget Sherlock Holmes; the two are manacled together. The image could not be more simple, expressing the truth that Doyle could never accept that he would, in the public mind, be forever shackled to Sherlock. 'He takes my mind from better things,' Doyle wrote, when he hurled Holmes off the Reichenbach Falls in 1892; but by the time he wrote the last adventure of the fabulous detective 35 years later, American publishers were paying him a dollar a word, such were the readers' demands. Holmes's impact was immediate; and over the years, some 16,000 attempts have been made at parodying him, or re-writing him in pastiche form....".

76.     Van Gelder, Lawrence. "Book Notes." The New York Times, January 4, 1995. C14.
"He'll be 141 years old on Friday. Although long retired as a consulting detective, he still busies himself as he has for many decades, tending bees in Sussex. His name is Sherlock Holmes. Sherlockian scholars agree that his birthday is Jan. 6, and around the world his exploits still thrill readers (not to mention those who follow his adventures on television or videocassette)....".

77.     Vosburgh, Dick. "Obituary: Edmund Hartmann; Erudite Screenwriter for Bob Hope." The Independent (London), December 9, 2003. 20.
"...When his RKO contract lapsed, Hartmann signed a seven-year deal with Universal Pictures. 'At Universal, I wrote for three great teams,' he told an interviewer, 'Abbott and Costello, Olsen and Johnson, and Holmes and Watson.' His Universal assignments included Abbott and Costello's Keep 'Em Flying (1941), Ride 'Em Cowboy (1942), In Society (1944), Here Come the Co-eds (1945) and The Naughty Nineties (1945), Olsen and Johnson's The Ghost Catchers (1944) and See My Lawyer (1945), and Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce's Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (1943), Sherlock Holmes in Washington (1943) and The Scarlet Claw (1944)....".

78.     Wales, Ruth. "Imagined Memoirs of the Famous." Christian Science Monitor, August 12, 1999. 19.
Review of Sherlock Holmes and the Rune Stone Mystery By Larry Millett (Viking 336 pp., $23.95). "Given the current popularity of autobiographical reminiscences, it's not surprising that the mystery memoir is almost a whodunit category. An author finds a hidden, handwritten document featuring a well-known literary name. With footnotes, commentary, or afterword, the resulting book can be fun to read and a delight to fans of the original. But writers who practice the art of the imagined famous-person memoir run risks. Their supposedly 'lost' manuscripts may be only clever echoes of a familiar voice. Or they may stretch readers' credulity by constructing an improbable plot. In 'Sherlock Holmes and the Rune Stone Mystery,' coming this fall, Larry Millett avoids both traps. His leading characters are true to type, and his Midwest setting allows him to create a believable background for his transplanted detectives....'.

79.     Wales, Ruth Johnstone. "Mysterious Old Characters Come Back to Life." Christian Science Monitor, February 25, 1999. 19.
Review of Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders by Larry Millett. "Fans of the classic Sherlock Holmes stories may or may not be enchanted by Larry Millett's factual fictions in which the famous sleuth practices his art in an American location. Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders, like its predecessor, takes place in St. Paul, Minn., at the time of the 1896 Winter Carnival. Using the pretense of a recently discovered manuscript by the indomitable Dr. Watson, Millett mixes real and invented people in a reasonable facsimile of an Arthur Conan Doyle tale....".

80.     Walker, Andrew. "Drama Tells of Holmes's Real Genius." The Scotsman, August 12, 1999. 20.
"As one of the world's greatest fictional detective teams, Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson have captivated readers for more than a century. Now the real-life inspiration behind the famous sleuth and the man who created the Sherlock Holmes phenomenon is to be put in the spotlight, as the subject of the BBC's latest period drama set in 19th century Edinburgh....".

81.     Walker, Maxton. "Holmes from Holmes: Websites Reviewed." The Independent (London), October 3, 1998. 80.
Short review of www.sherlock-holmes.com (The Sherlock Holmes Shoppe). "I'm lucky enough to be endowed with a terrible memory. The main advantage of this is that I get to read all of the Sherlock Holmes short stories every five years and enjoy them thoroughly every time. And then, when they've been exhausted, I can only feed my addiction with what the Internet has to offer. An excellent starting point for anybody in the same boat is The Sherlock Holmes Shoppe, which exists primarily in order to sell Sherlock-related paraphernalia....".

82.     Walton, David. "Sherlock Holmes's Maker." The New York Times Book Review, May 2, 1999. 34.
Review of "Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle" by Daniel Stashower.

83.     Wapshott, Tim. "Sherlock Holmes : Nemesis." The Times (London), August 23, 2008. Section: Features, 14.
Very short review of the computer game "Sherlock Holmes: Nemesis." "The intrepid supersleuth Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson take on a notorious cat burglar, who lays down the gauntlet to the duo in a letter promising that he will carry out five thefts in five days. The adventure is played out in the first person, with Watson doing much of the donkey work around the 3-D world. The graphics are detailed and the voice acting competent. All the same, this makes for fairly laborious gaming....".

84.     Waterhouse, Keith. "Oh, to be Back on Treasure Island." Daily Mail (London), April 26, 1999. 14.
Passing reference to Holmes. "...It seems that in primary schools most teachers are women, and it is the teachers who choose the books. The books they choose are more likely to be Jane Eyre and Pride And Prejudice than The Hound Of The Baskervilles and Treasure Island, and Education Secretary David Blunkett quite rightly wants Long John Silver and Sherlock Holmes to get a look in....".

85.     Watson, Peter. "For Sale all the Evidence of a Great Detective." The Guardian (London), June 11, 1995. 6.
"Baker Street Irregulars will this week be invited to one of the greatest gatherings Sherlock Holmes buffs have known. The jamboree is not at 221B Baker Street, mythical home of the great pipe-smoking detective, but round the corner in Bond Street, where the world's largest and most important collection of Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes memorabilia is about to go under the hammer at Sotheby's. The collection of Stanley MacKenzie, actor and deputy stage manager of the Royal Shakespeare Company -- who died in February, aged 82 -- probably contains not just everything Arthur Conan Doyle wrote on Holmes, but everything written about Holmes, together with memorabilia from every play, film and TV adaptation....".

86.     ———. "Sherlock Holmes Collection on London Auction Block." The Ottawa Citizen, June 15, 1995. F16.
"Baker Street Irregulars will this week receive invitations to one of the greatest gatherings Sherlock Holmes buffs have known. The jamboree is not at 221B Baker Street, mythical home of the great pipe-smoking detective, but round the corner in Bond Street, where the world's largest and most important collection of Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes memorabilia is about to go under the hammer at Sotheby's. The collection of Stanley MacKenzie, actor and deputy stage manager of the Royal Shakespeare Company -- who died in February, aged 82 -- probably contains not just everything Arthur Conan Doyle wrote on Holmes, but everything written about Holmes, together with memorabilia from every play, film and television adaptation....".

87.     Watson-Smyth, Kate. "Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery of the Missing Statue is Solved." The Independent (London), February 21, 1999. 13.
It is more than 70 years since Sherlock Holmes solved his last case, but he is still sent more than 40 letters a month to his rooms in Baker Street. One of the most enduring mysteries, however, is how this most famous of detectives came to be commemorated in Japan, Switzerland and Edinburgh but never by his home at 221B. The answer, when it finally emerged, was elementary, my dear Watson -- nobody had ever got round to it. But now, more than 60 years after the death of author G K Chesterton, who was the first to suggest a statue of the sleuth, planning permission for one has been granted to the Sherlock Holmes Society....".

88.     Watts, Janet. "At a Glance." Sunday Times (London), February 27, 2000. 42. Very short review of London 1900: The Imperial Metropolis, by Jonathan Schneer. "...Imperialism shapes every aspect of the city's culture -- the construction of Kingsway, music-hall black minstrels, Sherlock Holmes stories, the treatment of animals in London Zoo....".

89.     Webster, Paul. "Sherlock's Own French Connection; France has Claimed the Top British Sleuth as its Own, Reports Paul Webster." The Guardian (London), May 17, 1996. 15.
"The clues are so thick on the ground that even Dr Watson would have to exclaim: 'Elementary, mon cher Holmes, you have the blood, the brains and the flair of a Frenchman.' For the next three months, the French Sherlock Holmes Society will provide evidence from a dozen adventures to prove that the Baker Street sleuth would be several volumes short of an opus without his French ancestry and a fascination for Gallic art and science. At the opening of an exhibition in Paris devoted to Holmes's split loyalty, members of the society even made the bizarre claim that they had discovered a grave in the French capital where they believe the fictional character was secretly buried in 1957....".

90.     Webster, Stephen. "Off Line: The Case of the Cursed Curriculum." The Guardian (London), December 7, 1995. 11.
Comments on scientific illiteracy with passing reference to Holmes. "Was Sherlock Holmes scientifically literate? Undoubtedly he considered himself a scientist - his first recorded words concerned a new test for haemoglobin he had just cooked up in the Bart's Hospital chemistry lab. And the great detective was forever making observations and deductions and rearranging his ideas in the light of experience. Yet with his second comment, delivered to Dr Watson, Sherlock Holmes surely fails. Holmes believed the Sun went round the earth. He was a pre-Copernican, and not prepared to change his mind. Dr Watson was absolutely horrified. How could a man of science make such an elementary mistake? Holmes saw no problem whatsoever. For him, the machinations of the solar system were no business of his. Sleuthing in London, not the cosmos, was his job. I'm not sure Holmes would be so stubborn today. These days, innocent bystanders regularly find themselves polled about things miles away (the movements of the Sun) or about events that unfolded years ago (the creation of the universe). Rather like Sherlock Holmes, and probably for very much the same reason, they often give the wrong answer. And by giving the wrong answer the innocent bystanders show themselves to be suffering from that modern malady, scientific illiteracy....".

91.     Weingarten, Marc. "Case of the Lawyer with a Sherlock Holmes Bent." The New York Times, December 30, 2004. E1.
Portrait of Klinger and review of his "New Annotated Sherlock Holmes." "Leslie S. Klinger is not one of those Sherlock Holmes obsessives who feel compelled to actually live as if they were distant relatives of the fictional detective. He doesn't greet visitors wearing a deerstalker hat and an Inverness cape, and his cheerful contemporary home in Malibu, Calif., is a far cry from the Victorian lodging house at 221B Baker Street where Holmes and his trusty sidekick, Dr. John Watson, lived in London. But as Holmes himself could attest, first impressions can be deceiving. Step into Mr. Klinger's home office and you will find the evidence of his abiding passion: Thousands of books about one of the world's most famous crime busters. This is the raw material for Mr. Klinger's project 'The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes,' a two-volume, 10-pound collection of all 56 Holmes short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, complete with Mr. Klinger's exhaustive footnotes....".

92.     ———. "A Lawyer's Sherlockian Pursuit." The International Herald Tribune, January 14, 2005. 9.
"Leslie Klinger is not one of those Sherlock Holmes obsessives who feel compelled to actually live as if they were distant relatives of the fictional detective. He doesn't greet visitors wearing a deerstalker hat and an Inverness cape, and his cheerful contemporary home in Malibu, California, is a far cry from the Victorian lodging house at 221B Baker St. where Holmes and his trusty sidekick, Dr. John Watson, lived in London. But as Holmes himself could attest, first impressions can be deceiving. Step into Klinger's home office and you will find the evidence of his abiding passion: Thousands of books about one of the world's most famous crime busters. This is the raw material for Klinger's project 'The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes,' a hefty two- volume collection of all 56 Holmes short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, complete with Klinger's exhaustive footnotes....".

93.     ———. "Sinking His Critical Teeth into 'Dracula'; After Investigating and Annotating Doyle's Sherlock Holmes Tales, Leslie Klinger Focuses on Stoker's Novel." Los Angeles Times, October 31, 2008. E14.
"After writing nearly 2,000 footnotes for Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes corpus, one might think Leslie Klinger would take a respite. After all, he has a thriving tax law practice in Los Angeles. But when the three volumes of 'The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes' received glowing reviews upon their publication beginning in 2004 and wound up selling more than 50,000 copies, Klinger felt emboldened to ask his publisher, W.W. Norton, what his next project might be....".

94.     Wessely, Simon. "How to Profile a Hannibal Lecter." The Times (London), January 31, 1994. no page citation.
Includes passing references to Holmes.

95.     Wheen, Francis. "Francis Wheen Reveals the Elementary Truth Behind the Capture of the Jackal." The Observer, September 4, 1994. 4.
A short, humorous piece on various borrowings and literary connections related to Holmes, taking as a starting point a quotation from a recent news account: "A French academic has just published a merciless study of Sherlock Holmes, exposing the great sleuth's educational, social and politically incorrect failings, which is bound to cause deep offence among Holmes's touchy idolisers." (The Guardian).

96.     White, Richard. "The Strange Case of Mr Ritchie and the Cursed Movie." The Sun (London), November 29, 2008. 33.
"Guy Ritchie's new film Sherlock Holmes seems to be cursed after a string of nasty accidents. The cast and crew first wondered if they had a mystery fit for legendary detective Holmes on their hands when Robert Downey Jr was knocked out by a 7ft wrestler. Then yesterday, he and Jude Law, 35 -- who plays his sidekick Dr Watson -- had to flee the set with Ritchie when a petrol tanker exploded in a fireball....".

97.     Williams, Gill. "Between the Sheets; Inside our Hotel of the Week Sherlock Holmes Hotel, London." Sunday Mirror, June 10, 2007. Section: Features, 17.
Short review of the hotel.

98.     Williams, Sally. "Elementary, My Dear Watson... Silver Cutlery of the Family that Inspired Sherlock Holmes Classic is Tracked Down in Wales." The Western Mail, June 3, 2008. Section: News, 12.
"A set of silver cutlery featuring Sherlock Holmes' legendary Hound of the Baskervilles is to be sold at auction later this month. The 42-piece set, which is expected to fetch up to pounds 6,000, was hidden in a wardrobe at Baskerville Hall, Clyro Court, in Mid Wales - the setting that inspired author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to write his spine-chilling thriller. The crest showing a hound with a broken spear through its jaw with five drips of blood falling from its tip is on every piece of the dinner service. The hound, Black Vaughan, howled and roamed the nearby foggy moors of Hergest Ridge and was the inspiration of Conan Doyle's book. And the silver is believed to have been used at the fine banquets Conan Doyle would have attended during his numerous visits to the house in the late 19th and early 20th century. It lay hidden for 63 years until being discovered by antiques expert Martin Heath....".

99.     Wilson, Jamie. "Mystery Death of Holmes Expert." The Guardian (London), April 24, 2004. 5.
"The world's foremost expert on Sherlock Holmes was found garrotted in his bed surrounded by cuddly toys and a bottle of gin, an inquest heard yesterday. Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, had become paranoid in the days before his death, telling friends and relatives that his home was bugged and that a mysterious American was out to besmirch his reputation. He died from asphyxiation after a garrotte was tightened around his neck. Yesterday coroner Paul Knapman called it a "very unusual death" and recorded an open verdict. He said there was insufficient evidence to rule whether it was suicide, murder or a deviant sexual act taken too far that had caused the death of the former chair man of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London....".

100.     Winston, Iris. "A Riveting Revelation of Sherlock Holmes , the Man." The Ottawa Citizen, June 8, 2000. E6.
Short review of the play by David Stuart Davies. "...One of the most recent Sherlockian creations is a drama that provides a coda to the detective adventures. Playwright and Holmes expert David Stuart Davies offers an incisively written view of the man in Sherlock Holmes -- the last act! The show arrives in Ottawa this weekend for a three-day run....".

101.     Wong, Edwin. "Hone Your Investigation Skills!" New Straits Times (Malaysia), February 28, 2009. 6.
Using the computer game "Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective to hone skills. "Well before the millions of viewers began tuning into the CSI (Crime Scene Investigation) series every week to get their 'investigative fix', fans of logic and deduction were already captivated by the crime-solving mysteries of the great Sherlock Holmes. While our day jobs may seem far removed from the adrenaline rush of crime-busting, you don't really need to wear a cape to get your share of it. The fact is, logic, deduction and investigative skills are very much at the core of more day jobs than one may realise! Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be 'Logic, deduction and investigation 101' syllabus either in schools or universities, so unless your employer offers it, I guess you are expected to pick up the finer points from television or novels! Well, here's a better way. Playing designer games that not only teaches you the basics and helps you to hone your skills, but also transports you to the world of Sherlock Holmes, Jack the Ripper and more!...".

102.     Woods, Paula L. "Book Review; He's Hounding Sherlock Holmes." Los Angeles Times, November 30, 2008. F11.
"Expanding the scope of the 'detective criticism' he began in 2000's 'Who Killed Roger Ackroyd? The Mystery Behind the Agatha Christie Mystery,' French literature professor and psychoanalyst Pierre Bayard turns his attention to another canonical text of the genre, Arthur Conan Doyle's 'The Hound of the Baskervilles.' In 'Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong' (Bloomsbury: 196 pp., $20), Bayard analyzes 'the way the facts are presented, accepting no testimony without reservation and systematically calling into question everything' in and outside of the text....".

103.     Young, Chris. "Top Character is Elementary." Evening Times (Glasgow), July 21, 2001. 14.
"Peter MacDonald of Ibrox, Glasgow, asks which fictional character has been most often portrayed in films? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's detective Sherlock Holmes was played by more than 70 actors in over 200 films! Holmes was a favourite of silent films from 1903....".