10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays (75)

1. "Book Notes." Bulletin of the History of Medicine 77, no. 2 (2003): 482-483.

Includes a reference to Doyle. Todd Savitt, ed. Medical Readers' Theater: A Guide and Scripts. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2002. xix + 192 pp. $44.95 (cloth, 0-87745-798-0), $22.95 (paperbound, 0-87745-799-9). "'The concept behind our reader's theater program is simple,' writes Todd Savitt: 'adapt short stories about medicine to scripts, invite medical students to serve as the readers (actors), perform the stories to public and medical audiences, and hold postperformance discussions about the issues raised by the stories with the audiences and the cast' (p. xi). The result is an exchange of ideas and perceptions that, according to the author, has a profound effect on participants on both sides of the stage. The fourteen scripts--based on stories by William Carlos Williams, Richard Selzer, Susan Onthank Mates, Pearl S. Buck, Arthur Conan Doyle, Katherine Anne Porter, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, and Margaret Lamb--are divided into four sections: 'Physicians and Patients,' 'Being a Physician,' 'Ethical and Social Issues,' and 'Aging and Chronic Illness.' Each script includes instructions for placing the characters on stage, and questions for discussion."

2. "Books published recently with NEH support." Humanities 16, no. 4 (1995): 45.

Presents a list of National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)-supported books published in the United States. Includes New York University Joseph A. Callaway Prize for best theater book of the year: King, W. D. Henry Irving's Waterloo: Theatrical Engagements with Arthur Conan Doyle, George Bernard Shaw, Ellen Terry, Edward Gordon Craig, Late Victorian Culture, Assorted Ghosts, Old Men, and History. Los Angeles and Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.

3. "Criticism, Theater, Film, Journalism, etc." Reference & Research Book News 23, no. 3 (2008): 292-304.

The article reviews several books including one with a reference to Doyle. Blood on the stage; milestone plays of crime, mystery, and detection; an annotated repertoire, 1900-1925. Kabatchnik, Arnnon. Scarecrow Pr., ©2008 417 p. $100.00 "Kabatchnik, a retired theater professor from SUNY Binghamton, Stanford U., Ohio State U., Florida State U. and Elmira College, offers this chronology of plays containing themes of crime, mystery and criminal investigation. Plot summaries and reviews are supplied for these plays, which include works from such noted playwrights as Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jacinto Benavente and John Galsworthy. The author gives thorough criticism for the benefit of theater students on why each work is noteworthy, and why the appeal of this genre endures."

4. "Getting Into The Act." Stage of the Art 15, no. 1 (2002): 17-23.

Six practitioners of participation theater discuss their experiences. One of the practitioners, Bernice Bronson, who developed original scripts in participatory theater during her ten years as artistic director of the Looking Glass Theatre in Providence, Rhode Island, mentioned an experience with a Holmes reference. "...For instance, in Sherlock Holmes, a red-headed actress arrived as President of the Red Headed League. She told the children they were all members of The Red Headed League and were going to be in a fashion parade with her. She distributed red mop-heads for them to wear, saying, 'Let me see some of the things you're going to do.' They experimented and then 'The League' proceeded to the performance room. Other groups were prepared as felons, the Baker Street Irregulars, merchants of London, Scotland Yard, and the streets and alleys of London. One child would play Watson and would be supported by Sherlock Holmes and Mrs. Hudson, played by actors of the company. Watson would have lots to discuss, order and report, so the actors had to make sure to phrase their questions so that however little Holmes replied, it would be appropriate and helpful. For example, instead of asking the young actor 'Is this man dead or alive?' the company actors would ask, 'When did this man die?' The field was now open to him.At one of the early performances, I was worried that the young audience members might be jealous of one person being chosen to be Watson. Instead they felt he was their hero and they carried him out on their shoulders. By and large we had a wonderful time...."

5. "Heads Up." NEA Today 17, no. 2 (1998): 32.

Provides information on resources and events of interest to teachers and educators. Includes a Doyle reference. "Do your students have a flair for the dramatic? Treat them to Mystery Plays: 8 Plays, for the Classroom Based on Stories by Famous Writers. Tom Conklin adapts great tales by Hawthorne, O. Henry, Conan Doyle, and more for kids in grades 4-8...."

6. "Lyceum Theatre, 10 September 1901; On This Day." The Times (London), September 10, 1996: 1.

Reprint of an article from 1901 beginning: "We wonder whether it was quite politic of Dr. Conan Doyle, even with the assistance of Mr. William Gillette, to bring Sherlock Holmes upon the stage. Surely no playhouse is large enough to hold that colossal figure? You might as well attempt to get the Djinn into the bottle. And, then, the stage is fatal to mystery. The mythopoeic tendency has been busy with Sherlock Holmes. He has become the centre of a legend. To see him in the flesh, under the glare of the footlights, is to substitute intimacy for awe...."

7. "Publishing, Library Science, Bibliography." Reference & Research Book News 23, no. 3 (2008): 336-342.

The article reviews several books including Sherlock Holmes on stage: a chronological encyclopedia of plays featuring the great detective. Kabatchnik, Amnon. Scarverow Pr., ©2008 197 p. $55.00 "Retired from teaching theater at various prestigious US universities, Kabatchnik cites and describes each of the four plays Arthur Conan Doyle himself wrote about the Victorian London detective he created, along vidth 38 written by others, some of them one-act plays. Each article describes the context in which the play was written, points out references and other connections to the published stories, summarizes the action, discusses the production history and reception, and identifies the plajnvright."

8. "Truly enchanted. (Cover story)." Time 149, no. 21 (1997): 97.

Relates several events taking place in New Mexico in the summer of 1997. A passing reference to Holmes. "Also in Santa Fe, from June 3 through Aug. 16, is Santa Fe Stages: the International Theater Festival, for which the city will be host to everything from Canadian avant-gardists (a brochure warns of "brief nudity") to a women-in-drag version of Sherlock Holmes from Britain."

9. Aitchison, Ellay, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Leonard A Haffenden. The Adventure of the awful apparition: a play in three acts (and an encore). 1st ed, (Premium petrel). North Vancouver, B.C: Hansom Press Limited, 1999.

10. Barry, Martin. "The Crown Diamond: A Radio Play in One Act." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 4 (1995): 19-26.

11. Benedict, David. "Edinburgh Festival: Good heavens, they're alive!" The Independent (London), August 25, 1998: 12.

"Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson are more than 100 years old and still in the detective business. In an exclusive interview, David Benedict talks to the World's Greatest Detective and his chum....As visitors to the University of Minnesota (repository of the world's largest collection of Sherlock Holmes memorabilia) will attest, there's the nasty business of the needles: Holmes is a self- confessed addict....Maggie Fox and Sue Ryding, aka Lip Service, play Holmes and Watson in 'Move Over Moriarty at the Assembly Rooms...."

12. Billington, Michael. "Away with the fairies; What's wrong with Snoo Wilson's story about Sherlock Holmes , the sun god and the giant meteorite?" The Guardian (London), October 27, 1999: 14.

"How did it happen? No sooner had it opened than Snoo Wilson's Moonshine was dubbed 'Stinker of the Year' and 'unwatchable' by normally temperate critics. Guaranteed to empty Hampstead Theatre faster than a powerful laxative, it already has the makings of a myth, and, as with any play that sinks in the water, one wonders why anyone thought it seaworthy in the first place. My own suspicion is that Wilson made a seductive pitch to his director, Simon Stokes, and to Jenny Topper, who runs Hampstead Theatre. 'Look,' says Snoo, 'I've got this idea for a play about Conan Doyle. Did you know he was a dedicated spiritualist? And that, after he'd killed off Sherlock Holmes, he came to feel haunted by his own creation? I'm going to write this piece in which Doyle is projected into another world and I'll work in some topical stuff about global destruction and Rupert Murdoch.' 'Wowee!' say Stokes and Topper. 'Go ahead and write it.' But, given his head, Wilson proceeds to lose it...."

13. Brereton, Matt. "Review: Sherlock Holmes : Murder in the Garden." The Scotsman, August 21, 2007: 11.

"For sheer perseverance in the face of appalling weather, the cast of this promenade play almost earned an extra star. It was certainly an enthusiastic effort from Frantic Redhead Productions, but, rather than investigating the less-than-baffling murder here, Sherlock Holmes would have been better employed in the strange case of the dodgy Scottish accents and the erratic wardrobe master."

14. Brown, K. C, and Wayside Theatre. Sherlock's veiled secret [program]. Middletown, Va.: Wayside Theatre, 1995.

15. Brown, K. C, and Arne Zaslove. Sherlock's veiled secret. New York: Dramatists Play Service, 1996.

16. Brown, Kent R., and Arthur Conan Doyle. The Hound of the Baskervilles : a comic thriller starring Shirley Holmes and Jennie Watson. Woodstock, lL: Dramatic Pub., 2010.

19 cm. adapted and dramatized by Kent R. Brown ; inspired by the novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.; Sherlock Holmes and his faithful sidekick. Dr. John Watson, have left on an extended holiday throughout Europe, leaving their nieces--Shirley Holmes and Jennie Watson--to keep an eye on the famous flat at 221B Baker Street. Shirley, studying logic, and Jennie, studying medicine, are busy preparing for upcoming exams when there's a knock on the door ... Shirley and Jennie follow the trail of evidence and intrigue until, at last, they are confronted by the ravenous Hound itself!

17. Cable, Harold. "Big Red Riding Hood." Plays 56, no. 5 (1997): 13.

Presents the play 'Big Red Riding Hood,' by Harold Cable. Includes multiple references to Holmes.

18. Campbell, Patrick. The tides of the Wight the gentlemen go by. Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisconsin: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1999.

Includes bibliographical references;

19. Citron, Paula. "A little too elementary, my dear Watson." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), March 15, 2000: R4.

"Promising Sherlock Holmes play is hampered by direction, cast and a need to explain just how the great detective outwitted his worthy foe. Written by Doug Warwick Directed by Anne Butler Starring Michael Hanrahan, Sean Mulcahy and Catherine Vaneri At St. Vlad's Theatre in Toronto....Composer/jazzman/rock musician Doug Warwick has turned his hand to play-writing, and his ambitious maiden effort, Sherlock Holmes & The First English Gentleman , is now on view at St. Vlad's Theatre in Toronto. The play has already been running for two weeks and word-of-mouth has made it a near sell-out...."

20. Darlay, V, Henry Joseph Auguste de Gorsse, Frank J Morlock, and Arnaud Demaegd. Arsène Lupin vs. Sherlock Holmes the stage play. Encino, CA: Black Coat Press, 2005.

When Arsène Lupin was bold enough to steal the Sultan Diamond out from under the nose of the French Police, Sherlock Holmes announced he would not only recover the diamond but would arrest Lupin within the week. After the episode at Reichenbach Falls, Watson is closing the apartment at 221b. He is surprised by the appearance of Irene Adler, who reveals a dark side of Holmes that Watson never knew

21. Davies, David Stuart, Roger Llewellyn, Gareth Armstrong, Jay Productions, and Salisbury Playhouse. Sherlock Holmes the last act! : [program]. Ashcroft, B.C.?: Jay Productions in association with Salisbury Playhouse, 1999.

22. Davies, David Stuart, and Kathryn White. "'Port and Lemon' by John Cargill Thompson." The Ritual, no. 14 (1994): 53.

23. Dietz, Steven. Sherlock Holmes, the final adventure based on the original 1899 play by William Gillette and Arthur Conan Doyle. New York: Dramatists Play Service, 2007.

24. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Alan Lance Andersen. The speckled band a Sherlock Holmes drama. Roland, Iowa: Andersen Desktop Publishing, 2005.

25. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Ted Bergman, Sherlock Holmes Klubben i Danmark, and Solitary Cyclists of Sweden. Krondiamanten, eller, En kväll med Sherlock Holmes pjäs i en akt. Stockholm: s.n, 1976.

Citations: De Waal C2248; "This is Conan Doyle's play 'The Crown Diamond' (translated into Swedish by Ted Bergman) and with a foreword by Mattias Bostrom (also in Swedish) discussing a production of the play in Malmo in 1994, and with photographs from the show."

26. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Maurine V. Eleder. "The Brazilian Cat." Plays 53, no. 4 (1994): 72.

Presents a drama adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle's book 'The Brazilian Cat,' by Maurine V. Eleder, which deals with a man's failed attempt to murder his cousin in order to avail of the latter's inheritance.

27. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and David Skene Melvin. Waterloo a case-book on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's historical play. 1st ed. Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisconsin: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references;

28. Edwards, Owen Dudley. "Sherlock Holmes in Bedlam Bedlam Theatre Theatre." The Scotsman, August 13, 1998: 10.

"The rating of this show is tentative. Lemon Tree Productions has courageously chosen to perform six dramatisations of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short stories and our notice is based on their first, The Red-Headed League...."

29. Fredricksen, Barbara L. "'Vampire' troupe casts shadow of clout." St. Petersburg Times (Florida), October 15, 1999: 5.

"The Sherlock Holmes mystery The Case of the Sussex Vampire opens at Timber Greens Thursday, played by a touring company based in South Carolina....The production is by the professional touring company Patchwork Players and is the first show in the Timber Greens theater season....The Patchwork Players are based in Lexington, S.C. The performers come from all over the country....The play is an adaptation of the original story by Arthur Conan Doyle. The playwright is Catherine Eaker, the mother of the founder of the company. 'The story was written the year after Bram Stoker published Dracula,' Genie Eaker said. 'There was a great deal of interest in vampires at the time, just as there is now.'"

30. Gillette, William, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Christopher Newton. The Shaw Festival's Sherlock Holmes. Toronto: Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library, 1994.

Contents: The man who made Sherlock Holmes famous / by Christopher Redmond - A Genial creature : GBS and ACD / by Doug Elliott;

31. Gillette, William, Arthur Conan Doyle, Christopher Newton, Ont.) Shaw Festival (Niagara-on-the-Lake, and Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library. Shaw Festival's Sherlock Holmes. Rev. ed. Shelburne, Ont: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box Press, 1994.

Citations: De Waal C20166. Includes bibliographical references. Contents: The man who made Sherlock Holmes famous / by Christopher Redmond - A Genial creature : GBS and ACD / by Doug Elliott;

32. Hall, Charles, and Peter Blythe. On Stage: Sherlock Holmes. Edinburgh: the author, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Jan 1998; "A guide to 70 Sherlockian plays and musicals from 1899 to 1993, with synopses and commentary, and it's well done indeed, ranging from the major productions to scripts written for school performances, and from serious dramas to broad farce, offering a splendid look at the wide variety of Sherlockian theater. There are two booklets with a total of 105 pp."

33. ———. Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in Edinburgh. Edinburgh: the author, 1995.

Scuttlebutt Jul 1997; "Offers interesting discussions of Sherlockian and Doylean plays performed in Edinburgh (mostly during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe), Conan Doyle's speeches and lectures in Edinburgh, and memorials to him in Edinburgh, with amusing artwork by Hall."

34. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes: A Trilogy of Tales II adapted by John Chaffin." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 3 (2003): 28.

35. Hunter-Purvis, Mark. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in Edinburgh' by Charles Hall and Peter Blythe." The Ritual, no. 15 (1995): 55.

"Offers interesting discussions of Sherlockian and Doylean plays performed in Edinburgh (mostly during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe), Conan Doyle's speeches and lectures in Edinburgh, and memorials to him in Edinburgh, with amusing artwork by Hall."

36. Johns, Ian. "Pipe dreams, smoke screens." The Times (London), September 2, 2002: 18.

"As Sherlock Holmes returns to the stage, Ian Johns dons his deerstalker to investigate the pursuit of the whole sleuth. It's quite elementary, if you think about it. Sherlock Holmes was a woman who disguised herself as a man. That high voice and hairless chin, that secrecy about the past and the mysterious childhood. That love of dissembling. How else could a Victorian woman solve crimes in such a chauvinistic age? Curiously, Holmes's trusty chronicler Dr Watson (and Arthur Conan Doyle) failed to note this fact. But Therese Lentz did with her 1994 play 221B Baker Street. When it comes to the world's greatest detective, the theatre has often lifted the curtain on some lesser known aspect of his life. But finding the right tone has always been a three-pipe problem. 'It's the biggest hurdle,' admits the actor-turned-playwright Simon Williams, whose new version of The Hound of the Baskervilles opens this week at the Belgrade in Coventry. 'If it's too reverential and literal then you simply end up with a flat transcription. The best adaptations take a few liberties.'..."

37. King, W. D. Henry Irving's Waterloo theatrical engagements with Arthur Conan Doyle, George Bernard Shaw, Ellen Terry, Edward Gordon Craig : late-Victorian culture, assorted ghosts, old men, war, and history. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.

LC Control Number: 92031013; Scuttlebutt May 1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. 285-294) and index; "A fascinating and rewarding book. Arthur Conan Doyle adapted his story 'A Straggler of '15' (1891) into the one-act play 'A Story of Waterloo' and sent it to Henry Irving, who quickly bought the rights to the play and made it famous, performing it hundreds of times in London and on tour from 1894 until his death in 1905. But today it is best known (and often remembered only) for the scathing review that George Bernard Shaw gave Irving's performance when the play opened in London in 1895. One of the reasons why King's book is so fascinating and rewarding is that King stresses the fundamental change from the 'actor's theater' that Irving represented so well to the 'author's theater' that Shaw was about to launch and lead. And the book is full of real people, including Ellen Terry and Bram Stoker and Edward Gordon Craig and Napoleon, and King tells his and their story well, offering a fine look at what drama was like a century ago."

38. Lam, Agnes. "Mystery of learning English easily solved by famous British detective." South China Morning Post, March 28, 2005: 3.

"Students will get the chance to learn English by joining the famous fictional detectives Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson to investigate a theft. The Madrid-based education troupe Interacting Theatre Company will visit the city next month and host two public interactive theatre performances of Sherlock Holmes Goes to Scotland. The shows are part of 'Interacting in Hong Kong - A Theatrical Experience', jointly organised by the British Council and Standing Committee on Language Education and Research (Scolar) for the English Festival. The South China Morning Post is the media sponsor...."

39. Leonard, Hugh. Mask of Moriarty: Sherlock Holmes Collections.

Citations: De Waal C20295, C20296; Programs and related ephemera from productions of The Mask of Moriarty by Hugh Leonard

40. Mandell, Jonathan. "If Serial Killers Are All Women, It's the Theater (Fringe Festival Review)." The New York Times, August 21, 2002: E5.

"...The most polished of the three pieces is 'Sherlock Holmes and the Secret of Making Whoopee' at the Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center (107 Suffolk Street, Lower East Side). It is an hourlong takeoff by Sean Cunningham that finds Dr. Watson asking Holmes for help in finding Jill the Ripper. Jack the Ripper was a doctor who preyed on prostitutes. Jill the Ripper is a prostitute who is taking her revenge on doctors. She has already chopped off Dr. Watson's hands. But things are not the way they seem, and this detective story takes some exuberantly sophomoric twists and turns, veering into crude sex jokes, scatological humor and unflattering revelations about Holmes. The result is funnier than it probably deserves to be, pulled off by a cast of seven that largely knows what it is doing, especially Ray Bokhour as Watson and Susan Ferrara as various cold women in Holmes's life...."

41. Mauro, Robert. "The Case of the Prince and the Pauper." Plays 63, no. 6 (2004): 29-36.

Presents the script of the play "The Case of the Prince and the Pauper," by Robert Mauro. A Holmes play for middle grades. "World's most famous detective takes on a case of royla hijinks and mistaken identity." Setting: The library of Sherlock Holmes's house at 221B Baker Street, London, England, Bookcases on walls, a picture of Queen Victoria on center backdrop. A sofa up center. An easy chair right with a torch lamp beside it. A desk left. On it are a big magnifying glass, globe, piles of paper and a violin case covered by a large, opened map. A bust of some historic figure stands, near sofa, on a pedestal with Holmes's deer stalker cap sitting on its head.

42. ———. "The Case of the Red and Blue Hats." Plays 59, no. 6 (2000): 31.

Presents the script for the children's play 'The Case of the Red and Blue Hats,' by Robert Mauro. Characters include Holmes and Watson.

43. ———. "Who's the Real Sherlock?" Plays 60, no. 6 (2001): 39.

Presents a script of the children's play 'Who's the Real Sherlock?'

44. McLellan, Joseph. "P.G. Production Picks Up Where Peter and the Wolf Left Off." The Washington Post, May 09, 1996: M02.

"'Peter vs. the Wolf,' which had four performances last weekend in the Hallam Theatre at Prince George's Community College, opens with a newsboy (portrayed by Justin Lewis) running across the stage shouting, 'Extra! Extra! Read all about it! Crime of the Century! Wolf Swallows Duck!'...Before the first headline (or the duck) has been digested, the newsboy runs across the stage with another headline: 'Escape of the Century!' The wolf is on the loose. The scene is London in 1936 (the year 'Peter and the Wolf' was composed), and the wolf foolishly has tried to hide in a trunk in the lodgings of none other than Sherlock Holmes. He is caught, naturally, and demands a trial (on a charge of 'attempted duckicide in the first degree'), with the symphony orchestra as his witness and Sherlock Holmes (James Peacock) giving expert testimony....Designed essentially for children, the show held the attention of the adults who were nearly as numerous in the audience...."

45. Michael, Patrick. "Review--'Ronald Howard as Sherlock Holmes in 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes'; Two Original Drawing Room Plays--'The Case of the Violent Suitor' and 'The Case of the Impromptu Performance'." The Ritual, no. 28 (2001): 59-60.

46. Mitchell, Basil, and Frederic Arnold Kummer. The adventures of Shirley Holmes. Shelburne, Ont.: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2003.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-201). Contents: The Holmses of Baker Street, by Basil Mitchell -- The adventure of the queen bee, adapted by Frederic Arnold Kummer from the play by Basil Mitchell -- The Canterbury Cathedral murder, by Frederic Arnold Kummer and Basil Mitchell;

47. Olcott, Nick. Sherlock Holmes and the case of the purloined Patience program. Washington, D.C.: Interact Theatre Company, 1997.

48. Parra, Angelo, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The red-headed league : a Sherlock Holmes mystery : a play adaptation, (Reader's theater classics). Pelham, NY: Benchmark Education Co., 2007.

ill. ; 24 cm. + 1 teacher's guide ([8] p. ; 24 cm.);

49. Pendleton, Edrie. "Ghosts in the Library." Plays 59, no. 2 (1999): 35.

Presents a school play for middle and lower grade students entitled 'Ghosts in the Library,' written by Edrie Pendleton. Holmes is one of the characters.

50. Preston, Liz. "Spring ahead." Plays 66, no. 5 (2007): 1-1.

"This article reflects on a wonderful collection of plays that will open the mind, tickle the funny bone and gladden the heart. If one listens carefully, one will be able to hear British accents oozing through the pages of both a charming, newly minted Sherlock Holmes mystery and a selection from the humorous 'The Pickwick Papers.'"

51. Reyburn, Stanley S. The case of the derailed shipment a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97049024;

52. ———. The case of the fatal poppy a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, Calif: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97051919;

53. ———. The case of the nervous Nanny a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, Calif: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97049035;

54. ———. Holmes hiatus the Parisian affair, a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, Calif: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98028684;

55. ———. The Meiji experience a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97046910;

56. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the case of the crafty cracksman a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 99026435;

57. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the case of the perilous pawn a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, Calif: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98028687;

58. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the case of the Phantom Brigade a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98028406;

59. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the Kiangnan blueprint a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, Calif: Players Press, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99046896;

60. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the Manitoba marauder a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98028686;

61. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the Murray River mystery a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98028407;

62. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the scarab of Abu-Simbel a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99051855;

63. ———. Sherlock Holmes in The Soong conspiracy a Sherlock Holmes radio play. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99047944;

64. ———. Sherlock Holmes in the voyage of Sven Sigerson the final Sherlock Holmes radio drama. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 99026064;

65. Rose, Lloyd. "Gilbert & Sullivan, According To Doyle." The Washington Post, July 30, 1997: C01.

Review. "'Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Purloined 'Patience,'' which opened Saturday at Interact Theatre, is a charmer. In the time-honored tradition of Sherlockian pastiche (think 'The Seven-Per-Cent Solution'), author Nick Olcott has taken an actual incident in Victorian history -- the 'pirated' American productions of Gilbert & Sullivan's 'Patience' in 1881 -- and brought in the fictional Holmes to solve the case. It's a slightly loony enterprise, the sort that might have called forth the classic Dr. Watson exclamation, 'What ineffable twaddle!' Yes. Exactly. Thank heaven...."

66. Schwartz, Michael. Broadway and corporate capitalism : the rise of the professional-managerial class, 1900-1920. 1st ed. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.

22 cm. Palgrave studies in theatre and performance history. Includes bibliographical references and index. Introduction: a matter for experts -- The growth of Broadway, the emergence of the PMC -- Brave New York : nowhere to go but up -- The show business -- Who were the PMC? -- Meet the experts -- Where the actors stood : the actors' strike -- The problem of nerves -- Dim shadows : pre-PMC consciousness -- Modern men and modern nerves -- Gillette as Sherlock Holmes, super expert -- Fitch and the psychological moment -- Neurasthenics caught on Kodak -- Muckraking the playing field : emerging PMC class consciousness -- The freshest kids in town -- Fair play : The college widow, Strongheart, and Brown of Harvard -- Sweepings from the muckrakes : The lion and the mouse -- Strikers, gentlemen, and toughs : The boss -- A size thirteen collar : musicals and PMC class consciousness -- The musical : pre-post-mortem -- The providences of God : The Sultan of Sulu -- Musicals grow up for a moment : the princess shows -- Showing a class how to move : the castles -- System and farce : emerging PMC habitus -- Cohan as super model, positive and negative -- F.W. Taylor : a scientific call for PMC -- Losing and making a fortune : Brewster's millions -- Grant Mitchell : PMC poster boy -- Humbugging prelude : Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford -- Mitchell on the rise : it pays to advertise -- PMC apotheosis : a tailor-made man -- Conclusion : business as usual -- Clarence : leading the U.S. safely into the 1920s -- Freud and the PMC -- O'Neill and psychological capital -- Other cures for nerves : a look at the 1920s -- Postscript : the return of the tailor-made man.;

67. Swarbrick, Lisa. "Sabotage at the Savoy." Plays 62, no. 4 (2003): 4.

Presents the play 'Sabotage at the Savoy,' a drama for junior and senior high school children featuring Holmes and Watson.

68. Terry, J. E. Harold, A. Rose, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The return of Sherlock Holmes: a play in four acts. Romford: Ian Henry, 1993.

Citations: De Waal C1983f;

69. Walker, Lynne. "Arts Reviews: Theatre: Sherlock Holmes in Trouble." The Independent (London), July 29, 2003: 17.

Review of the play. "'When you have excluded the impossible,' said Sherlock Holmes, 'whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' I doubt if even he could have made much sense of the impossible and the improbable that roams the Royal Exchange Theatre in dizzyingly equal portions in its crazy summer show, Sherlock Holmes in Trouble. It's a spoof, like no other, on Conan Doyle's famous creation, dreamed up by Mark Long and Emil Wolk. The remark I over-heard most during the interval was, 'What on earth is it all about?' Nothing, is the answer. That it is simply a giddy romp is clear from the bemusing opening, bristling with anticipation of dark deeds and derring-do...."

70. Wattyne, P. de, Yorril Walter, and Frank J. Morlock. Sherlock Holmes vs. Fantômas : bandits in black coats : a drama in 5 acts. Encino, CA: Black Coat Press, 2009.

By Pierre de Wattyne & Yorril Walter ; translated and adapted by Frank J. Morlock. ill. ; 21 cm. Originally entitled: La mort de Herlock Sholmès, ou bandits en habit noir. "A Black Coat Press book." Bibliography: p. 174-176.; 1907. A mysterious criminal known as Fantômas terrorizes London. Only Sherlock Holmes believes in his existence, and he has begun laying the groundwork to arrest him, but Fantômas strikes first, and murders the great detective in circumstances that point suspicion at an innocent man. A young Harry Dickson and Sherlock Holmes' niece, Emily, must expose Fantômas before Scotland Yard sends her fiancé to the gallows. But where the king of detectives is concerned, there are always wheels within wheels--Publisher's description.

71. Weyman, Ronald C. Sherlock Holmes and the hanging judge: a screenplay. Shelburne, Ontario, Sauk City, Wis: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2002.

72. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the mark of the beast: a screenplay. Shelburne, Ontario, Sauk City, Wis: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2002.

73. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the ultimate disguise: a screenplay. Shelburne, Ontario, Sauk City, Wis: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2002.

74. Winston, Iris. "A riveting revelation of Sherlock Holmes , the man." The Ottawa Citizen, June 8, 2000: E6.

Short review of the play by David Stuart Davies. "...One of the most recent Sherlockian creations is a drama that provides a coda to the detective adventures. Playwright and Holmes expert David Stuart Davies offers an incisively written view of the man in Sherlock Holmes -- the last act! The show arrives in Ottawa this weekend for a three-day run...."

75. Zinoman, Jason. "A Court Full of Chaos, a Trial Crammed With Questions." New York Times, May 28, 2008: 8.

Review of 'Prisoner of the Crown' playing through July 6, 2008 at the Irish Repertory Theater. "The 1916 trial of Sir Roger Casement had everything a dramatist could want: salacious revelations, media manipulation, star cameos (George Bernard Shaw and Arthur Conan Doyle were among those appealing for clemency), political intrigue and a central character wrapped in mystery. Sir Roger (played here by Philip Goodwin) was an Irish patriot and former British diplomat who was arrested on charges of treason during World War I after returning from Germany, where he was seeking aid for the Irish independence movement. During the trial, in which he was convicted, the government released his diaries. Those revealed a homosexual private life and were circulated, as the courtroom drama 'Prisoner of the Crown' suggests, in an effort to influence public opinion. 'Was that really why they hanged Sir Roger?' a narrator asks leadingly early on." [Abstract from publisher]

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Held By The Enemy (1)

1. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 2.

Highlights the 1898 edition of William Gillette's play "Held By The Enemy."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Houdini - the Musical (1)

1. "A song up his sleeve." American Theatre 14, no. 10 (1997): 57.

Announces the Goodspeed Opera House's staging of 'Houdini, the Musical,' by the team of James Racheff and William Scott Duffield, through December 14, 1997 in Connecticut. Background on the story of Harry Houdini.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes (7)

1. "What's going on: Theatre." Performing Arts & Entertainment in Canada 28, no. 4 (1994): 39.

Reports on developments concerning theater in Canada, as of April 1994. Mentions the Shaw Festival production of Sherlock Holmes by William Gillette.

2. Bemrose, John. "Cynics and sybarites." Maclean's 107, no. 24 (1994): 45.

Focuses on the Shaw Festival, in integral part of summer at Niagara-on-the Lake, Ontario, for 33 years. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...As well, most of the works being presented later in the summer, from the Victorian melodrama Sherlock Holmes, by William Gillette, to J. B. Priestley's 1934 tale of a disillusioned actress, Eden End, feature authors or kinds of drama that have been successful draws in the past...."

3. Birmingham. "The fourth estate." Editor & Publisher 132, no. 52 (1999): 11.

Reports on developments in newspaper publishing in the United States as of December 25, 1999. Under "Amusements" section, a reference to a production of Sherlock Holmes at the Garrick Theater.

4. Kennedy, Janice. "Theatre: Murder plays provide fun at Shaw Festival." The Ottawa Citizen, June 20, 1994: B9.

"Christopher Newton has no illusions about Sherlock Holmes , the adventure play that opened this weekend for a four-month run at the Shaw Festival. 'It's good theatre -- not good dramatic literature,' says Newton, artistic director of the annual celebration of modern theatre at Niagara-on-the-Lake. 'Holmes is St. George, Moriarty is the dragon. It's like doing Richard III without the density of the poetry to support it.' But that doesn't mean it isn't great fun, he adds quickly. And that doesn't mean there isn't a legitimate spot on the Shaw playbill for entertainments like Holmes and the season's other murder mystery, Busman's Honeymoon...."

5. Kirchhoff, H. J. "Theatre Review Sherlock Holmes." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), July 9, 1994: C7.

"The thing to keep in mind about William Gillette's Sherlock Holmes, which opened Thursday night at the Shaw Festival, is that it is a Victorian melodrama, not a detective story. Viewing the play on those undemanding terms, it's easy to forgive its unlikely, convoluted plot and one-dimensional characters, and to just sit back and enjoy the hero's swashbuckling and intellectual dexterity...."

6. McWilliam, Rohan. "Melodrama and the Historians." Radical History Review, no. (2000): 28p.

Examines the emphasis on melodrama among historians, its significance, strengths and limitations. Sensitivity of historians to the role of fiction as a cultural resource; Views on melodrama in the 19th century; Factor that governed communication in the 19th-century public sphere. Includes a passing reference to Holmes (and Gillette, p. 65). "...Yet, in the 1970s and 1980s, melodrama was rediscovered with several revivals of melodramatic plays by the Royal Shakespeare Company: Dion Boucicault's London Assurance (1841) and William Gillette's Sherlock Holmes (1901)...."

7. Zappula, Eve. "2005 06 Season Preview." American Theatre 22, no. 8 (2005): 43-102.

This article lists the theatrical productions set to stage at the Theatre Communications Group theatres in the U.S. in 2005-2006. Includes Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: David Ira Goldstein. Mar 4-Apr 16 by the Arizona Theater Company; Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: Joseph Hanreddy. Apr 14-May 14 at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater; Sherlock Holmes and The West End Horror, Anthony Dodge, Marcia Milgrom Dodge (also dir). Oct 19-Nov 5 at the Pioneer Theater Company, Salt Lake.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act (8)

1. "Elementary My Dear Holmes." Birmingham Evening Mail, October 31, 2001: 11.

"The life of master fictional detective Sherlock Holmes will be centre stage at Stourbridge Town Hall on November 17. Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act sees Conan Doyle's creation return from retirement for the funeral of Dr Watson and reminisce about his life in a one-man show."

2. "Sherlock Holmes is centre stage." Birmingham Evening Mail, April 1, 2008: 18.

"Theatre goers will get an insight into the mind of the world's greatest fictional detective this month. Roger Llewellyn stars in 'Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act', a solo play that will be performed at the Lichfield Garrick Theatre on April 12 from 7.30pm. Set in 1916, Holmes is drawn out of his retirement in Sussex for the funeral of his good friend, Dr Watson, and returns to Baker Street to resolve the last act of his epic career - understanding his own psyche...."

3. Beacom, Brian. "Sherlock Holmes The Last Act." Evening Times (Glasgow), September 3, 2004: 29.

"Roger Llewellyn appears as the world's greatest fictional detective as he confronts his most complex case of all - his own psyche. Set in 1916, this top-rated one-man play sees Holmes returning to London, after two years retirement in Sussex, to attend the funeral of his friend and colleague Dr Watson. Combining wit, humour, drama and pathos, Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act, takes Holmes back to Baker Street. And in the process it explores the mind of the man, not the detective. What we come to discover is a passionate man with a cutting sense of humour. This vivid dramatisation also examines the close relationship between Holmes and Watson, as Llewellyn moves seamlessly through a gallery of Conan Doyle's characters. The play has toured the world to packed houses and rave reviews."

4. Chadwick, Peter. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes: The Last Act' by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 56-58.

5. Clarke, Roger. "Reviews: Llewellyn's excellent role is elementary; Sherlock Holmes...The Death and Life, Lichfield Garrick Theatre." Birmingham Evening Mail, February 13, 2009: 83.

"Roger Llewellyn produces an acting masterclass in this sequel to his first venture into Holmes' world. Sherlock Holmes ... the last act, written like the new production by David Stuart Davies, has been touring the world since 1999 and with Holmes killed off and resurrected the new production could be following in its footsteps. Llewellyn, on stage alone for the best part of an hour-and-a-half, plays ten characters living a conflict between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the creation he has come to hate, Sherlock Holmes. Into the mix comes Prof James Moriarty, arch villain of his age destined to kill the finest detective of his generation - until the characters develop a mind of their own. The play examines Doyle's frustration at the lack of success of his historical novels, his passion for spiritualism, his letters to his mother, his father's incarceration in an asylum and his relationship with Holmes. It is a test of the actor's art which Llewellyn passes with distinction."

6. Donnelly, Pat. "Sherlock Holmes's finest hour." The Gazette (Montreal), June 5, 2000: B4.

"You don't have to be a card-carrying member of a Sherlock Holmes club to enjoy Sherlock Holmes...the Last Act!, a one-man show starring Roger Llewellyn, which has just dropped into Centaur Theatre...."

7. Leland, Mary. "Review." The Irish Times, March 23, 2006: 2.

Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act! at the Everyman Palace in Cork. "An actor completely in charge of his material, his stage and his own artistry, Roger Llewellyn invests his performance in Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act! with all the tension achieved by Conan Doyle at his best. Written by David Stuart Davies and unfolding in the measured sequences of classic detective fiction, the play is, of course, a brilliant opportunity for any actor with the intelligence to grasp its rhythms and to peel away the sometimes pompous layers of the eponymous hero and reveal the passionate, lonely personality underneath....Presented by Jay Productions in association with the Salisbury Playhouse, the piece is, in fact, something of an exercise in detection in itself, but one of great style and subtlety. This is Holmes in 1916, mourning his colleague Watson whom he is at last able to acknowledge as a dear friend, and re-working through his tribute a series of plots and characters with which both have been memorably associated. It is a fiction upon a fiction, and held its audience captivated through two acts of 45 minutes each....Music by Simon Slater and lighting by Peter Hunter are threaded through Gareth Armstrong's direction in a presentation in which the few props are employed so skilfully that the bravura touches here and there are accents rather than declarations, commas rather than exclamation marks. This is a production which has been touring in England, Europe and America, yet there is nothing stale about it. The playwright - a Conan Doyle enthusiast - seasons his script with implied acknowledgements of contemporary approaches, but both the writing and the performance achieve an almost old-fashioned - and certainly rare - symmetry of excellence and entertainment."

8. Sampson, Benjamin W. "Season preview 2002-03. (Cover story)." American Theatre 19, no. 8 (2002): 43.

Presents a list of theatrical productions at Theatre Communications Group theaters across the U.S. for the 2002-03 season. Includes Holmes and Doyle listings. Apple Tree Theater, Highland Park, Illinois: The Sign of Four, adapt: D. Shanghai Low from Arthur Conan Doyle; dir: Steve Pickering. Jun 18-Jul 20.; The Kavinoky Theatre, Buffalo, New York: Sherlock Holmes...the last act, adapt: David Stuart Davies from Arthur Conan Doyle; dir: Gareth Armstrong. Jan 9-Feb 9.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes and The Case of the Jersey Lily (3)

1. "On Stage." American Theatre 25, no. 6 (2008): 88-95.

Includes listing of Parkway Playhouse, Burnsville, North Carolina, "Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure," Steven Dietz; dir: Andrew Gall. Aug 29-Sep 6, 2008; The People's Light & Theatre Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania, "Sherlock Holmes & the Case of the Jersey Lilly," Katie Forqette; dir: Steve Umberger. Thru Jul 13, 2008.

2. "Onstage." American Theatre 25, no. 5 (2008): 84-95.

The article reviews theatrical productions being performed by members of the Theatre Communications Group including Park Square Theatre, St. Paul, Minnesota. "Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure," Steven Dietz; dir: Peter Moore. May 30-Jun 22, 2008. The People's Light & Theatre Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania. "Sherlock Holmes & The Case of the Jersey Lily," Katie Forgette; dir: Steve Umberger. Jun 18-Jul 13, 2008.

3. "Season Preview 2007-2008." American Theatre 24, no. 8 (2007): 47-100.

Includes listings with Holmes references. Arkansas Repertory Theatre, Little Rock: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Robert Hupp. Apr 11-27; Meadow Brook Theatre, Rochester, Michigan: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: David Regal. Oct 10-Nov 4; Park Square Theatre, St. Paul, Minnesota: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Peter Moore. May 30-Jun 22; The Cleveland Play House, Ohio: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Tim Ocel. Oct 12-Nov 4. Co-production with Geva Theatre Center, NY; People's Light & Theatre Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania: Sherlock Holmes & The Case of the Jersey Lily, Katie Forgette; dir: Steve Umberger. Jun 18-Jul 13.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Purloined Patience (3)

1. "Theater." The Washington Times, August 14, 1997: M9.

"Sherlock Holmes and Gilbert and Sullivan are a better match than you'd guess in Nick Olcott's clever Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Purloined Patience. The common ground is language: Holmes' smug intellectualism fits right in with the erudite wordsmithery of W.S. Gilbert's lyrics. Mr. Olcott and Interact Theatre Company director Catherine Flye lay on just the right amount of silliness, and a crack musical-comedy cast takes things from there. At the Folger Shakespeare Library through Aug. 31."

2. Pressley, Nelson. "'Sherlock' finds home in musical." The Washington Times, July 29, 1997: C11.

"Sherlock sings! Playwright Nick Olcott has had the happy idea of putting Sherlock Holmes in the world of Gilbert and Sullivan, and the collision of these Victorian worlds results in high silliness. At least that's what director Catherine Flye is serving up in the Interact Theatre Company's enjoyable 'Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Purloined 'Patience,'' which opened at the Folger Shakespeare Library last weekend...."

3. ———. "[Theater Openings and Now Playing]." The Washington Times, July 24, 1997: M21.

"...Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Purloined Patience - Interact Theatre Company. Sherlock Holmes meets the world of Gilbert and Sullivan in this piece by Nick Olcott. At the Folger Shakespeare Library through Aug. 31..."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes and the Copper Beeches (1)

1. Doyle, Arthur Conan. "Sherlock Holmes and the Copper Beeches." Plays 62, no. 2 (2002): 59.

Presents the script of the mystery play 'Sherlock Holmes and the Copper Beeches,' adapted by Paul T. Nolan.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood (3)

1. "On stage." American Theatre 12, no. 9 (1995): 85.

Presents a schedule of theatrical productions in the United States for November 1995. Lists Pioneer Theatre Company, Salt Lake City, production of Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood, adapt: Paul Giovanni; and PA Stage, Allentown, Pennsylvania production of Sherlock's Last Case, Charles Marowitz; dir: Dennis Delaney.

2. Jordan, Anne. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood' by Paul Giovanni." The Ritual, no. 11 (1993): 43-45.

3. Kim, Suki S. "1995-96 Season Schedules." American Theatre 12, no. 8 (1995): 43.

Presents a listing of projected 1995-96 seasons of more than 250 resident professional theaters in the United States which are constituents of Theatre Communications Group. Includes the Birmingham Children's Theatre; Arizona Theatre Co.; Arkansas Repertory Theatre. Includes Doyle/Holmes production. Pioneer Theatre Company, Salt Lake City, (801) 581-6961. Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood adapt: Paul Giovanni from Sir Arthur Corian Doyle; dir: John Going. Nov 1-18.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes and the Curse of the Mummy's Tomb (1)

1. Ramsden, Timothy. "Nothing like a good story." Times Educational Supplement, no. (1994): 18.

Reports on the Christmas shows in British theaters. Charles Way's 'Sleeping Beauty'; Leicester Haymarket; Peter Whelan's 'The Tinder Box'; Julian Harries' 'Sherlock Holmes and the Curse of the Mummy's Tomb'; Dave Simpson's 'Perfect Strangers.'

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes and the Curse of the Sign of Four (1)

1. "Season Preview 1999-2000." American Theatre 16, no. 8 (1999): 35.

Presents a comprehensive listing of theater productions, complete with directors and dates at Theater Communications Group constituents and associate theaters in the United States for the 1999-2000 season. Includes Sherlock Holmes and the Curse of the Sign of Four at the Lifeline Theater, Chicago.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes and the West End Horror (10)

1. "December on Stage." American Theatre 21, no. 10 (2004): 76-87.

Presents a list of theatrical productions scheduled for December 2004 in the U.S. Includes The West End Horror: The New Sherlock Holmes Mystery! playing at the ASOLO Theatre Company of Sarasota.

2. "Elementary, My Dear Watson." American Theatre 19, no. 6 (2002): 74.

Reviews the play 'The West End Horror,' written by Nicholas Meyer and to be performed by Anthony Dodge through July 7, 2002.

3. "January on Stage." American Theatre 22, no. 1 (2005): 126-143.

Presents the schedule of events for member theatres of the Theatre Communications Group in the U.S. for January 2005. Production of The West End Horror: The New Sherlock Holmes Mystery! by the Asolo Theatre Company, Sarasota, Florida.

4. "March on Stage." American Theatre 22, no. 3 (2005): 60-71.

Presents a schedule of theatrical performances in the U.S. for March 2005. Lists Asolo Theater Company, Sarasota, Florida production of The West End Horror: The New Sherlock Holmes Mystery! and the Red Barn Theatre, Key West, production of Sherlock's Secret Life.

5. "November on Stage." American Theatre 21, no. 9 (2004): 106-119.

Presents a schedule of plays in the U.S. for November 2004. Includes The West End Horror: The New Sherlock Holmes Mystery! playing at the ASOLO Theatre Company of Sarasota.

6. "Onstage November 05." American Theatre 22, no. 9 (2005): 112-127.

This section presents a list of theatrical productions in the U.S. in November 2005. Included is Salt Lake City's Pioneer Theater Company production of Sherlock Holmes and the West End Horror.

7. Harris, Claudia. "Utah." Back Stage 46, no. 34 (2005): 30.

This article reports that Salt Lake's Pioneer Theatre Co. (PTC) has chosen a diverse season this year as usual. Beginning with the somewhat challenging "Metamorphoses," Mary Zimmerman's lyrical adaptation of Ovid's myths, the PTC season includes something for everyone with "Disney's Beauty and the Beast," "Sherlock Holmes and the West End Horror," "Julius Caesar," "Enchanted April," and "Five Guys Named Moe."

8. Klein, Alvin. "This Case No Match For Sherlock Holmes." The New York Times, June 30, 2002: 14LI.

"Now that Professor Moriarty is dead, Sherlock Holmes, having no reason to live, sinks into despair. What's the point of going on when your dearest enemy can no longer taunt you and challenge your wits? With such an intriguing psychological conceit, the story part of 'The West End Horror' at the Bay Street Theater begins. As if to prove Sherlock Holmes mania is ever with us, Anthony Dodge and Marcia Milgrim Dodge adapted 'The West Side Horror,' the second of Nicholas Meyer's two original Holmes novels, which was intended as a companion piece to his popular 'Seven Percent Solution.'..."

9. Sampson, Benjamin W. "Season Preview 2004-05." American Theatre 21, no. 8 (2004): 45-104.

Presents a comprehensive listing of theatrical productions that will be held in the U.S. for the period of 2004-2005. Includes one Holmes item from the Asolo Theater Company in Sarasota, Florida. "The West End Horror: The New Sherlock Holmes Mystery!, adapt: Anthony Dodge and Marcia Milgrom Dodge (also dir) from Nicholas Meyer, Nov 26-Mar 3."

10. Zappula, Eve. "2005 06 Season Preview." American Theatre 22, no. 8 (2005): 43-102.

This article lists the theatrical productions set to stage at the Theatre Communications Group theatres in the U.S. in 2005-2006. Includes Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: David Ira Goldstein. Mar 4-Apr 16 by the Arizona Theater Company; Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: Joseph Hanreddy. Apr 14-May 14 at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater; Sherlock Holmes and The West End Horror, Anthony Dodge, Marcia Milgrom Dodge (also dir). Oct 19-Nov 5 at the Pioneer Theater Company, Salt Lake.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes Takes the Case (1)

1. "Calendar." New York Times, June 17, 2007: 11.

A guide to cultural and recreational goings-on in and around Westchester and Putnam Counties during this week. Includes ''Sherlock Holmes Takes the Case,'' interactive theater by Traveling Lantern. June 23 at 2:30 p.m. Free. Croton Free Library, 171 Cleveland Drive.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes's Christmas Goose (2)

1. Doyle, Arthur Conan. "Sherlock Holmes's Christmas Goose." Plays 65, no. 3 (2005): 35-44.

The article presents the script of the play "Sherlock Holmes's Christmas Goose," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, adapted for school presentation by Paul T. Nolan.

2. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Paul T. Nolan. "Sherlock Holmes' Christmas goose." Plays 54, no. 3 (1994): 56.

Presents the play 'Sherlock Holmes' Christmas Goose,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, adapted by Paul T. Nolan.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes...the Death and Life (2)

1. "The most complex case for Sherlock; coffee break Preview Sherlock Holmes Torch Theatre, Milford Haven." The Western Mail, October 1, 2008: 26.

"One of the world's greatest fictional detectives confronts the most complex case of all - his own psyche - in a new Sherlock Holmes production which comes to Wales this week. In this staged fantasy based on fiction, Arthur Conan Doyle tires of his famous sleuth and creates arch-villain Professor Moriarty to dispose of him....Funny, engaging and dark, this tale of murder, mystery and the occult is a play which is packed with ideas - and it's also the perfect form of entertainment....The play features Roger Llewellyn as Holmes....Following his international success in Sherlock Holmes...The Last Act, the new play has been created and directed by the renowned author David Stuart Davies, directed by Gareth Armstrong and it features original music from the Royal Shakespeare Company's composer Simon Slater."

2. "Spooky tale of supersleuth Sherlock." Daily Post (Liverpool), January 23, 2009: 21.

"The character of Sherlock Holmes is the main talking point in a spinetingling new drama about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great detective. The man in the deerstalker is played by Roger Llewellyn in Sherlock Holmes...the Death and Life. In this story at Theatr Colwyn, the supersleuth is becoming somewhat arrogant and so malevolent Moriarty is brought in to take him on. But Doyle's dangerous strategy, combined with his passion for raising the spirits of the dead, has rather more surreal and dramatic consequences than he bargains for....The new play, written by David Stuart Davies and directed by Gareth Armstrong, is billed as a fantasy based on a fiction. Davies, a playwright and author, specialises in adaptations of the Conan Doyle canon. And there's original music by Simon Slater. Sherlock Holmes...the Death and Life, Theatr Colwyn, Colwyn Bay, Wednesday, February 4, 7.30pm."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes: A Melodrama in Four Acts (1)

1. "'Sherlock Holmes' A Melodrama in Four Acts at The Shaw Festival, Niagara-on-the-Lake [Advertisement]." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 5.

Advertisement for "a convocation of Sherlockians sponsored by The Bootmakers of Toronto and An Irish Secret Society at Buffalo

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure (16)

1. "Awards & Prizes." American Theatre 24, no. 7 (2007): 18-19.

This article discusses awards and prizes received by individuals in the theater industry including the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) award, which was awarded to Portland Center Stage's Gerding Theater at the Armory, the Rising Star Award, which was granted to Sean Montgomery, Roderick Justice, and Anthony Darnell, and McKnight Advancement Grants, which were awarded to playwrights David Adjmi and Christina Ham. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...More playwrights with winning scripts: Steven Dietz's Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure received the 2007 Edgar Allan Poe Award for best play from the Mystery Writers of America (see sidebar, page 45)"

2. "Corrections." American Theatre 24, no. 9 (2007): 6.

This article presents corrections to articles in previous issues including: "In a News in Brief (Sept. '07) item, Geva Theatre Center's first production of the season was incorrectly identified. Dial M for Murder began the 2006-07 season; this season kicked off with Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure."

3. "Miscellaneous Book Awards." World Almanac & Book of Facts, no. (2008): 256-256.

The article announces the recipients of book awards in 2007 including and Edgar awards for Best Critical/Biographical: The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, E. J. Wagner; Best Play: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz.

4. "On Stage." American Theatre 25, no. 6 (2008): 88-95.

Includes listing of Parkway Playhouse, Burnsville, North Carolina, "Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure," Steven Dietz; dir: Andrew Gall. Aug 29-Sep 6, 2008; The People's Light & Theatre Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania, "Sherlock Holmes & the Case of the Jersey Lilly," Katie Forqette; dir: Steve Umberger. Thru Jul 13, 2008.

5. "On Stage." American Theatre 25, no. 7 (2008): 108-119.

A directory of theater productions throughout the United States during September 2008 is given, which includes: Theatre in the Square, Marietta, Georgia, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Jessica Phelps West. Thru Sep 21.;Indiana Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Sep 16-Oct 11.;New Stage Theatre, Jackson, Mississippi, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Francine Thomas Reynolds. Sep 9-21.; Parkway Playhouse, Burnsville, North Carolina, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Andrew Gall. Thru Sep 6.; Peninsula Players Theatre, Fish Creek, Wisconsin, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz; dir: Jim Corti. Sep 3-Oct 19.

6. "On Stage." American Theatre 24, no. 7 (2007): 92-103.

This article presents reviews of a collection of plays with the Theatre Communications Group, which are performing nationwide including "Death Trap," by Ira Levin at Cyrano's Theatre Company in Anchorage, Alaska, from September 7, 2007 to September 30, 3007, "Man of La Mancha," by Dale Wasserman at the Lyric Stage Company of Boston in Boston, Massachusetts, from September 7, 2007 to October 13, 2007 and "The Forgiving Harvest," at the Omaha Theater Company for Young People in Omaha, Nebraska, from September 14, 2007 to September 30, 2007. Includes a Holmes/Doyle listing: The Jungle Theater, Minneapolis,(612) 822-7063, www.jungletheater.com Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: Joel Sass. Sep 7-Oct 14.

7. "On Stage." American Theatre 24, no. 9 (2007): 82-95.

The article presents a list of theatrical productions by members of the theater communications group, which ware being performed in November 2007. Productions on the list include Meadow Brook Theatre, Rochester, (248) 377-3300, www.mbtheatre.com Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: David Regal. Thru Nov 4.;The Cleveland Play House, (216) 795-7000, www.clevelandplayhouse.com Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Tim Ocel. Thru Nov 4. Co-production with Geva Theatre Center, NY.

8. "On Stage." American Theatre 23, no. 3 (2006): 80-95.

The article presents a list of theatrical productions shown at several TCG theaters in the U.S. The productions include the Arizona Theatre Company (Tucson) production of Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: David Ira Goldstein.

9. "On Stage November 08." American Theatre 25, no. 10 (2008): 98-111.

This article reviews theatrical productions from U.S. theater companies associated with the Theatre Communications Group, including Hedgerow Theatre, Wallingford, Pennsylvania's production of Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Janet Kelsey. Thru Nov 16.

10. "Onstage." American Theatre 25, no. 4 (2008): 86-95.

A calendar of theatrical productions playing at Theatre Communications Group theatres across the U.S. is presented including a listing related to Holmes: Arkansas Repertory Theatre, Little Rock, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Robert Hupp. Apr 11-27.

11. "Onstage." American Theatre 25, no. 5 (2008): 84-95.

The article reviews theatrical productions being performed by members of the Theatre Communications Group including Park Square Theatre, St. Paul, Minnesota. "Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure," Steven Dietz; dir: Peter Moore. May 30-Jun 22, 2008. The People's Light & Theatre Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania. "Sherlock Holmes & The Case of the Jersey Lily," Katie Forgette; dir: Steve Umberger. Jun 18-Jul 13, 2008.

12. "Season Preview 2007-2008." American Theatre 24, no. 8 (2007): 47-100.

Includes listings with Holmes references. Arkansas Repertory Theatre, Little Rock: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Robert Hupp. Apr 11-27; Meadow Brook Theatre, Rochester, Michigan: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: David Regal. Oct 10-Nov 4; Park Square Theatre, St. Paul, Minnesota: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Peter Moore. May 30-Jun 22; The Cleveland Play House, Ohio: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Tim Ocel. Oct 12-Nov 4. Co-production with Geva Theatre Center, NY; People's Light & Theatre Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania: Sherlock Holmes & The Case of the Jersey Lily, Katie Forgette; dir: Steve Umberger. Jun 18-Jul 13.

13. "Season Preview 2008-09." American Theatre 25, no. 8 (2008): 46-96.

The article lists U.S theatrical productions in the 2008 and 2009 season including: Indiana Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Thru Oct 11.; NACL Theatre, Highland Lake, New York, The Uncanny Appearance of Sherlock Holmes, Brad Krumholz (also dir); lyrics: Brett Keyser; music: ensemble, Glenn Hall, Tannis Kowalchuk. Dec 5-21. Co-production with HERE Arts Center, NY.; Hedgerow Theatre, Wallingford, Pennsylvania, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Janet Kelsey. Oct 14-Nov 16.; Peninsula Players Theatre, Fish Creek, Wisconsin, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz; dir: Jim Corti. Thru Oct 19.

14. Royce, Graydon. "Great Cast Makes for an Entertaining 'Holmes'." Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 10, 2008: E2.

Review of 'Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, by Steven Dietz. Directed by Peter Moore. Park Square Theatre, St. Paul. "...Moore has a fun, intriguing, well-acted show here. Nothing taxing or brilliant. Just thoroughly enjoyable."

15. Valois, Renee. "Case closed: 'Sherlock Holmes' is brilliant." St. Paul Pioneer Press, June11, 2008: A7.

Review of Steven Dietz play "Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure" performed at the Park Square Theater in St. Paul through June 22, 2008. "It's no mystery that Sherlock Holmes is a compelling character. And Park Square Theatre's premiere of 'Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure' is a match for the master detective. The play about his last encounter with the sinister Professor Moriarty will leave admirers wishing there were more adventures to follow...."

16. Zappula, Eve. "2005 06 Season Preview." American Theatre 22, no. 8 (2005): 43-102.

This article lists the theatrical productions set to stage at the Theatre Communications Group theatres in the U.S. in 2005-2006. Includes Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: David Ira Goldstein. Mar 4-Apr 16 by the Arizona Theater Company; Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Arthur Conan Doyle, William Gillette; dir: Joseph Hanreddy. Apr 14-May 14 at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater; Sherlock Holmes and The West End Horror, Anthony Dodge, Marcia Milgrom Dodge (also dir). Oct 19-Nov 5 at the Pioneer Theater Company, Salt Lake.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock's Last Case (3)

1. "On stage." American Theatre 12, no. 9 (1995): 85.

Presents a schedule of theatrical productions in the United States for November 1995. Lists Pioneer Theatre Company, Salt Lake City, production of Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood, adapt: Paul Giovanni; and PA Stage, Allentown, Pennsylvania production of Sherlock's Last Case, Charles Marowitz; dir: Dennis Delaney.

2. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock's Last Case by Charles Morowitz." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 11-12.

3. Jones, Chris. "2nd banana ripens in this 'Sherlock'." Chicago Tribune, no. (2005): 27.

"Enter a Baker Street irregular: the post-modern American playwright Charles Marowitz and his 1984 play 'Sherlock's Last Case,' currently under summer examination at the Drury Lane Oakbrook. Marowitz decided that modern audiences don't want to watch another Holmes triumph. They'd rather gain some insight into [John Watson]'s complex psyche."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- Sherlock's Secret Life (1)

1. "March on Stage." American Theatre 22, no. 3 (2005): 60-71.

Presents a schedule of theatrical performances in the U.S. for March 2005. Lists Asolo Theater Company, Sarasota, Florida production of The West End Horror: The New Sherlock Holmes Mystery! and the Red Barn Theatre, Key West, production of Sherlock's Secret Life.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (2)

1. "On Stage." American Theatre 24, no. 5 (2007): 76-87.

This article presents a list of plays being performed at Theatre Communications Group locations around the country. Includes a Holmes reference. "B Street Theatre, Sacramento, (916) 443-5300, www.bstreettheatre.org The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Jerry Montoya; dir: Buck Busfield. Thru May 27."

2. Bird, Gail. "Review--The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Footloose Theatre." The Ritual, no. 28 (2001): 61.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Crucifer of Blood (1)

1. The crucifer of blood. Purchase, NY: Phoenix Theatre Company, 1994. Visual Material 2 videocassettes (140 min.).

sd., col. NTSC ; 3/4 in. (U-matic). Copy of program available. Participants: Matthew Loney (as Sherlock Holmes), Matthew E. Beisner, Billy Crudup, Anthony Dodge, Walter Hudson, Bram Lewis, Noble Shropshire, Stephen Turner, Edward Yankie, I. Jordan, Melvin Lum, and Rachel York. Videotaped by The New York Public Library's Theatre on Film and Tape Archive at the Performing Arts Center, Purchase College, Purchase, N.Y., Aug. 5, 1994. Funding: Recorded with the financial assistance of The Ford Foundation Fund for the Theatre on Film and Tape Archive at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. The Phoenix Theatre Company, Bram Lewis, artistic director, Joel Warren, managing director, presents ; [written] by Paul Giovanni ; directed by Marcia Milgrom Dodge ; [video prod. company] Parker/Hodges Productions ; [video producer] Theatre on Film and Tape Archive, Betty L. Corwin, director. Sets and lighting, James F. Tilton ; costumes, Gail Brassard ; original music by Steven M. Alper ; sound, Aural Fixation ; prod. stage manager, Pamela Edington.;

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Crucifer of Blood (1978) (1)

1. Martindale, David. "Biograph." Biography 5, no. 6 (2001): 22.

Presents a brief biography of film actress Glenn Close. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...1975-82 Glenn spends the next few years cementing her reputation onstage as a dynamic yet nuanced actress, taking on everything from Sherlock Holmes to King Lear. The Crucifer of Blood (1978), a Holmes mystery in which Glenn plays villainess Irene St. Claire, is a Broadway crowd pleaser that delivers more than 200 performances...."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Death and Life of Sherlock Holmes (1)

1. Key, Philip. "The return of . . . The Return of Sherlock Holmes ; 08 Culture Diary." Daily Post (Liverpool), September 23, 2008: 16.

"One-man play The Death and Life of Sherlock Holmes comes to the region tomorrow night as part of the Sefton Celebrates Writing Festival. Renowned actor Roger Llewellyn reprises the role of the famous detective - and several more roles besides - after the first outing proved so successful...."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Hound of the Baskervilles (10)

1. "The Hound of the Baskervilles." Scholastic Scope 57, no. 6 (2008): 14-19.

The article presents the script of the play "The Hound of the Baskervilles," based on the novel by Arthur Conan Doyle, adapted by Zach Jones.

2. The Hound of the Baskervilles: a play in two acts. [Clearwater, FL]: [Clearwater Christian College], 2003. Visual Material 1 videocassette (ca. 120 min.).

sb., col. ; 1/2 in. Title supplied by cataloger from printed program. Participants: Stephanie Auger, Mallory Alexander, Dustin Black, Michael Morgan, Betsy Buchanan, Philip Bowen, Mike Rambo, Jessica Stephens, Tim Bjorgan, Matthew Auger, Shannon Hitchcock. from the classic thriller of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle ; adapted and dramatized by Tim Kelly. Robert S. Cundiff, director ; Paul Radford, Production designer ; Melissa Frame, Costumes; Karin Lovik, Lighting; Phil Dennis, Makeup.; Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson travel to the wild fog-bound moors of the English countryside to investigate the reappearance of a seemingly supernatural hound and the death of the heir of the House of Baskerville.

3. "No-Sweat Test Prep." Scholastic Scope 57, no. 6 (2008): 20-20.

A quiz is presented after reading the play "The Hound of the Baskervilles," based on the novel by Arthur Conan Doyle, adapted by Zach Jones.

4. Aykroyd, Clarissa, and Bob Coghill. "The Hound on Stage." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 53-55.

5. Barnes, Jon. "Shadows and slapstick." TLS, no. 5439 (2007): 18-18.

The article discusses the film and theater adaptations of two Victorian melodramatic stories including "Gaslight," starring Ingrid Bergman, Charles Boyer and Joseph Cotten in the film version, and the book "The Hound of the Baskervilles," by Arthur Conan Doyle, which has been produced on both stage and screen. Details relating to the summary of each and their various productions are provided.

6. Collins, Tony. "Review: Menacing Adaptation." Birmingham Evening Mail, June 10, 2004: 3.

Brief review of the play "The Hound of the Baskervilles," Highbury Theatre, Sutton Coldfield. "Tim Kelly's adaptation of the classic Arthur Conan Doyle story may not feature an actual hound, but that does not detract from the menace of his play. The supposedly supernatural beast is heard rather than seen in this stage version, written long after Conan Doyle's death in 1930....Rob Phillips and Wiley Bowkett are a double delight as Holmes and his faithful sidekick Dr Watson in this Highbury Players production....Kelly's adaptation adds one or two twists to Conan Doyle's original, but Sherlock Holmes' mastery still shines through."

7. Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Hound of the Baskervilles." Scholastic Scope 49, no. 8 (2000): 6.

Presents a script of the play about Sherlock Holmes, entitled 'The Hound of the Baskervilles,' by Arthur Conan Doyle.

8. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Joellen Bland. "The Hound of the Baskervilles (Drama)." Plays 60, no. 1 (2000): 59.

Presents the script of the play 'The Hound of the Baskervilles.'

9. Riley, Joe. "Arts: It's elementary Senor Watson; Spaniard playing Sherlock Holmes in Everyman shows he's a man of many parts." Liverpool Daily Echo, February 9, 2007: 13.

"Sherlock Holmes with a Spanish accent? According to Javier Marzan, born in the Basque country, his transfer to The Hound of the Baskervilles should be none the worse for not being delivered in the dulcet tones of Peter Cushing. The worldwide Sherlock branding and the knock-about physical nature of the touring show heading for the Liverpool Everyman later this month, should speak for itself, argues the actor, whose own background includes the study of mask, mime and clowning...."

10. Spencer, Charles. "Hysterical, my dear Watson." The Daily Telegraph (London), April 18, 2007: 30.

Charles Spencer reviews The Hound of the Baskervilles at The Duchess Theatre.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Mask of Moriarty (3)

1. Hargreaves, David. "Review--'The Mask of Moriarty' by Hugh Leonard." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 58-59.

2. Hartigan, Patti. "Not so elementary, my dear Moriarty." The Boston Globe, July 12, 1994: 50.

Review of "The Mask of Moriarty." Play by Hugh Leonard. Directed by John Tillinger. Set, James Noone. Costumes, Jess Goldstein. Lighting, Rui Rita. Presented by the Williamstown Theatre Festival through July 17. "Folks in the British Isles have a particularly punny sense of humor, with an affinity for wacky sex farces and literary spoofs. Hugh Leonard's 'The Mask of Moriarty' fits the latter category, and it's easy to imagine audiences across the Atlantic gasping with guffaws at this takeoff on Sherlock Holmes. But what's funny on the Thames or the River Liffey doesn't necessarily make it in the Berkshires. Despite the fact that the US premiere production at the Williamstown Theatre Festival is well cast and intelligently directed, it turns out to be a one-joke affair that goes on for two hours. After all the deductions are in, 'Mask of Moriarty' is a who-cares-who-dunnit....Initially, the spoof on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's legendary detective is very funny, but after the third 'elementary' it wears thin...With one exception, the acting is on target. Paxton Whitehead's Sherlock Holmes is witty and savvy, with perfect elocution and an appealing dose of irony. David Schramm's Watson is a spherical sidekick with a hilarious self-effacing air, and John Curless stands out as the bumbling Bobby. The weak link is Jane Krakowski as Gwen, who is all affectation and speaks her lines with a breathless girlish voice that becomes grating. The rest of the ensemble works well with the material, such as it is...."

3. McKuras, Julie. "The Old Globe Theatre, KPBS-FM of San Diego, and "The Mask of Moriarty"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 4.

Reports on the production and playbill for "The Mask of Moriarty" at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego and the associated radio program, "These Days," on KPBS-FM with the resulting donations to the Sherlock Holmes Collections. Includes photograph of Paxton Whitehead in the role of Holmes and Tom Lacy in the role of Watson

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Mummy (1)

1. Bland, Joellen. "The Mummy." Plays 60, no. 5 (2001): 55.

Presents the play 'The Mummy.' "From a story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Adapted for round-the-table reading..."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1)

1. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--'The Return of Sherlock Holmes,' a play by J. E. Harold Terry and Arthur Rose." The Ritual, no. 13 (1994): 48-49.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Secret of Sherlock Holmes (2)

1. "M2: the Secret of Sherlock Holmes." Birmingham Evening Mail, September 20, 2002: 47.

"Husband-and-wife team Stephen and Sue Downing are at the heart of Oldbury Rep's production of the Secret of Sherlock Holmes, by Jeremy Paul, which opens tomorrow at the Barlow Theatre, Langley...."

2. Byrne, Terry. "Uncovering the mystery behind the Holmes-Watson relationship." The Boston Globe, September 28, 2007: E5.

"Sherlock Holmes and his faithful friend Dr. Watson are the literary equivalent of Batman and Robin, a dynamic duo everyone knows. But the cornerstone of 'The Secret of Sherlock Holmes,' a stage drama about the two sleuths, is how well they know each other. Dave Demke plays Watson in Shakespeare & Company's US premiere of 'The Secret of Sherlock Holmes,' which starts previews tonight....The play will probably attract fans of the Conan Doyle stories, the Rathbone films, and the British TV series starring Jeremy Brett.....'The Secret of Sherlock Holmes' was commissioned by Brett, who played Holmes in the 1980s TV series with such brittle brilliance he is considered the definitive Holmes of his generation. To honor the Holmes centenary in 1987, Brett asked series writer Jeremy Paul to create a new script, with dialogue taken almost exclusively from Conan Doyle's original stories. Brett and Edward Hardwicke (who played Doctor Watson to Brett's Holmes on TV), performed the roles in the play, which references many of the crimes Holmes and Watson solved but ultimately focuses on the friendship between the two men...."

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Sign of Four (1)

1. Sampson, Benjamin W. "Season preview 2002-03. (Cover story)." American Theatre 19, no. 8 (2002): 43.

Presents a list of theatrical productions at Theatre Communications Group theaters across the U.S. for the 2002-03 season. Includes Holmes and Doyle listings. Apple Tree Theater, Highland Park, Illinois: The Sign of Four, adapt: D. Shanghai Low from Arthur Conan Doyle; dir: Steve Pickering. Jun 18-Jul 20.; The Kavinoky Theatre, Buffalo, New York: Sherlock Holmes...the last act, adapt: David Stuart Davies from Arthur Conan Doyle; dir: Gareth Armstrong. Jan 9-Feb 9.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Story of Waterloo (1)

1. "What's going on: Theatre." Performing Arts & Entertainment in Canada 32, no. 2 (1999): 43.

Presents updates on theater in Canada. Includes the Shaw Festival production of Doyle's Waterloo.

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Uncanny Appearance of Sherlock Holmes (3)

1. "On Stage." American Theatre 25, no. 10 (2008): 90-103.

A calendar of performances in December 2008 at U.S. theaters belonging to the Theatre Communications Group is presented. A reference to Holmes: NACL Theatre, Highland Lake, NY. The Uncanny Appearance of Sherlock Holmes, book and dir: Brad Krumholz; lyrics: Brett Keyser; music: ensemble, Glenn Hall, Tannis Kowalchuk. Dec 5-21. Co-production with HERE Arts Center, NY.

2. "Season Preview 2008-09." American Theatre 25, no. 8 (2008): 46-96.

The article lists U.S theatrical productions in the 2008 and 2009 season including: Indiana Repertory Theatre, Indianapolis, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Thru Oct 11.; NACL Theatre, Highland Lake, New York, The Uncanny Appearance of Sherlock Holmes, Brad Krumholz (also dir); lyrics: Brett Keyser; music: ensemble, Glenn Hall, Tannis Kowalchuk. Dec 5-21. Co-production with HERE Arts Center, NY.; Hedgerow Theatre, Wallingford, Pennsylvania, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz; dir: Janet Kelsey. Oct 14-Nov 16.; Peninsula Players Theatre, Fish Creek, Wisconsin, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapt: Steven Dietz; dir: Jim Corti. Thru Oct 19.

3. Genzlinger, Neil. "When Solving a Crime Involves Real Tricks." New York Times, Dec 9, 2008: 4.

"Sometimes mixing artistic genres not normally seen together can result in an exhilarating, revelatory production. Sometimes, though, it can result in an insipid, largely incoherent mishmash. Which brings us to 'The Uncanny Appearance of Sherlock Holmes,' a detective story at the Here Arts Center enacted by a rock band that also performs circus tricks. Sounds like a hoot, right? Well, it isn't, first and foremost because the disparate elements in this production by North American Cultural Laboratory never cohere. The story, by Brad Krumholz, who also directed, goes something like this: Holmes (Brett Keyser) is called on to investigate two murders -- of Jeremy Nietzsche and Kevin Freud; ah, the cleverness of it! -- and along the way confronts some self-doubt because of the presence of a crackerjack female detective (Sarah Dey Hirshan)." [Abstract from publisher]

10K Actors, Performances and Recordings -- Plays -- The Unknown Sherlock Holmes (1)

1. Hobbs, Don. "Review--The Unknown Sherlock Holmes by Lloyd W. Brown." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 6 (2000): 27.



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson