11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories (72)

1. Dark Detectives: adventures of the supernatural sleuths. 1st ed. Minneapolis: F&B Mystery, 1999.

In Egypt's land/Kim Newman -- Our lady of death/Peter Tremayne -- The mummy's heart/Kim Newman -- The horse of the invisible/ William Hope Hodgson -- The magician and the matinee idol/Kim Newman -- The adventure of the crawling horror/Basil Copper -- The trouble with Barrymore/Kim Newman -- Rouse him not/Manly Wade Wellman -- De Marigny's clock/Brian Lumley -- The Biafran bank manager/Kim Newman -- Someone is dead/R. Chetwynd-Hayes -- Vultures gather/Brian Mooney -- Lost souls/Clive Barker -- Mimsy/Kim Newman -- The man who shot Liberty Valence/Jay Russell -- The Dog story/Kim Newman -- Bay wolf/Neil Gaiman -- The duel of seven stars/Kim Newman.;

2. "The Ghosts of Baker Street: New Tales of Sherlock Holmes." Kirkus Reviews 73, no. 22 (2005): 1213.

Review of the book.

3. Herlock Shomes at it again. 1st ed, (Mysterious Sherlock Holmes). New York: The Mysterious Bookshop, 1999.

Added Title: Wipers times; "Shomes and Dr. Hotson (or is it Jotson? Or Flotsam?) go to work in this six-chapter parody that originally appeared in Wipers Times in 1918. Limited to 221 copies." (From the Mysterious Bookshop website)

4. "Master Sleuths." The Statesman (India), March 20, 2001: 1.

"Inspired by Sherlock Holmes and his acute powers of observation and reasoning, Satyajit Ray created his own Bengali super sleuth. Prodosh Chandra Mitter or Feluda to his fans and his cousin Topse, was a master sleuth...."

5. Professor Challenger: 5 Fantastic Tales. Morrisville: Lulu, 2004.

Scuttlebutt Sept 2005. Also available as a downloadable book at the Lulu site.; "A collection with a short introduction by Ron Hanna."

6. "Review--'And to think I saw it on Mulbaker Street' by Wiggins." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 1 (2004): 20.

7. "Spawn of Cthulhu!". Booklist 104, no. 2 (2007): 53.

The article reviews the books "The Children of Cthulhu: Chilling New Tales Inspired by H. P. Lovecraft," edited by Joh Pelan and Benjamin Adams, "Move under Ground," by Nick Mamatas, and "A Night in the Lonesome October," by Roger Zelazny. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Zelazny and collaborating illustrator Gahan Wilson, the dean of horror cartoonists, don’t know when to stop pastiche-ing in this Lovecraft-cum-Sherlock Holmes-cum-monster-movie parody that, since it’s told by a watchdog, honestly merits the rubric shaggy dog story.

8. The Wipers Times a facsimile reprint of the trench magazines:--the Wipers times--the New Church times--the Kemmel times--the Somme times--the B. E. F. times. London: H. Jenkins limited, 1918.

LC Control Number: 18001180; Scuttlebutt 1994; "The newspaper (which eventually became The B.E.F. Times) was published by British soldiers at the front during World War I, and it contained three parodies featuring Herlock Shomes. Brian Pugh notes that the 24th Division List of Staff Officers 28 September 1915 (on p. 375) includes Lt.-Col. J.F.I.H. Doyle (Arthur Conan Doyle's brother Innes); his full name was John Francis Innes Hay Doyle."

9. The Wipers Times including for the first time in one volume a facsimile reproduction of the complete series of the famous wartime trench magazines. London: E. Nash & Grayson limited, 1930.

LC Control Number: 31024185; Scuttlebutt 1994; "The newspaper (which eventually became The B.E.F. Times) was published by British soldiers at the front during World War I, and it contained three parodies featuring Herlock Shomes. Brian Pugh notes that the 24th Division List of Staff Officers 28 September 1915 (on p. 375) includes Lt.-Col. J.F.I.H. Doyle (Arthur Conan Doyle's brother Innes); his full name was John Francis Innes Hay Doyle."

10. The Wipers Times: The Complete Series of the Famous Wartime Trench Newspaper. London: Little Books, 2006.

Scuttlebutt 1994; "The newspaper (which eventually became The B.E.F. Times) was published by British soldiers at the front during World War I, and it contained three parodies featuring Herlock Shomes. Brian Pugh notes that the 24th Division List of Staff Officers 28 September 1915 (on p. 375) includes Lt.-Col. J.F.I.H. Doyle (Arthur Conan Doyle's brother Innes); his full name was John Francis Innes Hay Doyle."

11. Abrahams, Peter. The tutor. 1st ed. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002.

25 cm. Accelerated Reader/Renaissance Learning; UG; 4.5; 15. Scuttlebutt Oct 2005.; "Suspense, featuring girl-in-peril precocious 11-year-old Ruby Gardner, who is passionate about Sherlock Holmes (published as a paperback in 2003)."

12. ———. The tutor. Center Point large type ed. Thorndike, ME: Center Point Pub.: Melbourne, Australia: Bolinda Publ, 2003.

22 cm.;

13. ———. The tutor. London: Penguin, 2003.

19 cm.;

14. Adey, Robert. As it might have been: a collection of Sherlockian parodies from unlikely sources. Ashcroft, B.C.: Calabash Press, 1998.

Scuttlebutt Dec 1999; The thirty-eight short stories in this collection originally appeared in various, mostly obscure, papers and magazines dating back to 1893. "His research in humor magazines from the 1890s onward has uncovered many previously unreprinted examples of what writers have done with and to Sherlock Holmes."

15. Akunin, Boris, and Andrew Bromfield. Murder on the Leviathan : a novel. New York: Random House, 2004.

1st ed. 25 cm. Translated by Andrew Bromfield.; 'Erast Fandorin, a young Russian detective/diplomat, travels to India in 1878 on the maiden voyage of the Leviathan, and there are murders to solve (Dennis Drabelle reviewed the book in the May 16 issue of the Washington Post and noted echoes of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 'the detective's ability to fill in a character's background by noticing what is lost on less keen-eyed observers')."

16. Altman, Steven-Elliot, Michael Reaves, Bong Dazo, Simon Bowland, and Ben Templesmith. The Irregulars. 1st ed. Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Books, 2005.

A killer lurks in the shadows of Whitechapel and the police have a suspect, John Watson. To save his friend from the gallows, Sherlock Holmes enlists a band of street urchins to act as his eyes and ears on the streets

17. Amateur Mendicant Society (Madrid, Spain). Tercer Anuario de la Sociedad de Mendigos Aficionados. Madrid: the Society, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Feb 1997; "The third casebook of The Amateur Mendicant Society of Madrid, and nicely done, with 296 pages of Sherlockian scholarship and pastiches by members of the society, with an interesting exploration of 'El Sultan de Turquia' and a section of studies devoted to 'La Finca 'Copper Beeches'' and much more. It's all in Spanish."

18. Anderson, Marlow, Victor J. Katz, and Robin J. Wilson. Sherlock Holmes in Babylon : and other tales of mathematical history, (Spectrum series). Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America, 2004.

ill., maps ; 28 cm. ; "Has imaginative Sherlockian cover art, but only the artwork and title are Sherlockian. The original article appeared in the American Mathematical Monthly (May 1980) and was written by R. Creighton Buck, who started with an explanation: 'Let me begin by clarifying the title 'Sherlock Holmes in Babylon.' Lest some members of the Baker Street Irregulars be misled, my topic is the archaeology of mathematics.' And that was (and is) the only mention of Sherlock Holmes in the article and book.'

19. Booth, Matthew. "Review -- 'Sherlock Holmes and the Hellbirds' by Austin Mitchelson & Nicholas Utechin." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 110-112.

20. Boyer, Rick, and Yves-Charles Fercoq. Le rat géant de Sumatra, (Collection Sherlock Holmes). Paris: Éd. Mycroft's brother, Impr. Jouve, 2003.

ill., 21 cm. Translated by Yves-Charles Fercoq.;

21. Calamai, Peter. "For Sherlockians, one's masterful, the other's a cardboard cutout." The Ottawa Citizen, March 20, 1994: C3.

Review of The Beekeeper's Apprentice Or; On the Segregation of the Queen By Laurie R. King, St. Martin's Press; 347 pages; $31.99; and The Case of Emily V. By Keith Oatley, Reed Books; 407 pages; paperback; $17.99. "Everything Laurie King does right, [Keith Oatley] does wrong...."

22. Cassada, Jackie. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 119, no. 21 (1994): 139.

Reviews the book 'Sherlock Holmes in Orbit.'

23. Cornwell, Bob. "Book Review (Krimis im Fadenkruzl)." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 219-220.

24. D'Agneau, Marcel. The curse of the Nibelung: being the last case of Lord Holmes of Baker Street and Sir John Watson. London: Royal National Institute for the Blind, 1983.

Braille.;

25. Deacon, Theodore, and William Dunlop. "The Case of the Downloaded Diva." Opera News 68, no. 4 (2003): 46-48.

Presents an excerpt from the book "The Case of the Downloaded Diva," by John H. Watson. "A hitherto unpublished fragment from the memoirs of John H. Watson, M.D. Transcribed by Theodore Deacon and William Dunlop, with the generous assistance of Brian Bailey."

26. DeAndrea, William L, Juha Lindroos, and Jane Haddam. Murder--all kinds. 1st ed, (Crippen & Landru lost classics). Norfolk, Va: Crippen & Landru Publishers, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2005272293. Contents: (Matt Cobb, special projects) Snowy reception -- Killed top to bottom -- Killed in midstream -- Killed in good company -- (Other stories) Hero's welcome -- Sabotage -- A friend of mine -- The adventure of the cripple parade -- The adventure of the Christmas tree -- Prince Charming -- Murder at the end of the world. Includes bibliographical references (p. 208);

27. Dexter, Colin. Morse's greatest mystery, and other stories. London: Macmillan, 1993.

Contents: Morse's greatest mystery -- Evans tries an O-level -- Dead as a dodo -- At the Lulu-Bar Motel -- Neighbourhood watch -- A case of mis-identity (pp. 91-122) -- The inside story -- Monty's revolver -- The carpet-bagger -- Last call;

28. ———. Morse's greatest mystery, and other stories. 1st American ed. New York: Crown Publishers, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95052667. Contents: As good as gold -- Morse's greatest mystery -- Evans tries an O-level -- Dead as a dodo -- At the Lulu-Bar Motel -- Neighbourhood watch -- A case of mis-identity -- The inside story -- Monty's revolver -- The carpet-bagger -- Last call. Scuttlebutt Oct 1995;

29. Dorn, William S. "Did Watson Write The Case of the Man Who Was Wanted?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 4 (1994): 233-239.

Using the work of statisticians Mosteller and Wallace on literary "fingerprints," the author presents information on the possibility of Watsonian authorship.

30. Duchateau, André-Paul, and Bruno Di Sano. Le rat géant de Sumatra, (Sherlock Holmes 6). Bruxelles: C. Lefranc, 1995.

ill. 30 cm.;

31. Elliott, Doug, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf': Reviews of The Annotated Lost World and The Unpublished Solar Pons." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 1 (1996): 29-33.

32. Flutsch, Maria. "Book Reviews." Asian Studies Review 31, no. 4 (2007): 471-497.

The article reviews several books including one by Okamoto Kidô. The Curious Casebook of Inspector Hanshichi: Detective Stories of Old Edo (trans. Ian MacDonald). Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press. Introduction. xxiv, 335 pp. US$50.00, hardcover; US$24.00, paper. Includes multiple references to Doyle and Holmes. "...The fascination of these stories lies in the 70-year time-overlap of the writing (second and third decades of the twentieth century) and the setting (mid-nineteenth century Edo): they are modern, beautifully crafted short stories about the activities of the Edo detective, Inspector Hanshichi. Unlike Sherlock Holmes, on which Okamoto himself indicates that these stories are based, Hanshichi does not have science or technology to work with....'

33. Greenwood, L. B., and Roger Norman. Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland. [Vancouver]: Library Services Branch, Province of British Columbia, 1994. Sound Recording 5 sound cassettes (6 hr., 15 min.).

analog, 4.75 cm/s, 2 track, mono. Ed. recorded: New York : Simon & Schuster, c1989. ISBN 0-671-65916-2. Container includes braille. "This audiobook is for the exclusive use of persons unable to read print because of a physical or visual disability"--Container. "#94-230" Read by Roger Norman. Issued also in printed form. L. B. Greenwood.; Writing with the full approval of the Conan Doyle estate, the author continues the tales of the legendary detective, Sherlock Holmes. A jewel passed down from Scottish royalty goes missing from the hair clip of its owner on her wedding day. Since it formed part of her marriage "estate" it must be found and Holmes is the only man who can find it.

34. Grove, Nathaniel, and Stacey Lowery Bretz. "Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Raven and the Ambassador's Wife: An Inquiry-Based Murder Mystery." Journal of chemical education 82, no. 10 (2005): 1532-1533.

An inquiry-based activity that instructors can incorporate into chemistry courses is described. Students become actively involved in helping Sherlock Holmes solve a suspicious death by devising a series of laboratory experiments that will prove the guilt of the accused murderer. The 4 suggested experiments are molar mass determination using freezing point depression, flame tests, qualitative analysis, and the identification of crystal shape.

35. Gunson, Eilidh. "Review--'The Mammoth Book of New Sherlock Holmes Adventures' edited by Mike Ashley." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 64-65.

36. Hall, John. "Review--'As it Might Have Been: A Collection of Sherlockian Parodies from Unlikely Sources,' collected and edited by Robert C. S. Adey." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 58-59.

37. Hardenbrook, Don, and Thomas Przybilka. "Book Review (Jet by Tsuyaku Ginishago)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 191-192.

38. Harmidarow, Walter, Doug Wrigglesworth, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf': Reviews of The Scroll of the Dead, The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Dying Detective and Waterloo: a Case-Book on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Historical Play." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 2 (1998): 42-44.

39. Hatfield, Rab Conan. "Sherlock Holmes and the riddle of the 'Niccolo` da Uzzano'." Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies. Publications, 2, no. (1978): 219-238.

A pastiche of Conan Doyle, examining the question of the identity and authorship of the bust known as Niccolo` da Uzzano and attributed to Donatello (Bargello, Florence). On the basis of a portrait in Ghirlandaio's Sassetti Chapel frescoes in S. Trinita`, executed 1484, argues that the bust represents not Niccolo` da Uzzano (d.1433) but Gino di Neri Capponi, and that it is not by Donatello but a serial product by an artisan specialized in inexpensive portrait images. Also traces the relationship of Niccolo` to the Capponi and Capponi ownership of this and other busts. (Staff)

40. Hirayama, Yuichi. "Some Problems in Lestrade and the Hallowed House." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 50-54.

41. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Chinese Box Mysteries Vol. II." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 13.

42. ———. "Review--Curious Incidents 2 edited by J. R. Campbell and Charles Prepolec." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 29.

43. ———. "Review--My Sherlock Holmes edited by Michael Kurland." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 2 (2003): 32.

44. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Clocktower Mystery." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 4 (2002): 7.

45. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Dangerous Game." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 6 (2004): 32.

46. ———. "Review--The Confidential Casebook of Sherlock Holmes edited by Marvin Kaye." The Holmes & Watson Report 2, no. 2 (1998): 21.

47. Hughes, Mel. "The Adventure of Damascus Rode: The real lost 61st Story of the Holy Writ." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 77-80.

48. Hughes, Mel, and Michaud Rosemary. "The Strange Persecution of John Vincent Hardin." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 81-84.

49. Hughes, P. Whitney. The Extraordinary Affair of the Second Great Hiatus. Morrisville: Lulu, 2005.

Scuttlebutt Sept 2005.; "A science-fiction pastiche involving Holmes, Watson, Challenger, and Malone, with a few echoes from 'Star Trek'."

50. James, David. Sherlock Holmes and the midnight bell. Romford: Ian Henry, 2000.

23 cm.;

51. Katterjohn, Anna. "Prepub Mystery." Library Journal 133, no. 20 (2008): 100-100.

The article reviews several books, including Faye, Lyndsay. Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson. S. & S. Apr. 2009. 352p. ISBN 978-1-4165-8330-1. $25. "In 19th-century London, Sherlock Holmes hunts Jack the Ripper. This is New York City-based Faye's debut."

52. Kaye, Marvin. The confidential casebook of Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998.

22 cm. The darlington substitute scandal / Henry Slesar -- The adventure of the old Russian woman / H. Paul Jeffers -- The adventure of the noble husband / Peter Cannon -- The case of the woman in the cellar / Pat Mullen -- The adventure of the boulevard assassin / Kathleen Brady -- The case of the ancient british barrow / Terry McGarry -- The adventure of the dying ship / Edward D. Hoch -- The revenge of the Fenian Brotherhood / Carole Bugge -- The affair of the counterfeit countess / Craig Shaw Gardner -- The woman / Aline Myette-Volsky -- The little problem of the Grosvenor Square Furniture Van / Patrick LoBrutto -- A ballad of the White Plague / P.C. Hodgell -- The adventure of Vanderbilt and the Yeggman / Roberta Rogow -- The secret marriage of Sherlock Holmes / Shariann Lewitt -- The case of Vittoria the Circus Belle / Jay Sheckley. Edited by Marvin Kaye.; Fifteen stories featuring Sherlock Holmes's deductive powers, penned by known and unknown writers. The two dozen cases range from an incident involving the Titanic to anarchist bombings in Paris.

53. Kenney, Michael. "Holmesian tale engaging, inventive." The Boston Globe, February 20, 2001: D7.

Book Review Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years By Jamyang Norbu Bloomsbury, 288 pp., $23.95. "...Now comes an account by a Tibetan novelist, Jamyang Norbu, and while one does not want to play Baker Street Irregular by describing it as authentic, it is of more than passing interest because of its authorship, in addition to being a credible invention and an engaging entertainment...."

54. Lane, Andy. All consuming fire, (Doctor Who). London: Virgin Books, 1994.

55. Lovisi, Gary. "Book Review (The Alienist. Sherlockian Formul Transmogrified)." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 159.

56. Lowrie, John Patrick, Lawrence Albert, Jim French, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Volumes 5-8. [Bellevue, WA]: Jim French Productions, 2006. Sound Recording 4 sound discs (ca. 4 hr.).

digital ; 4 /3 4 in. Title from container. "Authorized by the estate of Dame Jean Conan Doyle." Based on characters created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Starring John Patrick Lowrie (Sherlock Holmes), and Lawrence Albert (Dr. Watson).;

57. Lowrie, John Patrick, John Gilbert, Lawrence Albert, Jim French, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Volumes 1-4. [Bellevue, WA]: Jim French Productions, 2006. Sound Recording 4 sound discs (ca. 4 hr.).

digital ; 4 /3 4 in. Title from container. "Authorized by the estate of Dame Jean Conan Doyle." Based on characters created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Starring John Patrick Lowrie (1st, 2nd, 5th-10th episodes) and John Gilbert (3rd and 4th episodes) as Sherlock Holmes, with Lawrence Albert as Dr. Watson.;

58. Michaels, Barbara, and Ray Childs. Other worlds. Louisville, KY: American Printing House for the Blind, 2002. Sound Recording 2 sound cassettes.

mono., NAB standard. Participants: Ray Childs. Must have program eligibility. Access through the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress.; A conference of specialists on the occult is convened to analyze two 19th century ghost hauntings, one in Tennessee, the other in Connecticut. Attended by such experts as Harry Houdini and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the conference attempts to arrive at an explanation. By the author of The Dancing Floor.

59. Michaels, Barbara, and Barbara Rosenblat. The Barbara Michaels CD audio treasury. [S.l.]: Harper Audio, 2005. Sound Recording (CD) 5 sound discs (6 hr.).

digital ; 4 3/4 in. In container (15 x 13 cm.). Compact discs. Narrated by Barbara Rosenblat. Issued also on cassette. Produced and directed by Rick Harris; Dancing floor, abridged by Janet McCarthy-Fabis; Other worlds, abridged by Nevenah Smith.; 1. The dancing floor: An American woman on a dream-fulfilling tour of ancient gardens in England, finds herself pulled into a labyrinth of mystery, witchcraft, and murder. 2. Other worlds: On a foggy evening, a lofty assemblage of crime specialists, Harry Houdini, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Dr. Nandor Fodor, and a talented writer, settle in to talk about poltergeists and murder.

60. ———. Other worlds. New York: Harper Audio, 1999. Sound Recording 2 sound cassettes (ca. 3 hr.).

analog, Dolby processed. Abridged. Read by Barbara Rosenblat. Produced and directed by Rick Harris ; abridged by Nevenah Smith.; Harry Houdini, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, psychoanalyst Nandor Fodor, and a mystery writer put their minds to solving a pair of mysteries involving families beset by poltergeist pranks and bewitched by inexplicable horrors.

61. ———. Other worlds. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books, 1999. Sound Recording (cassettes) 5 sound cassettes (7 hr.).

analog. Unabridged. Read by Barbara Rosenblat.; Harry Houdini, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, psychoanalyst Nandor Fodor, and a mystery writer put their minds to solving a pair of mysteries involving families beset by poltergeist pranks and bewitched by inexplicable horrors.

62. ———. Other worlds. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books, 1999. Sound Recording (CDs) 6 sound discs (7 hr.).

digital ; 4 3/4 in. Recorded Books evergreen. In container (17 cm.). "Unabridged fiction"--Container. "With tracks every 3 minutes for easy book marking"--Container. Compact discs. Narrated by Barbara Rosenblat. Issued also on cassette.; On a foggy evening, a lofty assemblage of crime specialists settles in to talk about poltergeists and murder.

63. Newman, Kim. The bloody Red Baron. 1st Carroll & Graf ed. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1995.

LC Control Number: 96152754; Scuttlebutt Jan 1996. Contents: Part 1. All quiet on the western front: Condor squadron -- The old man -- Past midnight -- Grey eminences -- The prophet of Prague -- Mata Hari -- Kate -- Castle keep -- La morte Parisienne -- In lofty circles -- What Kate did next -- Bloodlines -- Dr. Moreau and Mr. West -- Kate and Edwin -- Part 2. No man's land: The vile, the violent and the vein -- Twice bitten -- A solitary cyclist -- Hell's angels -- Biggles flies west -- Foreign field -- The castle -- Troglodytes -- Some of our aircraft are missing -- Hanging on the old barbed wire -- Dressing down -- A walk in the sun -- Part 3. Memoirs of a fox-hunting man: The red battle flier -- The moon also rises -- Watching the hawk -- Returned to life -- A poet's warrior -- A restorative -- The killer -- An Immelmann turn -- Important visitors -- Dark-adapted -- Master of the world -- Part 4. Journey's end: Offensive patrol -- Up at the front -- Kill the dragon -- Kaiserschlacht -- Night of the generals -- Attila falling -- Kagemusha Monogaturi -- To end that spree -- Valhalla -- Aftermath -- England calls -- Resolutions; "The book is a fanciful tale of vampire flying aces: Prof. Ten Brincken and Dr. Mabuse have turned Richtofen and his brethren into huge bat-winged night flyers, and the Germans have hired Edgar Allan Poe (who was vampirized by his child bride Virginia) to write about them."

64. North, Sam. The curse of the nibelung : a Sherlock Holmes mystery. 2nd ed. [Morrisville, NC]: Lulu Press, 2005.

23 cm. Originally published 1981 with author as Marcel d'Agneau. Scuttlebutt Sept. 2005.; "A pastiche/parody (or perhaps a parody/pastiche) set in England and on the Continent in 1939, with Holmes and Watson sent on a mission by Winston Churchill."

65. Penzler, Otto, David Birney, and John Rubinstein. The 50 greatest mysteries of all time. [S.l.]: Phoenix Audio, 2002. Sound Recording (cassettes) 8 sound cassettes.

David Birney, narrator ; John Rubinstein, reader. Winner of the AudioFile Earphone Award. compiled by Otto Penzler.; An anthology presents tales about such characters as Sherlock Holmes, Raffles, Kinsey Milhone, and Jimmy Valentine by writers including Stephen King, Dick Francis, Sue Grafton, Elmore Leonar, and P.D. James ...

66. Przybilka, Thomas. "Book Review (Sherlock Holmes und die Schreken von Sumatra)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 237-238.

67. Reed, Kevin. "Cockroach Bones and the Five Orange Peeps." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 56-60.

68. Satterthwait, Walter, Jeff Woodman, and Emily Gray. Escapade. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books, 2001. Sound Recording 9 sound cassettes (13 hr.).

Mystery on cassette. Unabridged. Narrated by Jeff Woodman and Emily Gray.;

69. Shaw, Ken. "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Serpentine Remains." Journal of chemical education 85, no. 4 (2008): 507-510.

The short story "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" by Ken Shaw is presented.

70. Shiffman, Stu. "Adventure of the Danzig Mien I, a tale of Holmes & Watson." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 60-73.

71. Shreffler, Philip A. Eliot Simpson & the Baker Street Irregulars in the twentieth century limited mystery. 1st ed. Indianapolis: Wessex Press, 2000.

72. Steinberg, Sybil, and Genevieve Stuttaford. "Forecasts: Fiction." Publishers Weekly 244, no. 51 (1997): 51.

Reviews the book 'The Confidential Casebook of Sherlock Holmes,' edited by Marvin Kaye.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- A (9)

1. "Disciplinary Classification." ISIS: Journal of the History of Science in Society 95, no. (2004): 24-50.

Presents a bibliography on disciplinary classification of science. Lists Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and other Tales of Mathematical History, ed. by Marlow Anderson, Victor J. Katz, and Robin J. Wilson. (The Mathematical Association of America, 2003) ISBN 0883855461

2. "Math, Computers." SciTech Book News 28, no. 2 (2004): 12-33.

Lists several books related to mathematics and computers. "Concurrent and Distributed Computing in Java," by Vijay Kumar Garg; "Foundations of Algorithms Using Java Pseudocode," by Richard E. Neapolitan and Kumarss Naimipour; "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History," edited by Marlow Anderson et al.

3. Allen, Conrad. Murder on the Celtic. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2007.

LC Control Number: 2006048685; "A dangerous fugitive and a series of thefts mar a voyage the Celtic makes in 1910 from New York to London in Allen's satisfying eighth shipboard mystery to feature the husband-wife detective team of Bostonian George Porter Dillman and Englishwoman Genevieve Masefield (after 2006's Murder on the Oceanic). While the lovely Genevieve fends off suitors vying for her affections (the pair conceal their marriage supposedly for more efficient sleuthing), she and George are on the lookout for Edward Hammond, a thief wanted for murder who might have sneaked on board. Among the legitimate first-class passengers is novelist Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, whose cherished first edition of his novel A Study in Scarlet—which introduced the character of Sherlock Holmes—goes missing. The light, well-executed plot will live up to the expectations of Allen's fans."

4. Chechile, Richard A. "Books received for review." Journal of Mathematical Psychology. Print; 49, no. 1 (2005).

Presents a list of books to be reviewed in the field of mathematics including "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History," edited by M. Anderson, V. Katz and R. Wilson (2004).

5. Hargreaves, David. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and the Strange Events at the Bank of England' by Graham Avery." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 62-63.

6. Kleiner, Israel. "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History." ISIS: Journal of the History of Science in Society 95, no. 3 (2004): 465-466.

M3: Book Review; Reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History," edited by Marlow Anderson, Victor Katz and Robin Wilson.

7. Ousby, Ian. "...My dear Derrida." Tls, no. (1998): 31.

Reviews the book 'The Secret Marriage of Sherlock Holmes and Other Eccentric Readings,' by Michael Atkinson.

8. Rauff, James. "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History." Mathematics Teacher 98, no. 5 (2004): 364-365.

M3: Book Review; Reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History," edited by Marlow Anderson, Victor Katz, and Robin Wilson.

9. White, Kathryn. "Review--'Draco, Draconis' by Brett Spencer Altamont and Dorian David Altamont." The Ritual, no. 19 (1997): 68.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Andrews, Val (34)

1. Andrews, Val. Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street dozen a collection of thirteen short stories. London: Breese Books, 1997.

Contents: The Kinema mystery -- The Strange case of the Burmese jungle fowl -- The Incident of the baker's watch -- All this and the giant rat of Sumatra! -- The Lobster quadrille -- Sherlock Holmes and the gypsy switch -- The Gantry Point wreckers -- The South Downs railway mystery -- The Case of the flying messengers -- Sherlock Holmes and a fraud in Baker Street -- The Teacup mystery -- The Maestro's problem -- The Baker Street conjurer;

2. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the circus of fear. London: Breese Books, 1997.

3. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Egyptian Hall adventure. London: Breese Books, 1994.

"Here is another wonderful Sherlock Holmes Pastiche from the prolific pen of Val Andrews. The author has a vast knowledge of conjuring and of Sherlockiana and in this exciting mystery he is able to combine both of his lifelong interests." "The Egyptian Hall, Maskelyne's theatre of mystery, forms the perfect backdrop for this the most exciting and unusual adventure ever embarked upon by the famous sleuth and his faithful Boswell, Dr. Watson." "The loss of an article of great value - the property of a titled lady - by a conjurer during the course of a stage trick is but the prelude to intrigue, mystery and murder most foul. But hush we can say no more...the game is afoot! Be sure that you are fully prepared for adventure before jumping into a hansom and returning to an age when the old Queen was still upon her throne and the fogs swirled through Baker Street." "Here is a real scorpion of a story with a sting in its tail to confound all concerned save Sherlock Holmes!". "Should you wish to receive details of other Sherlock Holmes books in advance of publication please contact the publishers at the address below."--Book jacket

4. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Greyfriars school mystery. London: Breese Books, 1997.

"In this exciting adventure, leading writer Val Andrews combines the amazing detective Sherlock Holmes and Billy Bunter, the famous overweight schoolboy, into one fast moving story. At Greyfriars School, the senior master has lost the manuscript of the history of the famous school. The headmaster calls in old boy, Dr Watson and seeks his influence to engage Sherlock Holmes to solve the mystery. During his investigations, the master detective not only traces the missing manuscript but is able to solve a number of other related puzzles - including a murder case - for the local constabulary."--Cover, p. [4]

5. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Holborn emporium. London: Breese Books, 2001.

6. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Houdini birthright. London: Breese Books, 1995.

"Here's another Sherlock Holmes pastiche from the fertile pen of Val Andrews. Again two areas of mystery are linked: the exploits of Sherlock Holmes and the secrets of master escapologist, Harry Houdini. Doctor Watson's collaborator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, finds himself drawn into the world of the fake psychics and Houdini is anxious for Holmes to unmask the perpetrators who prey on the innocent believers." "Once he has been torn away from his bee-keeping activities, Holmes's investigations lead him to some surprising locations including a Ruritanian castle. Sherlockians, historians and magic buffs will all be intrigued and delighted with this classic detective story which links fact and a little fiction to suggest what may have happened to Houdini after his death." "Again .... the game is afoot."--Book jacket

7. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Long Acre vampire. London: Breese Books, 2001.

22 cm. Cover and spine title: Sherlock Holmes and the Longacre vampire;

8. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the man who lost himself. London: Breese Books, 1997.

"A distinctly unfortunate inventor discovers that he doesn't exist. Finding himself in this nightmare situation he consults Sherlock Holmes and presents the sage of Baker Street with one of his most baffling challenges. Is it a simple case of amnesia or something far more sinister? The story involves some hair-raising transcontinental adventures and nightmare dealings with the hazardous flying machines of the day. Dr Watson lends a little light relief when forced into door to door commerce."--Cover p. [4]

9. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Sandringham House mystery. London: Breese Books, 1998.

10. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the secret seven. London: Breese Books, 2001.

11. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the theatre of death. London: Breese Books, 1997.

12. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the tomb of terror. London: Breese Books, 2000.

13. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Yule-tide mystery. London: Breese Books, 1996.

14. ———. Sherlock Holmes at the varieties. London: Breese Books, 2000.

15. ———. Sherlock Holmes on the western front. London: Breese Books, 2000.

16. ———. The torment of Sherlock Holmes. London: Breese Books, 2000.

17. Arthur, Joanna. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Man Who Lost Himself by Val Andrews." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 57-58.

18. Ashworth, Peter. "Review--The Torment of Sherlock Holmes by Val Andrews." The Ritual, no. 26 (2000): 68.

19. Fell, Christine. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Circus of Fear by Val Andrews." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 58-59.

20. Gunson, Eilidh. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Theatre of Death by Val Andrews." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 74-75.

21. Hall, John. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Egyptian Hall Adventure by Val Andrews." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 60-61.

22. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Circus of Fear by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 12-13.

23. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Holborn Emporium by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 5 (2001): 4.

24. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Longacre Vampire by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 5 (2001): 33.

25. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Sandringham House Mystery by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 2 (1999): 16.

26. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Seven by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 1 (2002): 17.

27. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Theatre of Death by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 2 (1999): 33.

28. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Tomb of Terror by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 4 (2000): 35.

29. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes at the Varieties by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 4 (2000): 32.

30. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes on the Western Front by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 4 (2000): 25.

31. ———. "Review--The Torment of Sherlock Holmes by Val Andrews." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 6 (2001): 7.

32. Johns, Ray. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and the Greyfriars School Mystery' by Val Andrews." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 73-74.

33. Michael, Patrick. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes at the Varieties' by Val Andrews." The Ritual, no. 27 (2001): 62-63.

34. Vicarel, Jo Ann. "Sherlock Holmes and the Brighton Pavilion Mystery." Library Journal 132, no. 10 (2007): 97-97.

The article presents a review of the book "Sherlock Holmes and the Brighton Pavilion Mystery," by Val Andrews.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- B (22)

1. "New books." Physics Today 50, no. 9 (1997): 74.

Introduces several books on Materials Science, Nonlinear Science and Chaos, Nuclear Physics and other topics in physics. Includes The Strange Case of Mrs. Hudson's Cat and Other Science Mysteries Solved by Sherlock Holmes. C. Bruce. Helix Books (Addison-Wesley), Reading, Mass., 1997. 254 pp. $23.00 hc ISBN 0-201-46139-0

2. Arney, Chris. "Conned Again Watson!" Mathematics and Computer Education 39, no. 2 (2005): 160-161.

Reviews the book Conned Again, Watson!: Cautionary Tales of Logic, Math, and Probability by Colin Bruce (Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 2001), 290 pp.

3. Bailey, Hilary. The strange adventures of Charlotte Holmes. London: Constable, 1994.

4. Baker, Abbey Pen. In the dead of winter. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994.

22 cm.; Myrl Adler Norton, professor of logic, investigates the murder of the landlady who always sat at her window, until her drapes closed and she would play the same record. It turns out the landlady was killed and stuffed, the drapes and record operated by pulleys.

5. ———. In the Dead of Winter. Cambridge, [England]: Irregular Special Press, for Baker Street Studios Ltd., 2010.

22 cm. Pastiche featuring a daughter of Sherlock Holmes./ "A Myrl Adler Norton mystery"--cover. ;

6. Baker, Abbey Pen, and Keiko Takada. Fuyuno sanakani. Tokyo: Tokyo Sogensha, 1996.

15 cm. In the dead of winter.; Japanese.; Myrl Adler Norton, professor of logic, investigates the murder of the landlady who always sat at her window, until her drapes closed and she would play the same record. It turns out the landlady was killed and stuffed, the drapes and record operated by pulleys.

7. Ballew, William. "Review--The Strange Case of Mrs. Hudson's Cat and Other Mysteries Solved by Sherlock Holmes by Colin Bruce." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 4 (1997): 18-19.

8. Berger, Arthur Asa. Durkheim is dead! Sherlock Holmes is introduced to sociological theory. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press/Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2002151885. Contents: I had seen a patient early that afternoon -- When she had left -- Just as I was about to leave -- I had just begun what I believed would be -- Holmes and I arrived at Claridge's hotel -- Max Weber knocked on the door -- We were to meet Sigmund Freud -- The next professor we interviewed -- The last setting for breakfast -- The famous black american social thinker -- We were surprised by a knock on the door -- One of Lestrade's men -- We left the room -- Beatrice Webb's party at Claridge's. Includes bibliographical references (p. 163-166) and index; "Durkheim Is Dead is a unique introduction to theories of sociology, as it presents the theories of W. E. B. Du Bois, Sigmund Freud, Vladimir Lenin, Beatrice Webb, and others in the unique format of a Sherlock Holmes mystery novel. Tracking Holmes and Watson as their latest case brings them to a 1910 conference in London on the new science of sociology, Holmes and Watson learn the theories and lives directly from the individuals who have proposed them in the workings of history. Durkheim Is Dead is a unique, original, entertaining, and educationally impressive means of teaching the reader about social science -- and will prove fascinating reading to all Sherlock Holmes mystery enthusiasts."

9. Bohem, Hilda, and Dayna McCausland. Jabberland : a Whiffle through the tulgey wood of "Jabberwocky" imitations. Shelburne, Ontario: George A. Vanderburgh, 2002.

ill. ; 21 cm. Includes reproductions from the Houghton Collection of Morgan mss. AAH 603 and AAH 641. Includes bibliographical references (p. 269) and indexes.; "Published in 2002 for the Lewis Carroll Society of Canada, offering more than 200 parodies, pastiches, burlesques, and imitations of the famous poem that have appeared since 1872. And two of them are Sherlockian, one composed by Ruth Berman and Ron Whyte (1957), and the other by Steve Tolins (1992)."

10. Boothe, Gary F. The Secret of Sherlock Holmes. Pasco, Washington: Press Craft Inc, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Dec 1997; "A new pastiche that brings Holmes out of retirement in 1907 to help forestall a threat to the economic security of the United States; he's assisted by his daughter Alice rather than by Watson."

11. Brown, Barry S. The Unpleasantness at Parkerton Manor : a novel, (Mrs. Hudson of Baker Street series). Santa Fe: Sunstone Press, 2010.

12. Brownstein, Gabriel. The man from beyond: a novel. 1st ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2005.

LC Control Number: 2005011982; "Inspired by the complex relationship between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the celebrated author and champion of spiritualism, and Harry Houdini, the famed magician and escape artist, Brownstein's uneven first novel reimagines the consequences of the séance, held in 1922 after a chance meeting on the New Jersey shore, in which the spirit-writing Lady Doyle delivered a message from Houdini's late mother to her skeptical son. While the author does a good job of getting inside the heads of his two historical protagonists with their opposing philosophies, much of the story focuses on the admirable but less interesting 22-year-old Molly Goodman, an intrepid reporter who follows the two great men's activities. In a vivid scene, after Houdini barely escapes from a locked box under the Hudson far down river from where he was supposed to emerge, he realizes that, like Sherlock Holmes after surviving his struggle with Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls, everyone believes he's dead. After this delicious twist, however, the story rushes to a hasty climax involving an insufficiently developed villain. Brownstein's story collection, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Apt. 3W (2002), won the PEN/Hemingway Award. "

13. Buggé, Carole. The haunting of Torre Abbey. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.

22 cm.;

14. ———. The star of India: a novel of Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97039833; "It is 1894, and Holmes and returned from the Reichenbach to find that Moriarty also survived the battle there, and is plotting revenge."

15. Dorey, Helen. "Review--'The Strange Adventures of Charlotte Holmes, Sister of the More Famous Sherlock' by Hilary Bailey." The Musgrave Papers, no. 7 (1994): 117-119.

16. Hobbs, Don. "Review--The Haunting of Torre Abbey by Carole Bugge." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 13.

17. ———. "Review--The Secret of Sherlock Holmes by Gary F. Boothe." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 11.

18. Kamsar, Joseph. "Reviews." Science Teacher 65, no. 2 (1998): 78.

Reviews the book, The Strange Case of Mrs. Hudson's Cat and Other Science Mysteries Solved by Sherlock Holmes, by Colin Bruce.

19. Klett, Rex E. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 123, no. 1 (1998): 148.

Reviews the book The Star of India, by Carole Bugge. (St. Martin's. c.208p. ISBN 0-31218-034-9. $21.95) "In an addition to the Sherlock Holmes saga that seems likely to succeed, Holmes displays his legendary powers of observation, and Watson unwittingly aids the bad guys. The story revolves around a beautiful woman and her expensive perfume, a missing fabled gemstone, and the return from certain death of Holmes's nemesis, Dr. Moriarty. First novelist Bugge captures the essence of Holmes as well as the spirit of the time. For all Sherlock fans."

20. Motyka, John, and Gerald Jonas. "Books in brief: Fiction." New York Times Book Review 147, no. 50936 (1997): 23.

Reviews several fiction titles. 'The Englishman's Boy,' by Guy Vanderhaeghe; 'Pure Slaughter Value,' by Robert Bingham; 'A Gracious Plenty,' by Sheri Reynolds; 'The Strange Case of Mrs. Hudson's Cat and Other Science Mysteries Solved by Sherlock Holmes,' by Colin Bruce; 'A Jewish Mother From Berlin and Susanna,' by Gertrude Kolmar.

21. Petocz, Peter, and Eric Sowey. "Statistical Diversions." Teaching Statistics 29, no. 2 (2007): 60-64.

The article discusses the issues of undergraduate students learning statistics. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...For further interesting reading on the gambler’s fallacy and the law of small numbers, we suggest...Bruce, C (2002), 'The Case of the Gambling Nobleman', in his Conned Again, Watson! Cautionary Tales of Logic, Maths, and Probability, UK: Vintage. In this Sherlock Holmes pastiche the gambler’s fallacy comes under scrutiny...."

22. Sveum, Richard J. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 2.

Focuses on John Kendrick Bangs, his connections with Doyle, and some of his writings from 1899. These include The Dreamers, A Club and "Sherlock Holmes Again" in Harpers Weekly.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Bangs, John Kendrick (9)

1. Bangs, John Kendrick. The dreamers : being a more or less faithful account of the literary exercises of the first regular meeting of that organization. 1st ed. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Wildside Press, 2001.

ill. ; 21 cm. The mystery of Pinkham's diamond stud (pp. 185-206). "A Wildside Press Mystery Classic."; "A trade paperback with Edward Penfield's illustrations, and Bangs' parody 'The Mystery of Pinkham's Diamond Stud.'"

2. ———. The mystery of Pinkham's diamond stud A Sherlock Holmes adventure dreamed by Fulton Streete. 1st separate ed, (Mysterious Sherlock Holmes). New York: The Mysterious Bookshop, 1999.

Includes bibliographical references;

3. ———. R. Holmes & Co being the remarkable adventures of Raffles Holmes, Esq., detective and amateur cracksman by birth, (Otto Penzler's Sherlock Holmes library). New York: O. Penzler Books, 1994.

LC Control Number: 93038798. Added Title: R. Holmes and Company. Added Title: Raffles Holmes and Company;

4. ———. R. Holmes & Co. : being the remarkable adventures of Raffles Holmes, Esq., detective and amateur cracksman by birth, (Otto Penzler's Sherlock Holmes library). New York: O. Penzler Books, 1994.

ill. ; 18 cm. Illustrated by Sydney Adamson.;

5. ———. Raffles Holmes & co being the remarkable adventures of Raffles Holmes, esq., detective and amateur cracksman by birth. 1st Wildside Press ed, (Wildside mystery classics). New York: Wildside Press, 2002.

6. ———. Raffles Holmes & co. : being the remarkable adventures of Raffles Holmes, esq., detective and amateur cracksman by birth. 1st Wildside Press ed, (Wildside mystery classics). New York: Wildside Press, 2002.

23 cm. Introduction by John Gregory Betancourt.;

7. ———. Sherlock Holmes again. 1st separate ed, (Mysterious Sherlock Holmes). New York: The Mysterious Bookshop, 1999.

8. Bangs, John Kendrick, and Jon L. Lellenberg. Shylock Homes: his posthumous memoirs. 1st ed, (Dispatch-Box Press publication). Arlington, Va.: Dispatch-Box Press, 1973.

LC Control Number: 73162788. Bibliography: p. 97-102. Citations: De Waal C21770;

9. Bangs, John Kendrick, and Otto Penzler. A Pragmatic Enigma. First separate ed, (Mysterious Sherlock Holmes). New York, Los Angeles, London: The Mysterious Bookshop, 1999.

20 cm. Limited edition of 221 copies. "Being a chapter from The Failures of Sherlock Holmes"--cover./ Originally published in the magazine section of The New York Herald, April 19, 1908. It was collected in book form in "Potted fiction", published by Doubleday, Page & Co., 1908. Introduction by Otto Penzler. by A. Conan Watson, M.D. [i.e. John Kendrick Bangs].;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Barr, Robert (1)

1. Barr, Robert. The triumphs of Eugène Valmont, (Oxford popular fiction). Oxford England, New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96044449. Includes bibliographical references (p. [xxiv]-xxv); "With an introduction by Stephen Knight and as a bonus, two of Barr's Sherlockian parodies: 'The Adventures of Sherlaw Kombs' and 'The Adventure of the Second Swag' (first published in The Idler in May 1892 and Dec. 1904, as by Luke Sharp).

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Barrett, Tracy (4)

1. "Children's Books for Spring." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 7 (2008): 27-116.

List includes Nancy Springer's The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets (the Enola Holmes Mysteries) ($14.99, 9-up); The Boy Sherlock Holmes continues with Death in the Air by Shane Peacock ($19.95, 10-14); The Sherlock Files debuts with The 100-Year-Old Secret by Tracy Barrett ($15.95.8-12).

2. Cruze, Karen. "The 100-Year-Old Secret." Booklist 105, no. 4 (2008): 81.

Reviews the book "The 100-Year-Old Secret" by Tracy Barrett. Read by David Pittu. 2008. 3hr. Listening Library, CD, $24 (9780739367636). Gr. 4-6. "This first Sherlock Files mystery-series title rests on the conceit that 12-year-old Xena Holmes and her 10-year-old brother, Xander, are direct descendants of Sherlock Holmes. Transplanted to England with their parents, the American sleuths investigate an unsolved Sherlock Holmes case involving a missing painting.... A fun, fast listen for young mystery lovers."

3. Kosiorek, Kathryn. "The 100-Year-Old Secret." School Library Journal 54, no. 6 (2008): 134-134.

The article reviews the book "The 100-Year-Old Secret," by Tracy Barrett. "Detective stories derived from the adventures of Sherlock Holmes are well represented in juvenile literature from Donald Sobol's 'Encyclopedia Brown' series to Nancy Springer's 'Enola Holmes' mysteries. Welcome 12-year-old Xena Holmes and her brother, Xander, Sherlock's great-great-great grandchildren, newly arrived in London from Florida....The main characters are observant, bright, and gifted with powers of deduction. Watson's great-great-great grandson, Andrew, is integral to the plot. Some clues seem to be obvious, but they can lead to a wrong conclusion. A well-paced beginning to a new series."

4. Romriell, Deanna. "The 100-Year-Old Secret: The Sherlock Files, Book 1." School Library Journal 54, no. 10 (2008): 74-74.

A review of the CD release of the audio book "The 100-Year-Old Secret: The Sherlock Files, Book 1," by Tracy Barrett, is presented. (unabr.). 3 CDs. 5:50 hrs. Prod. by Listening Library. Dist. by Listening Library/Books on Tape. 2008. ISBN 978-0-7393-6763-6. $24. "Shortly after 12-year-old Xena and her younger brother Xander move with their parents to London from Florida, they discover that they are the direct descendents of Sherlock Holmes and they receive his notebook of unsolved cases in this first title (Holt, 2008) in the series by Tracy Barrett....Likeable characters, an intriguing premise, and references to original Sherlock Holmes stories combine for a fun telling. David Pittu does a laudable job reading the tale and has an excellent sense of timing. He gives each character a unique voice and brings the various personalities to life. An enjoyable beginning to a new series."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Brandreth, Gyles (14)

1. "Fall 2008 Trade Paperbacks." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 26 (2008): 122-157.

The article reviews several books including Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder (Touchstone, Sept., $14) by Gyles Brandreth. "Imagines Wilde as a detective aided by Arthur Conan Doyle."

2. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 4 (2008): 4.

The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth. Includes passing references to Doyle. "...When a beautiful boy of the streets is brutally murdered and then his body disappears, Wilde enlists the investigative help of Robert Sherard, his faithful biographer, and Arthur Conan Doyle, a brilliant young author Wilde has just met. 'The challenge--and the excitement--has been to create a truthful portrait of Wilde, an atmospheric evocation of London and Paris in the late 1880s and an exciting murder mystery all at the same time,' says the author. 'Being a biographer has helped, I think. I want my portrait of Oscar Wilde--and Conan Doyle and their circle--to be accurate, truthful, human, sometime humorous and revealing.'..."

3. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 40 (2007): 38-38.

Short review of the book by Gyles Brandreth (Touchstone), $14 paper (368p) ISBN 978-1-4168-3483-9 with a passing reference to Doyle. "Oscar Wilde makes a stylish sleuth in this is clever series debut from Brandreth, a British author best known as a biographer (John Gielgud: An Actor's Life, etc.). Narrating the tale from his old age, poet Robert Sherard enjoys recalling the summer of 1889, when his friend Wilde was still celebrated and happily married. After discovering the butchered body of handsome young Billy Wood, Wilde fetches Sherard and his new friend Arthur Conan Doyle, but upon returning to the scene, they find neither body nor blood...."

4. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of no Importance." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 23 (2007): 1220-1220.

The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth.

5. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 27 (2008): 40-40.

The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder," by Gyles Brandreth. "...At a May 1892 meeting of the Socrates Club, a group founded by Wilde and including such luminaries as Arthur Conan Doyle and Bram Stoker, the members play "murder," a game that involves writing the name of a "victim" on a piece of paper and trying to guess who chose whom and why...."

6. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 14 (2008): 43-43.

The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder," by Gyles Brandreth. "As in Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance (2008), he enlists the assistance of Doyle, who ironically plays Watson to the playwright's Holmes."

7. Brandreth, Gyles Daubeney. Oscar Wilde and the candlelight murders. London: John Murray, 2007.

8. Fletcher, Connie. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Booklist 104, no. 5 (2007): 29.

Reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance" by Gyles Brandreth. "In this wow of a history-mystery, Brandreth (a former MP, BBC broadcaster, and biographer) gives us nothing less than the most credible Sherlock Holmes since the master of deductive reasoning toppled into Reichenbach Falls--except the uncannily brilliant sleuth is not Holmes but Oscar Wilde. Wilde gets to demonstrate his Holmesian knack for discovering the telling detail to his new friend Arthur Conan Doyle, whose recent 'Study in Scarlet' has skyrocketed him to fame. The mystery that engages Wilde is the murder of a 16-year-old artists’ model and male prostitute, Billy Wood (whose demise was the inspiration for The Portrait of Dorian Gray), with whom Wilde had an appointment. Wilde discovers the naked body of the model in the middle of a squalid flat; when he, enlisting Doyle as witness, returns later, the scene has been entirely cleaned and the body removed...."

9. ———. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Booklist 104, no. 22 (2008): 46-47.

Reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder" by Gyles Brandreth. "...Brandreth heightens the effect by having one of Wilde’s friends, Arthur Conan Doyle, play the role of dumbfounded Watson to Wilde’s brilliant Sherlock. Sharing the Watson role is narrator-poet Robert Sherard, who writes of Wilde’s exploits..."

10. Gunn, Drewey Wayne. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of no Importance." Lambda Book Report 16, no. 1 (2008): 24-24.

The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth.

11. ———. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Lambda Book Report 16, no. 3 (2008): 31-31.

The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder," by Gyles Brandreth. Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...Since another one of the main characters is Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes fans get the added pleasure of an extended conceit that some of Oscar's best lines become the source for dialogue Holmes will subsequently deliver in Doyle's stories...."

12. Jackson, Lorne. "Wilde about Oscar; book of the week, Oscar Wilde and the Ring of Death by Gyles Brandreth." Sunday Mercury, May 25, 2008: 6.

"He's a legendary former resident of Baker Street. An eccentric Englishman with a great nose for crime and a highly distinctive dress sense. However, he doesn't wear a deer-stalker hat or puff a pipe. This bloke is famous for his woolly jumpers. Gyles Brandreth is his name, not Sherlock Holmes. Perhaps you only know the plummy-voiced TV presenter because of his residency in Dictionary Corner in Countdown. Or for his less than distinguished career in the Nineties as a Tory whip in the ailing government of John Major. But Brandreth is also an author, and has just published the second book in a highly-polished series of detective novels starring none other than Oscar Wilde...."

13. Picker, Leonard. "Call of the Wilde." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 28 (2008): 46-46.

Gyles Brandreth, a former MP and an Oscar Wilde biographer, delivers his second mystery to feature Wilde as a Holmesian detective, Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder. A brief interview with the author that includes references to Doyle and Holmes.

14. Vicarel, Jo Ann. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Library Journal 132, no. 18 (2007): 48-48.

The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. Brandreth, Gyles. Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance. Touchstone: S. & S. Jan. 2008. c.347p. ISBN 978-1-4165-3483-9. pap. $14. "In 1889 London, writer Oscar Wilde finds the corpse of a male artist's model in a house used by men for assignations. Wilde later returns with friends Robert Sherard and Arthur Conan Doyle, but the body has vanished, the room cleaned, and the police declare that nothing has happened...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Bruce, Colin (10)

1. Bruce, Colin. Conned again, Watson! : cautionary tales of logic, math, and probability. New York: Basic Books, 2001.

ill. ; 21. The case of the unfortunate businessman -- The case of the gambling nobleman -- The case of the surprise heir -- The case of the ancient mariner -- The case of the unmarked graves -- The case of the Martian invasion -- Three cases of unfair preferment -- The execution of Andrews -- Three cases of relative honor -- The case of the poor observer -- The case of the perfect accountant -- Three cases of good intentions. Includes bibliographical references (p. 287) and index.; In these cautionary tales of greedy gamblers, reckless businessmen, and ruthless con men, Sherlock Holmes uses his deep understanding of probability, statistics, decision theory, and game theory to solve crimes and protect the innocent.

2. ———. Conned again, Watson! : cautionary tales of logic, maths and probability. London: Vintage, 2002.

ill. ; 20 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index.;

3. ———. Conned again, Watson! cautionary tales of logic, math, and probability. Cambridge, Mass: Perseus Books, 2001.

Contents: The case of the unfortunate businessman -- The case of the gambling nobleman -- The case of the surprise heir -- The case of the ancient mariner -- The case of the unmarked graves -- The case of the Martian invasion -- Three cases of unfair preferment -- The execution of Andrews -- Three cases of relative honor -- The case of the perfect accountant -- Three cases of good intentions; In these cautionary tales of greedy gamblers, reckless businessmen, and ruthless con men, Sherlock Holmes uses his deep understanding of probability, statistics, decision theory, and game theory to solve crimes and protect the innocent

4. ———. The Einstein paradox and other science mysteries solved by Sherlock Holmes, (Helix books). Reading, MA: Perseus Books, 1997.

LC Control Number: 98087055;

5. ———. Elémentaire mon cher Watson! : douze enquêtes policières résolues grâce à la logique, aux mathématiques et aux probabilités. [Paris]: Flammarion, 2002.

ill. ; 21 cm. Includes index. Conned again Watson! French. Traduit de l'anglais par Martine Devillers-Argouarc'h et Daniel Paget.;

6. ———. Novas aventuras científicas de Sherlock Holmes : casos de lógica, matemática e probabilidade. Rio de Janeiro: Jorge Zahar Ed., 2003.

23 cm. Tradução Helena Londres. Uniform Title: Conned again, Watson!: (cautionary tales of logic, math and probability). Portuguese.;

7. ———. The strange case of Mrs. Hudson's cat and other science mysteries solved by Sherlock Holmes, (Helix books). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Pub, 1997.

LC Control Number: 97006866;

8. ———. Su zi de xian jing : jie kai 12 ge shu xue de mi huo. Chu ban ed, (Next). Taibei Shi: Shi bao wen hua, 2001.

ill. ; 21 cm. Uniform Title: Conned again, Watson! : cautionary tales of logic, math and probability. Chinese. Includes bibliographical references: p. 291-292. Kelin Bulusi zhu ; Sheng Fengshi yi.;

9. Bruce, Colin, and Yukiko Fuse. Mata damasaretana watosun kun. Tokyo: Kadokawashoten, 2002.

20 cm. Translation of Conned again, Watson!;

10. Bruce, Colin, and Murat Saglam. Mantik ve olasilik hikayeleri. Istanbul: Güncel Yayincilik, 2001.

ill. Conned again, Watson! Türkçesi Murat Saglam.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- C (23)

1. Cadwallader, Sharon, and Patrick O. Chapin. Cookie McCorkle and the case of the crooked key, (An Avon Camelot book). New York: Avon Books, 1993.

LC Control Number: 92097473; Cookie McCorkle and her friend Walter work on a case that has been unsolved for more than 100 years, one that involves strange noises in the middle of the night and a light burning in a house with no electricity

2. ———. Cookie McCorkle and the case of the mystery map, (An Avon Camelot book). New York: Avon Books, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93090225;

3. Cannon, P. H, and Jason C. Eckhardt. The Lovecraft papers. United States: GuildAmerica Books, 1994.

Contents: Pulptime -- Scream for Jeaves. Added Title: Pulptime. Added Title: Scream for Jeeves;

4. Cannon, P. H, and J. C. Eckhardt. Scream for Jeeves a parody. 1st ed. New York: Wodecraft Press, 1994.

LC Control Number: 96224120;

5. Champlin, Tim. Deadly Season. Bath: Gunsmoke, 2010.

20 cm. Originally published: Unity, Me.: Five Star, 1997.; In 1880s San Francisco, detective Fred Casey teams up with visiting detective Sherlock Holmes to solve a murder in Chinatown. A tale of opium smuggling.

6. Cody, Liza, Michael Z. Lewin, H. R. F. Keating, and Crime Writers' Association (Great Britain). 3rd culprit an annual of crime stories. London: Chatto & Windus Ltd, 1994.

Contents: Mr. Idd / H.R.F. Keating (p. [27]-36). Added Title: Mr. Idd;

7. Cohen, Paula. Das Haus am Gramercy Park. Frankfurt an Main: Scherz, 2004.

18 cm. Translation of: Gramercy Park. Aus dem Amerikanischen von Tatjana Kruse.;

8. ———. Gramercy Park. London: Fourth Estate, 2002.

20 cm. Scuttlebutt Oct 2001.; "Paula calls the book 'historical suspense,' closest in spirit to Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, but set in Edith Wharton's New York. The novel opens in New York in 1894, when Mario Alfieri, the world's greatest tenor, moves into an elegant mansion facing Gramercy Park and encounters a bewitching orphan named Clara Adler. Paula is 'Lady Mary Brackenstall' amongst the Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes."

9. ———. Gramercy Park. Large type ed. Leicester: Ulverscroft, 2003.

26 cm. Originally published: London : Fourth Estate, 2002.;

10. ———. Gramercy Park. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2002.

24 cm. ; "Paula calls the book 'historical suspense,' closest in spirit to Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, but set in Edith Wharton's New York. The novel opens in New York in 1894, when Mario Alfieri, the world's greatest tenor, moves into an elegant mansion facing Gramercy Park and encounters a bewitching orphan named Clara Adler. Paula is 'Lady Mary Brackenstall' amongst the Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes."

11. ———. Gramercy Park. Large type ed. Hampton Falls, NH: Beeler Large Print, 2002.

24 cm.;

12. ———. Gramercy Park. Barcelona: Umbriel Editores, 2002.

23 cm. Translated by Juanjo Estrella.;

13. Conant, Susan. The Barker Street regulars a dog lover's mystery. 1st ed. New York: Doubleday, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97012751; "Involves amateur sleuth Holly Winter and her malamutes Rowdy and Kimi with some Boston Sherlockians, an animal psychic, and a murder; it's an amusing story: Conant knows and loves dogs, and had Sherlockian assistance from Bruce Southworth."

14. Connelly, Michael, and Otto Penzler. The best American mystery stories 2003, (The best American series). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 2003.

22 cm. Foreword -- Introduction / Michael Connelly -- The jukebox king / Doug Allyn -- Aardvark to aztec / Christopher Chambers -- The pickpocket / Christopher Cook -- After you've gone / John Peyton Cooke -- Hostages / James Crumley -- Death on denial / O'Neil de Noux -- The jeweler / Pete Dexter -- Thug : signification and the (de) construction of self / Tyler Dilts -- War can be murder / Mike Doogan -- Richard's children / Brendan Dubois -- When the women came out to dance / Elmore Leonard -- The Confession / Robert Mckee -- Lavender / Walter Mosley -- The skull / Joyce Carol Oates -- The dead their eyes implore us / George P. Pelecanos -- Sockdolager / Scott Phillips -- The adventure of the agitated actress / Daniel Stashower -- Home sweet home / Hannah Tinti -- Controlled burn / Scott Wolven -- That one autumn / Monica Wood -- Contributor's notes -- Other distinguished mystery stories of 2002.

edited and with an introduction by Michael Connelly ; Otto Penzler, series editor.; Includes Daniel Stashower's "The Adventure of the Agitated Actress."

15. Cooke, Jason. Sherlock Holmes and the morphine gambit. Cambridge: Breese Books, 2009.

22 cm.; In 1912, Sherlock Holmes is asked by Mycroft to investigate the burglary of a German financier, living in Norfolk. Holmes quickly determines a spy ring is in operation, but Mycroft's subsequent behavior raises doubt in Sherlock's mind about his brother's intentions.

16. Cooper-Posey, Tracy. Chronicles of the lost years a Sherlock Holmes mystery. Winnipeg, Man: Ravenstone, 1999.

LC Control Number: 00274261. Scuttlebutt Jun 2000; "Offers quite a bit of adventure and romance: Holmes is involved with a mysterious and accomplished woman named Elizabeth Sigerson before, during, and after the Great Hiatus, but there's mystery, too, and the adventures are interesting."

17. Cummings, Pat. Jimmy Lee did it. New York: Harper-Trophy, 1995.

Scuttlebutt Sept 1995; Artie keeps telling his sister that the messes all over their house are the work of the elusive Jimmy Lee. Angel plays detective (wearing a deerstalker).

18. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Every Dark Cloud by David Coker." The Holmes & Watson Report 2, no. 3 (1998): 8.

19. ———. "Review--The Case of the Reluctant Agent by Tracy Cooper-Posey." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 6 (2003): 10.

20. ———. "Review--The Elementary Cases of Sherlock Holmes by Ian Charnock." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 2 (2000): 18.

21. Hoffert, Barbara. "Prepub Alert." Library Journal 133, no. 1 (2008): 58-64.

The article reviews several fiction books including Capuzzo, Michael. The Murder Room: The Heirs of Sherlock Holmes Gather To Solve the World's Most Perplexing Cold Cases. Gotham: Penguin Group (USA). May 2008. 384p. ISBN 978-1-59240-142-0. $27.50. "Capuzzo investigates the Vidocq Society (named for Eugène François Vidocq, the first modern detective), which gathers in Philadelphia to solve ice-cold cases. He'll tour cities featured in the book."

22. Klett, Rex E., and Barbara Hoffert. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 123, no. 2 (1998): 116.

Reviews the book Barker Street Regulars, by Susan Conant. (Doubleday. Mar. 1998. c.262p. ISBN 0-385-48668-5. $29.95.) "Conant's following will enjoy series sleuth Holly Winter's latest outing with malamutes Rowdy and Kimi. Rowdy's work as a therapy dog for a Sherlock Holmes fan at a local nursing home ultimately involves Holly in another case of murder."

23. Wright, Henry James. "Review--'Watson's Last Case' by Ian Charnock." The Ritual, no. 27 (2001): 60-61.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Carr, Caleb (24)

1. "Caleb Carr." Entertainment Weekly, no. Issue 227 (1994): 48.

Cites author Caleb Carr's book preferences, with a passing reference to Holmes. "When people leave me alone long enough, I read [a] big, two-volume collection of Sherlock Holmes."

2. "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 14 (2005): 44.

Reviews the book "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes," by Caleb Carr, with an afterword by Jon Lellenberg.

3. "The List." Rolling Stone 973, no. (2005): 35.

The article presents current developments in the field of mass media in the United States. Includes the observation in the list: "Extreme Victorian makeover! Alienist author Caleb Carr brings his twisted eye for historical detail to the Sherlock Holmes franchise in The Italian Secretary (due out May 10th), which takes the coke-addled sleuth to the streets of Scotland."

4. Adams, Michael. "Audio." Library Journal 131, no. 5 (2006): 108-110.

An annotated directory of audiobooks is provided including Carr, Caleb. The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes. 4 cassettes. unabridged. 7 hrs. S. & S. Audio. 2005. ISBN 0-7435-5003-X [ISBN 978-0-7435-5003-1]. $26. "When two men are killed during the renovation of the royal palace at Holyrood in Scotland, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are summoned. Mycroft Holmes, the famous detective's brother, is a trusted advisor to Queen Victoria and wants to prevent a possible assassination attempt. Clues point to the involvement of David Rizzio, but the Italian secretary of Mary, Queen of Scots, was murdered at Holyrood 300 years earlier. Carr seems a natural to try his hand at a Holmes adventure since the psychologist hero of The Alienist, his best-known novel, uses methods similar to those of the consulting detective. As with The Alienist, this book offers plenty of period detail and is written in a slightly stiff style, approximating that of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Carr's Sherlock seems a bit vague, with Watson and Mycroft being much more specific and interesting. Simon Prebble, one of the best readers of mysteries, employs a variety of voices and accents to heighten the Victorian verisimilitude. Recommended for all popular collections."

5. ———. "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes." Library Journal 131, no. 5 (2006): 108-108.

The article reviews the audiobook "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes," by Caleb Carr.

6. Baker, John F. "Hot Deals." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 50 (2004): 12-12.

Presents news briefs on deals between authors and publishers in the U.S. as of December 13, 2004. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...Military historian and novelist Caleb Carr is writing his next novel, a Sherlock Holmes tale involving murder in the entourage of Queen Victoria, for Carroll & Graf, where Will Balliett bought North American rights from agent Suzanne Gluck at William Morris; it's called The Italian Secretary and will appear in May..."

7. Carr, Caleb. The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes. New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2006.

8. Carr, Caleb, and Jon L. Lellenberg. The Italian secretary a further adventure of Sherlock Holmes. 1st Carroll & Graf ed. New York: Carroll & Graf, 2005.

Scuttlebutt Apr 2005.; "Brings Holmes and Watson to Edinburgh to assist Mycroft in defending Her Majesty against a plot that involves Holyrood and David Rizzio (who was Queen Mary's secretary and met his death at Holyrood. There's an afterwood by Jon Lellenberg, who has hopes of some day reading a pastiche in which Sherlock Holmes meets Laszlo Kreizler."

9. Forbes, Steve. "Two Holmes Runs." Forbes 177, no. 6 (2006): 32-32.

This article presents reviews for two books entitled "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes," by Caleb Carr and "Holmes on the Range," by Steve Hockensmith.

10. Goodwin, Karin. "Holmes returns for case at Holyrood." Sunday Times (London), June 19, 2005: 13.

"The deer-stalker has been dusted off, the pipe packed and the magnifying glass polished. Sherlock Holmes is to make his first official return to the printed page since the death of his Scottish creator 75 years ago. In what Sir Arthur Conan Doyle might have called The Case of the Homecoming Hero, the sleuth investigates his first murder in Scotland. The Italian Secretary, written by the American thriller writer and historian Caleb Carr, is the first novel to be commissioned by the Conan Doyle estate...."

11. Hargreaves, Tracy. "'We Other Victorians': Literary Victorian Afterlives." Journal of Victorian Culture 13, no. 2 (2008): 278-286.

"The article explores how 20th century writers have portrayed Victorians and the Victorian period. It examines the works of authors such as Virginia Woolfe and John Galsworthy and discusses the social, political and family issues that were raised in the 20th century regarding life in the Victorian period. It discusses the representation of Victorian life on television in the 1950s and 1960s and what the afterlife of the Victorian period has allowed social and cultural commentators to reexamine about the values and morals of the Victorians." Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...The classic text has been re-imagined.... Emily Brontë resurfaces in Jane Urquhart’s Changing Heaven: A Novel, Clare Boylan’s Emma Brown: A Novel From the Unfinished Manuscript of Charlotte Bronte appeared in 2004, Maryse Conde transplants Wuthering Heights to Windward Heights, Emma Tennant imagines Heathcliff’s Tale, Caleb Carr and Jamyang Norbu add to the Sherlock Holmes canon (The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes and Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years respectively) as of course did Julian Barnes in Arthur and George. Wilkie Collins and Charles Dickens were intertextually present in Sarah Waters’ Fingersmith...."

12. Herman, Carol. "Sherlock in Scotland." The Washington Times, June 5, 2005: B08.

"Google Sherlock Holmes and you'll find 1,460,000 entries to choose from. The vaunted detective has lived so far beyond the original four novels and 56 short stories in which he sleuthed and disarmed that it is hard to fathom how it will all end for him, if it ever does....Sherlock Holmes prospered for almost 30 years more in Conan Doyle's work and to varying degrees ever after in the work of others. Readers can find him in countless parodies...But there are also the pastiches. For these, the stakes are considerably higher because, among other things, they have been devised with the idea of matching or extending the original vision of their creator. This takes chutzpah. Or, in the case of Caleb Carr, author of the bestselling novel 'The Alienist,' what it seems to have taken is a direct invitation from the Conan Doyle estate. And chutzpah. So, how does 'The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' measure up? Well, it turns out that the book is very smart and entertaining and, most importantly, Mr. Carr returns the super sleuth to a challenge that is worthy of him...."

13. Klinger, Leslie S. "Review: The Italian Secretary, by Caleb Carr." Los Angeles Times, May 8, 2005: 6.

In Books section.

14. Martinez, Susan B. "The Old Enemy." Journal of Religion & Psychical Research 28, no. 4 (2005): 205-217.

An intensive study of MPD (multiple personality disorder) has spilled over into other areas of mental aberration (obsession, possession, criminology, etc.) -- with a common link that goes beyond childhood abuse. Case studies reveal that religious mania and the idee fixe play a significant part in warping the vulnerable mind. We look to the family background -- but also beyond it -- to the excarnate intruders who prey upon mortal minds in disruption. Deceit, control -- even bondage -- are the inevitable themes explored in this investigation of "inexplicable" human behavior. [Abstract from author]. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Where the patient is TELLING us something meaningful, we must not dismiss it as fantasy or quirk, 'It is remarkable, gentlemen, how often clues are mistaken for riddles' -- Sherlock Holmes (as portrayed by Caleb Carr in The Italian Secretary, p. 11... '

15. Memmott, Carol. "Holmes resurfaces in two new tales." USA Today, April 21, 2005: D4.

"Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has been dead for nearly 75 years, but his most famous literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, lives on as never before. Two critically acclaimed authors, Caleb Carr and Mitch Cullin, are following in Conan Doyle's foot-steps by placing Holmes and his loyal friend Dr. Watson at the center of their new novels...."

16. Riippa, Laurele, and Robert Dahlin. "Hardcover Fiction/General and Short Stories." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 4 (2005): 144-150.

Presents several books including The Italian Secretary (May, $25) by Caleb Carr. "The author of The Alienist returns with Sherlock Holmes and Watson investigating a pair of gruesome murders." A Slight Trick of the Mind (Apr., $23.95) by Mitch Cullin "probes beneath the cool facade of Sherlock Holmes to reveal his hidden past."

17. Samson, Antonio R. "Fence Sitter." BusinessWorld, July 11, 2005: 1.

"Certain serial characters like James Bond live on in sequels that more modern authors have been authorized by the estate to take on. Even Victor Hugo's Cosette and Margaret Mitchell's Scarlet O'Hara have been resurrected in sequels. But no other character fascinates mystery writers more than Sherlock Holmes....Caleb Carr's The Italian Secretary (2005, 266 pages) hews more closely to the Sherlock Holmes "canon." This canon consists of the Doyle's Sherlock Holmes character in the complete stories which define his mannerisms, history, approach, and partnership with Watson whom he first met in A Study in Scarlet. Thus, continuing the character beyond the life of the original author needs a familiarity, if not intimate knowledge, of who Sherlock Holmes is...."

18. Samul, Ron. "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes." Library Journal 130, no. 7 (2005): 74.

Reviews the book "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes," by Caleb Carr.

19. Skow, John. "A case for Sherlock Freud." Time 143, no. 16 (1994): 74.

Reviews Caleb Carr's novel 'The Alienist,' a good psychological thriller and a remarkable time machine voyage. Carr's story is so well told that Paramount has paid $500,000 for the film rights, but it is his ability to re-create the past that is truly impressive. No reference to Holmes beyond title.

20. Stoffman, Judy. "There's still smoke in Sherlock's pipe." The Toronto Star, April 30, 2005: H02.

A short profile and review of Caleb Carr's The Italian Secretary.

21. Teeman, Tim. "Sherlock Holmes." The Times (London), December 11, 2004: 11.

"The Conan Doyle estate has given its approval to a novel called The Italian Secretary by Caleb Carr, author of The Alienist, in which two royal servants die, with echoes of the murder of a confidante of Mary, Queen of Scots 300 years earlier."

22. Trone, Mary C. "Mystery; [Metro Edition]." Star Tribune (Minneapolis), Dec 12, 1994: 11.

A Small Sacrifice by Ellen Hart (Seal Press, $20.95) and Once Upon a Crime by M.D. Lake (Avon, $4.99) are both by local authors, continuing two series that feature Twin Cities' protagonists. Hart's Jane Lawless is a restaurateur and amateur sleuth who's called on to find a killer among her friend Cordelia's reunited college chums. Lake's campus cop, Peggy O'Neill, seeks a wolf disguised as a lamb during a Hans Christian Andersen conference at the university.; Sins of the Wolf by Anne Perry (Fawcett, $20), The Alienist by Caleb Carr (Random House, $22) and Laurie R. King's The Beekeeper's Apprentice (St. Martin's Press, $21.95) are all outstanding period mysteries. Perry returns to Victorian London; Carr takes readers back to New York City in the 1890s, and King provides Sherlock Holmes with a young woman sidekick to liven up his retirement.

23. Zaleski, Jeff. "Returning to Holmes." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 16 (2005): 36-36.

Interviews mystery fiction writer Caleb Carr. Background of his book "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes"; Reasons behind the interest shown by mystery writers in the literary works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; His views on the tendency of readers to expect conspiracies in mystery stories.

24. Zeitchik, Steven. "Books on the Side." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 10 (2005): 20-20.

Discusses the reasons of authors for doing side projects with other publishers while maintaining a publishing contract. Projects of author Caleb Carr for Carroll & Graf and Random House; Reaction of Scribner, publisher of King, on the decision of King to write a book for Hard Case Crime; Reason of author Stephen King for agreeing to do a book for Hard Case Crime. Includes passing references to Holmes. "...But the issue of publisher reaction begs the larger question: in this era of unprecedented reward and resources for celebrity authors, what makes one want to jump in the first place? For some, of course, it's the chance to step out of the limelight and into a more free-spirited space, the literary equivalent of putting on a Halloween costume. 'There's a lot less weight of expectation,' said Carr agent Suzanne Gluck, referring to her client's C&G book, a Sherlock Holmes mystery in the voice of Dr. Watson....C&G is a Holmes hotbed in a way Random could never be...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Carr, John Dickson (1)

1. Strout, Cushing. "Theatrical Magic and the Novel." Sewanee Review 111, no. 1 (2003): 169.

Discusses the use of theatrical magic in more serious forms of the novel. Affinity between classic fictional methods of detection and theatrical methods of deception; Use of theatrical magic in novels such as 'The Magician's Wife,' by Brian Moore, 'The Houdini Girl,' by Martyn Bedford and 'The Magician's Assistant,' by Ann Patchett. Includes references to Doyle and John Dickson Carr.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Chabon, Michael (20)

1. Cahill, Bryon. "Michael Chabon: A writer with many faces." Writing 27, no. 6 (2005): 16-19.

This article focuses on writer Michael Chabon and includes a reference to Holmes. "...I asked him if he could pinpoint a time in his life when he knew that he wanted to be a writer. He said that when he was just 10 years old, he had to write a short story for a class assignment. The result was a tale about Sherlock Holmes. It was a grand success, receiving an A and flattering kudos from his parents. Interestingly, 30 prolific years later, Chabon's most recent book, The Final Solution, is a novella centered on the character of Holmes as an old man (though the author never actually names the famous detective)...."

2. Carter, Adrienne, Jonah Freedman, Megan Johnston, Tara Kalwarski, and Stephanie D. Smith. "Book Picks." Money 33, no. 12 (2004): 152.

"This article recommends several books for holiday gift-giving. Picks by Todd Stewart and Bridget Warren. "The Complete Aubrey/Maturin Novels," by Patrick O'Brian. Last year's "Master and Commander" film spawned a whole new set of rabid fans of O'Brian's 20-book series of sea adventures. "McSweeney's Enchanted Chamber of Astonishing Stories," edited by Michael Chabon. This "pulp fiction" collection includes tales from Stephen King, Margaret Atwood and Joyce Carol Oates. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes." Dr. Watson, Moriarty, the hound: All here in a two-volume illustrated collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's 56 detective stories...."

3. Chabon, Michael. The final solution: a story of detection. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Fourth Estate, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004053343;

4. Chabon, Michael, and Toshiyuki Kurohara. Sharokku homuzu saigo no kaiketsu, Shincho bunko. Tokyo: Shinchosha, 2010.

16 cm. Final solution. Japanese. Saigo no kaiketsu. Kurohara Toshiyuki yaku.;

5. Dahlin, Robert, Natalie Danford, Charles Hix, Karole Riippa, and Laurele Riippa. "Fall 2004 Hardcovers: Fiction/General & Collections." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 32 (2004): 157-161.

Features several fiction books, including a Holmesian title. "The Final Solution (Dec., $16.95) by Michael Chabon turns to the great master of detection: Sherlock Holmes. 60,000 first printing."

6. Davis, Alan. "Road Trips." Hudson Review 58, no. 2 (2005): 344-351.

Critiques several novels including 'The Final Solution,' by Michael Chabon. Includes reference to Holmes.

7. Davis, J. Madison. "Mix and Match: Michael Chabon's Imaginative Use of Genre." World Literature Today 82, no. 6 (2008): 9-11.

A literary criticism of the book "The Yiddish Policemen's Union," by Michael Chabon is presented. The author comments on how Chabon writes novels that present variations on popular genres. The author discusses how the book combines elements and archetypes of mystery novels with an alternate history and comments on surreal elements of the book's plot.

8. Deresiewicz, William. "The Imaginary Jew." Nation 284, no. 21 (2007): 44-48.

The article reviews the books "The Yiddish Policemen's Union," by Michael Chabon, and "The Ministry of Special Cases," by Nathan Englander. Includes a reference to his Holmes title. "...Chabon's detective novella The Final Solution centers on the relationship between a young German-Jewish refugee and Sherlock Holmes...."

9. Donahue, Deirdre. "'Union': Original but overwrought." USA Today, May 1, 2007: D4.

Review of The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon. HarperCollins, 414 pp., $26.95. Other works listed, including The Final Solution. "The 2004 novella features an elderly Sherlock Holmes."

10. Francken, James. "This Month's Choice." The Daily Telegraph (London), February 5, 2005: 10.

"In 'The Final Problem', an ingenious short story by Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes plunges over the Reichenbach Falls, locked in the grip of his nemesis - Professor Moriarty. Does Holmes survive? Conan Doyle's story never lets on. But in The Final Solution, the dazzling new novella by Michael Chabon - this month's choice for the Daily Telegraph Book Club - we are given an answer...."

11. Grossman, Lev. "The Genius Who Wanted to Be a Hack." Time 170, no. 19 (2007): 74.

A book review is presented of "Gentlemen of the Road," by Michael Chabon. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "In the past eight years Michael Chabon, who is probably the premiere prose stylist--the Updike--of his generation, has written a novel about superhero comics; a fantasy tale; a mystery starring an old man who may or may not be Sherlock Holmes; and a pulp crime book set in an alternate time...."

12. Henderson, Eleanor. "From Pittsburgh to Sitka." Virginia Quarterly Review 83, no. 3 (2007): 248-257.

The article reviews the book "The Yiddish Policemen's Union," by Michael Chabon. Includes passing references to Doyle and Holmes.

13. Hobbs, Don. "Review--The Final Solution by Michael Chabon." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 6 (2005): 14.

14. Hoberek, Andrew. "Introduction: After Postmodernism." Twentieth Century Literature 53, no. 3 (2007): 233-247.

The article discusses various reports published within the issue including one by Jeremy Green on declarations of postmodernism's demise and another by Minsoo Kang on the sign of an intellectual idea's final demise. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...We can see in this example a continuity with the postmodern project as it works its way back and forth between the production and criticism of fiction: postmodern fiction's openness to mass culture begets the culturalist turn in criticism which begets not only the opening of the canon but also the expansion of what counts as literature in the present. Among younger authors this shift can be quite self-conscious. Thus Michael Chabon argues--at the same time that his fiction progresses from the early novels of alienated middle-class life through the transitional The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (2001) to The Final Solution (2005), a novella featuring an unnamed but recognizable Sherlock Holmes, and his own alternate history The Yiddish Policemen's Union (2007)--that serious authors should return to genre fiction as an antidote to the dominance of 'the contemporary, quotidian, plotless, moment-of-truth revelatory story' (6), a form he understands not as essentially literary but as itself a genre contingently elevated to high cultural status...."

15. K, S. "The Final Solution (Book)." People 62, no. 24 (2004): 58-58.

Reviews the book "The Final Solution," by Michael Chabon.

16. Kingsbury, Pam. "Maps and Legends: Essays on Reading and Writing Along the Borderlands." Library Journal 133, no. 5 (2008): 72-72.

The article reviews the book "Maps and Legends: Essays on Reading and Writing Along the Borderlands," by Michael Chabon. Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "In his first work of nonfiction, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Chabon (The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay) tells readers of some of the books that have helped shape his writing career. Among his loves: F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Philip Roth's Goodbye, Columbus, Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes mysteries, and various comic strips and ghost stories...."

17. Miller, Laura. "Zelig on Baker Street." New York Times Book Review 154, no. 52998 (2004): 31-31.

Presents an essay on Sherlock Holmes and his many resurrections since his invention some 150 years ago. Contention that the book "Curious Incident of the Dog in The Night-Time," by Mark Haddon, not only gets its title from author Arthur Conan Doyle but also parallels the way that trusty Watson could notice facts without grasping their meaning; "The Hamilton Case," by Michelle de Kretser which also makes mention of Holmes; "Final Solution," by Michael Chabon where an elderly unnamed man (suggested to be Holmes) is brought out of retirement to solve a case; Criticism of "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes edited by Leslie S. Klinger who is a confirmed Sherlockian; How the campiness of the stories remains a winning feature after all this time.

18. Myers, D. G. "Michael Chabon's Imaginary Jews." Sewanee Review 116, no. 4 (2008): 572-588.

The article presents a biography of Michael Chabon, author of novels focused on the modern Jewish tradition. "...The Final Solution tried to combine Sherlock Holmes with a Holocaust narrative; and, if passionate readers of Doyle were unable to recognize literature's most famous detective from what passed for his reasoning, the Paris Review was impressed, awarding the novella its Aga Khan Prize for Eiction; and reviewers were too--by and large. One exception was Melvin Jules Bukiet, a ten-years-older American novelist, himself an author of Holocaust narratives, who noted that 'although the language is often luscious enough to lap up, it leaves a bad taste because Chabon uses a background of genocide for what is essentially a young adult novel or a mystery story,' Bukiet was right about the novella's effect, although its source is not Chabon's impiety toward the Holocaust, Tova Reich, another Jewish novelist, recently published an irreverent look at "Holocaust obsessiveness" (My Holocaust, 2007) that respects the event by puncturing the false pieties surrounding its remembrance. If his novella was inappropriate the reason is that Chabon had never given a moment's thought to the question of appropriateness, and not much more to what he was trying to say. His conceptions of genre and style were too rigid to allow for much beyond genre-bending and stylistic play...."

19. Sayers, Valerie. "The Chosen Frozen." Commonweal 134, no. 16 (2007): 26-27.

The article reviews the book "The Yiddish Policemen's Union," by Michael Chabon. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Chabon's subsequent work continues to pair his interest in popular culture with his exploration of the twentieth century's dark history. As guest editor of a controversial 2002 issue of McSweeney's, he wrote a manifesto celebrating old-fashioned genre-driven plot, and followed that up with The Final Solution, a short novel that resurrects an aged Sherlock Holmes to solve a post-Holocaust mystery...."

20. Seaman, Donna. "Maps and Legends: Essays on Reading and Writing along the Borderlands." Booklist 104, no. 13 (2008): 28.

Reviews the book "Essays on Reading and Writing along the Borderlands: Maps and Legends" by Michael Chabon. "...He offers a fresh and affecting take on Arthur Conan Doyle and pays witty and provocative tribute to M. R. James, a seemingly serene British author of superb horror and ghost stories...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Cullin, Mitch (10)

1. "The Post-War Dream." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 1 (2008): 5-5.

The article reviews the book "The Post-War Dream," by Mitch Cullin. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "Cullin's fiction has ranged widely, and results have been mixed, but he seemed to have found his footing in A Slight Trick of the Mind (2005), a dazzling fictional portrayal of Sherlock Holmes in old age...."

2. Adams, Michael. "Audio." Library Journal (1976) 130, no. 20 (2005): 183.

An annotated bibliography of fiction and nonfiction audiobooks is provided. Includes Cullin, Mitch. A Slight Trick of the Mind. 6 CDs. unabridged. 7 1/4 hrs. HighBridge Audio. 2005. ISBN 1-56511-950-9. $29.95. "Cullin takes an unusual approach to Sherlock Holmes by creating a character study of the elderly detective instead of having him solve a traditional mystery. A Slight Trick of the Mind alternates between three narratives: the 93-year-old Holmes in retirement, keeping bees at his cottage on the Sussex coast; a visit to Japan shortly after World War II; and flashbacks to a case of a missing wife years earlier. The author smoothly ties the three strands together to present Holmes's regret over his underdeveloped emotional nature. A death for which Holmes bears some responsibility results in the cold, distant old man seeking forgiveness. The sections depicting the detective in his prime and the sojourn to Japan are full of colorful period detail. Cullin's moving story of the necessity and pain of love is brilliantly handled by Simon Jones, who creates a wonderfully evocative, gruff voice for Holmes. Recommended for all collections."

3. Baker, John F. "Hot Deals." Publishers Weekly 250, no. 45 (2003): 14-14.

Offers updates on book deals in the U.S. as of November 10, 2003 with a reference to Holmes. "A new novel that portrays Sherlock Holmes, in retirement at 93, suffering some loss of his fabled memory, uncharacteristically subject to emotion and struggling to come to terms with a mysterious case from his past, was signed as part of a two-book deal by Coates Bateman, a new editor at Nan Talese's Doubleday imprint. The author is L.A.--based Mitch Cullin, who has been a devoted Sherlockian ever since childhood, and the North American rights deal was made with agent Peter Steinberg at JCA Literary. Steinberg said that both Bateman and Talese had 'flipped' for the book, called The Moon Reflects the Sun, and offered a two-book buy, which helped clinch the deal against strong auction opposition from other publishers."

4. Costa, Richard Hauer. "A Slight Trick of the Mind." Magill Book Reviews, no. (2005).

"Mitch Cullin has written a loving, sad tale of Sherlock Holmes in the era of Hiroshima--a Holmes who, while no longer sure of his powers, has come into his own humanity."

5. Klinger, Leslie S. "Review: A Slight Trick of the Mind, by Mitch Cullin." Los Angeles Times, April 15, 2005: 2.

In Books section.

6. McCord, Jeff, and Mike Shea. "Previews + Reviews." Texas Monthly 33, no. 4 (2005): 60-60.

Reviews several books and music releases. "Black Sheep Boy," by Will Sheff and Jonathan Meiburg; "A Slight Trick of the Mind," by Mitch Cullin; "Dishing," by Liz Smith. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...Texas-raised Mitch Cullin has taken a lion-in-winter approach to the Sherlock Holmes myth, portraying the legendary sleuth as a beekeeping retiree drifting into the mists of forgetfulness on his Sussex Downs estate in Slight Trick of the Mind (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday). And he's done so in an elegantly entertaining fashion, triangulating his book between Holmes's daffy domestic concerns, a visit to post-World War II Japan, and a manuscript written by the man himself about a mystery from his heyday as an investigator. Cullin shrewdly employs young Roger, the housekeeper's son, as the device to tie the narrative together and lead it to a brilliant conclusion. Inventive and thoroughly satisfying.

7. Memmott, Carol. "Holmes resurfaces in two new tales." USA Today, April 21, 2005: D4.

"Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has been dead for nearly 75 years, but his most famous literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, lives on as never before. Two critically acclaimed authors, Caleb Carr and Mitch Cullin, are following in Conan Doyle's foot-steps by placing Holmes and his loyal friend Dr. Watson at the center of their new novels...."

8. Riippa, Laurele, and Robert Dahlin. "Hardcover Fiction/General and Short Stories." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 4 (2005): 144-150.

Presents several books including The Italian Secretary (May, $25) by Caleb Carr. "The author of The Alienist returns with Sherlock Holmes and Watson investigating a pair of gruesome murders." A Slight Trick of the Mind (Apr., $23.95) by Mitch Cullin "probes beneath the cool facade of Sherlock Holmes to reveal his hidden past."

9. Sklaroff, Sara. "Read More Books." U.S.News & World Report 137, no. 23 (2004): 56-56.

Encourages people to read more books. Book titles to look for in 2005. Includes A Slight Trick of the Mind by Mitch Cullin; Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. "The legendary Sherlock Holmes is 93 and retired to a Sussex farmhouse."

10. Wilkinson, Joanne. "The Post-War Dream." Booklist 104, no. 8 (2007): 26-27.

Reviews the book "The Post-War Dream" by Mitch Cullin. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "After his multifaceted fictional portrait of Sherlock Holmes, A Slight Trick of the Mind (2005), Cullin turns to a seemingly more ordinary tale of a Korean war vet haunted by both his combat experiences and the recent fatal diagnosis of his wife’s ovarian cancer...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- D (20)

1. Dahlin, Robert, Natalie Danford, Charles Hix, Karole Riippa, and Laurele Riippa. "Fall Trade Paperbacks: Fiction/Mystery & Suspense." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 32 (2004): 206-206.

Presents several mystery and suspense fiction books available in the U.S. as of August 2004. Included, from Berkley Prime Crime, is Mrs. Hudson and the Spirits' Curse (Dec., $13) by Martin Davies. "[F]eatures the brilliant housekeeper for Sherlock Holmes."

2. Daly, Lorraine. Sherlock Holmes and the Lusitania. Romford, Essex: Ian Henry Publications, 1999.

LC Control Number: 98040038; Scuttlebutt Jul 1999; "Extends Holmes' career beyond his capture of Von Bork, and involves Holmes and Watson in an investigation of the sinking of the 'Lusitania' and in a battle against German saboteurs."

3. Daugherty, Mary Ellen. Sigerson at the pole. Santa Maria, CA: Scion of the Green Dragon, 1997.

4. Davidson, Avram. The other nineteenth century. New York : Tor; Godalming : Melia, 2003.

21 cm.;

5. Davidson, Avram, Grania Davis, and Henry Wessells. The other nineteenth century : a story collection. 1st ed. New York: TOR, 2001.

22 cm. "A Tom Doherty Associates book." Edited by Grania Davis and Henry Wessells. Scuttlebutt Jan 2002.; "Contents include 'The Singular Incident of the Dog on the Beach' (reprinted from Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, Dec. 1986)."

6. Davies, David Stuart. Sherlock Holmes and the Reichenbach secret. Huddersfield: Thumbprints, 1997.

ill. ; 21 cm.;

7. Davies, Martin. Mrs. Hudson and the spirits' curse. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004054425; "Mrs. Hudson takes an interest in one of Holmes' cases, and with Flottie, the orphan girl in her care, is determined to solve the mystery."

8. Day, Barry. Sherlock Holmes and the Alice in Wonderland murders. London: Oberon Books, 1998.

18 cm.; Holmes and Watson encounter American newspaper boss, John Moxton, whose yellow press, The Clarion, is beginning to threaten and undermine political stability in Victorian England. At the same time, public figures are humiliated and then murdered, each incident having a parallel in "Alice in Wonderland", and each time The Clarion is conveniently on hand. Holmes and Watson race against time to discover Moxton's master plan and thwart him.

9. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Shakespeare Globe murders. London: Oberon, 1997.

ill. ; 18 cm.;

10. DeChancie, John. From Prussia with love: a Castle Falkenstein novel. Rocklin, Calif.: Prima Pub, 1996.

LC Control Number: 94080150; Scuttlebutt Apr 1996; "A spin-off from the Castle Falkenstein role-playing game created by R. Talsorian Games. The game and the novel are set in a magical Victorian alternate universe that includes fairies, dwarves, steam engines, and dragons, and Prof. Moriarty makes a brief but villainous appearance in the novel."

11. ———. Masterminds of Falkenstein: a castle Falkenstein novel. Rocklin, CA: Prima Pub, 1996.

LC Control Number: 95072962; Scuttlebutt Apr 1996; "Moriarty turns up again in a magical Victorian alternate steampunk universe."

12. Duchâteau, André-Paul, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Stibane. Sherlock Holmes : Jack l'Eventreur ou Ricoletti au pied bot, (Collection Detectives présentée par Le Masque). Bruxelles: Lefrancq, 1994.

chiefly col. ill. ; 30 cm. scénario original: André-Paul Duchâteau ; dessin: Stibane.;

13. Dunyach, Jean-Claude. The night orchid : Conan Doyle in Toulouse. Encino: Black Coat Press, 2004.

22 cm. Adapted in English by Sheryl Curtis ... [et al.] ; foreword by David Brin.; "A collection of stories, translated from the French. In the title story 'Arthur Conan Doyle takes Professor Challenger to the south of France, where he encounters the famous Professor Picard, Irene Adler, and an ancient horror.'"

14. Dvorkin, David. Time for Sherlock Holmes. 2nd ed. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Wildside Press, 2000.

23 cm.;

15. Dyke, John Brooks van. No ordinary terror. Dallas, Tex. : Durban House: St. Albans : Verulam, 2004.

23 cm.; "Richard and Emma Watson, twin children of Dr. John H. Watson (she's also a doctor, in practice with her father) investigate an Edwardian espionage mystery set before World War I. Mycroft is involved, and so is a second-generation Inspector Gordon Lestrade."

16. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Alice in Wonderland Murders by Barry Day." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 20.

17. Pitt, David. "Indigo Christmas." Booklist 104, no. 22 (2008): 43.

Reviews the book "Indigo Christmas" by Jeanne M. Dam. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Luckily, Hilda’s a resourceful woman, and she soon comes up with an ingenious solution to her investigative problem, one that will, not to give too much away, be of particular interest to Sherlock Holmes fans. The novel has a suspenseful story, but, as usual, it’s the characters and setting (rendered in precise but not obtrusive detail) that really capture our interest"

18. Samson, Antonio R. "Fence Sitter." BusinessWorld, January 28, 2008: S1/4.

"Box-office hit movies invite new installments to continue the narrative from where it left off. So popular are sequels that producers always look out for a 'franchise' - a succession of sequels featuring the same characters moving into different situations....Strangest of all are sequels to old classics fashioned by new authors....Then there is Michael Dibdin, a mystery writer who has created his own unforgettable detective in Aurelio Zen, an Italian sleuth struggling with the police bureaucracy and the mafia. Early in his mystery-writing career, Dibdin wrote a story featuring Sherlock Holmes. Dibdin prefaces his mystery, The Last Case of Sherlock Holmes, with a quote from Arthur Conan Doyle which purports to allow future writers to do what they wish with his immortal character, Holmes. 'Marry him, kill him, do what you want with him,' Conan Doyle is claimed to have said. Dibdin takes Conan Doyle at his word and proceeds to spin a tale of the master of deductive reasoning which is sure to upset some Sherlock Holmes fans, including this one...."

19. ———. "Fence Sitter." BusinessWorld, June 13, 2008: S1/4.

"The popularity of the sequel is easy to understand. A box-office hit already contains the ingredients that have worked with the paying audience. There is a built-in following that understands the major characters. A sense of clubbiness prevails among fans who share trivial knowledge of the plot, its history, and the various characters involved. Even when new villains are matched up against the familiar hero, they exude the same evil and familiar mystique....Then there is Michael Dibdin, a mystery writer who has created an unforgettable detective in Aurelio Zen, an Italian detective struggling with the bureaucracy and the mafia. Early in his writing career, Dibdin had written a sequel of Sherlock Holmes...."

20. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--Seventeen Steps to Slimness: A Sherlockian Diet Manual by Susan Z. Diamond." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 1 (2002): 28.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Davies, David Stuart (14)

1. "Without Conscience: A Johnny Hawke Novel." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 37 (2008): 48-48.

The article reviews the book "Without Conscience: A Johnny Hawke Novel," by David Stuart Davies. St. Martin's Minotaur/Dunne, $23.95 (224p) ISBN 978-0-312-38210-0. "Sherlock Holmes expert Davies relies too much on contrived plot twists in his second WWII novel to feature PI Johnny Hawke (after 2007's Forests of the Night)....Davies repeatedly sets up coincidences to advance the plot, including a link between Hawke and Jenkins that leads to Blake's being taken hostage. Those looking for a nuanced view of the English home front on a par with, say, TV's Foyle's War may be disappointed."

2. Booth, Matthew. "Review--The Scroll of the Dead: A Sherlock Holmes Adventure by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 64-65.

3. ———. "Review--The Shadow of the Rat by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 62-64.

4. Davies, David Stuart. The scroll of the dead: a Sherlock Holmes adventure. Ashcroft, B.C.: Calabash Press, 1998.

"The pastiche is a nicely-plotted mystery that has Holmes and Watson involved in pursuing and thwarting a villain who hopes to find the secret of immortality."

5. ———. The shadow of the rat: a Sherlock Holmes adventure. Ashcroft, British Columbia: Calabash Press, 1999.

6. ———. Sherlock Holmes, the last act. Ashcroft, British Columbia: Calabash Press, 1999.

7. ———. The tangled skein. Long Preston: Dales, 2000.

8. ———. The tangled skein. 1st paperback ed. Ashcroft, BC: Calabash, 1998.

foreword by Peter Cushing;

9. ———. The tangled skein. Penyffordd, Chester: Calabash, 1995.

foreword by Peter Cushing;

10. ———. The tangled skein. Toronto: Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library, 1995.

11. ———. The tangled skein. Ware: Wordsworth Editions, 2006.

foreword by Peter Cushing;

12. ———. The veiled detective. London: Robert Hale, 2004.

In 1880, a young Sherlock Holmes arrived in London to create his career. His successes were noted by a criminal mastermind, James Moriarty, who began a duel with young Holmes--a duel that played out at Reichenbach Falls, but not quite in the way Watson first reported it to the world

13. Davies, David Stuart, and Kathryn White. The final spooking, (The annals of Skelington Bones spook detectve). S.l.: Thumbprints, 1998.

14. Masters, Rosalind. "Review--'The Annals of Skelington Bones: the Case of the Phantom Paperhanger of Bug Hare Hall' by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 16 (1995): 60.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Douglas, Carole Nelson (22)

1. "Core Collection: Historical Mystery Timeline." Booklist 103, no. 17 (2007): 14-15.

This article presents reviews of books that are set between the year 80 BC and 1901. Includes a couple of Holmes references. "1881 Irene Adler series, by Carole Nelson Douglas (Forge). The beautiful opera singer who outwitted Sherlock Holmes takes center stage in a series of crime-solving capers....1915 Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes series, by Laurie R. King (Bantam). The famous detective's brilliant young apprentice becomes his partner in both mystery and marriage...."

2. "Spider Dance: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Irene Adler and Sherlock Holmes (Book)." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 48 (2004): 27.

Reviews the book "Spider Dance: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Irene Adler and Sherlock Holmes," by Carole Nelson Douglas.

3. Douglas, Carole Nelson. The adventuress : an Irene Adler novel. 1st mass market ed. New York: Tom Doherty Associates, 2004.

ill., map ; 17 cm. "A Tom Doherty Associates book." Originally published in 1991 as "Good morning Irene". Map illustrations by Darla Tagrin ; maps by Carole Nelson Douglas. Includes selected bibliography.;

4. ———. Another scandal in Bohemia: an Irene Adler novel. New York: Tom Doherty Associates Book, 1994.

LC Control Number: 93043825;

5. ———. Castle Rouge: an Irene Adler novel. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 2002.

LC Control Number: 2002026057. Includes bibliographical references (p. [537]-538);

6. ———. Chapel noir : an Irene Adler novel. 1st mass market ed. New York: Forge, 2002.

17 cm. "A Tom Doherty Associates book." "A novel of suspense featuring Irene Adler and Sherlock Holmes, and Jack the Ripper"--book cover. Includes bibliographical references and publisher's advertisements at the end. "Forge mystery"--spine.;

7. ———. Chapel noir : an Irene Adler novel. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 2001.

map ; 22 cm. "A Tom Doherty Associates book." Includes bibliographical references.;

8. ———. Chapel noir : an Irene Adler novel. 1st ed. New York: Tom Doherty Associates Book, 2001.

22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. (491]-492);

9. ———. Chapel noir : an Irene Adler novel. 1st mass market ed. New York: Tom Doherty Associates Book, 2002.

18 cm. An excerpt from the author's book, "Castle rouge" appears on pages [473]-485. "A Forge book." Includes bibliographical references (p. (469]-470).; "The story thrusts readers into one of the darkest periods of criminal fact and fiction when two courtesans are found brutally slaughtered in the lavish boudoir of a Paris house that dare not speak its name. No woman should ever see such horrors, authorities declare, but a powerful sponsor has insisted that Irene investigate the case, along with her faithful companion, sheltered parson's daughter Penelope Huxleigh. Yet does anyone really seek the truth, or do they wish only to bury it with the dead women?" "For there is a worse horror that will draw Irene and her archrival, Sherlock Holmes, into a duel of wits with a fiendish opponent: These Paris killings mimic a series of gruesome murders that terrorized London only months before. In a dangerous and disreputable part of town known as Whitechapel."--BOOK JACKET.

10. ———. Femme fatale an Irene Alder novel. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2003046851;

11. ———. Good night, Mr. Holmes. New York: Forge, 2005.

19 cm. Scuttlebutt May 2005.;

12. ———. Irene's last waltz. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 1994.

13. ———. Midnight Louie's pet detectives. 1st mass market ed. New York: Forge, 2000.

LC Control Number: 98012431. Daisy and the silver quaich / Anne Perry -- Where does a herd of elephants go? / Toni L. P. Kelner -- The dark one / Lilian Jackson Braun -- Dr. Couch saves a bird / Nancy Pickard -- Fetch / Dorothy Cannell -- Kittens take detection 101 / Jan Grape -- El lobo rides alone / Bill Crider -- A hamster of no importance / Esther M. Friesner and Walter J. Stutzman -- Mandy: "Free to good home" / J. A. Jance -- On the take / Carolyn Wheat -- Harbinger / Jean Hager -- Final reunion / Lisa Lepovetsky -- Go to the devil / Barbara Paul -- A Baker Street irregular / Carole Nelson Douglas -- Masked marauders of the mossbelt / Bruce Holland Rogers -- Final vows / Elizabeth Ann Scarborough -- The cage / Ed Gorman.; An anthology comprising seventeen mystery stories with animals as sleuths. The heroes and heroines range from cats to birds, to an elephant. Each entry is accompanied by an introduction. "Contents include her own story 'A Baker Street Irregular' (in which Midnight Louie meets Irene Adler and solves a mystery for Sherlock Holmes)."

14. ———. Midnight Louie's pet detectives. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98012431. Daisy and the silver quaich / Anne Perry -- Where does a herd of elephants go? / Toni L. P. Kelner -- The dark one / Lilian Jackson Braun -- Dr. Couch saves a bird / Nancy Pickard -- Fetch / Dorothy Cannell -- Kittens take detection 101 / Jan Grape -- El lobo rides alone / Bill Crider -- A hamster of no importance / Esther M. Friesner and Walter J. Stutzman -- Mandy: "Free to good home" / J. A. Jance -- On the take / Carolyn Wheat -- Harbinger / Jean Hager -- Final reunion / Lisa Lepovetsky -- Go to the devil / Barbara Paul -- A Baker Street irregular / Carole Nelson Douglas -- Masked marauders of the mossbelt / Bruce Holland Rogers -- Final vows / Elizabeth Ann Scarborough -- The cage / Ed Gorman.; An anthology comprising seventeen mystery stories with animals as sleuths. The heroes and heroines range from cats to birds, to an elephant. Each entry is accompanied by an introduction. "Contents include her own story 'A Baker Street Irregular' (in which Midnight Louie meets Irene Adler and solves a mystery for Sherlock Holmes)."

15. ———. Spider dance a novel of suspense featuring Irene Adler and Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. New York: Tom Doherty Associates/Forge, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004053282;

16. Douglas, Carole Nelson, and Glenn Harrington. A soul of steel. New York: Forge, 2006.

Irene Adler and her husband, Godfrey Norton, are enjoying coffee at a Parisian sidewalk cafe, when a stranger collapses at their feet. When he recovers, he reveals that he is looking for the doctor who treated him at the battle of Maiwand, whose life is in danger and whose name is John H. Watson

17. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Castle Rouge by Carole Nelson Douglas." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 5 (2002): 15.

18. ———. "Review--Chapel Noir by Carole Nelson Douglas." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 6 (2002): 3.

19. ———. "Review--Femme Fatale by Carole Nelson Douglas." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 6 (2004): 7.

20. ———. "Sherlocking With Carole Nelson Douglas." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 5 (2002): 5-10.

21. Monfredo, Miriam Grace, and Sharan Newman. Crime through time II. Berkley Prime Crime ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 1998.

Table of Contents: Murder one / Walter Satterthwait -- The Etruscan house / John Maddox Roberts -- Domesday Deferred / Edward Marston -- The movable city / Edward D. Hoch -- The case of the Santo Niño / Anne Perry -- Anna and the mirror / Dianne Day -- Mizu-age / Laura Joh Rowland -- A scientific education / Nancy Kress -- A mule named Sal / Miriam Grace Monfredo -- Sense and sensuality / Robert Barnard -- The high constable and the Rochester rappers / Maan Meyers -- The ballad of Gentleman Jem / Gillian Linscott -- The hungry ghost of Panamint / William F. Wu -- The promised land / Sharan Newman -- Mesmerizing Bertie / Carole Nelson Douglas -- A man of my stature / Jan Burke -- Fearful / Sarah Smith -- Unsinkable / Elizabeth Foxwell -- Dorothy past and present / Michael Coney.;

22. Wren, Celia. "Sherlockian Apocrypha." Commonweal 128, no. 22 (2001): 18.

Focuses on several playwrights and writers who have indulged in works related to the fictitious [sic] detective Sherlock Holmes. Characters in Carole Nelson Douglas' mystery novel 'Chapel Noir'; Examples of fictional mysteries that feature historical personages.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- E (1)

1. Skoyles, Lesley. "Review--'Absolute Discretion' by Grant Eustace." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 69-70.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Elrod, P. N. (24)

1. Bennett, Nigel, and P. N. Elrod. His father's son. Riverdale, NY, New York, NY: Baen. Distributed by Simon & Schuster, 2001.

LC Control Number: 00065092; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

2. ———. Keeper of the king. Riverdale, NY: Baen Books, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96036663; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

3. ———. Siege perilous. Riverdale, NY: Baen Books, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004014349; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

4. Elrod, P. N. The adventures of Myhr, (Baen fantasy). Riverdale, NY, New York, NY: Baen. Distributed by Simon & Schuster, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2005574551; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

5. ———. A chill in the blood. 1st ed, (The vampire files). New York: Ace Books, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97040373; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

6. ———. Cold streets. 1st ed, (The vampire files). New York: Ace Books, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2002026190; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

7. ———. Dance of death, (The adventures of Jonathan Barrett, gentleman vampire). Dallas: Benbella Books, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004008578; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

8. ———. The dark sleep, (The vampire files). New York: Ace Books, 2000.

LC Control Number: 2002553922; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

9. ———. The dark sleep. 1st ed, (The vampire files). New York: Ace Books, 1999.

LC Control Number: 98052426; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

10. ———. Death and the maiden, (The adventures of Jonathan Barrett, gentleman vampire). Dallas: BenBella Books, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2003024933; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

11. ———. Death masque being the third book in the adventures of Jonathan Barrett, gentleman vampire. 1st BenBella Books ed, (The adventures of Jonathan Barrett, gentleman vampire). Dallas, TX: BenBella Books. Distributed by the Independent Trade Publishers Group, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004001479; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

12. ———. Dracula in London. New York: Ace Books, 2001.

LC Control Number: 00067858; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

13. ———. I Strahd the memoirs of a vampire / P. N. Elrod, (Ravenloft books). Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2007270975; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

14. ———. I, Strahd, (Ravenloft). Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1995.

LC Control Number: 94061680; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

15. ———. I, Strahd, (Ravenloft books). Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93060256; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

16. ———. I, Strahd the war against Azalin, (Ravenloft novel). Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, Inc, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96060822; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

17. ———. Lady Crymsyn. 1st ed, (The vampire files). New York: Ace Books, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99059041; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

18. ———. Lady Crymsyn, (The vampire files). New York: Ace Books, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99089927; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

19. ———. My big fat supernatural wedding. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Griffin, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2006045725; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

20. ———. Quincey Morris, vampire. Riverdale, NY: Baen, 2001.

LC Control Number: 2002554213; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

21. ———. Red death, (The adventures of Jonathan Barrett, gentleman vampire). Dallas: BenBella Books, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2003024538; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

22. ———. Song in the dark. 1st ed, (The vampire files). New York: Ace Books, 2005.

LC Control Number: 2005045322; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

23. ———. The vampire files. Ace trade pbk. ed. New York: Ace Books, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2003045118. Contents: v. 1. Bloodlist ; Lifeblood ; Bloodcircle -- v. 2 Art in the blood ; Fire in the blood ; Blood on the water; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

24. Elrod, P. N., and Roxanne Conrad. Stepping through the stargate science, archaeology and the military in Stargate SG-1. Dallas, Tex: BenBella Books, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004012939. Includes bibliographical references; "P. N. Elrod (better known in Sherlockian circles as Patti Nead Elrod, the creator of the 'Baker Street Irragulars') began her paperback series The Vampire Files for Ace in 1990, featuring Jack Fleming (formerly a reporter and now a vampire) and his private-detective friend Charles Escott (whose name is not the only Sherlockian echo in the six-book series). Patti has other books in print, a fan club, and a Jack Fleming short story in the Martin H. Greenberg anthology Vampire Detectives, and another in the Greenberg anthology Celebrity Vampires. She is getting ready to return to The Vampire Files with a novel Dark Sleep that will focus on Charles Escott, who (as it happens) is the natural son of Sherlock Holmes."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Estleman, Loren D. (5)

1. Estleman, Loren D. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes, (A Sherlock Holmes mystery). New York: Ibooks, 2001.

Simon & Schuster (distributor). 21 cm. Repr. with new afterword. - Originally published: Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday, 1979.; "Holmes uses his expertise as a chemist to explain a mysterious gap" in Robert Louis Stevenson's story.

2. ———. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes [Internet Resource; Computer File Date of Entry: 20040713]. Ibooks, 2001 [cited. Available from http://www.contentreserve.com/TitleInfo.asp?ID={FD99AF0C-A84C-4090-B41C-0D4C67A5679C}&Format=50.

Repr. with new afterword. - Originally published: Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday, 1979. Electronic reproduction.;

3. ———. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes. 1st ed, (Further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan Books, 2010.

21 cm.;

4. ———. Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula. New York, London: Ibooks. Simon & Schuster, 2003.

5. ———. Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1995.

Scuttlebutt Jan 1996;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- F (11)

1. "Venus on the Half-Shell and Others." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 48 (2007): 54-54.

The article reviews the book "Venus on the Half-Shell and Others," by Philip José Farmer. Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. "Farmer appends his own name at last to his stories written under pen names borrowed from other authors' characters, most famously Venus on the Half-Shell, a novel allegedly by Kurt Vonnegut's fictional science fiction writer, Kilgore Trout. As Harry Manders, created by E.W. Horning, Farmer pens the suspenseful 'The Problem of the Sore Bridge--Among Others.' As Rex Stout's psychologically and physically maimed Paul Chapin, he offers the violent 'The Volcano.' A story by Harlan Ellison's Cordwainer Bird, 'The Last Rise of Nick Adams,' discloses that Bird was related to Farmerian heroes the Shadow and the Spider. Finally, after demonstrating how Tarzan might have sounded had he been written by William S. rather than Edgar Rice, Farmer dons the mantle of Conan Doyle's Dr. Watson and introduces Tarzan to Holmes in 'The Adventure of the Peerless Peer.' Only a writer as mature as Farmer could have pulled this stunt off so successfully."

2. Farran, Christopher. Houdini and the seance murders. 1st ed. Bend, OR: Salvo Press, 2000.

22 cm. Scuttlebutt Dec. 2000.; "Harry Houdini and Arthur Conan Doyle, together in Italy, must join forces to solve a murder that happened before their own eyes during a seance. Can the master of escape and the master of detection put aside their egos long enough to solve these bizarre murders?"--P. [4] of cover. "Has Harry Houdini, Houdini's nephew Ira, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Sir Arthur's granddaughter Lucinda (who'd rather be called Solitaire) investigating a murder committed during a seance in Trieste; Ira and Solitaire get to visit Paris, and they do most of the adventuring."

3. ———. Houdini and the seance murders [Internet Resource; Computer File Date of Entry: 20040329]. Salvo Press, 2000 [cited. Available from http://www.contentreserve.com/TitleInfo.asp?ID={7C5DD5E9-FBFF-487A-8990-188D406194B1}&Format=50.

Electronic books. Requires Adobe Reader 6.0 (file size: 522 KB). Title from eBook information screen. Scuttlebutt Dec. 2000.; Harry Houdini and Arthur Conan Doyle, together in Italy, must join forces to solve a murder that happened before their own eyes during a seance. Can the master of escape and the master of detection put aside their egos long enough to solve these bizarre murders? This could be Houdini's greatest escape and Doyle's most important case.

4. Faye, Lyndsay. Dust and shadow : an account of the Ripper killings by Dr. John H. Watson. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2009.

map ; 24 cm.;

5. ———. Dust and Shadow : An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson. 1st Simon & Schuster trade pbk. ed. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2010.

map ; 22 cm.;

6. Fish, Robert L., and Jon L. Lellenberg. Dr. Watney's agent speaks out! an interview about Schlock Homes with Robert L. Fish, (Occasional paper of The Dispatch-Box Press). Alexandria, Va: Robert L. Fish. The Dispatch-Box Press, 1974.

Citations: De Waal C21660. Added Title: Project on the History of the Sherlock Holmes Parody and Pastiche;

7. Fruttero, Carlo. The D Case: the truth about the mystery of Edwin Drood. London: Chatto & Windus, 1994.

Translated from the Italian by Gregory Dowling; "...the book is an account of the events at a Forum on the Completion of Unfinished or Fragmentary Works in Music and Literature, and of the deliberations by participants who include Father Brown, Hercule Poirot, Nero Wolfe, Lew Archer, and Sherlock Holmes." "Charles Dickens died before the last installments of The Mystery of Edwin Drood were written, so the book has tantalized readers for many years. In this clever combination of literary scholarship and satire, such famous fictitious detectives as Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot, Jules Maigret, and others gather at a conference in Rome to mull over the clues and offer their solutions to the mystery. As the discussion continues and the characters interact, even the relationship between Dickens and Wilkie Collins is brought into question. The text of The Mystery of Edwin Drood (also known as MED) is interspersed between their discussions. This is a very pleasant way of reading literary criticism."

8. Hargreaves, David. "Review--'Flashman and the Tiger' by George MacDonald Fraser." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 61-62.

9. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Three Dragons by Luke Steven Fullenkamp." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 5 (2000): 24.

10. ———. "Review--Spanking Watson by Kinky Friedman." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 5 (1999): 13.

11. Stander, Bella, and Daisy Maryles. "Whodunit? Morrow may tell at ABA." Publishers Weekly 240, no. 20 (1993): 39.

Discusses promotion by William Morrow and Avon Books for Mark Frost's first novel 'The List of Seven,' slated for hardcover publication in September 1993. A Victorian adventure/occult thriller featuring the young Arthur Conan Doyle; Susan Halligan, Morrow's director of advertising and promotion; More.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Fawcett, Quinn (13)

1. Fawcett, Quinn. Against the brotherhood: a Mycroft Holmes novel. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 1997.

LC Control Number: 97013322 //r97; "For the first time, Dame Jean Conan Doyle has authorized a series of Holmesian novels featuring Mycroft, Sherlock Holmes's older brother. These exciting adventures will entertain both newcomers and devotees of the canon. Acknowledged by Sherlock himself as the smarter of the two and gifted with even greater powers of observation than the famous consulting detective, Mycroft Holmes appears in only four Conan Doyle stories. The barest details of his life are revealed - just enough to tantalize the reader. How was it that Mycroft at times seemed to control the British government even though he rarely left his home in Pall Mall or the comfortable environs of the Diogenes Club? "Against the Brotherhood begins to lift the veil from the life of Mycroft Holmes - and his previously unknown staff. There's Mycroft's man, an ex-army officer who may have been a spy; Sutton, an actor whose flawless impersonation of Mycroft proves essential; and young Guthrie, whose employment as Mycroft's new secretary allows him to fulfill the Watsonian role of chronicler. Guthrie's upper-class education has not prepared him for the rough-and-tumble world of international politics, nor for his encounters with the beautiful and cunning Miss Gatspy, who is a thief, spy, and assassin. Against the Brotherhood is full of attempted assassinations, secret spymasters, anarchist cabals, concealed identities, double- and triple-agents, burglary, and sabotage, all done in true Conan Doyle style."--Dust jacket

2. ———. Against the brotherhood: a Mycroft Holmes novel. New York: TOR, 1998.

3. ———. Embassy Row: a Mycroft Holmes novel. 1st mass market ed. New York: Tom Doherty Associates Book, 1999.

LC Control Number: 98023488; "Acknowledged by his brother, Sherlock, as the smarter, more observant of the two, the enigmatic Mycroft Holmes appeared in only four of the original Conan Doyle stories. Now, with Embassy Row, Fawcett brings us more skulduggery and sabotage, concealed identities and double agents - written in true Conan Doyle style." "Paterson Guthrie has grown comfortable in his current employment as Mycroft Holmes' secretary. At present, he is accompanying Mycroft to a series of discreet negotiations with the Japanese, intended to secure England's position in Japanese-controlled waters. But there are those who would like to see these talks come to naught. Many highly placed Englishmen do not wish to ally themselves with a people they consider inferior to their own, and certainly the Japanese are wary of close ties with a society they find increasingly hostile. And why exactly is the flirtatious Miss Gatspy lurking around the embassy - is she after information or Guthrie?". "Despite many setbacks, misunderstandings, and suspicious accidents, the agreement nears completion. But the night the papers are to be signed and sealed, a British diplomat, whose opposition to the negotiations is no secret, is found dead with a Japanese dagger in his back. Mycroft and Guthrie must solve his murder, expose the agitators behind it, and see to the finalization of the agreement - without finding themselves on the wrong end of the knife."--Book jacket

4. ———. The Flying Scotsman: a Mycroft Holmes novel. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99022251; "Acknowledged by his brother, Sherlock, as the smarter, more observant of the two, the enigmatic Mycroft Holmes appeared in only four of the original Conan Doyle stories. With Against the Brotherhood and Embassy Row, novelist Quinn Fawcett introduced us to a part of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's world hitherto unexamined, and featured perhaps the most intriguing sleuth to come along since Sherlock himself." "The Flying Scotsman is a luxury train and the fastest way to travel between London and Edinburgh. The Scotsman is also the secret escape route for a European prince who has narrowly escaped assassination at a royal wedding. The Prince was in London to negotiate a treaty between his country and England; the British government believes that the assassination is an attempt to keep the treaty from being finalized and signed. Now he must be safely returned to his homeland.". "Mycroft Holmes is assigned to be the prince's protector. Posing as travel writers, Mycroft and Paterson Guthrie, his able assistant and the chronicler of his adventures, board the Scotsman along with the Prince for what should be a quick pleasure trip to Scotland - one that is interrupted almost immediately by a death that may be another try at murdering the Prince." "Guthrie soon spots some familiar faces among his fellow passengers. He and Mycroft have tangled with Sir Cameron MacMillian before. Is the Scottish laird merely heading home aboard the luxurious train, or is his evil political cabal behind the assassination attempts? Then there's Penelope Gatspy, the beautiful anarchist and sometime assassin. Is she after the Prince - or Guthrie?"--Book jacket

5. ———. The Flying Scotsman: a Mycroft Holmes novel. 1st trade paperback ed. New York: Forge, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99022251; "Acknowledged by his brother, Sherlock, as the smarter, more observant of the two, the enigmatic Mycroft Holmes appeared in only four of the original Conan Doyle stories. With Against the Brotherhood and Embassy Row, novelist Quinn Fawcett introduced us to a part of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's world hitherto unexamined, and featured perhaps the most intriguing sleuth to come along since Sherlock himself." "The Flying Scotsman is a luxury train and the fastest way to travel between London and Edinburgh. The Scotsman is also the secret escape route for a European prince who has narrowly escaped assassination at a royal wedding. The Prince was in London to negotiate a treaty between his country and England; the British government believes that the assassination is an attempt to keep the treaty from being finalized and signed. Now he must be safely returned to his homeland.". "Mycroft Holmes is assigned to be the prince's protector. Posing as travel writers, Mycroft and Paterson Guthrie, his able assistant and the chronicler of his adventures, board the Scotsman along with the Prince for what should be a quick pleasure trip to Scotland - one that is interrupted almost immediately by a death that may be another try at murdering the Prince." "Guthrie soon spots some familiar faces among his fellow passengers. He and Mycroft have tangled with Sir Cameron MacMillian before. Is the Scottish laird merely heading home aboard the luxurious train, or is his evil political cabal behind the assassination attempts? Then there's Penelope Gatspy, the beautiful anarchist and sometime assassin. Is she after the Prince - or Guthrie?"--Book jacket

6. ———. The Scottish ploy: a Mycroft Holmes novel. 1st ed. New York: Forge, 2000.

LC Control Number: 00031711; "Seemingly unconnected events are pulling Mycroft Holmes in several directions at once. There are the usual dispatches to read and spy networks to monitor - England's and those of the enemies of the Empire. European politics seem to be heating up again and, to prevent the leaders of an anarchist group from reaching England's shores, Mycroft must, much to his dismay, become part of the intended reconciliation of a husband and wife.". "Then there are the minor distractions: Why is a gentleman who claims to be Turkish seeking his supposedly kidnapped brother in London? Why does an eminent phrenologist urgently want Mycroft's opinion on the inhabitants of his asylum? Who has been following Mycroft and his estimable secretary, the amiable Paterson Guthrie, through foggy streets? What motivated the attempted assassination of an Admiralty courier on Mycroft's own doorstep? When the lovely Penelope Gatspy saves Guthrie's life, is it because of the attraction between them, or on orders of the mysterious "lodge" she serves?" "And, most important - to Mycroft - what is behind the kidnapping of his old friend Edmund Sutton, an actor currently enjoying a triumphant run as MacBeth?"--Book jacket

7. ———. The Scottish ploy: a Mycroft Holmes novel. 1st trade paperback ed. New York: Forge, 2001.

LC Control Number: 00031711; "Seemingly unconnected events are pulling Mycroft Holmes in several directions at once. There are the usual dispatches to read and spy networks to monitor - England's and those of the enemies of the Empire. European politics seem to be heating up again and, to prevent the leaders of an anarchist group from reaching England's shores, Mycroft must, much to his dismay, become part of the intended reconciliation of a husband and wife.". "Then there are the minor distractions: Why is a gentleman who claims to be Turkish seeking his supposedly kidnapped brother in London? Why does an eminent phrenologist urgently want Mycroft's opinion on the inhabitants of his asylum? Who has been following Mycroft and his estimable secretary, the amiable Paterson Guthrie, through foggy streets? What motivated the attempted assassination of an Admiralty courier on Mycroft's own doorstep? When the lovely Penelope Gatspy saves Guthrie's life, is it because of the attraction between them, or on orders of the mysterious "lodge" she serves?" "And, most important - to Mycroft - what is behind the kidnapping of his old friend Edmund Sutton, an actor currently enjoying a triumphant run as MacBeth?"--Book jacket

8. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Embassy Row by Quinn Fawcett." The Holmes & Watson Report 2, no. 6 (1999): 8.

9. ———. "Review--The Flying Scotsman by Quinn Fawcett." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 5 (1999): 26.

10. ———. "Review--The Scottish Ploy by Quinn Fawcett." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 3 (2001): 29.

11. Michaud, Rosemary. "Review--Against the Brotherhood by Quinn Fawcett." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 5 (1997): 21-22.

12. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--The Flying Scotsman by Quinn Fawcett." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 6 (2001): 22.

13. ———. "Review--The Scottish Ploy by Quinn Fawcett." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 6 (2002): 16-17.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Fforde, Jasper (3)

1. Fforde, Jasper. First among sequels. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2007.

"Full of bizarre subplots, many of which don't go anywhere, bestseller Fforde's fifth novel to feature intrepid literary detective Thursday Next (after 2004's Something Rotten) blends elements of mystery, campy science fiction and screwball fantasy à la Terry Pratchett's Discworld. With the Stupidity Surplus reaching dangerously high levels all over England, Acme Carpets employee and undercover SpecOps investigator Next has her hands full trying to persuade her 16-year-old slacker son, Friday, to join the ChronoGuard, which deals with temporal stability; if Friday continues to sleep away his future, the end is near—for everyone. To complicate matters, a malicious apprentice begins making classic works of literature into reality book shows (Pride and Prejudice becomes The Bennets), a ruthless corporation tries to turn the Bookworld into a tourist trap, and the Cheese Enforcement Agency tries to bust Next for smuggling killer curd. The fate of the world may lie in a Longfellow poem. Fans of satiric literary humor are in for a treat."

2. ———. Thursday Next in first among sequels: a novel. New York: Viking, 2007.

LC Control Number: 2007014615;

3. ———. Thursday Next in Lost in a good book: a novel. New York: Penguin, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2002071304; The inventive, exuberant, and totally original literary fun that began with The Eyre Affair continues with Jasper Fforde's magnificent second adventure starring the resourceful, fearless literary sleuth Thursday Next. When Landen, the love of her life, is eradicated by the corrupt multinational Goliath Corporation, Thursday must moonlight as a Prose Resource Operative of Jurisfiction-the police force inside books. She is apprenticed to the man-hating Miss Havisham from Dicken's Great Expectations, who grudgingly shows Thursday the ropes. And she gains just enough skill to get herself in a real mess entering the pages of Poe's The Raven. What she really wants is to get Landen back. But this latest mission is not without further complications. Along with jumping into the works of Kafka and Austen, and even Beatrix Potter's The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies, Thursday finds herself the target of a series of potentially lethal coincidences, the authenticator of a newly discovered play by the Bard himself, and the only one who can prevent an unidentifiable pink sludge from engulfing all life on Earth. Her adventures as a renowned Special Operative in literary detection have left Thursday Next yearning for a rest. But when the love of her life is eradicated by the corrupt multinational Goliath Corporation, Thursday must bite the bullet and moonlight as a Prose Resource Operative in the secret world of Jurisfiction, the police force inside books. There she is apprenticed to Miss Havisham, the famous man-hater from Dickens's Great Expectations, who teaches her to book-jump like a pro. If she retrieves a supposedly vanquished enemy from the pages of Poe's "The Raven," she thinks Goliath might return her lost love, Landen. But her latest mission is endlessly complicated. Not only are there side trips into the works of Kafka and Austen, and even Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Flopsy Bunnies, Thursday finds herself the target of a series of potentially lethal coincidences, the authenticator of a newly discovered play by the Bard himself, and the only one who can prevent an unidentifiable pink sludge from engulfing all life on Earth

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Fraser, George MacDonald (6)

1. Fraser, George MacDonald. Flashman & the angel of the Lord from the Flashman papers, 1858-59. 1st American ed. New York: A.A. Knopf. Distributed by Random House, 1995.

LC Control Number: 94047219. Includes bibliographical references; "[T]he latest installment in the grand saga of Flashman's exploits (eventually one of the books will reveal what happened when Flashman stalked Col. Sebastian Moran in an empty house in Baker Street); the Angel of the Lord is John Brown, so the time is pre-Canonical, but Flashman, reminiscing early on for his grandchildren, does mention the prize-fighter Jack Johnson, which allows Fraser to mention Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in an end-note."

2. ———. Flashman and the Tiger : and other extracts from the Flashman papers. London: HarperCollins, 2000.

20 cm. Originally published: 1999. Includes bibliographical references. Scuttlebutt Oct 1999; "Offers the first (and long-awaited) book appearance of the story first published in the Daily Express, Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 1975. It's a delightful tale: the 'tiger' is Colonel Sebastian Moran, with whom Flashman had three encounters (this being the third, in an empty house in Baker Street in 1894)."

3. ———. Flashman and the Tiger : and other extracts from the Flashman papers, (The Flashman papers). London: HarperCollins, 2006.

20 cm. Originally published: 1999. Scuttlebutt Oct 1999; "Offers the first (and long-awaited) book appearance of the story first published in the Daily Express, Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 1975. It's a delightful tale: the 'tiger' is Colonel Sebastian Moran, with whom Flashman had three encounters (this being the third, in an empty house in Baker Street in 1894)."

4. ———. "Flashman and the Tiger and other extracts from The Flashman papers." Knopf, 2000.

1st American ed. 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 343-347). Scuttlebutt Oct 1999; "Offers the first (and long-awaited) book appearance of the story first published in the Daily Express, Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 1975. It's a delightful tale: the 'tiger' is Colonel Sebastian Moran, with whom Flashman had three encounters (this being the third, in an empty house in Baker Street in 1894)."

5. ———. Flashman and the Tiger and other extracts from The Flashman Papers. London: HarperCollins, 1999.

23 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 315-[319]). Scuttlebutt Oct 1999; "Offers the first (and long-awaited) book appearance of the story first published in the Daily Express, Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 1975. It's a delightful tale: the 'tiger' is Colonel Sebastian Moran, with whom Flashman had three encounters (this being the third, in an empty house in Baker Street in 1894)."

6. ———. Flashman and the Tiger and other extracts from the Flashman papers. 1st Anchor Books ed. New York: Anchor Books, 2001.

21 cm. Previously published in hardcover in the United States: New York : Knopf, 2000. Includes bibliographical references (p. 343-347). Scuttlebutt Oct 1999; "Offers the first (and long-awaited) book appearance of the story first published in the Daily Express, Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 1975. It's a delightful tale: the 'tiger' is Colonel Sebastian Moran, with whom Flashman had three encounters (this being the third, in an empty house in Baker Street in 1894)."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Freemantle, Brian (4)

1. Freemantle, Brian. The Holmes factor. Sutton/New York: Severn House, 2005.

22 cm. Scuttlebutt Apr 2005.; "The second novel in his series about Sherlock Holmes' son Sebastian, who has been sent to Russia just before the start of World War I to assess the political situation; he meets Churchill and Asquith, and Kerensky and Stalin and Rasputin, and is involved in lots of intrigue. Sherlock and Mycroft and Watson are also on hand, but in supporting roles."

2. ———. The Holmes factor. Large type ed, (A Sherlock and Sebastian Holmes story). Sutton: Severn House, 2006.

22 cm. Scuttlebutt Apr 2005. Originally published: 2005.;

3. ———. The Holmes inheritance. New York: Severn House, 2004.

23 cm.; "Sebastian Holmes, estranged son of the great detective, sails to America on the Lusitania to investigate rumors of business magnates plotting secret weapons deals with the Germans just before WWI."

4. ———. The Holmes inheritance. Large type ed. Sutton: Severn House, 2005.

23 cm. Originally published: 2004.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Frost, Mark (9)

1. "Bobbi Tichenor; [Fourth Edition]." The Oregonian (Portland, OR), December 4, 1994: F05.

Owner of Annie Bloom's Books Currently Reading: "The Art of the Personal Essay" by Phillip Lopate. Just finished "The List of Seven" by Mark Frost. What They're About: "The Art of the Personal Essay" is a collection of essays by writers starting with the Roman philosopher Seneca and including Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, E.B. White, Annie Dillard and many others.

2. Frost, Mark. The list of seven. London: Arrow, 1994.

3. ———. The list of seven. New York: Avon Books, 1994.

LC Control Number: 93012305; "On Christmas Day 1884, a desperate plea from a mysterious woman leads Arthur Conan Doyle - struggling physician, aspiring writer, and part-time demystifier of the occult - to a seance in London's East End and into a fiendish and deadly trap. Stunned by a shocking display of black magic, Doyle witnesses a murder, nearly falling victim himself before being rescued by a secretive stranger: Jack Sparks, a man who claims to be special agent to Queen Victoria. He tells Doyle that he has been targeted by a diabolical coven of Satanists - the Dark Brotherhood." "As they track their attackers across the length and breadth of Britain, assailed by forces of darkness both human and supernatural, Conan Doyle and Sparks unmask a terrifying conspiracy that threatens not only the Crown but the very fabric of modern civilization. Their only clue: a list of seven names, the leaders of the Brotherhood.". "Skeptical by nature and profession, Doyle labors to prove that the events he has witnessed - horrifying visions, zombies, ghouls, molecular alteration - are elaborate ruses with logical explanations. But if so, why? Simply because Doyle's anti-occultist writings, never even published, have inadvertently exposed the Brotherhood's intentions? Who is the elusive, seemingly superhuman mastermind behind the Seven? Most important, as Doyle continues to put his life in the hands of Jack Sparks, the question persists: Can Sparks be trusted?"--Book jacket

4. ———. The six messiahs. 1st ed. New York: Morrow, 1995.

LC Control Number: 94039216; "In The Six Messiahs, Mark Frost creates a novel of nineteenth-century mystery, adventure, and terror with Arthur Conan Doyle - the creator of the Sherlock Holmes books - at the center of the heart-stopping action." "Now off to America for his first book tour, Doyle is joined by his impetuous younger brother, Innes, and a cryptic Irish priest. During their voyage across the Atlantic, the men are stalked by an otherworldly order of assassins attempting to steal a precious piece of the ship's cargo: a priceless book of ancient mysticism.". "The Book of Zohar is the first piece of a lethal puzzle that will draw Doyle across the burgeoning young nation. From the filthy slums of lower Manhattan to the dark alleys of Chicago to a final apocalyptic confrontation in the searing Arizona desert, Doyle and his companions track the paths of six mysterious strangers who are united by a single, eerie dream. A dream of a black tower rising out of a wasteland - and a river of blood. As their trails converge at the source of this terrifying vision, Doyle and company confront an evil so dark and profound that it threatens to obliterate the very fabric of the world."--Book jacket

5. ———. The six messiahs. New York: Avon Books, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Sept 1996;

6. Frost, Mark, and André Fransee. In het teken van de zes. Baarn: De Prom, 1996.

7. Frost, Mark, and Jordi Mustieles. Los seis mesías. New York: Rayo, 2006.

In 1894 on a visit to the U.S., Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, investigates the theft of valuable books on the world's great religions. In the process he uncovers a sinister plot by a group of fanatics in a commune in the Arizona desert.

8. Frost, Mark, and David Warner. The 6 messiahs. Beverly Hills, CA: Dove Audio, 1995. Sound Recording (cassettes) 4 sound cassettes (ca. 6 hr.).

analog, Dolby processed. Abridged. Performed by David Warner.;

9. Hoffert, Barbara. "First novelists: What measure success?" Library Journal 119, no. 5 (1994): 43.

Discusses first novelists and presents a retrospective of last season's most promising new talents. Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes with: Frost, Mark. The List of 7. Morrow. ISBN 0-688-12245-0. $20. "In Frost's spooky retelling of the creation of Sherlock Holmes, the charismatic Jack Sparks comes to the rescue of Arthur Conan Doyle, who is being pursued by an occult group out for revenge. Morrow put plenty of time, money, and energy into promoting this book, and though it didn't break out as expected, the estimated sale of 40,000 copies is nothing to regret. Morrow bought the book as a package with Avon. which will shortly issue the paperback in a big way. And since Frost is both a director (Storyville) and screenwriter (Twin Peaks), it's no surprise that a movie is in the offing."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- G (12)

1. García Jiménez, Francisco. Misterio en la vuelta de Rocha con intervención de Sherlock Holmes, Arséne Lupin, Joseph Rouletabille. Bs. As. i.e. Buenos Aires: Corregidor, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98224855;

2. Garland, Lawrence, and John DePol. The affair of the unprincipled publisher. New Castle (Del.): Oak Knoll Books, 1983.

LC Control Number: 84161252. Citations: De Waal C22185; "A pastiche by Lawrence Garland that reports on an encounter between Thomas J. Wise and Sherlock Holmes."

3. Gaspar, Stephen. The Canadian adventures of Sherlock Holmes : from the memoirs of Dr. John H. Watson. Shelburne, Ont.: Sauk City, Wisc., 2004.

21 cm. Also available in electronic format. Edited by Stephen Gaspar. Scuttlebutt Nov. 2002.;

4. Gilbert, Paul D. Sherlock Holmes and the Giant Rat of Sumatra. London: Robert Hale, 2010.

5. Gilson, Jamie, and Dee DeRosa. Soccer circus. 1st ed. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books, 1993.

LC Control Number: 92009716; In their determination to have fun while spending the night at a motel during a soccer tournament, Hobie Hanson and his friends get caught up in a mystery buff's efforts to solve a ficticious case

6. Gorman, Edward, and Martin Harry Greenberg. The adventure of the missing detective and 19 of the year's finest crime and mystery stories! New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2005.

LC Control Number: 2006278710. Contents: The year in mystery and crime fiction: 2004 / Jon L. Breen -- A 2004 yearbook of crime and mystery / Edward D. Hoch -- The mystery in Great Britain -- Maxim Jakubowski -- The newest four-letter word in mystery / Sarah Weinman -- The adventure of the missing detective / Gary Lovisi -- The Westphalian ring / Jeffery Deaver -- The hit / Robert S. Levinson -- The last case of Hilly Palmer / Duane Swierczynski -- Everybody's girl / Robert Barnard -- Imitate the sun / Luke Sholer -- Father Diodorus / Charlie Stella -- A nightcap of hemlock / Francis M. Nevins -- The best in online mystery fiction in 2004 / Sarah Weinman -- Just pretend / Martyn Waites -- Geoffrey says / Aliya Whiteley -- God's dice / David White -- The consolation blond / Val McDermid -- The shoeshine man's regrets / Laura Lippman -- For benefit of Mr. Means / Christine Matthews -- East side, west side / Max Allan Collins and Matthew V. Clemens -- The promotion / Larry D. Sewazy -- Me and Mitch / Bill Pronzini and Barry N. Malzberg -- The necromancer's apprentice / Lillian Stewart Carl -- The banshee / Joyce Carol Oates -- Sounds of silence / Dennis Richard Murphy;

7. Goulart, Ron. Murder in studio 221B Sherlock Holmes solves the murder of Professor Moriarty. 1st ed, (Mysterious Sherlock Holmes). New York: Mysterious Bookshop, 1999.

8. Grant, Barry. Sherlock Holmes and the Shakespeare Letter. Sutton: Severn House, 2010.

9. ———. The Strange Return of Sherlock Holmes. Sutton: Severn House, 2010.

23 cm.; When James Wilson retires from journalism, he decides to settle down in a small Welsh town with a roomate, a Mr. Cedric Coombes, and at first thinks little of his new friend's eccentric behavior. But he can't shake the feeling that he knows him from somewhere else. As Coombes displays his astonishing deductive prowess, and becomes embroiled in the police investigation of the bizarre death, and apparent murder, of a man in a bathtub, Wilson, or should we say Watson, begins to wonder just who this Coombes really is.

10. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Frightened Golfer by J. M. Gregson." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 4 (2000): 32.

11. Pitt, David. "Moriarty." Booklist 105, no. 6 (2008): 21.

Reviews the book "Moriarty" by John Gardner. Nov. 2008. 320p. Harcourt/Otto Penzler, $24 (9780151012527). "More than 30 years after The Return of Moriarty (1974) and The Revenge of Moriarty (1975), the late Gardner presents a new story featuring the archnemesis of Sherlock Holmes...."

12. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Clown Prince of London by Joe Gentile." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 1 (2002): 29-30.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Greenberg, Martin H. (5)

1. "The Ghosts of Baker Street." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 47 (2005): 26-26.

Review of The Ghosts of Baker Street. Edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower (Carrol & Graf), $16.95 paper (240p) ISBN 0-7867-1400-X

2. "A Savvy List of the Season's's Best." Publishers Weekly 248, no. 33 (2001): 173.

Presents a list of bestseller hardcovers including Carroll & Graf title Murder in Baker Street: New Tales of Sherlock Holmes (Oct., $25), edited by Martin Greenberg et al., "collects stories by Anne Perry and 10 other mystery writers."

3. Addy, John. "Review--Sherlock Holmes in Orbit edited by Mike Resnick and Martin H. Greenberg." The Ritual, no. 16 (1995): 59-60.

4. Hobbs, Don. "Review--More Holmes for the Holidays edited by Martin Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg and Carol-Lynn Waugh and The Vital Essence by David L. Hammer." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 6 (2000): 14.

5. ———. "Review--Murder in Baker Street edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 5 (2003): 23.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Greenberg, Martin Harry (8)

1. Greenberg, Martin Harry. Celebrity vampires. New York: DAW Books, 1995.

Scuttlebutt Jan 1996; Introduction / Ed Gorman -- Dracula on the rocks / Carole Nelson Douglas -- Traces of red / Max Allan Collins -- Too short a death / Peter Crowther -- Sweet dreams, Norma Jeane / Barbara Collins -- Totally Tallulah / Barbara Paul -- Plague / John Lutz -- The beautiful, the damned / Kristine Kathryn Rusch -- Woollcott and the vamp / Jon L. Breen -- The vampire of the opera / Karen Haber -- Blessed by his dying tongue / Tracy A. Knight. A singular event on a night in 1912 / Roman A. Ranieri -- Vladimir's conversions / J.N. Williamson -- Death on the Mississippi / Wendi Lee & Terry Beatty -- The swashbuckler and the vampire / Mike Baker -- I vant to be alone / Barb D'Amato -- Undead origami / Norman Partridge -- Bloody Sam / Gary A. Braunbeck -- King of the night / Bill Crider -- A night at the (horse) opera / P.N. Elrod.; "With stories that include 'Dracula on the Rocks' (by Carole Nelson Douglas, starring Irene Adler), 'A Singular Event on a Night in 1912' (by Roman A. Ranieri, starring Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Bram Stoker), and non-Sherlockian tales by Jerry Neal Williamson and Patti Nead Elrod."

2. Greenberg, Martin Harry, and John Helfers. Villains victorious, (DAW book collectors). New York: DAW, 2001.

18 cm. Scuttlebutt Apr 2001. Introduction / John Helfers -- All things being relative / Tanya Huff -- The mould of form / Rosemary Edghill -- The specter of Tullyfane Abbey / Peter Tremayne -- Doubting Thomas / Kristine Kathryn Rusch -- The whiteviper scrolls / David Bischoff -- A new man / Ed Gorman -- Souls to take / Gary A. Braunbeck and Lucy A. Snyder -- Nina / Pauline E Dungate -- Horror show / Tim Waggoner -- Death mage / Fiona Patton -- King of thorns / R. Davis -- The usurper memos / Josepha Sherman -- To speak with angels / Michelle West -- Heroes and villains / Peter Crowther. Edited by Martin H. Greenberg and John Helfers.; "An anthology of 14 original stories, including a Sherlockian pastiche by Peter Tremayne, about Holmes' first encounter with Moriarty, in Ireland, where Colonel James Phillimore disappeared from his estate in Kerry."

3. Greenberg, Martin Harry, Jon L. Lellenberg, and Daniel Stashower. Sherlock Holmes in America. New York: Skyhorse Pub., 2009.

Edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg, and Daniel Stashower. 24 cm. "A Herman Graf book." Introduction: "American, as you perceive" / Case of Colonel Warburton's madness / Ghosts and the machine / Exerpts from an unpublished memoir found in the basement of the home for retired actors / Flowers of Utah / Adventure of the coughing dentist / Minister's missing daughter / Case of Colonel Crockett's violin / Adventure of the White City / Recalled to life / Seven walnuts / Adventure of the Boston Dromio / Case of the rival queens / Adventure of the missing three quarters / Song at twilight / Moriarty, Moran, and more: Anti-hibernian sentiment in the Canon / How the creator of Sherlock Holmes brought him to America / Romance of America /; From the bustling neighborhoods of New York City and Washington, D.C., to sunny yet sinister cities like San Francisco on the West Coast, the world's best-loved British sleuth will face some of the most cunning criminals America has to offer, and meet some of America's most famous figures along the way. A fascinating and extraordinary collection of never-before-published crime and mystery stories by bestselling American writers.

4. ———. Sherlock Holmes in America. London: Robinson, 2010.

5. Greenberg, Martin Harry, Jon L. Lellenberg, and Carol-Lynn Rössel Waugh, eds. Holmes for the holidays. 1st ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96019798. Contents: The Adventure of the Canine Ventriloquist / Jon L. Breen; The Adventure of the Christmas Ghosts / Bill Crider; The Adventure of the Christmas Tree / William L. DeAndrea; The Thief of Twelfth Night / Carole Nelson Douglas; The Adventure of the Three Ghosts / Loren D. Estleman; The Italian Sherlock Holmes / Reginald Hill; The Christmas Client / Edward D. Hoch; A Scandal in Winter / Gillian Linscott; The Adventure in Border Country / Gwen Moffat; The Sleuth of Christmas Past / Barbara Paul; The Watch Night Bell / Anne Perry; The Yuletide Affair / John Stoessel; The Adventure of the Angel's Trumpet / Carolyn Wheat; The Adventure of the man Who Never Laughed / J. N. Williamson;

6. ———. More Holmes for the holidays. Berkley prime crime pbk. ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 2001.

LC Control Number: 99027229; "In Anne Perry's "The Christmas Gift," a Stradivarius is plucked away from a master violinist just before a holiday performance - one Sherlock Holmes had his heart set on attending ..." "In Loren D. Estleman's "The Adventure of the Greatest Gift," Holmes receives an unusual present, a wax recording cylinder bearing festive greetings - or is it a warning about an impending war between England and France?" "In Carolyn Wheat's "The Case of the Rajah's Emerald," Timothy "Tiny Tim" Cratchit requests Holmes and Watson's assistance in identifying the true heir of the late philanthropist Ebenezer Scrooge ..." "In Peter Lovesey's "The Four Wise Men," Watson's former army superior invites him to appear in a Nativity service and guard the valuable Star of Bethlehem treasure from being stolen by a villain from Holmes's past ...". "With these and seven more merry mysteries, you can spend the season with the world's most famous detective, courtesy of today's masters of mystery, in More Holmes for the Holidays."--Book jacket

7. ———. More Holmes for the Holidays. 1st ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 1999.

24 cm. The Christmas gift / Anne Perry -- The four wise men / Peter Lovesey -- Eleemosynary, my dear Watson / Barbara Paul -- The adventure of the greatest gift / Loren D. Estleman -- The case of the Rajah's emerald / Carolyn Wheat -- The Christmas conspiracy / Edward D. Hoch -- The music of Christmas / L.B. Greenwood -- The adventure of the Christmas Bear / Bill Crider -- The adventure of the naturalist's stock pin / Jon L. Breen -- The adventure of the second violet / Daniel Stashower -- The human mystery / Tanith Lee. Edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg, and Carol-Lynn Waugh.;

8. Greenberg, Martin Harry, Jon L. Lellenberg, Carol-Lynn Rössel Waugh, Reginald Hill., Edward D Hoch, and Masamichi Higurashi. Sharokku Homuzu Kurisumasu no irainin=Holmes for the holidays. Tokyo: Hara Shobo, 1998.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- H (15)

1. Burns, Ann. "Best Audiobooks of 2003." Library Journal 129, no. 3 (2004): 44-45.

An annotated directory of the best audiobooks of 2003 is provided. Included is Haddon, Mark. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. Recorded Bks. 5 cassettes, 61/4 hrs. ISBN 1-4025-5978-X. $45. "This first novel captures 'without sentimentality the joy and pain' of a child with Asperger's syndrome. Christopher, a 15-year-old with an interest in Sherlock Holmes, tries to solve the murder of his neighbor's dog. Jeff Woodman's 'voice and tone are totally convincing as those of a working-class English adolescent.' The print version was selected as one of LJ's Best Books of 2003. (LJ 1/04)"

2. Chatzky, Jean Sherman. "Wall Street Irregulars." Money 32, no. 1 (2003): 124.

Discusses the book 'Detective and the Investor,' by author and mutual fund manager Robert Hagstrom. Includes multiple references to Holmes.

3. David, Grainger. "Clueing In Investors." Fortune 146, no. 13 (2002): 186-186.

Presents an interview with Robert Hagstrom and his view of the stock market according to mystery fiction, with details of his book, "The Detective and the Investor." Includes references Holmes. "...Sherlock Holmes is the most well known and popular of the detectives. He had attributes that were identified--hold on [rustles around his office]--on page 206. He is very objective and has an unemotional viewpoint. He pays attention to detail. Finally--and this is hard for investors--he remains open to new or contrary information....There are rules of fair disclosure in investing too. With Enron, I'm not sure that even Holmes could have figured it out."

4. Haddon, Mark. The curious incident of the dog in the night-time. 1st ed. New York: Doubleday, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2002031355; Despite his overwhelming fear of interacting with people, Christopher, a mathematically-gifted, autistic fifteen-year-old boy, decides to investigate the murder of a neighbor's dog and uncovers secret information about his mother

5. Hammer, David L. The twenty-second man : in re Sherlock Holmes, German agent. Dubuque, Iowa: Gasogene Press, 1989.

ill. ; 22 cm. Cover title: The 22nd man./ Includes bibliographical references.;

6. Hardwick, Michael. The Revenge of the hound. New York: Ibooks Inc., distributed by Simon & Schuster, 1999.

7. Henry, O. The Sleuths: A Misadventure of Shamrock Jolnes, (Mysterious Sherlock Holmes). New York: Mysterious Bookshop, 1999.

Includes bibliographical references;

8. Hobbs, Don. "Review--More Holmes for the Holidays edited by Martin Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg and Carol-Lynn Waugh and The Vital Essence by David L. Hammer." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 6 (2000): 14.

9. ———. "Review--The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 3 (2004): 21.

10. Hoch, Edward D. Diagnosis impossible the problems of Dr. Sam Hawthorne. 1st ed. Norfolk, Va: Crippen & Landru, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96157728; Scuttlebutt Mar 1996. Contents: The problem of the covered bridge -- The problem of the old gristmill -- The problem of the lobster shack -- The problem of the haunted bandstand -- The problem of the locked caboose -- The problem of the little red schoolhouse -- The problem of the Christmas steeple -- The problem of cell 16 -- The problem of the country inn -- The problem of the voting booth -- The problem of the county fair -- The problem of the old oak tree -- A Dr. Sam Hawthorne chronology / Marvin Lachman;

11. Hoch, Edward D., and Marvin Lachman. The ripper of Storyville, and other Ben Snow tales. Signed limted ed. Norfolk, Va: Crippen & Landru Publishers, 1997.

LC Control Number: 98220781; Scuttlebutt Oct 1997. Contents: Frontier street -- Valley of arrows -- Ghost town -- Flying man -- Man in the alley -- Ripper of Storyville -- Snow in Yucatan -- Vanished steamboat -- Brothers on the beach -- 500 hours of Dr. Wisdom -- Trail of the bells -- Phantom stallion -- Sacramento waxworks -- Only tree in Tasco -- Long way from home: the travels of Ben Snow / Marvin Lachman;

12. Hosier, Sydney. Most baffling, Mrs. Hudson. New York: Avon Books, 1998.

Scuttlebutt Mar 1998; "His third book about 'the other sleuth of Baker Street,' who solves another murder mystery, with the assistance of her friend Vi Warner (who performs no astral projection this time), but without any input from her famous lodger except one of his cast-off suits."

13. ———. Murder, Mrs. Hudson. New York: Avon Books, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Dec 1996, Feb 1997; "This time Emma is hired by journalist-and-would-be-politician Winston Churchill to find, follow, and thwart an international terrorist and assassin. Emma is again assisted by a friend's powers of astral projection, and by Holmes' apparent willingness to do without a housekeeper."

14. Leeper, Evelyn C. "Book Review--'The Whitechapel Horrors' by Edward B. Hanna." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 73 (1993): 45-46.

15. Maclaren, Angus, and David L. Hammer. The quest being the search for the treasure of Sherlock Holmes, the 22nd man. Dubuque, Iowa: Gasogene Press, 1993.

LC Control Number: 94174907;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Haddon, Mark (8)

1. Baker, John F. "Hot Deals." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 26 (2002): 14.

Presents updates on deals in the book industry in North America as of July 1, 2002 with a reference to Holmes. "Britain's Mark Haddon is best known as a children's author, but many years ago he used to work with autistic children, and the experience is the basis for his first adult novel, just preempted by editor-in-chief Bill Thomas at Doubleday after a string of European sales at auction. The book is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, and if that sounds like a Sherlock Holmes sort of title, it's because the book's hero, young Christopher Boone, is obsessed with Holmes...."

2. Greenwell, Bill. "The Curious Incidence of Novels About Asperger's Syndrome." Children's Literature in Education 35, no. 3 (2004): 271-284.

"Since Asperger's Syndrome was formally recognised in 1994, several novels featuring characters with the syndrome have appeared. Bill Greenwell's article discusses these books in providing a context for a closer consideration of the British publishing sensation of 2003, Mark Haddon's 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time'. The reasons for the success of this suburban comedy, Greenwell argues, include the consequences for the reader of Haddon's choice of the sufferer from Asperger's as narrator, especially the generation of unconscious humour and the range of literary forms he uses to tell his story. Nicholas Tucker adds an Afterword from his perspective as an educational psychologist as well as a literary critic, finding in the novel a rich mixture of heroism, mystery and love mediated through narrrative ingenuity." Includes a reference to Holmes. "...Christopher has also said he does not like 'proper novels' (like Lou), and gives an example of an elaborate metaphor he has seen in a library book. However, he does like Sherlock Holmes stories (which use metaphor, as it happens), and we are told therefore that he is going to write a murder mystery novel. He will solve the problem of who killed the poodle. The Holmes parallel--since Holmes sees the detail we mis, as do Asperger children--is very cunning...."

3. Hearon, Shelby. "Fact-finding mission." Writer 117, no. 4 (2004): 38-40.

Suggests rules for finding factual information as a basis of a fiction. Importance of collecting rich and varied facts for a fiction writer; Significance of putting emphasis on the facts of the story; Use of the details of the facts in revealing the conflict of the story. Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...Finally, in Mark Haddon's amazing first novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, the rigid rules of the autistic narrator, 15-year-old Christopher, a British schoolboy, seem arbitrary and both sad and funny. Through detail the author shows: why Christopher is good at remembering things; why he likes Sherlock Holmes but not Arthur Conan Doyle;..."

4. Hoffert, Barbara, Carolyn Kuebler, and Heather McCormack. "Best Books of 2003." Library Journal 129, no. 1 (2004): 48-50.

Reviews of the winners of the Library Journal's Best Books of 2003 awards are provided. One entry includes a reference to Holmes. Haddon, Mark. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-50945-6. $22.95. "In one of the most daring first-person narratives in recent years, first novelist Haddon recounts a teenaged autistic boy's search for the killer of his neighbor's poodle. Like his hero, Sherlock Holmes, Christopher Boone has the advantage of a fiercely logical mind, yet he is so rigid that he can't navigate the wider world. When clues point to a bigger mystery involving his parents, the boy must travel to London or suffer the consequences of his knowledge. Haddon deftly expresses Christopher's mind games, spinning a story filled with quiet but powerful irony."

5. Miller, Laura. "Zelig on Baker Street." New York Times Book Review 154, no. 52998 (2004): 31-31.

Presents an essay on Sherlock Holmes and his many resurrections since his invention some 150 years ago. Contention that the book "Curious Incident of the Dog in The Night-Time," by Mark Haddon, not only gets its title from author Arthur Conan Doyle but also parallels the way that trusty Watson could notice facts without grasping their meaning; "The Hamilton Case," by Michelle de Kretser which also makes mention of Holmes; "Final Solution," by Michael Chabon where an elderly unnamed man (suggested to be Holmes) is brought out of retirement to solve a case; Criticism of "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes edited by Leslie S. Klinger who is a confirmed Sherlockian; How the campiness of the stories remains a winning feature after all this time.

6. Riippa, Laurele, and Robert Dahlin. "Spring 2003 Hardcovers: Fiction/First & Collections." Publishers Weekly 250, no. 4 (2003): 149.

Presents information on several fiction books including The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (June, $22.95) by Mark Haddon "is told by a 15-year-old autistic savant who, accused of killing his neighbor's dog, uses Sherlock Holmes as his model to solve the crime. Ad/promo. Author tour."

7. Talley, Heather Laine. "Review Essay: The Curious Incident of Disability in the Night-Time." Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. Electronic; 34, no. 2 (2005): 235-245.

Reviews the book, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time," by Mark Haddon. This is a coming-of-age story of sorts. When fifteen-year-old Christopher Boone finds his neighbor's dog murdered with a pitchfork, he initially is arrested for the murder but then takes on the role of detective. Emulating his favorite literary character, Sherlock Holmes, Christopher begins searching for the real murderer. Christopher, the book's narrator, takes us through his interrogation at the police station, his subsequent release, and his process for developing a list of potential suspects. Initially, Christopher focuses on his neighbors, but these suspects reveal details that turn Christopher's focus toward his own family. Christopher eventually identifies the murderer, and in doing so, he solves several additional mysteries about his mother's whereabouts, his parents' relationship, and his role within the family. Although there is room for reading this book with mindfulness of the multiple ways in which people experience the world, there is the potential for readers to engage the narrative using the same "mindblindness" that characterizes some with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Perhaps the author's intention in creating a book entirely composed of stark details is to give readers without autism some sense of what it might be like to be autistic.

8. Wynne-Jones, Tim. "Tigers and Poodles and Birds, Oh My!" Horn Book Magazine 80, no. 3 (2004): 265-275.

Features several adult books that have enjoyed the readership of children thus blurring the line that differentiates adult literature from children's literature. "Life of Pi," by Yann Martel; "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time," by Mark Haddon; "What the Birds See," by Sonya Hartnett.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Hall, John (8)

1. Ashworth, Peter. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Abbey School Mystery and Sherlock Holmes and the Hammerford Will by John Hall." The Ritual, no. 28 (2001): 54-56.

2. Booth, Matthew. "Review--The Travels of Sherlock Holmes by John Hall." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 71-72.

3. Hall, John. Sherlock Holmes and the disgraced inspector. London: Breese Books, 1998.

4. Healey, Tim. "Review--'The Abominable Wife and Other Unrecorded Cases of Mr. Sherlock Holmes' by John Hall." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 53-55.

5. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Boulevard Assassin by John Hall." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 13.

6. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Disgraced Inspector by John Hall." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 1 (2000): 29.

7. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Telephone Murder Mystery by John Hall." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 2 (1999): 16.

8. ———. "Review--The Travels of Sherlock Holmes by John Hall." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 2 (1999): 13.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Hockensmith, Steve (16)

1. "The Black Dove." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 1 (2008): 16-16.

The article reviews the book "The Black Dove," by Steve Hockensmith. Passing references to Doyle and Holmes. "...Hockensmith's third Holmes on the Range mystery is buoyant and consistently entertaining...."

2. "The Black Dove." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 17 (2008): 133-133.

The article reviews the audiobook "The Black Dove," by Steve Hockensmith. Read by William Dufris. Tantor Audio, unabridged, nine CDs, 10.5 hrs., $34.99 ISBN 978-1-4001-0605-9. "William Dufris provides an appealing down-home delivery to his narration of Hockensmith's third adventure featuring the Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson-emulating brothers, Gustov 'Old Red' and Otto 'Big Red' Amlingmeyer...."

3. "The Black Dove: A Holmes on the Range Mystery." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 44 (2007): 46-46.

The article reviews the book "The Black Dove: A Holmes on the Range Mystery," by Steve Hockensmith.

4. "On the Wrong Track." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 26 (2007): 56-56.

The article reviews the book "On the Wrong Track," by Steven Hockensmith. Includes references to Holmes.

5. Adams, Michael. "Holmes on the Range." Library Journal 132, no. 12 (2007): 130-130.

The article reviews the audiobook "Holmes on the Range," by Steve Hockensmith.

6. ———. "On the Wrong Track." Library Journal 132, no. 13 (2007): 129-129.

The article reviews the book on tape "On the Wrong Track," by Steve Hockensmith.

7. Chipman, Ian. "The Black Dove." Booklist 104, no. 8 (2007): 28.

Reviews the book "The Black Dove" by Steve Hockensmith.

8. Ephron, Hallie. "Hitting one out of the park the first time at bat." Writer 120, no. 8 (2007): 19-23.

The article provides interviews with the five finalists for the 2006 Edgar Award for "Best First Novel by an American Author," with the interviewed writers talking about various aspects of writing their books. Alex Berenson is the writer of "The Faithful Spy." Cornelia Read is the writer of "A Field of Darkness." Gillian Flynn is the writer of "Sharp Objects." John Hart is the writer of "King of Lies." Steve Hockensmith is the writer of "Holmes on the Range."

9. Forbes, Steve. "Two Holmes Runs." Forbes 177, no. 6 (2006): 32-32.

This article presents reviews for two books entitled "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes," by Caleb Carr and "Holmes on the Range," by Steve Hockensmith.

10. Hockensmith, Steve. Holmes on the range. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2005050406; It's 1893, and in Montana, jobs are scarce. Big Red and Old Red Amlingmeyer sign on as ranch hands on the Bar VR and are expecting hard work and a campfire where they can read their favorite Sherlock Holmes stories in Harper's Weekly.When the boys come across a body, Old Red sees a chance to try out his Holmes deductifyin' skills, and like it or not, Big Red is roped into the chase

11. ———. On the wrong track. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2007.

LC Control Number: 2007005176;

12. Hockensmith, Steve, and William Dufris. Holmes on the Range: a mystery. [S.l.]: Tantor Media, 2006. Sound Recording (CDs) 8 sound discs (9.5 hr.).

digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact discs. Unabridged. Read by William Dufris.;

13. ———. Holmes on the Range: a mystery. [Old Saybrook, CT]: Tantor Media, 2006. Sound Recording (disc) 1 sound disc (ca. 9.5 hrs.).

digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact disc ; MP3 format. "This audiobook is encoded in MP3 format and will only play on CD and DVD players or computers that have the ability to play this unique format." -- container. Read by William Dufris.;

14. Kim, Ann. "Prepub Mystery." Library Journal 132, no. 16 (2007): 50-50.

Provides pre-publication information on forthcoming books. Included in the list is one title with a Holmesian connection. Hockensmith, Steve. The Black Dove: A Holmes on the Range Mystery. Minotaur: St. Martin's. Feb. 2008. 304p. ISBN 978-0-312-34782-6. $23.95. "The two Sherlock Holmes devotees and cowpokes in training get a shot at 'detectifying' in 1893 San Francisco in their third appearance. Hockensmith lives in Petaluma, CA. Author tour in the West."

15. ———. "Prepub Mystery." Library Journal 130, no. 16 (2005): 63.

A review of upcoming mystery titles is provided. Includes entries with Holmes references. Hockensmith, Steve. Holmes on the Range. Minotaur: St. Martins. Feb. 2006. 320P. ISBN 0-312-34780-4. $22.95. "A pair of cowboy sleuths with a Sherlock Holmes fetish kick up some dust and solve some murders in 1893 Montana. A debut by short story writer Hockensmith, who lives in the Bay Area, CA. Regional author tour." Kurland, Michael. Empress of India: A Professor Moriarty Novel. Minotaur: St. Martins. Feb. 2006. 320P. ISBN 0-312-29144-2. $24.95. "More Holmes escapades as once again he squares off against his nemesis--but this time, maybe Moriarty's innocent? Edgar Award finalist Kurland lives in Petaluma, CA."

16. Klett, Rex E. "Mystery." Library Journal 130, no. 18 (2005): 55-57.

An annotated bibliography of mystery titles set in small towns and villages is provided. Includes one title with a Holmes reference. Hockensmith, Steve. Holmes on the Range. Minotaur: St. Martin's. Feb. 2006. c.304p. ISBN 0-312-34780-4. $22.95. "Cross-genre fiction can be a lot of fun when it works. This first novel will keep both mystery fans and afficionados of Westerns grinning from the first page to the last. Two German cowboy brothers, Gustav ('Old Red') and Otto ('Big Red') Amlingmeyer, have been reading the adventures of Sherlock Holmes in magazines and take on the roles of the master detective and his sidekick, Watson, when an albino cowboy turns up dead in a locked outhouse. They have only 24 hours to solve a case that involves a blustery English lord, a fraudulent cattle scheme, some black-hatted bad guys, and a cannibalistic mountain man named Bob. Mix Big Red's earthy cowboy narrative and Old Red's deductive abilities with plenty of action, including cattle stampedes, a prairie ambush, and a six-gun showdown finale, and the result is highly recommended for all mystery and Western collections. Hockensmith, whose short stories featuring Big Red and Old Red appear in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, lives in Petaluma, CA."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- I (1)

1. "When We Were Orphans (Book Review)." Publishers Weekly 247, no. 49 (2000): 32.

Reviews the audiobook 'When We Were Orphans,' by Kazuo Ishiguro and read by John Lee. Includes a reference to Holmes. "Set in Shanghai on the eve of World War II, Ishiguro's Booker-nominated novel follows the surreal predicament of Christopher Banks, an English expatriate whose overwrought state is perfectly rendered by narrator John Lee. After his parents are mysteriously kidnapped, nine-year-old Christopher is shipped off to England, where he grows up to become the Sherlock Holmes of his times-a man able to right wrongs, restore order."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- J (12)

1. Butler, Tamara. "An Opened Grave: Sherlock Holmes Investigates His Ultimate Case." Library Journal 131, no. 18 (2006): 62-62.

The article reviews the book "An Opened Grave: Sherlock Holmes Investigates His Ultimate Case," by L. Frank James.

2. Chapman, Paul M. "Review--'The Case of the Scarlet Woman: Sherlock Holmes and the Occult' by Watkin Jones." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 55-57.

3. Hall, John. "Review--'A Ghostly Crew: Tales from the Endeavour' by Roger Johnson." The Ritual, no. 28 (2001): 62.

4. Hobbs, Don. "Review--A Duel With the Devil by Roger Jaynes." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 1 (2004): 22.

5. Jack, Alex. Inspector Ginkgo tips his hat to Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. Becket, Mass: One Peaceful World Press, 1994.

LC Control Number: 95100333;

6. Jackson, Marian J. A. The sunken treasure, (A Miss Danforth mystery). New York: Walker & Co, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94002816; Scuttlebutt July 1995; "...Miss Danforth, continues to ignore Conan Doyle's earlier warning that amateur detecting is no career for a young lady, and now is on a millionaire's yacht bound from Panama to New Orleans 1900, and as usual involved in a lively mystery."

7. Jacobs, Earle W. The Grimpen Mire Affair : A Sherlock Holmes Tale As Related by His Good Friend Dr. Watson. [S.l.]: Authorhouse, 2010.

8. Jaynes, Roger. Sherlock Holmes: a duel with the devil. London: Breese Books, 2003.

Contents: The Case of the Baffled Courier; The Case of the Dishonoured Professor; Moriarty's Fiendish Plan;

9. ———. Sherlock Holmes: a duel with the devil. Large type ed, (Linford mystery library). Leicester: Linford, 2004.

19 cm. Originally published: 2003.;

10. Jeffers, H. Paul. A grand night for murder. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95015231. Scuttlebutt Oct 1995; "'A corking-good mystery' with references to the Canon and to the Baker Street Irregulars."

11. ———. The Stalwart Companions, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

21 cm.;

12. Jones, Jill. Bloodline. New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2000.

18 cm. Scuttlebutt Jun 2000; "She combines the romance and mystery genres in an investigation of a modern serial killer whose murders start at a Sherlockian 'The Unsolved Case of Jack the Ripper--Where Was Sherlock When We Needed Him?' conference in London. The hero's a Scotland Yard inspector and the heroine an FBI agent, there's plenty of romance as well as mystery, and the Sherlockian aspects are incidental."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Jakubowski, Maxim (3)

1. Jakubowski, Maxim. Murder through the ages : a bumper anthology of historical mysteries. London: Headline, 2000.

24 cm. Scuttlebutt Dec. 2000.; "With a new Sherlockian pastiche by June Thomson."

2. ———. Murder through the ages : a bumper anthology of historical mysteries. London: Headline, 2001.

18 cm. Originally published: 2000. Scuttlebutt Dec. 2000.; "With a new Sherlockian pastiche by June Thomson."

3. ———. Murder through the ages : bumper anthology of historical mysteries. New York : iBooks: Enfield, 2006.

18 cm. Who killed Dido? / Amy Myers -- Investigating the Silvius boys / Lindsey Davis -- Trunk call / Marilyn Todd -- Who stole the fish / Peter Tremayne -- The fury of the Northmen / Kate Ellis -- Raven feeder / Manda Scott -- The Shoulder-blade of a ram / Edward Marston -- Flyting, fighting / Clayton Emery -- The Trebuchet murder / Susanna Gregory -- Id Quod Clarum... / Paul Doherty -- Pie powder / John Hall -- Cold comfort / Catherine Aird -- A gift to the bridegroom / Judith Cook -- A matter of flesh and blood / Gavin Newman -- Spellbound / Carol Anne Davis -- But poor men pay for all / Mat Coward -- A poisoned chalice / John Sherwood -- Miss Unwin's mistake / H.R.F. Keating -- The case of the abominable wife / June Thomson -- The Curzon Street conundrum / David Stuart Davies -- Unsettled scores / Jürgen Ehlers -- A right royal attempt / Ian Morson -- The playwrights / Michael Hemmingson -- The problem of stateroom 10 / Peter Lovesey -- Dark mirror / Lauren Henderson. Scuttlebutt Dec. 2000.; "With a new Sherlockian pastiche by June Thomson."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- K (12)

1. "Empress of India: A Professor Moriarty Novel." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 45 (2005): 46-46.

Review of the Empress of India: A Professor Moriarty Novel by Michael Kurland (St. Martin's Minotaur) $24.95 (320p) ISBN 0-312-29144-2

2. Chapman, Paul M. "Review -- 'The Resurrected Holmes' by Arvin Kaye." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 125-127.

3. Fletcher, Connie. "Hangman's Corner." Booklist 104, no. 14 (2008): 31.

Reviews the book "Hangman's Corner" by Peter King. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "King gives readers a wonderfully diverse roundup of characters and classes from Victorian London by having a hansom cab driver as his hero. Ned Parker is kind of a poor man’s Sherlock Holmes: his job matches his passion for observation and carries him into all corners of the city, making him a perfect amateur sleuth...."

4. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Chinese Box Mysteries by Dan Kilcup." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 10-11.

5. ———. "Review--Night Watch by Stephen Kendrick." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 5 (2003): 3.

6. Kent, Jack. Sherlock Holmes i VCE-VCE-VCE. Moscow: MiK, 1994.

Scuttlebutt Mar 1997. Illustrated by Nikolai Lebedev.; "A Russian parody, illustrated by Nikolai Lebedev. Holmes and Watson (and Miss Marple, Nero Wolfe, Inspector Maigret, Perry Mason, Father Brown, and others) find themselves in a castle out on the moors, defending themselves against a murderer who is killing them off, one by one."

7. Kim, Ann. "Prepub Mystery." Library Journal 130, no. 16 (2005): 63.

A review of upcoming mystery titles is provided. Includes entries with Holmes references. Hockensmith, Steve. Holmes on the Range. Minotaur: St. Martins. Feb. 2006. 320P. ISBN 0-312-34780-4. $22.95. "A pair of cowboy sleuths with a Sherlock Holmes fetish kick up some dust and solve some murders in 1893 Montana. A debut by short story writer Hockensmith, who lives in the Bay Area, CA. Regional author tour." Kurland, Michael. Empress of India: A Professor Moriarty Novel. Minotaur: St. Martins. Feb. 2006. 320P. ISBN 0-312-29144-2. $24.95. "More Holmes escapades as once again he squares off against his nemesis--but this time, maybe Moriarty's innocent? Edgar Award finalist Kurland lives in Petaluma, CA."

8. King, Phillip, and Robert King. Farewell, my dummy, (Batsford bridge series). London: B.T. Batsford, 1996.

LC Control Number: 97158321; Scuttlebutt Jan 1997; "A new collection of bridge-problem pastiches similar to their earlier The Kings' Tales. Holmes and Watson appear in 'The London Bridge Mystery' (Jeffrey Archer, Jane Austen, and Raymond Chandler are among the authors whose styles are used in other stories)."

9. ———. The Kings' Tales. London: B. T. Batsford, 1994.

Scuttlebutt Aug 1996; "A collection of bridge-problem pastiches, done in the styles of authors such as Chandler, Runyon, Wodehouse, Asimov, Kafka, and Coward, and one of them is 'A Study in Sherlock'.

10. Klimmek, Friedrich Gerhard. Sherlock Holmes und die wahre Geschichte vom gesprenkelten Band oder Mrs. Hudsons Theorie : Roman. Taschenbuch-Erstausg. ed. München: vmd, 2004.

19 cm. Scuttlebutt Jan 2005.; "Tells the 'true story' of 'The Speckled Band'."

11. Knight, Bernard. "Sherlock Holmes returns to the case." New Scientist 120, no. (1988): 11-14.

12. Knight, H. R. What rough beast. New York: Leisure Books, 2005.

18 cm. Scuttlebutt Apr 2005.; "Conan Doyle and Houdini in 1903, involved in a battle against demonic possession."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Kelly, Gerard M. (6)

1. Kelly, Gerard M. The mystery of the locked study, (Sherlock Holmes mystery). Timperley: Baker Street Books, 1999.

2. ———. The outstanding mysteries of Sherlock Holmes. Shelburne, Ont: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2002.

3. ———. The Paddington pyromaniac, (Sherlock Holmes mystery). Timperley: Baker Street Books, 1999.

4. ———. The prodigal quest, (Sherlock Holmes mystery). Timperley: Baker Street Books, 1999.

5. ———. The riddle of the Carstairs legacy, (Sherlock Holmes mystery). Timperley: Baker Street Books, 1999.

6. ———. A slaying in suburbia, (Sherlock Holmes mystery). Timperley: Baker Street Books, 1999.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Kendrick, Stephen (3)

1. Kendrick, Stephen. "Night watch : a long-lost adventure in which Sherlock Holmes meets Father Brown." Pantheon Books, 2001.

1st ed. 22 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001.; "An interesting dual pastiche: it's Christmas in 1902, and a gruesome murder has been committed in a church in London, and Sherlock Holmes is called in to solve the mystery, and meets a young Catholic priest named Paul Brown, whose deductive prowess is impressive, and who at the end of the book calls at Baker Street to explain a clue that Holmes overlooked."

2. ———. "Night watch : a long-lost adventure in which Sherlock Holmes meets Father Brown." Berkley Prime Crime, 2003.

Berkley Prime Club trade paperback ed. ill. ; 21 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001.;

3. ———. Night watch : a long-lost adventure in which Sherlock Holmes meets Father Brown. Berkley Prime Crime mass-market ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 2006.

17 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- King, John R. (3)

1. "The Shadow of Reichenbach Falls." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 18 (2008): 47-48.

A review of the book by John R. King. Forge, $25.95 (352p) ISBN 978-0-7653-1801-5. "King's muddled alternate version of the epic final battle between Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty teams the Baker Street sleuth with William Hope Hodgson's Thomas Carnacki, a detective who often contends with the supernatural....Despite the author's obvious affection for the characters, he fails to provide a plot that does justice to his intriguing premise."

2. "The Shadow of Reichenbach Falls." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 11 (2008): 34-34.

The article reviews the book "The Shadow of Reichenbach Falls," by John R. King. "It takes two fictional sleuths to engineer Professor Moriarty's comeuppance. In a letter to Dr. Watson written 20 years after Holmes met Moriarty at Reichenbach Falls, Thomas Carnacki, the detective who solved supernatural cases using the principle of the electric pentacle, recounts how an apparently chance encounter with one Anna Schmidt led to their picnicking at the Falls just in time to rescue one man who had been pushed over by the other.....Sherlockians may quibble at their hero's fallibility, but King (The Angel of Death in Chicago, 2008, etc.) could well create new fans for William Hope Hodgson's early sci-fi tales of Carnacki."

3. Pitt, David. "The Shadow of Reichenbach Falls." Booklist 104, no. 19 (2008): 54.

Reviews the book "The Shadow of Reichenbach Falls" by John R. King. "The popular fantasy novelist (readers know him better as J. Robert King) joins the ranks of Sherlock Holmes pasticheists with this thoroughly enjoyable novel...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- King, Laurie R. (77)

1. "Core Collection: Historical Mystery Timeline." Booklist 103, no. 17 (2007): 14-15.

This article presents reviews of books that are set between the year 80 BC and 1901. Includes a couple of Holmes references. "1881 Irene Adler series, by Carole Nelson Douglas (Forge). The beautiful opera singer who outwitted Sherlock Holmes takes center stage in a series of crime-solving capers....1915 Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes series, by Laurie R. King (Bantam). The famous detective's brilliant young apprentice becomes his partner in both mystery and marriage...."

2. "Miscellany." Writer 116, no. 7 (2003): 10.

Provides information on topics and issues related to literature as of July 2003. Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes under entry for Laurie R. King. "Had Laurie R. King known just how dedicated fans of Sherlock Holmes could be to the sanctity of Arthur Conan Doyle's stories, she wonders if she would have been so eager to invent Mary Russell, Holmes' investigative equal and eventual lovematch. 'No, come to think of it, I probably wouldn't have [hesitated],' she tells Mystery Readers International. Holmes, she says, 'needed a change, of the sort that opened up the aspects of his personality not previously explored during his Baker Street days.'...King's Mary Russell novels begin with The Beekeeper's Apprentice, when Holmes retires from his investigations to raise bees in the country. King points out that historically, 'Holmes responds to strong, capable women,' noting that the only female known to have 'tweaked his interest' was Irene Adler, the one person who was able to outwit him in a case. Holmes needed a challenge, says King--and in Mary Russell, 'he got one.'"

3. "Mystery." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 44 (2002): 30.

Features several mystery books on the best seller list in the U.S. as of November 2002. Mention of Doyle and Holmes. "In the most notable Sherlock Holmes pastiches, the great detective was essentially off-stage: Laurie King's seventh Mary Russell mystery, Justice Hall (Bantam), and David Pirie's The Patient's Eyes (St. Martin's Minotaur), with a young Conan Doyle playing Dr. Watson to Dr. Joseph Bell's Holmes."

4. "Prepub Alert." Library Journal 126, no. 20 (2001): 90.

Provides a listing of books due to be published in April 2002, including Laurie R. King's Justice Hall.

5. Bliss, Laurel M. "Locked Rooms: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes." Library Journal 130, no. 8 (2005): 67.

Reviews the book "Locked Rooms: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes," by Laurie R. King.

6. Burns, Ann. "Audio Reviews." Library Journal 125, no. 12 (2000): 161.

Reviews several audio tapes, including O Jerusalem by Laurie R. King. 9 cassettes. unabridged. 13 1/2 hrs. Recorded Bks. 1999. ISBN 0-7887-3746-5. $80. "King has received both the Edgar and the John Creasey Award. O Jerusalem is the newest in a series about Sherlock Holmes and his young apprentice, Mary Russell. It is a flashback to a chapter in the Beekeeper's Apprentice in which Holmes and Russell flee danger in London, traveling to Palestine in the service of Mycroft, Holmes's older brother. When Holmes and Russell reach Palestine, they join Mahmoud and Ali, all four traveling in the garb of Bedouins. Their journey begins with the investigation of a murder and ends with preventing the destruction of Jerusalem. The narrator, Jenny Sterlin, is most convincing as the arrogant and condescending older Holmes, and the voices she uses for each character are distinct and believable. Essential for listeners or readers of the Holmes and Russell series."

7. Burns, Ann, Kristin M. Jacobi, and Wry Martinis. "Audio Reviews." Library Journal 123, no. 16 (1998): 148.

Presents numerous brief reviews of audio recordings including The Moor by Laurie R. King. 8 cassettes, unabridged. 11 hrs. Recorded Bks. 1998. ISBN 0-7887-1979-3. $72. "In this fourth Mary Russell novel, read by Jenny Sterlin, King takes us back to Dartmoor, scene of The Hound of the Baskervilles, again on the trail of a spectral hound. Shedockians have been amused or horrified by King's misappropriation of Holmes. Holmes, who had stated that love is 'an emotional thing...opposed to true cold reason' and 'I should never marry myself, lest I bias my judgment,' is in the King books married to an American half his age. Not satisfied with changing Holmes's misogynistic nature, King also robs him of his trusty biographer, Dr. Watson. Pastiche, in its truest sense, tries to resemble the style of the original work. Libraries wanting Sherlock Holmes mysteries would do better with any of the BBC series (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Audio Reviews, LJ 2/15/97). Not recommended."

8. Calamai, Peter. "For Sherlockians, one's masterful, the other's a cardboard cutout." The Ottawa Citizen, March 20, 1994: C3.

Review of The Beekeeper's Apprentice Or; On the Segregation of the Queen By Laurie R. King, St. Martin's Press; 347 pages; $31.99; and The Case of Emily V. By Keith Oatley, Reed Books; 407 pages; paperback; $17.99. "Everything Laurie King does right, [Keith Oatley] does wrong...."

9. Cunningham, David S. "Summer Reading." Commonweal 135, no. 12 (2008): 26-28.

"...Love and loss are also at the heart of my current favorite series of mystery novels. Mary Russell, the young protagonist of Laurie R. King's series, was sent to live with her English aunt after her parents died (in an accident for which Mary had always blamed herself). She buried her grief in scholarship on ancient languages and theological texts, until one day--wandering through the Sussex Downs--she met an avid beekeeper lately retired from detective work. How many men fit that description? He is, of course, Sherlock Holmes, whose powers of observation, deduction, and perseverance are well matched by the young Mary. The Beekeeper's Apprentice launched a series of finely wrought mysteries in which the two pursue their craft in tandem. Particularly noteworthy is King's deft grasp of Conan Doyle's narrative voice and characterization of his hero; those who know Holmes well will find him alive again in these pages, but more interesting for being forced to work with (rather than against) his intellectual equal, who is (egad!) a woman. The books often wrestle with theological elements, whether a text (A Letter of Mary), a place (O Jerusalem), or a charismatic preacher (A Monstrous Regiment of Women). The eighth and latest installment, Locked Rooms (Bantam, $6.99, 528 pp.), is set in Prohibition-era San Francisco, with flashbacks to the 1906 earthquake, allowing us to learn gradually where the secret past of Mary's family--and untimely deaths--has been locked away...."

10. Dwyer, Ed. "Great Audio expectations." Billboard 107, no. 32 (1995): 45.

Describes audiobooks that major publishers plan to release for fall and winter. Includes 'A Monstrous Regiment of Women' and 'The Beekeeper's Daughter' from Durkin Hayes Publishers; 'Game Plans for Success' from Time Warner Audiobooks; 'I Will Sing Life' from Dove Audio; 'The Lost World' from Random House Audio. While there is no reference to Doyle with 'The Lost World,' there is a passing reference to Holmes related to the King release. "...At Durkin Hayes Publishers, there's growing excitement over the September release of 'A Monstrous Regiment Of Women' by novelist Laurie King, acclaimed author of 'The Beekeeper's Daughter.' Like 'Daughter,' King's latest tale concerns the exploits of a feisty American girl who becomes Sherlock Holmes' sidekick...."

11. Gropman, Jackie, and Susan Woodcock. "Adult books for young adults." School Library Journal 44, no. 12 (1998): 28.

Lists several adult books for young adults that have been reviewed and selected by the 'School Library Journal' as the best books for 1998. Includes The Moor by Laurie R. King. St. Martin's. Tr $23.95. ISBN 0-31216934-5. "When Sherlock Holmes is summoned to solve an eerie murder at Baskerville Hall, the research skills of his independent young wife enhance his already superior powers."

12. ———. "Best Books 2004: Adult Books for High School Students." School Library Journal 50, no. 12 (2004): 48-49.

An annotated bibliography of the best adult books of 2004 suitable for high school students is provided. The themes of the fiction, nonfiction, and graphic novels included in this bibliography reflect the varied interests of adolescents. Includes Laurie R. King's The Game. Bantam. Tr $23.95. ISBN 0-553-80194-5. "This is the seventh and possibly best Mary Russell mystery yet, rich in period detail and sense of time and place. The heroine and her husband, Sherlock Holmes, travel to India to search for Kim, the hero of Rudyard Kipling's novel."

13. Hahn, Robert C. "PW Talks with Laurie R. King." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 7 (2002): 78.

Interviews author Laurie R. King. Opinion on the themes used in the novels; Comments on the reaction of the public to the novels; Views on freeing Sherlock Holmes from the preconceptions of Arthur Conan Doyle.

14. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Justice Hall by Laurie R. King." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 5 (2002): 20.

15. ———. "Review--O Jerusalem by Laurie King." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 4 (1999): 23.

16. ———. "Review--The Game by Laurie King." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 2 (2004): 15.

17. ———. "Review--The Moor by Laurie King." The Holmes & Watson Report 2, no. 2 (1998): 36.

18. Hoffert, Barbara. "Prepub Alert." Library Journal 128, no. 18 (2003): 52-54.

Presents information on several commercial and noncommercial fiction books including KING, Laurie R. The Game. Bantam. Mar. 2004. 368p. ISBN 0-553-80194-5. $23.95. "Conan Doyle meets Kipling as Mary Russell and hubby Sherlock Holmes head to India, hunting for a spy who turns out to be the model for the orphan in Kim."

19. James, Dean, and Shirley E. Havens. "Word of mouth." Library Journal 119, no. 9 (1994): 128.

Reviews five sleepers. 'Track of the Cat,' by Nevada Barr; 'The Beekeeper's Apprentice,' by Laurie R. King; 'Life Blood,' by Caroline Llewellyn; 'Death Comes As Epiphany,' by Sharan Newman; 'Trouble in Transylvania,' by Barbara Wilson.

20. Jones, J. T. "Depending on Memory: Intertextuality in Popular Fiction." Journal of American & Comparative Cultures 25, no. 1/2 (2002): 81-84.

Focuses on intertextuality in popular fiction. Criteria for distinguishing between literary novels and popular fiction; Example of an author rewriting a story from an alternative viewpoint; Discussion on Laurie King's Sherlock Holmes novel 'The Beekeeper's Apprentice'; Existence of intertextual connections to classic works in the novels 'Ahab's Wife' and 'The 13th Warrior.'

21. Jones, Trevelyn E., and Luann Toth. "Adult books for young adults: Fiction." School Library Journal 43, no. 6 (1997): 151.

Reviews several fiction books for young adults including Laurie R. King's A Letter of Mary. 276p. St. Martin's. 1996. Tr $23.95. ISBN 0312-14670-1. LC 96-22424. "As this latest Mary Russell/Sherlock Holmes escapade opens, the happy couple is settled in a cottage in Sussex. It is now 1923, and Mary and her husband set out to find the assumed murderers of her dear friend Dorothy Ruskin, an archaeologist working in Palestine at the beginning of the Zionist movement. The detectives employ all of the old tools of analysis, disguise, and reasoning for which Holmes is so well known to solve the puzzle. This story contains as much if not more, of the wit and intelligence of The Beekeeper's Apprentice (1994) and A Monstrous Regiment of Women (1995 both St. Martin's), as well as a fully developed relationship between the partners. King continues to provide period details and she maintains the integrity of Holmes's character as established by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. This is as good or better than the first and hopefully a harbinger of more well-constructed and literate adventures featuring this unusual but highly involving twosome. The mystery is well developed and the history and feelings of the time are evoked with much skill. A sure hit with previous fans and a fine introduction to a dynamic duo...."

22. ———. "SLJ's best books 1994. (Cover story)." School Library Journal 40, no. 12 (1994): 20.

Lists many books chosen by School Library Journal's editors as the best of 1994 chosen from among more than 3,700 new titles reviewed during 1994. Includes Laurie R. King's Beekeeper's Apprentice: Or on the Segregation of the Queen. St. Martin's Pr. 1994. Tr $21.95. ISBN 0-312-10423-5. "Humming interaction between elderly mysogynist Sherlock Holmes and a bookish, orphaned heiress leads to a hive of intellectual activity and mentoring. A strong female protagonist invades Baker Street's most famous address. (July)"

23. Jones, Trevelyn E., Luann Toth, and Joy Fleishhacker. "SLJ's best books 1998." School Library Journal 44, no. 12 (1998): 22-29.

A bibliography of 61 titles for children and young adults that have been selected as the best books of 1998 by School Library Journal is provided. One entry relates to Holmes. King, Laurie R. The Moor. St. Martin's. Tr $23.95. ISBN 0-312-16934-5. "When Sherlock Holmes is summoned to solve an eerie murder at Baskerville Hall, the research skills of his independent young wife enhance his already superior powers."

24. King, Laurie R. The art of detection. New York: Bantam Dell, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2006040665;

25. ———. The art of detection. Bristol: Poisoned Pen Press, 2006.

26. ———. The beekeeper's apprentice. Burlington, Ont: Durkin Hayes Publishing, 1996. Sound Recording (cassette) 2 sound cassettes (186 min.).

Read by Megan Follows; Mary Russell, a brilliant and headstrong Oxford student, meets for the first time London's most legendary private eye and before long she finds herself on the trail of kidnappers, then in a race for time with a mysterious person who intends to kill both Holmes and herself

27. ———. The beekeeper's apprentice, or, On the segregation of the queen. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994.

LC Control Number: 93043522. Added Title: Beekeeper's apprentice on the segregation of the queen;

28. ———. The beekeeper's apprentice, or, On the segregation of the queen. Bantam Trade pbk. ed. New York: Bantam Books, 2002.

LC Control Number: 2001043926;

29. ———. The beekeeper's apprentice, or, On the segregation of the queen. Bristol: Poisoned Pen Press, 2006.

30. ———. The beekeeper's apprentice, or, On the segregation of the queen. Large type ed. Thorndike, Me: G.K. Hall, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96027293;

31. ———. The Beekeeper's Apprentice, or, On the Segregation of the Queen. London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

Originally published: New York: St. Martin's, 1994; London: Collins Crime, 1996.;

32. ———. Dvori pravednosti / Uniform Title: Justice hall. Croatian. Zagreb: Algoritam, 2007.

19 cm. Translation of: Justice hall.;

33. ———. The game. London: Allison & Busby, 2004.

22 cm.;

34. ———. The Game, (A Mary Russell novel). London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

Originally published: 2004.;

35. ———. The game : a Mary Russell novel. Large type ed. Waterville, Me.: Thorndike Press, 2004.

maps ; 22 cm.; Traveling incognito, Mary Russell and her spouse, Sherlock Holmes, head for India to search for a missing spy, the famous orphan who inspired Rudyard Kipling's "Kim," and find themselves caught up in a dangerous intrigue.

36. ———. The game: a Mary Russell novel. New York: Bantam Books, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2003055684; A visit from Mycroft to Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes reveals Holmes' friendship with a now missing English spy named Kimball O'Hara, Kipling's "Kim". To find him, Russell and Holmes must travel incognito across India, where it's sometimes impossible to tell friend from deadly foe

37. ———. The game: a Mary Russell novel. New York: Bantam, 2005.

A visit from Mycroft to Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes reveals Holmes' friendship with a now missing English spy named Kimball O'Hara, Kipling's "Kim". To find him, Russell and Holmes must travel incognito across India, where it's sometimes impossible to tell friend from deadly foe

38. ———. The God of the Hive. London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

39. ———. The God of the Hive : a novel of suspense featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. New York: Bantam Books, 2010.

1st ed. map ; 25 cm. ; Maintaining tenuous contact only by means of coded messages and cryptic notes with her husband, Sherlock Holmes, and with Holmes' young granddaughter in her safekeeping, Russell will have to call on instincts she didn't know she had as the famous husband and wife sleuths are pursued by a killer immune from the sting of justice.

40. ———. The God of the Hive : a novel of suspense featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. Large print ed, (Thorndike Press large print mystery; A Mary Russell novel). Waterville, ME: Thorndike Press, 2010.

map ; 23 cm.; Maintaining contact by cryptic notes with her husband, Sherlock Holmes, and with Holmes' young granddaughter in her safekeeping, Russell will have to call on instincts she didn't know she had they are pursued by a killer immune from the sting of justice.

41. ———. Het moeras. Utrecht: Bruna, 2002.

Dutch translation of The Moor. Omslag vermeldt: een Mary Russell/Sherlock Holmes-mysterie. [vert. uit het Engels Jet Matla].; Het echtpaar Holmes onderzoekt op de "Moor" of de geruchten rond spookverschijningen van een rijtuig en van de "Hound of the Baskervilles" kloppen en of de onverklaarbare

42. ———. Justice hall. London: HarperCollins, 2002.

22 cm. Originally published: New York: Bantam.;

43. ———. Justice Hall : a Mary Russell novel. Bantam mass market ed. New York: Bantam Dell, 2003.

44. ———. "Justice Hall : a Mary Russell novel." Bantam Books, 2002.

24 cm. Scuttlebutt Feb 2002.; "Laurie R. King's sixth novel about Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, set in 1923 in Berkshire (and in Paris and London) after their visit to Dartmoor in "The Moor," and it's well up to her high standards, with interesting characters and an intriguing mystery, and the reappearance of old friends."

45. ———. Justice Hall : a Mary Russell novel. Large type ed, (Thorndike Press large print mystery series). Waterville, Me. : Thorndike Press: Bath, England : Chivers Press, 2002.

23 cm.;

46. ———. The Language of Bees, (A Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mystery). London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

Originally published: 2009.;

47. ———. The Language of Bees. Large print ed, (A Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mystery). Bath: Camden, 2010.

Originally published: London: Allison & Busby, 2009.;

48. ———. The language of bees : a Mary Russell novel. New York: Bantam Books, 2009.

map, 24 cm.;

49. ———. The Language of Bees : a Mary Russell novel. Bantam Books trade paperback ed. New York: Bantam Books Trade Paperbacks, 2010.

map ; 21 cm. Originally published in hardcover: [New York] : Bantam Books, 2009. Includes excerpt from the author's book: The god of the hive.; A young painter asks for help when his wife and child go missing. Mary finds herself on the trail of a very dangerous killer, one whom Sherlock might be protecting for reasons known only to him.

50. ———. A letter of Mary: a Mary Russell novel. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96022424; "The time is 1923, and Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes now are married (yes, to each other), and involved in solving a mystery that's really a mystery, and Mary is more mature, and she's very much a character in her own right. There are some subtleties to amuse mystery fans, and some new insights into the lives of both Russell and Holmes, and a good story, told well."

51. ———. A letter of Mary: a Mary Russell novel. Large type ed, (G.K. Hall large print mystery collection). Thorndike, Me: G.K. Hall, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96051929; "The time is 1923, and Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes now are married (yes, to each other), and involved in solving a mystery that's really a mystery, and Mary is more mature, and she's very much a character in her own right. There are some subtleties to amuse mystery fans, and some new insights into the lives of both Russell and Holmes, and a good story, told well."

52. ———. A letter of Mary: a Mary Russell novel. New York: Bantam, 1998.

"The time is 1923, and Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes now are married (yes, to each other), and involved in solving a mystery that's really a mystery, and Mary is more mature, and she's very much a character in her own right. There are some subtleties to amuse mystery fans, and some new insights into the lives of both Russell and Holmes, and a good story, told well."

53. ———. Locked Rooms, (A Mary Russell novel). London: Allison & Busby, 2010.

Originally published: 2005.;

54. ———. Locked Rooms : a novel of suspense featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. Bantam Books trade pbk. ed. New York: Bantam Books Trade Paperbacks, 2010.

21 cm. Originally published: New York : Bantam Books, 2005.;

55. ———. Locked rooms: a Mary Russell novel. New York: Bantam Books, 2005.

LC Control Number: 2005048082; Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes are in to San Francisco to settle the Russell family estate. As a child, she lived through the 1906 earthquake and fire but has never been able to recall them. But the past has not forgotten her. Others from her past have died violent deaths and Mary is targeted now. With the aid of a young detective and crime writer named Hammett, Russell and Holmes find themselves unravelling a mystery that leads them from the winding streets of Chinatown to the secrets of a family marriage and the car accident that only fourteen-year-old Mary survived."

56. ———. A monstrous regiment of women. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95021088;

57. ———. A monstrous regiment of women. New York: Bantam, 1997.

58. ———. The moor: a Mary Russell novel. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97031886; "Brings Mary Russell and her husband to Dartmoor in 1923, summoned by the Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould to solve a new mystery that echoes the one that Sherlock Holmes solved there decades earlier. The moor is as wet and cold as ever, in the book, at any rate (the first time Laurie was there to do research the weather was so pleasant that she had to make another trip), and she has done a fine job with the time and place and characters, as well as with the mystery. She also has discovered a delightful echo of the reverend in his grandson's biography of Sherlock Holmes (no spoiler here)."

59. ———. The moor: a Mary Russell novel. New York: Bantam, 1999.

60. ———. O Jerusalem a Mary Russell novel. New York: Bantam Books, 1999.

LC Control Number: 98056124; "At the close of the year 1918, forced to flee England's green and pleasant land, Russell and Holmes enter British-occupied Palestine under the auspices of Holmes' enigmatic brother, Mycroft."--Book jacket. ""Gentlemen, we are at your service." Thus Holmes greets the two travel-grimed Arab figures who receive them in the orange groves fringing the Holy Land. Whatever role could the volatile Ali and the taciturn Mahmoud play in Mycroft's design for this land the British so recently wrested from the Turks?"--Book jacket. "A recent rash of murders seems unrelated to the growing tensions between Jew, Moslem, and Christian, yet Holmes is adamant that he must reconstruct the most recent one in the desert gully where it occurred. His singular findings will lead him and Russell through labyrinthine bazaars, verminous inns, cliff-hung monasteries - and into mortal danger."--Book jacket

61. ———. Sharokku Homuzu no manadeshi, (Shueisha bunko). Tokyo: Shueisha, 1997.

16 cm. Translation of: The beekeeper's apprentice./ "The beekeeper's apprentice on the segregation of the queen"--Jacket. Rori Kingu ; Yamada Kumiko yaku. / Uniform Title: Beekeeper's apprentice. Japanese;

62. King, Laurie R., and Sirkka-Liisa Sjöblom. Oikeuden talo / Uniform Title: Justice hall. Helsinki: Gummerus : Book Studio, 2003.

22 cm. Alanimeke irtopäällyksessä: Rikosromaani, päähenkilöinä Sherlock Holmes ja Mary Russell. [suomentanut Sirkka-Liisa Sjöblom].;

63. Klett, Rex E. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 122, no. 20 (1997): 159.

Reviews the mystery novel The Moor, by Laurie R. King.

64. Lewis, Shirley. "Outstanding new books K-12." Emergency Librarian 25, no. 2 (1997): 54.

Features books for K-12 students. Includes 'Arctic & Antarctic,' by Dave Weller; 'Arctic son,' by Jean Craighead George; 'Chicken soup for the teenage soul,' by Jack Canfield. Also includes a reference to Holmes and Laurie R. King. "...A Monstrous Regiment of Women. Laurie King. Bantam. $5.99. 0-55357456-6. Grades 9 up. -- Now available in paperback, this sequel to The beekeeper apprentice will captivate adults and young people. The genre is mystery, the plot is rich and the style is beguiling. This ripping read features Sherlock Holmes and his young female apprentice who encounter a feminist cult movement where murders most foul are suspected."

65. Maryles, Daisy. "Behind the Bestsellers." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 12 (2004): 15-15.

Features several bestselling books as of March 22, 2004. "Bad Business," by Robert B. Parker; "The Game," by Laurie R. King; "The Power of Intention," by Wayne W. Dyer.

66. McAuley, Lynn. "The followup to The Beekeeper's Apprentice doesn't disappoint." The Ottawa Citizen, December 24, 1995: C4.

Review. "...A Monstrous Regiment of Women (St. Martin's Press; 326 pages; $33.50) has finally arrived -- a wonderful book, better in many respects than the first...."

67. Monfredo, Miriam Grace, and Sharan Newman. Crime through time. Berkley Prime Crime ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 1997.

LC Control Number: 97197215; Scuttlebutt Jul 1997. Contents: Death of a place-seeker / Lynda S. Robinson -- Archimedes' tomb / Steven Saylor -- Solomon's decision / Sharan Newman -- Murder at anchor / Edward Marston -- The hangman's apprentice / Leonard Tourney -- Suffer a witch / Miriam Grace Monfredo -- The lullaby cheat / Kate Ross -- Anything in the dark / Edward D. Hoch -- Bertie and the boat race / Peter Lovesey -- The high constable and the visiting author / Maan Meyers -- Look to the lady / Alanna Knight -- Mrs. Hudson's case / Laurie King -- Exit centre stage / M.J. Trow -- Decision of the umpire / Troy Soos -- Uncle Charlie's letters / Anne Perry -- Killing the critic / Gillian Linscott -- Portrait of the artist as a young corpse / Barbara Paul -- The Mamur Zapt and the Kodaker's eye / Michael Pearce -- Storm in a tea shoppe / Carola Dunn -- The enemy / Ken Kuhlken -- The soldier and his dead companion / Nicholas A. DiChario; "An anthology offering 21 new short stories, including Laurie R. King's 'Mrs. Hudson's Case' (with Mary Russell) and M. J. Trow's 'Exit Centre Stage' (with Inspector Sholto Lestrade)."

68. Nagle, Sarah. "Beyond Sherlock Holmes: British Crime Fiction." Library Journal 131, no. 7 (2006): 128.

An annotated bibliography of British crime fiction titles is provided. Includes reference to Holmes. " The American writer Edgar Allan Poe is often considered the father of crime fiction as we know it. But starting with Sherlock Holmes, the fictional character created by Arthur Conan Doyle at the end of the 19th century, British writers soon took the genre to great heights, peaking in the 1920s and 1930s, mystery's 'Golden Age,' with Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers as the chief purveyors of detective fiction. Today, there is a new golden era of high-quality traditional mysteries, authored by both UK and U.S. writers, that feature atmospheric and historical British settings, as well as strong characters and sophisticated plots. Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes was a confirmed bachelor. However, Laurie R. King has created a 'fictitious' wife for Holmes's later years, the intrepid Mary Russell, who, at an early age, becomes an informal student of Holmes and later his independent and scholarly spouse. Together, the two sleuths sharpen their considerable deductive powers through conversation and battles of intellect. There are currently six novels in the series, starting with The Beekeeper's Apprentice (Bantam. 2002. ISBN 0-553-38152-0. pap. $12)."

69. O'Gorman, Rochelle. "You know my methods: new Holmes mysteries." The Boston Globe, April 11, 1999: G3.

"Both Baker Street Irregulars and garden-variety mystery buffs should prick up their ears at the news of two new Sherlock Holmes whodunits. Though the mystery takes a back seat to vivid characterization and rich atmosphere, Laurie R. King's 'The Moor' is an addictive 1920s adventure (Recorded Books; unabridged fiction; eight cassettes; 10 hours, 45 minutes; $16.50 if rented, $72 if purchased; read by Jenny Sterlin; 800-638-1304)....A more conventional tale is found in a Sherlockian mystery by Larry Millett, who once again brings the hawkeyed detective to America in 'Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders' (Penguin Audio; abridged fiction; four cassettes; six hours; $24.95; read by Simon Prebble)...."

70. Ott, Bill. "A Hard-Boiled Gazette to San Francisco." Booklist 104, no. 17 (2008): 10-13.

The article reviews books including "The Art of Detection," by Laurie R. King.

71. Peters, Timothy B. "Success Is No Mystery." Publishers Weekly 250, no. 17 (2003): 27.

Highlights the sales growth of books at M Is for Mystery bookstore in San Mateo, California due to author focused events. Profile of loyal clientele of the store; Overview of the extensive stocks of the store; Remarks from bookstore owner and founder Ed Kaufman regarding the events. Includes references to Holmes and Laurie R. King. "...The loyal clientele of his store--both Bay Area buyers who show up in person and 'virtual' customers from around the world--have made it a premiere venue for writers. Laurie King, the author of the Kate Martinelli mysteries, the Mary Russell/Sherlock Holmes series and three other suspense novels, has done several events at M Is for Mystery and was at the store in late March to promote her new book, Keeping Watch. 'Ed's events are remarkably well-organized and remarkably well-attended,' she reported. 'Ed gets a good mixture of real fans who know my work and new readers because he publicizes the events so well.'..."

72. ———. "A Twist of Two Tales." Publishers Weekly 253, no. 24 (2006): 24-25.

The article focuses the combination of the two fictional worlds by author Laurie King into one book entitled The Art of Detection. The four novels featuring homicide detective Kate Martinelli are police procedurals that combine murders with portrayals of contemporary life. In King's novel, Martinelli discovers what could be the original manuscript of an unpublished Sherlock Holmes novella while investigating the bizarre murder of an eccentric, obsessive Holmes collector named Philip Gilbert.

73. Pour-El, I. "Audio." Library Journal 131, no. 3 (2006): 155-157.

Reviews of recently released fiction and nonfiction audio-books are provided. Included is King, Laurie R. Locked Rooms. 10 cassettes, unabridged. 14 hrs. Recorded Bks. 2005. ISBN 1-4193-4062-X. $94.75; 12 CDs. ISBN 1-4193-4064-6. $119.75. "Traveling back to England by way of her childhood home in San Francisco, Mary Russell (a.k.a. Mrs. Sherlock Holmes) is troubled by disturbing nightmares. Although she was the only survivor of the tragic motor-car accident that killed her father, mother, and younger brother, there is clearly something more than survivor's guilt on her mind. Gradually, as Mary explores the gaps in her memory, her husband realizes that someone is trying to kill her, and they both set out to identify the criminal. Set in a less exotic location than recent Russell/Holmes adventures, the book focuses on Mary's self-exploration rather than crime, politics, or mountaineering. Along the way, the two detectives collect an appealing set of assistants, including Dashiell Hammett, a Chinese scholar, and a modern set of street urchins. While the work lacks the charms of fictional, post-Victorian colonial England characteristic of the neo-Holmes canon, it is still a good mystery. King's writing style always transfers well to the audio format, and reader Jenny Sterlin is competent and easy to understand. Recommended for all public libraries."

74. Riippa, Laurele, and Robert Dahlin. "Hardcover Fiction/Mystery & Suspense." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 4 (2005): 150-153.

Presents several books on mystery and suspense including Locked Rooms: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes (July, $24) by Laurie R. King. In 1924, "Mary and hubby Sherlock intend to settle in San Francisco, despite her nightmares. 65,000 first printing. Ad/promo. Author publicity."

75. Trone, Mary C. "Mystery; [Metro Edition]." Star Tribune (Minneapolis), Dec 12, 1994: 11.

A Small Sacrifice by Ellen Hart (Seal Press, $20.95) and Once Upon a Crime by M.D. Lake (Avon, $4.99) are both by local authors, continuing two series that feature Twin Cities' protagonists. Hart's Jane Lawless is a restaurateur and amateur sleuth who's called on to find a killer among her friend Cordelia's reunited college chums. Lake's campus cop, Peggy O'Neill, seeks a wolf disguised as a lamb during a Hans Christian Andersen conference at the university.; Sins of the Wolf by Anne Perry (Fawcett, $20), The Alienist by Caleb Carr (Random House, $22) and Laurie R. King's The Beekeeper's Apprentice (St. Martin's Press, $21.95) are all outstanding period mysteries. Perry returns to Victorian London; Carr takes readers back to New York City in the 1890s, and King provides Sherlock Holmes with a young woman sidekick to liven up his retirement.

76. Vicarel, Jo Ann. "Mystery." Library Journal 131, no. 8 (2006): 67-8, 70-2.

An annotated bibliography of mystery titles is provided. Includes an entry with a Holmes reference. King, Laurie R. The Art of Detection. Bantam. Jun. 2006. c.358p. ISBN 0-553-80453-7 [ISBN 978-0-553-80453-91. $24. "After a six-year hiatus, King returns to her Kate Martinelli mystery series, set in present-day San Francisco. Much has changed in Kate's life, including the addition of a new house and a daughter with lover Lee. Fortunately, her partnership with Al Hawkin remains steadfast. When a body is found in a gun emplacement in the Marin headlands, jurisdiction is a bit iffy, but the case eventually goes to Kate and Al. The pajama-clad corpse is identified as Sherlock Holmes enthusiast Philip Gilbert, whom Kate discover had recently purchased a mysterious manuscript he thought might be an unpublished short story by Holmes, and she wonders if similarities between the story and Gilbert's fate hold the key to his murder. King knows both Holmes and the Bay Area, and this book is a delightful mix of the two. However, it's misleading to think it is connected to her Mary Russell series in any substantial way. Highly recommended for all public libraries."--Laurel Bliss, Princeton Univ. Lib., N

77. Williams, Wilda. "Shelf Life." Library Journal 129, no. 3 (2004): 34-37.

"Several librarian-authors discuss how their writing is a natural extension of their day jobs. They talk about how library books have inspired them and helped them in their research, the challenge of creating a writing life in the time left over after the working day, and the difficulties of finding a publisher." Includes a reference to Holmes. "...In [Will] Thomas's case, it was a library book that helped steer him down the road to publication. Long fascinated by the Victorian era, Thomas had for several years written essays for various Sherlock Holmes society publications and lectured on Victorian crime fiction. Although he enjoyed such writers as Perry and Laurie King, Thomas considered their Victorian mysteries to be genteel cozies that didn't really reflect the period...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Kurland, Michael (8)

1. Kurland, Michael. Death by gaslight. New York: New American Library, 1982.

18 cm. "A Signet book.";

2. ———. The empress of India : a Professor Moriarty novel. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2006.

22 cm.;

3. ———. The great game a Professor Moriarty novel. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2001.

LC Control Number: 2001019577; "Labeled the "Napoleon of Crime" by an obsessed Sherlock Holmes, Professor James Moriarty is a prominent scientist, a keen analytical mind, and a dabbler in less than savory doings. Two friends and former associates of Moriarty - Benjamin Barnett and his wife, the former Cecily Perrine - are traveling in Europe in early 1891 when they realize that they have become objects of scrutiny from persons unknown. Things turn deadly when they find themselves in the midst of an attempted assassination of a German prince. Meanwhile in Vienna, the younger son of a British nobleman - indulging in what was then known as "the Great Game" of amateur spying - finds himself framed for the murder of his paramour and the assassination of an Austrian duke. In London, an unknown caller arrives at Moriarty's door on a matter of great urgency. But before Moriarty can be summoned to speak with him, the stranger is shot by a crossbow bolt loosed by unseen hands.". "While a lesser man might be daunted, Moriarty is merely intrigued and begins to investigate. What Moriarty uncovers is a cabal that seems to be using assassination to destabilize the rule of the crowned heads of Europe. But he also senses that there is something even bigger than this operating - a conspiracy behind the conspiracy - and detects the workings of a mind quite possibly as clever as his own. Using his contacts, friends, and the not-so-desired help of his often-nemesis Sherlock Holmes, Moriarty must save his friends and outwit his most cunning opponent while the fate of history hangs in the balance."--Book jacket

4. ———. The infernal device & others : a Professor Moriarty omnibus. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2001.

21 cm. The infernal device -- The paradol paradox -- Death by gaslight. Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hol042/2001281320.html;

5. ———. My Sherlock Holmes: untold stories of the great detective. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2002035664;

6. ———. My Sherlock Holmes: untold stories of the great detective. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2004.

21 cm. Introduction -- Incident of the impecunious chevalier (M. Dupin) / Richard Lupoff -- Dollmaker of marigold walk (First Mrs. Watson) / Barbara Hambly -- Adventure of forgotten umbrella (James Phillimore) / Mel Gilden -- Call me Wiggins (Wiggins, B.S.I.) / Norman Schreiber -- Mycroft's great game (Mycroft Holmes) / Gary Lovisi -- Witch of Greenwich (Billy, the page boy) / Gerard Dole -- Years ago and in a different place (Professor James Moriarty) / Michael Kurland -- Mrs. Hudson reminisces (Mrs. Hudson) / Linda Robertson -- Cabaret aux assassins (Irene Adler) / Cara Black -- Study in orange (Colonel Sebastian Moran) / Peter Tremayne -- Riddle of the young protestor (Second Mrs. Watson) / Michael Mallory -- Adventure of the celestial snows (Reginald Musgrave) / George Alec Effinger -- And the others (Giles Lestrade, Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Bevis Stamford, Arthur Conan Doyle, James Mortimer) / C.D. Ewing -- About the authors. Reprint. First published 2003.; "For over a century, readers have thrilled to the exploits of Sherlock Holmes through the tales narrated by his sidekick and official chronicler, Dr. John Watson. But do Dr. Watson's tales really tell the true story of the great detective? In this collection of thirteen original tales, each told by a side character in the original canon, ranging from the famous (Irene Adler, Professor James Moriarty, and Mycroft Holmes) to the decidedly minor (Billy the page boy, Wiggins of the Baker Street Irregulars, and both Mrs. Watsons), readers finally get to hear another side of the legend. From what Inspector Lestrade really thought of Holmes to the untold tale of his encounter with Dr. Fu Manchu, from the bitter reminiscences of him by C. Auguste Dupin to the thoughts of his longtime landlady Mrs. Hudson, the totality of the veil of mystery over the legend that is Sherlock Holmes is at last removed. With stories from Barbara Hambly, Cara Black, Peter Tremayne, and Michael Kurland, among others, My Sherlock Holmes is a unique and compelling entry into the literature of the world's most famous detective."

7. ———. Sherlock Holmes : the American years. 1st ed. New York: Minotaur Books, 2010.

22 cm. Foreword / by Leslie S. Klinger -- Introduction / by Michael Kurland -- Inga Sigerson weds / by Richard A. Lupoff -- My silk umbrella : a Mark Twain story / by Darryl Brock -- The old senator / by Steve Hockensmith -- The American adventure / by Gary Lovisi -- The sacred white elephant of Mandalay / by Michael Mallory -- The curse of Edwin Booth / by Carole Buggé -- The case of the reluctant assassin / by Peter Tremayne -- Cutitng for sign / by Rhys Bowen -- The English señor / by Marta Randall -- The stagecoach detective : a tale of the golden West / by Linda Robertson.; This collection of ten original stories brings light to one of the least examined periods in the life of the great detective--his time in the former colonies, the United States, when he is a young man not yet set upon his course in life and in his famous lodgings at 221B Baker Street.

8. ———. Sherlock Holmes: the hidden years. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004046802. Contents: The beast of Guangming Peak, Michael Mallory -- Water from the moon, Carolyn Wheat -- Mr. Sigerson, Peter Beagle -- The mystery of Dr. Thorvald Sigerson, Linda Robertson -- The case of the lugubrious manservant, Rhys Bowen -- The bughouse caper, Bill Pronzini -- Reichenbach, Michael Kurland -- The strange case of the voodoo priestess, Carole Bugge -- The adventure of the missing detective, Gary Lovisi -- Cross of gold, Michael Collins -- God of the naked unicorn, Richard Lupoff;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- L (20)

1. "SF/Fantasy/Horror Notes." Publishers Weekly 253, no. 3 (2006): 41-41.

Notes Terrors by Richard A. Lupoff, who "gathers 16 diverting imaginative tales, each a pastiche in tribute to a popular author like Edgar Rice Burroughs, Arthur Conan Doyle or H.P. Lovecraft."

2. "The Universal Holmes." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 18 (2007): 143-143.

The article reviews the book "The Universal Holmes," by Richard A. Lupoff. "The affection of prolific fantasy author Lupoff (Marblehead: A Novel of H.P. Lovecraft) for Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson lifts this collection of five previously published tales, one of which, 'The God of the Naked Unicorn,' has a new ending. The strongest entry is 'The Adventure of the Voorish Sign,' in which the great detective and his Boswell pursue a cult planning to liberate H.P. Lovecraft's monstrous Old Ones. 'The Adventure of the Boulevard Assassin,' written in the style of Jack Kerouac, is a curiosity perhaps best appreciated by Kerouac fans. The volume concludes on a light note with a recipe for 'Giant Rat of Sumatra Stew' (chicken is an acceptable substitute). While these stories may fall short of the standard set by such masters of the Holmes pastiche as Denis Smith and Donald Thomas, Lupoff, as ever, consistently entertains."

3. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Wood Green Empire Mystery by W. Lane." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 4 (2000): 40.

4. ———. "Review--The Surrogate Assassin by Christopher Leppek." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 12.

5. Lachman, Marvin. The heirs of Anthony Boucher: a history of mystery fandom. 1st U.S. trade pbk. ed. Scottsdale, AZ: Poisoned Pen Press, 2005.

LC Control Number: 2005925961;

6. Landon, Lucinda. Meg Mackintosh and the mystery in the locked library. 1st ed, (A Solve-it-yourself mystery). Boston: Joy Street Books, 1993.

LC Control Number: 92019948; Meg investigates the theft of a rare book from a locked library. The reader is challenged to solve the mystery before Meg, using clues in both text and illustrations

7. Leadley, Steve. Sherlock Holmes and the circle of blood. Encino CA: Black Coat Press, 2009.

ill. 21 cm. Sherlock Holmes and the circle of blood first appeared under the title, "Sherlock Holmes in Cape May" (the author: 2006). The circle of blood -- The Highland intrigue -- The medium problem. Cover illustration by Daylon.; Circle: In Washington on a discreet mission for the British Government, Holmes and Watson receive a telegram reporting that a leading citizen of Cape May has been murdered, and next to the body was a bust of Socrates, circled with blood. Highland: An old comrade writes Watson, asking for help regarding the death of his uncle, in "indelicate" circumstances. Medium: Watson is alarmed that a medium in London is gaining popularity and asks Holmes to expose her. Holmes is uninterested until the medium recovers a stolen diamond.

8. Leppek, Christopher, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The surrogate assassin : a Sherlock Holmes mystery. 1st ed. Aurora, CO: Write Way Pub., 1998.

24 cm. "Based on the characters created by Sir Conan Doyle.";

9. Lofts, William Oliver Guillemont, and Jon L. Lellenberg. The Adventures of Herlock Sholmes: a history. Draft ver ed. Alexandria, Va: Dispatch-Box Press, 1975.

Includes bibliographical references;

10. ———. The Adventures of Herlock Sholmes: a history and bibliography, (Occasional paper of The Dispatch-Box Press). Alexandria, Va: Dispatch-Box Press, 1976.

Citations: De Waal C21309. Includes bibliographical references (p. 15-19);

11. Lumley, Brian. Harry Keogh necroscope and other weird heroes! 1st ed. New York: Tor, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2003042619; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

12. ———. Necroscope. 1st ed, (The lost years). New York: Tor, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95023536; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

13. ———. Necroscope. 1st Tor trade ed. New York: Tor, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94031311; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

14. ———. Necroscope. 1st hardcover ed. New York: Tor, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2003057062; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

15. ———. Necroscope. 1st ed. New York: Tor, 2000.

LC Control Number: 00023325; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

16. ———. Necroscope. 1st Tor trade ed. New York: TOR, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96023842; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

17. ———. Necroscope. 1st ed. New York: TOR, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99024562; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

18. ———. Necroscope. 1st ed, (The lost years). New York: Tor, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96022941; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

19. ———. Necroscope. 1st ed. New York: Tor, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2006045673; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

20. ———. Necroscope avengers. New York: Tor/Tom Doherty Associates Book, 2001.

LC Control Number: 2001017386; Scuttlebutt Dec 1995; "Harry Keogh is the hero, who can talk with the dead and is searching for a serial killer who believes he's a werewolf, and whose name is Arthur Conan Doyle Jamieson."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Leblanc, Maurice (4)

1. Leblanc, Maurice. Arsène Lupin versus Herlock Sholmes, (Wildside mystery). Holicong, PA: Wildside Press, 2001.

23 cm. Uniform Title: Arsène Lupin contre Herlock Sholmès. English.;

2. Leblanc, Maurice, Arnaud Demaegd, Jean-Marc Lofficier, and Randy Lofficier. The blonde phantom. Encino, CA: Black Coat Press Book, 2005.

3. Leblanc, Maurice, Jean-Marc Lofficier, Randy Lofficier, and Kim Newman. Arsene Lupin vs. Sherlock Homes the hollow needle. Encino, Calif: Black Coat Press, 2004.

Contents: Sherlock Holmes arrives too late -- The hollow needle -- Escape not the thunderbolt, by Jean-Marc and Randy Lofficier;

4. Leblanc, Maurice, and Alexander Teixeira de Mattos. Arsène Lupin versus Holmlock Shears. Rockville, Md.: James A. Rock & Company, Publishers, 2002.

23 cm. First episode: The fair-haired lady -- Second episode: the Jewish lamp. Translated by Alexander Teixeira de Mattos.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Lovesey, Peter (4)

1. Lovesey, Peter. The Sedgemoor strangler. London: Allison & Busby, 2002.

23 cm.;

2. ———. The Sedgemoor strangler and other stories of crime. Large type ed. Bath: Camden, 2004.

23 cm. This ed. originally published: Bath: Chivers, 2003.;

3. ———. The Sedgemoor strangler, and other stories of crime. 1st ed. Norfolk, VA: Crippen & Landru Publishers, 2001.

24 cm. + 1 pamphlet (7 p. ; 22 cm.) Pamphlet title: The butler didn't do it : a puzzle mystery.; The Sedgemoor strangler -- The perfectionist -- Interior, with corpse -- Dr Death -- The four wise men -- Away with the fairies -- Showmen -- The word of a lady -- Star struck -- The amorous corpse -- The kiss od death -- The stalker -- Ape -- The usual table -- The problem of stateroom 10 -- Murdering Max.

4. ———. The Sedgemoor strangler, and other stories of crime. Large type ed. Bath, England: Chivers Press, 2004.

22 cm.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- M (22)

1. Booth, Matthew. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Somerset Hunt by Rosemary Michaud." The Ritual, no. 11 (1993): 49-50.

2. Glantz, Shelley. "Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Irregulars: The Fall of the Amazing Zalindas." Library Media Connection 25, no. 6 (2007): 74-74.

The article reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Irregulars: The Fall of the Amazing Zalindas," by Tracy Mack. "Lovers of the whodunit will be overjoyed to discover this new series. Set in Victorian England, the Baker Street Irregulars are nine homeless boys who often work for the illustrious detective Sherlock Holmes. Holmes employs the boys after a family of tightrope walkers fall to their deaths during a performance. Though the story’s twist and turns are predictable, readers will enjoy the action. Fans of Sherlock Holmes will enjoy the many references to his other famous cases. Observant readers will find a message hidden throughout the text in bold letters. Pen and ink illustrations are scattered throughout the book."

3. Gray, B. Allison. "The Fall of the Amazing Zalindas." School Library Journal 53, no. 1 (2007): 132-132.

The article reviews the book "The Fall of the Amazing Zalindas," by Tracy Mack and Micheal Citrin. "When three tightrope walkers fall to their deaths, Sherlock Holmes must investigate. He is aided by a group of street children who help him as well as one another. These ragamuffins, led by the very capable Wiggins, go to the circus to seek out clues while Holmes and Watson pursue other leads. The case involves the theft of a priceless 17th-century book commissioned by Charles I1 and only meant to be seen by the ruling king or queen. Frail Ozzie turns out to be a vital new member of the Irregulars with a razor-sharp memory, and a gypsy girl from the circus proves helpful to solving the murders. Ozzie and Wiggins are memorable characters, and Holmes and Watson are extremely well defined. Black-and-white illustrations seem quite slapdash and do little to enhance the Victorian flavor of the book. Alex Simmons and Bill McKay's The Raven League (Sleuth, 2006), another story about Holmes and a gang of waifs, gives readers a more immediate impression of the realities of Victorian London with its many abused and homeless children, child labor, filth, and class differences."

4. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes: The Tandridge Hall Murder & Other Stories by Eddie Maguire." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 4 (2001): 13.

5. ———. "Review--The Childhood of Sherlock Holmes by Mona Morstein." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 4 (2000): 3.

6. Leeper, Evelyn C. "Book Review--'The Canary Trainer' by Nicholas Meyer." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 75 (1994): 39-40.

7. Madsen, Diane Gilbert. Hunting for Hemingway : a DD McGil literati mystery. 1st ed. Woodbury, MN: Midnight Ink, 2010.

21 cm. Includes excerpt from author's next book: The Conan Doyle notes.;

8. Maron, Margaret. Corpus Christmas. 1st ed. New York: Doubleday, 1989.

LC Control Number: 89034006;

9. ———. Corpus Christmas. Warner Books ed. New York: Mysterious Press, 2001.

LC Control Number: 2001031587;

10. Martin, Les, and Karen Chandler. Return of the werewolf, (Bullseye chillers). New York: Random House, 1993.

LC Control Number: 92047289; Smitten with a beautiful countess, Sherlock Holmes's cousin agrees to unmask the killer who's been savaging her ancestral village

11. McCarver, Sam. The case of the 2nd séance a John Darnell mystery. New York: Signet, 2000.

"It's set in 1916, and Lloyd George's teenage daughter is kidnapped during a seance at 10 Downing Street attended by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who asks paranormal investigator John Darnell to help solve the mystery."

12. McClellan, Robert E, and Giacinta Bradley Koontz. Sherlock Holmes and the skull of death. Bloomington, Ind.: 1st Books Library, 2001.

13. McGregor, Rafe. Eight Weird Tales. Large print ed, (Linford mystery series). Leicester: Thorpe, 2010.

19 cm.; A curious woman investigates the dark secrets harboured within the ancient chapel of a ruined signal station. An antique ivory hunting horn will spell the downfall of Professor Goodspeed. Meanwhile, an eldritch voice draws a lonely man ever closer to the drowned town of Lod... Eight short tales, each directly inspired by a master of the mysterious or supernatural - Arthur Conan Doyle, H.P. Lovecraft, Anthony Hope, or M.R. James - which will send chills down your spine...

14. Michael, Patrick. "Review--'The Hound of the Baskervilles According to Spike Milligan'." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 66-67.

15. Miller, Thos Kent. The great detective at the crucible of life, or, The adventure of the rose of fire : from a memoir as told by Allan Quatermain : 1881 manuscript recorded, edited, and supplemented by John H. Watson, M.D. 1st Wildside Press ed. [Rockville, Md.]: Wildside Press, 2005.

ill. ; 23 cm. Scuttlebutt Jun 2005.;

16. Milne, A. A. The Red House Mystery. Large print ed. Oxford: Isis, 2010.

24 cm.; "The next moment Antony saw it. A man was lying on the floor at the far end of the room, his back towards them. A man? Or the body of a man?"Far from the gentle slopes of the Hundred Acre Wood lies The Red House, the setting for A. A. Milne's only detective story, where secret passages, uninvited guests, a sinister valet and a puzzling murder lay the foundations for a classic crime caper. When the police prove baffled, it is up to a guest at a local inn to appoint himself "Sherlock Holmes" and, together with his friend and loyal "Watson", delve deeper into the mysteries of the dead man.

17. Monahan, Eric. After the Beryl Coronet the further misadventures of Alexander Holder. Devon: Parallel Publications, 1998.

18. Moore, Graham. The Sherlockian. 1st ed. New York: Twelve, 2010.

19. Morstein, Mona. The childhood of Sherlock Holmes the butler's tale. 1st ed. Lakeville, Minn: Galde Press, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99041708; "Presents an imaginative and well-written history of the Holmes family, both parents and children, told by the butler who served them."

20. Skoyles, Lesley. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and the Lure of Reichenbach' by Susan Maslen." The Ritual, no. 14 (1994): 52-53.

21. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--The Hound of the Baskervilles According to Spike Milligan by Spike Milligan." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 4 (2002): 32-33.

22. Valley, Richard. "Review--"The Canary Trainer' by Nicholas Meyer." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 37-39.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Manson, Cynthia (3)

1. Manson, Cynthia, ed. Murder by the book literary mysteries from Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine and Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. 1st ed. New York: Carroll & Graf, 1995.

LC Control Number: 96156448; Scuttlebutt Sept 1996;

2. ———, ed. Murder by the book literary mysteries from Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine and Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. Sutton: Severn House, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Sept 1996;

3. ———, ed. Murder by the book: literary mysteries from Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine and Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Sept 1996. Body language / Bill James -- Once a writer ... / Robert Cenedella -- Private eye who collected pulps / Bill Pronzini -- Jane Austen murder / Michelle Knowlden -- Macbeth murder mystery / James Thurber -- Spy at the Crime Writers Congress / Edward D. Hoch -- Lieutenant Harald and the Treasure Island treasure / Margaret Maron -- Magwitch returns / John Nelson -- The Hit / Michael Z. Lewin -- Secret in the woodpile / Michael Innes -- Woman's voice / Joseph Hansen -- Something ventured / Carl Martin -- In the bluebell wood / Julian Symons -- Willie's last trip / Donald Olson -- Learned adventure of the Dragon's head / Dorothy L. Sayers -- Man who read Dashiell Hammett / William Brittain -- Lord Chizelrigg's missing fortune / Robert Barr -- Copper Peacock / Ruth Rendell -- World according to Uncle Albert / Penelope Wallace -- With a smile for the ending / Lawrence Block.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Meyer, Nicholas (5)

1. Meyer, Nicholas. The canary trainer : from the memoirs of John H. Watson. 1st pbk. ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 1995.

20 cm. Sequel to: The seven-per-cent solution.;

2. ———. The canary trainer: from the memoirs of John H. Watson. 1st ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93013149;

3. ———. The West End horror : a posthumous memoir of John H. Watson, M.D, (Norton paperback). New York: W.W. Norton, 1994.

21 cm.;

4. ———. The West End horror a posthumous memoir of John H. Watson, M.D. Braille ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 1994.

21 cm. Reproduction: Braille. Phoenix, Ariz. : Foundation for Blind Children./ 2 v. (277 p.).;

5. Meyer, Nicholas, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Sherlock Holmes et le fantôme de l'opéra : roman d'après un inédit du Dr. John H. Watson. Montréal: L'Archipel, 1995.

23 cm. Translation of: The canary trainer./ Sequel to: "The seven per cent solution" (1975) and "The West End horror" (1984). Traduit de l'anglais par Pierre Charras.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Millett, Larry (27)

1. Larry Millett. [Minneapolis, MN]: Produced by Minnesota Center for the Book, Metronet and Metro Cable Network, 1997. Visual Material 1 videocassette (30 min.).

sd., col. ; 1/2 in. Northern lights ; 378; VHS format. Participants: Interviewers: David Wiggins and Bruce Southworth.; Interview with Larry Millett, author of Twin Cities then and now, and a mystery, Sherlock Holmes and the red demon.

2. "Midwest Bookends." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 33 (2002): 46.

Focuses on trade shows and congresses of booksellers associations in the U.S. in September 2002 including the congress of the Upper Midwest Booksellers Association in Saint Paul, Minnesota. "On Saturday morning, the tried-and-true UMBA Book and Author Breakfast features regional writers Jerry Apps (Stormy), Larry Millett (The Disappearance of Sherlock Holmes)..."

3. Amirthanayagam, Guy. "His American Bow." The Washington Post, January 2, 2000: X07.

Review of Larry Millett's Sherlock Holmes and the Rune Stone Mystery.

4. Dyer, Lucinda. "It's Not Whodunit, but How-Do-You-Do-It?" Publishers Weekly 246, no. 43 (1999): 34.

Describes how publishers support the careers of their mystery writers. Process of building an author to a bestseller according to Bantam Deputy Publisher Nita Taublib; Opinion of Crown editor Steve Ross on writer Ruth Rendell; Effect of the changes in the book's cover on its sales. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...'We try to stretch a little further with each book,' says Penguin marketing director Marcia Burch. That means additional reading copies to targeted booksellers, increased use of the Internet and a more creative use of author appearances. For Larry Millett's Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders (Oct.) and Jonathan Gash's Prey Dancing (Nov.), it also means stretching to include cover redesigns...."

5. Hobbs, Don. "Review--The Disappearance of Sherlock Holmes by Larry Millett." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 2 (2003): 35.

6. ———. "Review--The Rune Stone (sic) by Larry Millett." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 5 (1999): 13.

7. Hoffert, Barbara. "The auteur allure." Library Journal 121, no. 16 (1996): 46.

Presents first novels from authors for October, 1996. Inset: Mapping this season's first novels, by Ann Burns. Inset mentions John H. Watson (Larry Millett), Sherlock Holmes and the Red Demon (Viking--Sept.) Minnesota.

8. Millett, Larry. The Disappearance of Sherlock Holmes : a mystery featuring Shadwell Rafferty, (A Penguin mystery). New York: Penguin Books, 2002.

18 cm.;

9. ———. The disappearance of Sherlock Holmes a mystery featuring Shadwell Rafferty. New York: Viking, 2002.

LC Control Number: 2002025886. Includes bibliographical references (p. [313]-339);

10. ———. The disappearance of Sherlock Holmes a mystery featuring Shadwell Rafferty, (A Penguin mystery). New York: Penguin Books, 2003.

Includes bibliographical references; Holmes learns that a vicious enemy Abe Slaney has kidnapped again and is trying to frame Holmes for the crime. Holmes sets off for Chicago to obtain the help of the genial Irish saloonkeeper, Shadwell Rafferty. Together they try to settle the score and hope to escape with their lives

11. ———. Sherlock Holmes a vrazdy v ledovém paláci : z amerických zápisku dr. Johna H. Watson, (Príbehy Sherlocka Holmese). Brno: Jota, 2000.

21 cm. Sherlock Holmes and the ice palace murders;

12. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace murders. New York: Penguin Audio Books, 1998 4 sound cassettes (360 min.).

Performer Note: Read by Simon Prebble;

13. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace murders from the American chronicles of John H. Watson, M.D. New York: Viking, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98022067. Includes bibliographical references; The year is 1896 and Sherlock Holmes and his esteemed companion, Dr. John Watson, have once again been summoned to Minnesota, where winter holds the "dead tough" city of St. Paul in its icy grip. Jonathan Upton, scion of one of the city's richest families, has vanished on the eve of his wedding, which was to have taken place in the immense glittering ice palace being built for the annual Winter Carnival. Brought in to investigate the disappearance by James J. Hill, St. Paul's most powerful man and a close friend of young Upton's father, Holmes and Watson soon make a horrific discovery that uncovers a flurry of clues, all distractingly opaque. Why did Upton's fiancee give back her bridal dress? What dark secrets lurk behind the comfortable facade of the Muskrat Club, where the young swells of St. Paul gather to drink and gamble? Who is the brilliant "Spider" at the center of the affair? And does the ice palace itself hold the key to the ghastly secret within its gleaming walls? In this fiendishly complex case, Holmes finds himself taxed to the limit - and is quite surprised when a local saloonkeeper, a large-hearted and cunning Irishman with a devilish sense of humor, beats him to a clue. But, as Holmes seen discovers, no one knows St. Paul - and everyone in it - as well as Shadwell Rafferty, and the two develop enormous, though at times begrudging respect for each other. Soon one must save the other from death's door, as they brave the Mississippi River's frigid waters and confront the villain amid the roar of rockets, in one of the most thrilling episodes "Watson" ever committed to paper

14. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace murders from the American chronicles of John H. Watson, M.D, (Penguin mystery). New York: Penguin Books, 1999.

LC Control Number: 98022067. Includes bibliographical references; "The year is 1896 and Sherlock Holmes and his esteemed companion, Dr. John Watson, have once again been summoned to Minnesota, where winter holds the "dead tough" city of St. Paul in its icy grip." "Jonathan Upton, scion of one of the city's richest families, has vanished on the eve of his wedding, which was to have taken place in the immense glittering ice palace being built for the annual Winter Carnival. Brought in to investigate the disappearance by James J. Hill, St. Paul's most powerful man and a close friend of young Upton's father, Holmes and Watson soon make a horrific discovery that uncovers a flurry of clues, all distractingly opaque. Why did Upton's fiancee give back her bridal dress? What dark secrets lurk behind the comfortable facade of the Muskrat Club, where the young swells of St. Paul gather to drink and gamble? Who is the brilliant "Spider" at the center of the affair? And does the ice palace itself hold the key to the ghastly secret within its gleaming walls?". "In this fiendishly complex case, Holmes finds himself taxed to the limit - and is quite surprised when a local saloonkeeper, a large-hearted and cunning Irishman with a devilish sense of humor, beats him to a clue. But, as Holmes seen discovers, no one knows St. Paul - and everyone in it - as well as Shadwell Rafferty, and the two develop enormous, though at times begrudging respect for each other. Soon one must save the other from death's door, as they brave the Mississippi River's frigid waters and confront the villain amid the roar of rockets, in one of the most thrilling episodes "Watson" ever committed to paper."--Book jacket

15. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Red Demon. New York: Viking, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96006723 //r972. Includes bibliographical references;

16. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Red Demon. New York: Penguin, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96006723 //r972. Includes bibliographical references;

17. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Red Demon. New York: Penguin, 2001.

maps ; 18 cm.;

18. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the rune stone mystery from the American chronicles of John H. Watson, M.D, (A Penguin mystery). New York: Penguin Books, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99029472;

19. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the rune stone mystery from the American chronicles of John H. Watson, M.D. New York: Viking, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99029472; A Minnesota farmer discovers an ancient stone giving details of Viking exploration in the area. When the farmer is murdered and the stone stolen, Sherlock Holmes is sent to the scene

20. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the secret alliance. New York: Penguin Books, 2002.

21. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Alliance. New York: Viking, 2001.

map ; 24 cm.;

22. Millett, Larry, and Jaromír Klubícko. Sherlock Holmes a Ohnivý démon. Vyd. 1 ed, (Príbehy Sherlocka Holmese). Brno: Jota, 1998.

23. Millett, Larry, Gaylord Schanilec, Michael Lizama, Jana Pullman, Michael Bixler, and Dennis Ruud. The Mystery of the Jeweled Cross : a Shadwell Rafferty adventure. [Minneapolis]: Minnesota Center for Book Arts, 2002.

ill. ; 15 cm., in box 31 cm. + 1 leaf in portfolio. 4. p. "author's note" laid in. "Fourteenth in an annual commissioned series celebrating the creative potential of book art. Designed by Michael Lizama ... letterpress printed by Jana Pullman ... The Baskerville type was composition-set by Michael Bixler. The standard edition on Mohawk Superfine consists of 125 copies numbered and signed by the author and artist, case bound by Steven Filler with an accompanying print folio. The deluxe edition on Rives Lightweight consists of 26 lettered copies signed by the author and artist. The book is leather-bound with goatskin onlay, inlay and gold stamping; binding, maple box (label of Cave Paper by Bridget O'Malley) and print folio designed and executed by Dennis Ruud."--Colophon.;

24. O'Gorman, Rochelle. "You know my methods: new Holmes mysteries." The Boston Globe, April 11, 1999: G3.

"Both Baker Street Irregulars and garden-variety mystery buffs should prick up their ears at the news of two new Sherlock Holmes whodunits. Though the mystery takes a back seat to vivid characterization and rich atmosphere, Laurie R. King's 'The Moor' is an addictive 1920s adventure (Recorded Books; unabridged fiction; eight cassettes; 10 hours, 45 minutes; $16.50 if rented, $72 if purchased; read by Jenny Sterlin; 800-638-1304)....A more conventional tale is found in a Sherlockian mystery by Larry Millett, who once again brings the hawkeyed detective to America in 'Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders' (Penguin Audio; abridged fiction; four cassettes; six hours; $24.95; read by Simon Prebble)...."

25. Riippa, Laurele, and Robert Dahlin. "Trade Paperbacks." Publishers Weekly 246, no. 32 (1999): 265.

Presents a list of trade paperbacks including Penguin, Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders: From the American Chronicles of John H. Watson, M.D. (Oct., $5.99) by Larry Millett "takes place at the 1896 Winter Carnival in St. Paul. Author tour."

26. Wales, Ruth. "Imagined memoirs of the famous." Christian Science Monitor, August 12, 1999: 19.

Review of Sherlock Holmes and the Rune Stone Mystery By Larry Millett (Viking 336 pp., $23.95). "Given the current popularity of autobiographical reminiscences, it's not surprising that the mystery memoir is almost a whodunit category. An author finds a hidden, handwritten document featuring a well-known literary name. With footnotes, commentary, or afterword, the resulting book can be fun to read and a delight to fans of the original. But writers who practice the art of the imagined famous-person memoir run risks. Their supposedly 'lost' manuscripts may be only clever echoes of a familiar voice. Or they may stretch readers' credulity by constructing an improbable plot. In 'Sherlock Holmes and the Rune Stone Mystery,' coming this fall, Larry Millett avoids both traps. His leading characters are true to type, and his Midwest setting allows him to create a believable background for his transplanted detectives....'

27. Wales, Ruth Johnstone. "Mysterious old characters come back to life." Christian Science Monitor, February 25, 1999: 19.

Review of Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders by Larry Millett. "Fans of the classic Sherlock Holmes stories may or may not be enchanted by Larry Millett's factual fictions in which the famous sleuth practices his art in an American location. Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders, like its predecessor, takes place in St. Paul, Minn., at the time of the 1896 Winter Carnival. Using the pretense of a recently discovered manuscript by the indomitable Dr. Watson, Millett mixes real and invented people in a reasonable facsimile of an Arthur Conan Doyle tale...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Moore, Alan (6)

1. Moore, Alan, and Kevin O'Neill. The absolute league of extraordinary gentlemen. London: Titan, 2003.

all col. ill. ; 31 cm. In slip case.;

2. ———. The absolute league of extraordinary gentlemen. London: Titan, 2005.

chiefly col. ill. ; 31 cm. In slip case.;

3. ———. League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. [S.l.]: Paw Prints, 2008.

4. ———. The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Vol. 1, 1898. 1 vols. La Jolla, CA: America's Best Comics, 2000.

col. ill. ; 26 cm. "Originally published in single magazine form as The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, vol. 1, #1-6."--T.p. verso.;

5. ———. The league of extraordinary gentlemen. Vol. 2. 1 vols, (The League of extraordinary gentlemen). La Jolla, CA: America's Best Comics, LLC, 2003.

col. ill. ; 26 cm. 1. Phases of Deimos -- 2. People of other lands -- 3. And the dawn comes up like thunder -- 4. All creatures great and small -- 5. Red in tooth and claw -- 6. "You should see me dance the polka ..." "Originally published in 2002-2003 in single magazine form, v. 2, #1-6. [presented by co-creators Alan Moore, writer, Kevin O'Neill, artist].;

6. Moore, Alan, Kevin O'Neill, Ben Dimagmaliw, and Bernd Kronsbein. The League of extraordinary gentlemen, (Speed). Bad Tölz: Tilsner, n.d.

Bd. 1 von Alan Moore ; Kevin O'Neill ; Ben Dimagmaliw. [Gerlinde Althoff, Ubers. Bernd Kronsbein & Martin Budde, Red.];

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- N (13)

1. "Sherlock Holmes (Book Review)." Publishers Weekly 247, no. 51 (2000): 58.

Reviews the book 'Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years: The Adventures of the Great Detective in India and Tibet,' by Jamyang Norbu.

2. Chapman, Paul M. "Review--'The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes' edited by Jamyang Norbu." The Ritual, no. 26 (2000): 69.

3. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--'Anno Dracula' by Kim Newman." The Ritual, no. 11 (1993): 51.

4. Fell, Christine. "Review--'Sherlock in Love' by Sena Jeter Naslund." The Ritual, no. 13 (1994): 50-51.

5. Godwin, Marshall. "It's elementary medicine, my dear Watson." CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal 177, no. 12 (2007): 1551-1552.

The article reviews the book "Evidence-Based Medicine in Sherlock Holmes' Footsteps," by Jorgen Nordenstrom.

6. Hargreaves, Tracy. "'We Other Victorians': Literary Victorian Afterlives." Journal of Victorian Culture 13, no. 2 (2008): 278-286.

"The article explores how 20th century writers have portrayed Victorians and the Victorian period. It examines the works of authors such as Virginia Woolfe and John Galsworthy and discusses the social, political and family issues that were raised in the 20th century regarding life in the Victorian period. It discusses the representation of Victorian life on television in the 1950s and 1960s and what the afterlife of the Victorian period has allowed social and cultural commentators to reexamine about the values and morals of the Victorians." Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...The classic text has been re-imagined.... Emily Brontë resurfaces in Jane Urquhart’s Changing Heaven: A Novel, Clare Boylan’s Emma Brown: A Novel From the Unfinished Manuscript of Charlotte Bronte appeared in 2004, Maryse Conde transplants Wuthering Heights to Windward Heights, Emma Tennant imagines Heathcliff’s Tale, Caleb Carr and Jamyang Norbu add to the Sherlock Holmes canon (The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes and Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years respectively) as of course did Julian Barnes in Arthur and George. Wilkie Collins and Charles Dickens were intertextually present in Sarah Waters’ Fingersmith...."

7. Heleno, Carlos. "Book review--'Return to the Lost World' by Nicholas Nye." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 71 (1992): 40-41.

8. Hoveyda, Nourieh. "Evidence-based medicine in Sherlock Holmes' footsteps." Evidence-Based Medicine 13, no. 4 (2008): 124-124.

The article reviews the book "Evidence-based medicine in Sherlock Holmes' footsteps," by J. Nordenstrom.

9. Natsume, Soseki, and Damian Flanagan. The Tower of London : tales of Victorian London. London: Peter Owen; Distributed in the U.S. by Dafour Editions, 2005.

ill., maps ; 22 cm. From The cuckoo (1901-3) -- Letter from London -- Bicycle diary -- From Drifting in space (1906) -- The tower of London -- The Carlyle museum -- From Short pieces for long days (1909) -- Lodgings -- The smell of the past -- A warm dream -- Impression -- Fog -- Long ago -- Professor Craig. Includes bibliographical references. Natsume Soseki ; translated and introduced by Damian Flanagan. Scuttlebutt Feb 2005.; "Natsume Soseki has been described as Japan's most revered author (from 1984 to 2004 his portrait was on Japan's 1000-yen note); he lived in London from 1900 to 1902....[This book] collects English translations of his essays about his visit, along with Yamada Futaro's 'The Yellow Lodger' ['Kiiro Geshukunin'], a pastiche first published in Hoseki magazine (Dec. 1953) and reprinted in many anthologies. This is the first translation of 'The Yellow Lodger', which is a pastiche in which Soseki meets Sherlock Holmes. Soseki did not enjoy his stay in London, and with good reason; translator Damian Flanagan also has contributed an excellent introduction to the book, and explanatory notes on the essays and the pastiche."

10. Newman, Kim. Anno Dracula. New York: Avon Books, 1994.

Includes bibliographical references; "Mycroft and fellow-members of the Diogenes Club versus Dracula, who is both Prince Consort and Regent, in a well-written novel."

11. Nolan, William F. Dark Dimensions. 1st ed. Bonney Lake, WA: Darkwood Press, 2010.

21 cm. Horror at Winchester House -- Getting along just fine -- Descent -- Vampire dollars -- At the 24-hour -- Zachry revisited -- Child's care -- The man who stalked Hyde -- The pelican's brother -- A woods encounter -- To be with Amy -- Stabbed by Rob -- What love is this? -- The death of Sherlock Holmes.;

12. Sweet, Matthew. "Books: Old Enemies Unmasked; Matthew Sweet Finds Out what the Great Detective was really Up to in Tibet." The Independent (London), October 29, 2000: 68.

Review of The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes by Jamyang Norbu.

13. Tracey, David. "Tibetan Sherlock shakes up the movement." The International Herald Tribune, March 28, 2002: 18.

Portrait of the Tibetan writer Jamyang Norbu. "...Welcome to the real world of refugee politics. Norbu knows it from the inside out, starting with his decision in 1962 to run away from school to join a group of CIA-financed Tibetan guerrillas fighting China. It sounds like fodder for some of the thrills he visits on his heroes in 'The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years,' but Norbu chuckles at the real-life experience...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Naslund, Sena Jeter (3)

1. Naslund, Sena Jeter. Sherlock in love : a novel. 1st ed. Boston: David R. Godine, 1993.

21 cm. Scuttlebutt Apr 2001.; "The book opens in 1922 with Watson having decided to write a biography of Sherlock Holmes, and quickly encountering a series of mysteries, current and past, that involve a mysterious violinist named Sigerson, an attempt to rescue Mad King Ludwig of Bavaria, and much more. The style and voice are consistent with the Canon, and the narrative is cinematic, as is often the case with modern pastiches."

2. ———. Sherlock in love : a novel. 1st Perennial ed. New York: Perennial, 2001.

21 cm. Scuttlebutt Apr 2001.; "The book opens in 1922 with Watson having decided to write a biography of Sherlock Holmes, and quickly encountering a series of mysteries, current and past, that involve a mysterious violinist named Sigerson, an attempt to rescue Mad King Ludwig of Bavaria, and much more. The style and voice are consistent with the Canon, and the narrative is cinematic, as is often the case with modern pastiches."

3. ———. Sherlock verliebt. Hildesheim: Claassen Verlag, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Sept 1997;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Norbu, Jamyang (4)

1. Norbu, Jamyang. The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes the adventures of the great detective in India and Tibet : a novel. New York, London: Bloomsbury. Distributed to the trade by Holtzbrinck Publishers, 2003.

2. ———. The mandala of Sherlock Holmes the missing years : based on the reminiscences of Hurree Chunder Mookerjee. London: John Murray, 2000.

"In 1891, the public was horrified to learn that Sherlock Holmes had perished in a deadly struggle with the archcriminal Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls. Then, to their amazement, he reappeared two years later, informing the stunned Watson: 'I travelled for two years in Tibet, therefore, and amused myself by visiting Lhasa.'" "Nothing has been known of those two missing years until Jamyang Norbu's discovery, in a rusting tin dispatch box in Darjeeling, of a flat packet carefully wrapped in waxed paper and neatly tied with stout twine. When opened the packet revealed Hurree Chunder Mookerjee's own account of his travels with Sherlock Holmes.". "Now, for the first time, we learn of Sherlock Holmes's brush with the Great Game, with Colonel Creighton, Lurgan Sahib and the world of Kim. We follow him north across the hot and dusty plains of India to Simla, summer capital of the British Raj, and over the high passes to the vast emptiness of the Tibetan plateau. In the medieval splendour that is Lhasa, intrigue and black treachery stalk the shadows, and in the remote and icy fastnesses of the Trans-Himalayas good and evil battle for ascendancy. As Patrick French has written, 'Read this, and your view of the great detective will never be the same again.'"--Book jacket

3. ———. Sherlock Holmes-- the missing years : the adventures of the great detective in India and Tibet : a novel. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Bloomsbury : Distributed to the trade by St. Martin's Press, 1999.

ill., maps ; 25 cm. Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hol051/00054657.html "Based on the reminiscences of Hurree Chunder Mookerjee ..., Rai Bahadur ....";

4. ———. Sherlock Holmes--the missing years : the adventures of the great detective in India and Tibet. New York: Bloomsbury, 2001.

ill. ; 24 cm. "Based on the reminiscences of Hurree Chunder Mookerjee..."--t.p.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- O (3)

1. Andrews, Marke. "Booking time for 10 great reads this year: The Best of Books; [Final Edition]." Dec 28, 1994: C4.

"...The Case of Emily H. By Keith Oatley. An ingenious novel from Toronto author Oatley that has a depressed Sherlock Holmes seeking out Sigmund Freud, then investigating a death that involves one of Freud's young patients. Freud's character is enriched by a personal crisis; he is tormented by self-doubt. A literary mystery...."

2. Osborne, Mary Pope, and Victoria Chess. Spider Kane and the mystery at Jumbo Nightcrawler's. New York: A.A. Knopf. Distributed by Random House, 1993.

LC Control Number: 91010983; Lieutenant Leon Leafwing and Detective Spider Kane investigate the mysterious disappearance of Leon's mother and members of the Order of the Moth

3. Oudin, Bernard. Sherlock Holmes et la suffragette amoureuse. Paris: Mycroft's Brother, 2004.

ill. ; 21 cm. Scuttlebutt Jan 2005; "A collection of seven new pastiches, and it's only one of many interesting books available in French from Thierry Saint-Joanis' Editions Mycroft's Brother."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- P (11)

1. Bliss, Laurel M. "The Dark Water: The Strange Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes." Library Journal 131, no. 13 (2006): 62-62.

The article reviews the book "The Dark Water: The Strange Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes," by David Pirie.

2. Chapman, Paul M. "Review -- 'The Hampstead Poisonings' by Glen Petrie." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 115-116.

3. Edwards, Owen Dudley. "Read of the Week Not a Bad Tale - if You can Forget about the Real Conan Doyle." The Scotsman, June 18, 2001: 13.

Review of "The Patient's Eyes" by David Pirie.

4. Hays, Carl. "Holmes: Haydn's Head." Booklist 104, no. 19 (2008): 60.

Reviews the book "Haydn's Head: Holmes" by Omaha Perez. "Ever since Conan Doyle penned his last Holmes and Watson whodunit, imitators have been resurrecting the pair in a colorful variety of further adventures. Perhaps none of those have been quite as bizarre as this risqué Sherlockian spoof from noted comics artist Perez...."

5. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Story for Which the World is Not Yet Prepared by Stephen F. Pierce." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 2 (2003): 35.

6. Paige, Robin. Death at Dartmoor. 1st ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 2002.

LC Control Number: 2001043769. Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-324);

7. Perkins, David N. The intelligent eye: learning to think by looking at art, (Occasional papers). Santa Monica, CA: Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94000030. Includes bibliographical references; "A review published in The College Board Review (summer 1994), notes that Perkins 'invents imaginary internal dialogues between Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes.'"

8. Perry, Anne, and Sharan Newman, eds. Crime through time III. Berkley Prime Crime ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 2000.

LC Control Number: 2003576663. Contents: The consul's wife / Steven Saylor -- Merchants of discord / Laura Frankos -- Farmers' law / Harry Turtledove -- The case of the murdered pope / Andrew Greeley -- Lark in the morning / Sharyn McCrumb -- The weeping time / Maureen Jennings -- The Irish widower / Leonard Tourney -- Smoke / William Sanders -- The episode of the water closet / Bruce Alexander -- Suspicion / Michael Coney -- Murder in Utopia / Peter Robinson -- Dr. Death / Peter Lovesey -- Dinner with H.P.B. / Eileen Kernaghan -- The haunting of Carrick Hollow / Jan Burke and Paul Sledzik -- Howard / H.R.F. Keating -- Come flit by me / Elizabeth Foxwell -- Murder on the Denver Express / Margaret Coel -- A single spy / Miriam Grace Monfredo;

9. Petrie, Glen. The Hampstead poisonings a Mycroft Holmes adventure. Romford, Essex: Ian Henry Publications, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95013258; Scuttlebutt July 1995;

10. Petrucci, Paul. Prodigal logic : a Ray Gabriel floating home mystery. Seattle, WA: P. Petrucci, 2002.

ill. ; 22 cm. Scuttlebutt May 2002.; "A first novel, featuring Ray Gabriel, a computer programmer who lives on a houseboat in Seattle and who is working on a 'Sherlock-in-a-Box' program based on the 'thumb-rules' found in the Sherlock Holmes stories; he becomes involved in a murder investigation, and his computer program helps with the solution."

11. Polidori, John William, George Gordon Byron Byron, Charles Nodier, Eugène Scribe, Frank J Morlock, and David Rabbitte. Lord Ruthven the vampire. Encino, Calif: Black Coat Press, 2004.

Contents: The vampire / by John William Polidori -- Fragments of a novel / by George Gordon, Lord Byron -- The vampire / by Charles Nodier -- Being Lord Ruthven / by Eugène Scribe & Mélesville -- The adventure of the beneficent vampire / by Frank J. Morlock;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Peacock, Shane (6)

1. "Children's Books for Fall." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 28 (2007): 34-127.

A list of children's books for fall 2007 is presented. Included is one related to Holmes. "The Boy Sherlock Holmes debuts with His 1st Case: Eye of the Crow by Shane Peacock ($19.95, 10-14)."

2. "Children's Books for Spring." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 7 (2008): 27-116.

List includes Nancy Springer's The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets (the Enola Holmes Mysteries) ($14.99, 9-up); The Boy Sherlock Holmes continues with Death in the Air by Shane Peacock ($19.95, 10-14); The Sherlock Files debuts with The 100-Year-Old Secret by Tracy Barrett ($15.95.8-12).

3. "Comprehensive Bibliography." Book Links 17, no. 4 (2008): 61-63.

References for the articles published in the March 1, 2008 issue of "Book Links" are presented. Under "Best New Books for the Classroom" is listed Eye of the Crow: The Boy Sherlock Holmes, His First Case. By Shane Peacock. 2007.

4. "Top 10 Crime Fiction for Youth." Booklist 104, no. 17 (2008): 47-47.

This article reviews the books "The Diamond of Drury Lane," by Julia Golding, "Evil Genius," by Catherine Jinks, and "Eye of the Crow," by Shane Peacock. Includes a reference to Holmes. "This first entry in Peacock’s The Boy Sherlock Holmes series stars a 13-year-old Sherlock, whose curiosity is piqued after an Arab youth insists that he has been wrongly arrested for a vicious London murder."

5. Fiscus, Sheila. "Eye of the Crow." School Library Journal 53, no. 11 (2007): 134.

The article reviews the book "Eye of the Crow," by Shane Peacock. "Solitary and brooding, 13-year-old Sherlock Holmes prefers observing street life in 1860s London to attending school, and is skilled at appraising people. He's frustrated by his family's strained financial circumstances and the social prejudice that limits his future. His mother, once a wealthy socialite, married a poor Jewish scholar and was disowned by her parents. His brilliant father has been forced to take a job training birds at The Crystal Palace, and his urging Sherlock to become whatever he wishes seems hollow. The boy becomes obsessed with a gruesome murder, an interest that eventually lands him in jail as an accomplice to the primary suspect. There, he's visited by Irene Doyle, a young philanthropist who becomes his crime-solving partner. To prove his innocence, Sherlock makes a daring escape and sets about solving the crime. The details of the plot are plausible, the pacing well timed, and the historical setting vividly depicted. Past advice from Sherlock's father steers his thinking as he gathers clues and employs deductive processes. The titular crow comes fascinatingly into play, as Sherlock imagines himself as one of the birds that were the only witnesses to the crime. Inspector Lestrade and his son are introduced, as is Malefactor, a gang leader with a mysterious past who is Sherlock's intellectual equal and worthy opponent. On balance, the characters enrich the book and help give Holmes's storied abilities credence. The tragic death of his mother paves the way for his future pursuit of justice."

6. Goedhart, Bernie. "Young Sherlock holmes investigates a fatal plunge." The Gazette (Montreal), April 12, 2008: I12.

Review of "Death in the Air" by Shane Peacock. Tundray Books, 254 pages. "Sherlock Holmes, boy detective, is back for a second adventure - this one involving some high-flying acrobats and a ruthless gang of thieves. Ontario native Shane Peacock, long fascinated with Arthur Conan Doyle's stories about the brilliant Sherlock Holmes, launched his own series about the character as a budding 13-year-old sleuth last year with Eye of the Crow...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Peters, Elizabeth (3)

1. Peters, Elizabeth. The hippopotamus pool. New York: Warner Books, 1996.

LC Control Number: 95031886; Scuttlebutt July 1996; "The eighth in her series of mystery novels about Amelia Peabody Emerson, set in Victorian England and Egypt, all with direct or indirect Canonical echoes."

2. ———. The hippopotamus pool. Large type ed. Thorndike, ME: G.K. Hall, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96005477; Scuttlebutt July 1996; "The eighth in her series of mystery novels about Amelia Peabody Emerson, set in Victorian England and Egypt, all with direct or indirect Canonical echoes."

3. ———. The snake, the crocodile, and the dog. New York: Warner Books, 1992.

LC Control Number: 92054096. Scuttlebutt Apr 1996; "Elizabeth Peters' series of mystery novels about Amelia Peabody Emerson now runs to seven titles, and they're written with style and humor, set in Victorian England and Egypt, and all with direct or indirect Canonical echoes. "

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Pirie, David (25)

1. "Did Conan Doyle play Dr Watson, on the case with a real Sherlock Holmes?". Daily Mail (London), January 3, 2000: 27.

"Shortly before the black flag above the jail let the crowds swarming over Calton Hill know justice had been done, the condemned man made a remarkable request. Turning to Dr Henry Littlejohn, Edinburgh's chief medical officer who had come to witness the hanging, wife murderer Eugene Chantrelle said coolly: 'Give my compliments to Joe Bell. He did a good job in bringing me to the scaffold.' In 1878 the remark was widely reported, yet it remains a mystery. Joseph Bell was an eminent Victorian surgeon at Edinburgh's Royal Infirmary, who would amuse medical students by deducing the occupation of his patients from small clues in their appearance. This habit would later inspire a certain student called Arthur Conan Doyle to create the world's most famous detective in Sherlock Holmes. But could there have been more to it than that? Chantrelle's remark suggests Bell solved the murder, not those who took credit at the trial for proving the womanising alcoholic had disposed of his wife with a large dose of opium. If Bell was a real-life Sherlock Holmes, solving crimes that baffled the police, who was the real Doctor Watson who assisted in his secret detective work? The creator of a new BBC drama claims the model for Watson was Doyle himself, and that he and Bell were actively involved in solving crimes. In uncovering the evidence, screen writer David Pirie had to wrestle with mysteries that would have taxed even Holmes. Bell and Doyle were very private men and would in any case have been sworn to secrecy if they did special detective work for the Crown Office...."

2. "Mystery." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 44 (2002): 30.

Features several mystery books on the best seller list in the U.S. as of November 2002. Mention of Doyle and Holmes. "In the most notable Sherlock Holmes pastiches, the great detective was essentially off-stage: Laurie King's seventh Mary Russell mystery, Justice Hall (Bantam), and David Pirie's The Patient's Eyes (St. Martin's Minotaur), with a young Conan Doyle playing Dr. Watson to Dr. Joseph Bell's Holmes."

3. Champkin, Julian. "Elementary! This is the real Sherlock Holmes." Daily Mail (London), May 20, 1999: 13.

"...And if that sounds like Sherlock Holmes, it is because the young medical student was Arthur Conan Doyle and his teacher was Dr Joseph Bell - the man who inspired the creation of the great fictional detective. But new research seems to show that Bell was rather more than just an Edinburgh doctor - he may have been a real-life detective....But now the BBC would have us believe otherwise. David Pirie, script editor for a BBC series on Bell to be shown in the autumn, claims to have evidence that Bell was not only a doctor when Conan Doyle met him - he was a consulting detective as well...."

4. Gibb, Eddie. "Alimentary." The Sunday Herald, January 2, 2000: 12.

"...The parallels between Bell and Holmes have been milked for all they are worth in a new two-part drama called Murder Rooms: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes, which the BBC has high hopes it will be able to turn into a series. Think of a Victorian Inspector Morse with a heavy dollop of Edinburgh Gothic and you will get an idea of how this show looks. Much of the drama was shot in the narrow wynds of Edinburgh's Old Town and has a grim, claustrophobic feel that producer Ian Madden likens to the contemporary horror movie, Seven...."

5. Hanks, Robert. "Television Review." The Independent (London), January 5, 2000: 16.

"David Pirie's two-part drama, Murder Rooms: the Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes (BBC2), which concludes tonight, doesn't leave much to the imagination. Not that it is notably explicit; it just won't allow any credit to human powers of invention. The subject is the early life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and in particular his relationship with Joseph Bell, the Edinburgh surgeon whose forays into minute observation and deduction were the avowed inspiration for Sherlock Holmes...."

6. Hellen, Nicholas. "Elementary, My Dear Doctor." The Toronto Star, May 22, 1999: 1.

"Sherlock Holmes, regarded by many as the world's greatest fictional detective, might well have owed his literary origins to a note scribbled by a condemned murderer as he stood at the gallows. The doomed man identified Dr. Joseph Bell, Arthur Conan Doyle's medical instructor, as the sleuth who secretly helped the police secure his conviction. 'My compliments to Joseph Bell,' wrote Eugene Chanterelle. 'He did a good job in bringing me to the scaffold.' BBC researchers are convinced that the note alerted Conan Doyle to the double life of his eminent tutor and helped inspire some of the most memorable cases of the fictional Victorian detective. At the Cannes Film Festival last weekend, the BBC announced plans for a feature film and TV series starring Bell as the real Sherlock Holmes with Conan Doyle - rather than Dr. Watson - as his loyal assistant. Jonathan Pryce, the actor best known for his role as the villain in the James Bond movie, Tomorrow Never Dies, is tipped to play the part of Holmes. David Pirie, the script editor of the dramatization, says fresh clues to the origins of Holmes emerged from the memoirs of Conan Doyle's Edinburgh contemporaries...."

7. ———. "Last words of killer gave life to Sherlock Holmes." Sunday Times (London), May 16, 1999: 7.

"Sherlock Holmes, regarded by many as the world's greatest fictional detective, owed his literary origins to a note scribbled by a condemned murderer as he stood at the gallows. The doomed man, Eugene Chantrelle, identified Dr Joseph Bell, the medical instructor of Arthur Conan Doyle, as the sleuth who secretly helped the police to secure his conviction. 'My compliments to Joseph Bell,' he wrote. 'He did a good job in bringing me to the scaffold.' BBC researchers are convinced that the note alerted Conan Doyle to the double life of his eminent tutor, and helped to inspire some of the most memorable cases of the fictional Victorian detective. Tomorrow, at the Cannes Film Festival, the BBC will announce plans for a feature film and a television series starring Bell as the real Sherlock Holmes with Conan Doyle, instead of Watson, as his loyal assistant. Jonathan Pryce, the actor best known for his role as the villain in the James Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies, is tipped to play the part of Holmes. David Pirie, the script editor of the dramatisation, said fresh clues to the origins of Holmes had emerged among the memoirs of Conan Doyle's Edinburgh contemporaries...."

8. ———. "Secrets behind Sherlock's Scots origins revealed." Sunday Times (London), May 16, 1999: 7.

"...Tomorrow, at the Cannes film festival, the BBC will announce plans for a feature film and a television series starring Bell as the real Sherlock Holmes with Conan Doyle, instead of Watson, as his loyal assistant. Jonathan Pryce, the actor best known for his role as the villain in the James Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies, is tipped to play the part of Holmes. David Pirie, the script editor of the dramatisation, said fresh clues to the origins of Holmes had emerged among the memoirs of Conan Doyle's Edinburgh contemporaries...."

9. Joseph, Joe. "Review." The Times (London), September 5, 2001: 2.

"...Although freshly minted, with a pacy storyline from David Pirie, Murder Rooms has the air of a show that could have been made at any time in the past three decades: those vintage railways, wreathed in steam so as to mask the electricity pylons in the background; the wigs that would never have got past Burt Reynolds's grooming consultant; the itchy suits; every set diligently screened for period authenticity. All this puts a heavy burden on the writer, cast and director which -in this case -they carry lightly...."

10. Mazzeno, Laurence W. "The Dark Water: The Strange Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes." Magill Book Reviews, no. (2007).

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is the hero of this fictionalized tale about his work with his mentor Dr. Joseph Bell to prevent a notorious serial killer from stealing a family's treasure in a remote English village.

11. Picker, Leonard. "The Real Sherlock Holmes." Publishers Weekly 253, no. 27 (2006): 56-56.

The article presents an interview with David Pirie, author of three mysteries. He explained his reasons for writing mysteries about Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes. He discussed his novel The Dark Water. He shared how he had created his characters Doyle and Joseph Bell for BBC.

12. Pirie, David. The dark water. London: Century, 2004.

Locked in a dank cottage, Arthur Conan Doyle finds himself at the mercy of his nemesis, Thomas Neill Cream. Doyle escapes, only to find he is the chief suspect in the murder of the man who had lived there. On the run, he turns to Dr. Joseph Bell for help finding Cream and clearing his name. To do that, they must solve an old mystery involving death, disappearance, and hidden gold

13. ———. The dark water the strange beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. 1st Pegasus Books ed. New York: Pegasus Books, 2006.

Locked in a dank cottage, Arthur Conan Doyle finds himself at the mercy of his nemesis, Thomas Neill Cream. Doyle escapes, only to find he is the chief suspect in the murder of the man who had lived there. On the run, he turns to Dr. Joseph Bell for help finding Cream and clearing his name. To do that, they must solve an old mystery involving death, disappearance, and hidden gold

14. ———. The night calls. 1st St. Martin's Minotaur ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2003.

LC Control Number: 2003050626;

15. ———. The night calls, (The dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes). London: Century, 2002.

24 cm.;

16. ———. The night calls. 1st Pegasus Books ed. New York: Pegasus Books : Distributed by W. W. Norton, 2008.

21 cm. "The dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes"--Cover.;

17. ———. The night calls, (Murder rooms). London: Arrow, 2003.

18 cm. Originally published: London: Century, 2002.;

18. ———. The night calls : murder rooms : the dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes, (Murder rooms). London: Arrow Books, 2004.

20 cm.;

19. ———. The patient's eyes. London: Century, 2001.

"The Patient's Eyes moves from Edinburgh and the strange circumstances surrounding Arthur Conan Doyle's meeting with the remarkable Joseph Bell to Southsea where he begins his first medical practice. There he is puzzled by the symptoms presented by Heather Grace, a sweet young woman whose parents have died tragically several years before. Heather has a strange eye complaint, but is also upset by visions of a phantom cyclist who vanishes as soon as he is followed. This enigma, however, is soon forgotten as Doyle finds himself embroiled in more threatening events - including the murder of a rich Spanish businessman - events that call for the intervention of the eminent Dr. Bell." "But despite coming to Doyle's aid, perversely Dr. Bell considers the murder of Senor Garcia a rather unimportant diversion from the far more sinister matter which has brought him south: the matter of the patient's eyes and the solitary cyclist."--Book jacket

20. ———. The patient's eyes, (Murder rooms). London: Arrow, 2004.

Originally published: London: Century, 2001.;

21. ———. The patient's eyes : the dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. 1st U.S. ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2002.

ill. ; 22 cm. Originally published in Great Britain by Arrow, 2001.;

22. ———. The patient's eyes : the dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes, (Murder rooms). London: Arrow, 2001.

ill. ; 18 cm.;

23. ———. The patient's eyes the dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. St. Martin's pbks. ed. New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 2003.

24. ———. The patient's eyes: the dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. 1st Pegasus Books trade pbk. ed. New York: Pegasus Books, 2007.

25. Pirie, David, and Richard Matthews. The patient's eyes. Newport Beach, CA: Books on Tape, 2001. Sound Recording 5 sound cassettes (90 min. each).

analog. Unabridged. Read by Richard Mathhews.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Pérez-Reverte, Arturo (54)

1. Pérez-Reverte, Arturo. The Club Dumas. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1996.

Translated from the Spanish by Sonia Soto.;

2. ———. The Club Dumas. New York: Harcourt, Inc., 2006.

Translated from the Spanish by Sonia Soto. "A Harvest book."/ Originally published : New York : Harcourt Brace, 1996.;

3. ———. De club Dumas, of De schaduw van Richelieu. Baarn: De Prom, 1995.

Language: Dutch; vert. [uit het Spaans] door Jean Schalekamp ; [ill.: Francisco Solé]. Omslagtitel: De club Dumas.;

4. ———. De club Dumas, of De schaduw van Richelieu, (Flamingo noire pockets). Amsterdam: Anthos, 1999.

Language: Dutch; vert. [uit het Spaans] door Jean Schalekamp. Omslagtitel: De club Dumas./ Original: 1e dr. Nederlandse geb. uitg.: Baarn : De Prom, 1995.;

5. ———. Der Club Dumas. Stuttgart ; Wien: Weitbrecht, 1995.

Language: German; Aus dem Span. von Claudia Schmitt.;

6. ———. Der Club Dumas. [München]: Goldmann, 1997.

Language: German; Aus dem Span. von Claudia Schmitt. Lizenz des Weitbrecht-Verl., Stuttgart, Wien.;

7. ———. Der Club Dumas. Berlin: List, 2005.

Language: German; Aus dem Span. von Claudia Schmitt.;

8. ———. Die neun Pforten. [München]: Goldmann, 2000.

Language: German; Aus dem Span. von Claudia Schmitt. Lizenz des Weitbrecht-Verl., Stuttgart, Wien. - Früher als: Goldmann; 72193.;

9. ———. The Dumas club. London: Harvill, 1996.

Translated from the Spanish by Sonia Soto. Originally published in Spanish, Madrid: Alfaguara, 1993./ English translation fron the Spanish of: El club Dumas.;

10. ———. The Dumas Club. London: Harvill Press, 2000.

Translated from the Spanish by Sonia Soto.;

11. ———. The Dumas club. London: Harvill Press, 1997.

12. ———. Dumas Club. London: Harvill, 1995.

Translated from the Spanish P. Bush.;

13. ———. The Dumas club. London: Harvill, 1999.

Translated from the Spanish by Sonia Soto. Originally published in Spanish, Madrid: Alfaguara, 1993. Reprint of translation originally published, 1996.;

14. ———. The Dumas club. London: Vintage, 2003.

Translated from the Spanish by Sonia Soto. This translation originally published: London: Harvill, 1996.;

15. ———. Dumas kulubü ya da Richelieu'nün gölgesi. Istanbul: Iletisim, 1998.

Language: Turkish; Ispanyolca'dan çeviren Peral Bayaz Charum.;

16. ———. Dwima k`ullop. Soul-si: Sigongsa, 2002.

Language: Korean; Chong Ch`ang omgim.;

17. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Santillana, 1998.

"One of the characters is named Irene Adler, who lives at 223 Baker Street, Pam Russell reports, but this is a minor homage, and a passing one at that. And there is a movie based on the book: 'The Ninth Gate' now in pre-production, with Roman Polanski as director and starring Johnny Depp and Lena Olin."

18. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Alfaguara, 1999.

Language: Spanish;

19. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Santillana, 1993.

Language: Spanish;

20. ———. El Club Dumas. México, D.F.: Aguilar, Altea, Taurus, Alfaguara, 1997.

Language: Spanish;

21. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Santillana, 2000.

Language: Spanish;

22. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Alfaguara, 2002.

Language: Spanish;

23. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Alfaguara, 1998.

Language: Spanish; "Puede un libro ser investigado policialmente como si de un crimen se tratara ... ? Lucas Corso, mercenario de la bibliofilia, cazador de libros por cuenta ajena, debe encontrar

24. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Alfaguara, 1997.

Language: Spanish;

25. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Alfaguara, 2000.

Language: Spanish;

26. ———. El Club Dumas. Spain: Alfaguara, 1998.

Language: Spanish;

27. ———. El club Dumas. Barcelona: RBA Editores, 1994.

Language: Spanish;

28. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Suma de Letras, 2005.

Language: Spanish;

29. ———. El club Dumas. Madrid: Alfaguara Hispanica, 1993.

Spanish text.;

30. ———. El club Dumas. Barcelona: Rosa dels Vents, 2004.

Language: Catalan; traducció de Neus Nueno. Título original: El club Dumas.;

31. ———. El club Dumas o la sombra de Richelieu. [Madrid]: Punto de Lectura, 2000.

Language: Spanish;

32. ———. El club Dumas o la sombra de Richelieu. [Madrid]: Suma de Letras, 2000.

Language: Spanish;

33. ———. El club Dumas o la sombra de Richelieu. [Madrid]: Punto de Lectura, 2004.

Language: Spanish;

34. ———. El club Dumas, o, La sombra de Richelieu. Madrid: Suma de Letras, 2006.

Language: Spanish;

35. ———. El club Dumas, o, La sombra de Richelieu. Buenos Aires: Suma de Letras, 2003.

Language: Spanish. Originally published by Arturo Pérez-Reverte in 1993./ "La novela que inspiró la película La novena puerta de Roman Polansky"--Cover.;

36. ———. Klub Diuma, ili Ten’ Rishel’e, (The best of Inostranka). Moskva: Izd-vo "Inostranka", 2003.

Language: Russian; [perevod s ispanskogo N. Bogomolovoi]. Translation of: El Club Dumas.;

37. ———. Klub Diuma, ili, Ten’ Rishel’e. Moskva: Inostranka, 2002.

Language: Russian; [perevod s ispanskogo N. Bogomolovo].;

38. ———. Klub Diuma, ili, Ten’ Rishel’e. Moskva: "EKSMO", 2004.

Language: Russian. Translation of: El club Dumas o la sombra de Richelieu.;

39. ———. Klub Dumas. Warszawa: MUZA SA, 1998.

Language: Polish; przelozyl Filip Lobodzinski. Translation of: El club Dumas.;

40. ———. Klub Dumas. Warszawa: MUZA SA, 2001.

Language: Polish; przelozyl Filip Lobodzinski. Translation of: El club Dumas./ Original Spanish title on t.p. verso.;

41. ———. Klub Dumas, (Galeria). Warszawa: Muza, 2006.

Language: Polish; przel. Filip Lobodzinski; il. Gabriela Becla i Zbigniew Tomecki.;

42. ———. Klub Dumas, (Kalejdoskop). Warszawa: Muza, 2002.

Language: Polish; przel. Filip Lobodzinski.;

43. ———. Klub Dumas. Warszawa: Libros - Grupa Wydawnicza Bertelsmann Media, 2001.

Language: Polish; z hisz. przel. Filip Lobodzinski.;

44. ———. Klub Dumas, (Galeria). Warszawa: Muza, 2003.

Language: Polish; przel. Filip Lobodzinski.;

45. ———. Klub Dumas. Warszawa: "Muza", 2001.

Language: Polish; przel. Filip Lobodzinski.;

46. ———. Le Club Dumas. [Quebec?]: JC Lattes, 1993.

traduit de l'espagnol par Jean-Pierre Quijano.;

47. ———. Le Club Dumas, ou, L'ombre de Richelieu. [Paris]: J.-C. Lattès, 1994.

Language: French; roman traduit de l'espagnol par Jean-Pierre Quijano. "Le livre de poche"--Spine.;

48. ———. Mo`adon Deyuma. Tel Aviv: Prag ; Yerushalayim : Setsenah, 2000.

Language: Hebrew; mi-Sefaradit, Yoram Meltser. Translation of: El club Dumas.;

49. ———. The ninth gate. London: Harvill, 1999.

Translation of: El club Dumas.; translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa. Film tie-in./ This translation originally published as The Dumas club. London: Harvill, 1996.;

50. ———. Noroi no dyuma kurabu. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1996.

Language: Japanese; Okuma Sakae yaku. Translation of: El Club Dumas.;

51. ———. O Clube Dumas ou a sombra de Richelieu, (Ficça universal 219). Lisboa: Dom Quixote, 2000.

Language: Portuguese; trad. de Maria do Carmo Abreu. Omslagtitel: Clube Dumas.; Wanneer een liefhebber van zeldzame boeken speurt naar de geheimen van twee uitzonderlijke boeken, laat hij een spoor van lijken na.

52. ———. Yhdeksäs portti, (Like-pokkari). Helsinki: Like, Otava, 2002.

Language: Finnish; suomentanut Katja Kallio.;

53. ———. Yhdeksäs portti, eli, Richelieun varjo. Helsinki: Like, WSOY, 1998.

Language: Finnish; suomentanut Katja Kallio.;

54. Pérez-Reverte, Arturo, and Sonia Soto. The Club Dumas a novel. 1st Vintage International ed. New York: Vintage International, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97050179; "Lucas Corso, middle-aged, tired, and cynical, is a book detective, a mercenary hired to hunt down rare editions for wealthy and unscrupulous clients. When a well-known bibliophile is found hanged, leaving behind part of the original manuscript of Alexandre Dumas's The Three Musketeers, Corso is brought in to authenticate the fragment. The task seems straightforward, but the unsuspecting Corso is soon drawn into a swirling plot involving devil worship, occult practices, and swashbuckling derring-do among a cast of characters bearing a suspicious resemblance to those of Dumas's masterpiece. Aided by a mysterious beauty named for a Conan Doyle heroine, Corso travels from Madrid to Toledo to Paris in pursuit of a sinister and seemingly omniscient killer."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- R (15)

1. "Forecasts: Fiction." Publishers Weekly 247, no. 19 (2000): 208.

Reviews the book 'The Problem of the Evil Editor: A Charles Dodgson/Arthur Conan Doyle Mystery,' by Roberta Rogow.

2. Baker, Simon. "The Character Who Refused to Die." Spectator 299, no. 9254/9255 (2005): 64-64.

The article reviews books "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, Volume III: The Novels," by Arthur Conan Doyle and "Sherlock Holmes: The Unauthorized Biography," by Nick Rennison.

3. Burns, Ann. "Forthcoming Debuts." Library Journal 128, no. 16 (2003): 42-44.

Presents a list of books slated for launch in October 2003. Includes Ted Riccardi, The Oriental Casebook of Sherlock Holmes (Random).

4. Cannon, Peter. "The Problem of the Surly Servant (Book Review)." Publishers Weekly 248, no. 28 (2001): 51.

Reviews the book 'The Problem of the Surly Servant: A Charles Dodgson/Arthur Conan Doyle Mystery,' by Roberta Rogow.

5. Hobbs, Don. "Review--The Oriental Casebook of Sherlock Holmes by Ted Riccardi." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 6 (2004): 13.

6. Klett, Rex E., and Eric Bryant. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 123, no. 8 (1998): 143.

Reviews the book The Problem of the Missing Miss, by Roberta Rogow. (St. Martin's. May 1998. c.272p. ISBN 0-312-18553-7. $21.95.) "First novelist Rogow pairs an aging Charles Dodgson (a.k.a. Lewis Carroll) and a youthful, impetuous Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle (willing to pursue a mystery at the expense of his honeymoon). They meet in late 19th-century Brighton, where Lord Marbury's daughter, meant to spend some time with Dodgson, is abducted by opponents of the upcoming Criminal Amendment Bill. The abduction spawns murder, but Doyle and Dodgson have difficulty convincing police that the daughter is in danger. Part of the fun here lies in the reluctant partnership, but there are other spunky characters to watch as well. A good Victorian historical."

7. Leitch, Thomas. "Neither Fish nor Fowl." Kirkus Reviews 74, no. 18 (2006): 918-918.

The article reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes: The Unauthorized Biography," by Nick Rennison.

8. Peters, Susan L. "Sherlock Holmes: The Unauthorized Biography." Library Journal 131, no. 15 (2006): 61-61.

This article reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes: The Unauthorized Biography," by Nick Rennison.

9. Resnick, Michael D, and Martin Harry Greenberg. Sherlock Holmes in orbit. New York: MJF Books, 1995.

Contents: The Musgrave version / by George Alec Effinger -- The case of the detective's smile / by Mark Bourne -- The adventure of the Russian grave / by William Barton and Michael Capobianco -- The adventure of the field theorems / by Vonda N. McIntyre -- The adventure of the missing coffin / by Laura Resnick -- The adventure of the second scarf / by Mark Aronson -- The phantom of the Barbary Coast / by Frank M. Robinson -- Mouse and the master / by Brian M. Thomsen -- Two roads, no choices / by Dean Wesley Smith -- The Richmond enigma / by John DeChancie -- A study in Sussex / by Leah A. Zeldes -- The Holmes team advantage / by Gary Alan Ruse -- Alimentary, my dear Watson / by Lawrence Schimel -- The future engine / by Byron Tetrick -- Contents: Holmes ex machina / by Susan Casper -- The Sherlock solution / by Craig Shaw Gardner -- The fan who molded himself / by David Gerrold -- Second fiddle / by Kristine Kathryn Rusch -- Moriarty by modem / by Jack Nimersheim -- The greatest detective of all time / by Ralph Roberts -- The case of the purloined L'Isitek / by Josepha Sherman -- The adventure of the illegal alien / by Anthony R. Lewis -- Dogs, masques, love, death: flowers / by Barry N. Malzberg -- You see but you do not observe / by Robert J. Sawyer -- Illusions / by Janni Lee Simner -- The adventure of the pearly gate / Mike Resnick;

10. ———. Sherlock Holmes in orbit. New York: DAW Books, 1995.

Contents: The Musgrave version / George Alec Effinger -- The case of the detective's smile / Mark Bourne -- The adventure of the Russian grave / William Barton and Michael Capobianco -- The adventure of the field theorems / Vonda N. McIntyre -- The adventure of the missing coffin / Laura Resnick -- The adventure of the second scarf / Mark Aronson -- The phantom of the Barbary Coast / Frank M. Robinson -- Mouse and the master / Brian M. Thomsen -- Two roads, no choices / Dean Wesley Smith -- The Richmond enigma / John DeChancie -- A study in Sussex / Leah A. Zeldes -- The Holmes team advantage / Gary Alan Ruse -- Alimentary, my dear Watson / Lawrence Schimel -- The future engine / Byron Tetrick -- Contents: Holmes ex machina / Susan Casper -- The Sherlock solution / Craig Shaw Gardner -- The fan who molded himself / David Gerrold -- Second fiddle / Kristine Kathryn Rusch -- Moriarty by modem / Jack Nimersheim -- The greatest detective of all time / Ralph Roberts -- The case of the purloined L'Isitek / Josepha Sherman -- The adventure of the illegal alien / Anthony R. Lewis -- Dogs, masques, love, death: flowers / Barry N. Malzberg -- You see but you do not observe / Robert J. Sawyer -- Illusions / Janni Lee Simner -- The adventure of the pearly gate / Mike Resnick;

11. Richards, Kel. Sherlock Holmes footsteps in the fog and other stories. Lane Cove, NSW: Beacon Communications, 1999.

Contents: The Waters of death -- Footsteps in the fog -- Wolfman of Dartmoor;

12. Rickman, Philip. The prayer of the night shepherd. London: Macmillan, 2004.

ill. ; 25 cm. Scuttlebutt Aug 2005.; "The sixth in a mystery series that features the Reverend Merrily Watkins (Deliverance Consultant to the Diocese of Hereford); it's fiction, but involves Rickman's belief that The Hound of the Baskervilles was inspired in Herefordshire rather than Devon. Rickman had an article in Sherlock #60 suggesting that Conan Doyle used the legend of Black Vaughan of Kington, and his ghostly Hergest hound."

13. ———. The prayer of the night shepherd, (A Rev Merrily Watkins mystery). London: Pan, 2004.

18 cm. Originally published: London: Macmillan.;

14. Robertson, Michael. The Baker Street Letters. Large print ed, (Thorndike Press large print mystery). Waterville, ME : Thorndike; Bath, England : Chivers, 2010.

23 cm. Cover title: The Baker Street letters, a mystery.;

15. Southworth, Bruce E. "Book Review--'The Disappearance of Edwin Drood' by Peter Rowland." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 71 (1992): 42-43.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Randisi, Robert J. (3)

1. Randisi, Robert J. First cases first appearances of classic private eyes. New York: Dutton, 1996.

LC Control Number: 95033140;

2. ———. First cases new and classic tales of detection. New York: Signet, 1999.

LC Control Number: 2002585106. Contents: Introduction / by Robert J. Randisi -- Her dagger before me (a Lloyd Carter/Ed Rivers story) / by Talmage Powell -- A change of clients (a Delilah West story) / by Maxine O'Callaghan -- Chee's witch (a Jim Chee story) / by Tony Hillerman -- Death of the Mallory Queen (a Chip Harrison story) -- Snow (a Porfiry Rostnikov story) / by Stuart M. Kaminsky --Someone else (a Fred Carver story) / by John Lutz -- Polo at the Ritz (a Nick Polo story) / by Jerry Kennealy -- The Pig Man (a Saxon story) / by Les Roberts -- And pray nobody sees you (an Aaron Gunner story) / by Gar Anthony Haywood. [5 more not listed];

3. ———. Mystery street. 20th anniversary PWA anthology. ed, (The Private Eye Writers of America anthology). New York: Signet Book, 2001.

18 cm. House party / Robert Crais -- New guy on the block / Jack Bludis -- Shoot-out on Sunset / Max Allan Collins -- Woodward plan / Loren D. Estleman -- Washington Avenue / Carolina Garcia-Aguilera -- Carole on Lombard / Jerry Kennealy -- Just missed blonde / Patricia McFall -- Peculiar events on Riverside Drive / Maan Meyers -- Beaubien / Deborah Morgan -- Highly irregular on Baker Street / Warren Murphy -- Murder Boulevard / Percy Spurlark Parker -- Eyes on the road / by Marcus Pelegrimas -- Double-crossing Delancey / S.J. Rozan -- North West 33rd Court / Dan A. Sproul -- Last kiss / Tom Sweeney. At head of title:; Private Eye Writers of America presents. Edited by Robert J. Randisi.; 'Includes Warren Murphy's 'Highly Irregular on Baker Street', which stars his series P.I. Devlin Tracy, investigating a murder at the present-day 221B Baker Street."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Roberts, Barrie (22)

1. "Booklines." Birmingham Post, February 3, 2001: 52.

"West Midlands lawyer Barrie Roberts impersonating Conan Doyle in his latest Sherlock Holmes narrative, Sherlock Holmes & The Crosby Murder (Constable Crime, pounds 16.99)."

2. "Off the Shelf: Murder and a Che Mystery." Birmingham Evening Mail, April 16, 2001: 27.

Short review of "Sherlock Holmes and the Crosby Murder" by Barrie Roberts (Constable, pounds 16.99) "...This is the sixth Sherlock Holmes mystery penned by Barrie Roberts, a criminal lawyer with West Midlands firms and one of the men involved in the appeals of the Birmingham Six. For Holmes' fans the series is great fun, although the novels, understandably, never quite capture that special Arthur Conan Doyle atmosphere. Particularly impressive is the way Roberts explains his research and supports his theories with extensive editor's notes at the end of the story...."

3. "Sherlock Holmes and the American Angels." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 25 (2007): 38-38.

The article reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes and the American Angels," by Barrie Roberts.

4. "Sherlock Holmes and the King's Governess." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 24 (2005): 36.

Reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes and the King's Governess," by Barrie Roberts.

5. Hall, John. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes & the Devil's Grail' by Barrie Roberts." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 108-110.

6. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Man From Hell by Barrie Roberts." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 12.

7. Klett, Rex E. "Keeping with Tradition." Library Journal 130, no. 12 (2005): 56-56.

Introduces a list of several mystery books reviewed in this issue of the "Library Journal." Author's view that traditional private investigator literary characters are still big with readers despite the introduction of a recent wave of unusual sleuths; Reference to Barrie Roberts's "Sherlock Holmes and the King's Governess" and "Sandra Scoppettone's "This Dame for Hire."

8. ———. "Sherlock Holmes and the King's Governess." Library Journal 130, no. 12 (2005): 57.

Reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes and the King's Governess," by Barrie Roberts.

9. Melton, Emily. "Sherlock Holmes and the American Angels." Booklist 103, no. 17 (2007): 38.

Reviews the book 'Sherlock Holmes and the American Angels,' by Barrie Roberts. "A mysterious coded message in the newspaper draws Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson into their latest adventure. Holmes believes the message indicates a dangerous plot involving the Scottish pretender to the throne is afoot in London. A dead body in Regents Park and another in a London hotel--both stabbed to death by the same Scottish knife--underscore Holmes’ suspicion. Then he and Watson are visited by a representative of President Roosevelt who asks Holmes to find the killer of the two murdered men. The killer, the representative explains, is likely after a hoard of gold reputed to have been hidden in Scotland during the American War of Independence. The gold, if found, could be used by a subversive group plotting to overthrow the American government. Holmes and Watson immediately head to Scotland to unmask the killer and save America. Watson is initially as puzzled as readers are likely to be by the convoluted plot, but the story is cleverly resolved and will delight fans of the fictitious British sleuth, who is at his supercilious, brilliant best."

10. Roberts, Barrie. The Man from Hell, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

21 cm.;

11. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Crosby Murder, (Constable crime). London: Constable, 2001.

"After an absence of three years, Sherlock Holmes has returned to London, and his old partner Dr. Watson knows only too well the dissatisfaction which overtakes his friend in times of inactivity. 'Something is bound to turn up,' he ventures by way of encouragement. And indeed it does." "Moments later Inspector Lestrade arrives at Baker Street with a parcel which has recently arrived at Scotland Yard. Having examined the strange contents, Holmes announces that Lestrade's package contains nothing less than the shrunken head of Crosby, a missing banker." "Recently returned from a trip to America and the West Indies, Crosby has not been seen for six weeks. His yacht, the Gyrfalcon, has also vanished; it was last seen sailing out of Itchen skippered by a mysterious yacht-hand called Teddy the American.". "When Holmes discovers a curious word chart in Teddy's lodgings, the mystery begins to unfold, and he and Watson find themselves following a dangerous trail of curses and revenge that reaches across the world to a mountain wilderness in America's West." "In a dramatic hunt for the killer, Watson's life is put at risk before the investigation comes to a violent conclusion in London's East India Docks."--Book jacket

12. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the Crosby murder : a narrative believed to be from the pen of John H. Watson, MD. 1st Carroll & Graf ed. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2002.

23 cm. Includes bibliographical references.;

13. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the devil's grail a narrative believed to be from the pen of John H. Watson, MD. London: Allison & Busby, 2000.

14. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the harvest of death a narrative believed to be from the pen of John H. Watson, MD, (Constable crime). London: Constable, 1999.

15. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the king's governess. Sutton: Severn House, 2005.

23 cm. Scuttlebutt Jun 2005.; "It's set in London during the Diamond Jubilee in 1897 and involves Diana Fordeland (who bears a striking resemblance to Anna Leonowens) and a battle again evil Tsarist agents."

16. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the King's governess. Large type ed. Sutton: Severn House Large Print, 2007.

23 cm. Originally published: 2005.;

17. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the railway maniac a narrative believed to be from the pen of John H. Watson, MD. London: Constable, 1994.

18. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the railway maniac a narrative believed to be from the pen of John H. Watson, MD. London: Allison & Busby, 2001.

"Now in his third year of retirement, the celebrated master detective Sherlock Holmes announces his firm resolve to stay well out of the affairs of others to his old friend and colleague, Dr John Watson. But this emphatic sentiment is to be short lived." "At the behest of his enigmatic brother, Mycroft, Holmes is persuaded to investigate two unexplained, catastrophic train derailments which have caused the death of more than forty people. Why would a criminal wreck an express train?" "As the clues accumulate - a strange astronomer, the German Intelligence Service, a Russian yacht in the port of Aberdeen - the most homicidal lunatic in Britain remains at large. Something was afoot in Scotland to draw both the King and Mycroft from their lairs...a meeting with the emissary of the Czar, or something more?". "Can even the strenuous efforts of Sherlock Holmes avert an international calamity and bring to justice this evil assassin? All is revealed in an ingenious tale that even the late Conan Doyle would have been proud of."--Book jacket

19. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the royal flush a narrative believed to be from the pen of John H. Watson, MD, (Constable crime). London: Constable, 1998.

20. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the rule of nine. Sutton, Surrey, New York: Severn House, 2003.

A series of accidents befall small shopowners but Sherlock Holmes discerns a pattern--someone is running a protection racket and murder is involved. Holmes teams up with a New York detective who has come to London to discover the meaning of The Rule of Nine

21. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the rule of nine : from a manuscript believed to be the work of John H. Watson, MD. Large type ed. Sutton: Severn House, 2004.

23 cm. Originally published: 2003.;

22. Skoyles, Lesley. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and the Railway Maniac' by Barrie Roberts." The Ritual, no. 13 (1994): 51-52.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Rogow, Roberta (6)

1. Rogow, Roberta. The problem of the evil editor. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2000.

LC Control Number: 00029675; "In the winter of 1888, Reverend Charles Dodgson of Christ Church at Oxford - better known to the world as author Lewis Carroll - brings his newfound friend Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle to London to introduce him to editors potentially interested in Doyle's writing. Their first stop is the offices of a weekly magazine, Youth's Companion, where they arrive to find the place in an uproar - the staff is upset, the printers in a rage, and Samuel Bassett, the editor, is busy violently rejecting the work of up-and-coming Irish writer Oscar Wilde. Dr. Doyle fares no better with the foul-tempered, duplicitous, and mean editor - and the duo depart.". "Shortly thereafter, in full sight of Dodgson and Doyle, Bassett is murdered outside of the magazine's offices. Due to the heavy snowstorm, neither of them can identify Bassett's attacker, but they are on hand to hear Bassett's final gasp. With the Labor Riots raging in the streets and unrest in the air, the police immediately assume that Wilde, a socialist, is responsible and set about trying to find him. But, believing that Wilde is innocent, Dodgson and Doyle are determined to find out the truth behind the vicious attack. In a quest that takes them from the most prestigious literary and art circles in Victorian London to the lowest dives of ill repute, the unlikely duo seeks to unmask a killer before he strikes again."--Book jacket

2. ———. The problem of the missing miss. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98005329; Scuttlebutt June 1998; "Charles Dodgson and Arthur Conan Doyle do meet...it's August 1885, and Conan Doyle and his bride Touie are on their honeymoon in Brighton, where a liberal MP's daughter on her way for a holiday with Dodgson is kidnapped and in peril. Conan Doyle and Dodgson do manage to solve the mystery, of course, and rescue the girl, and foil all the villains and villainesses."

3. ———. The Problem of the Spiteful Spiritualist. London: Robert Hale, 1999.

24 cm. Includes bibliographical references.;

4. ———. The Problem of the Spiteful Spiritualist. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999.

22 cm. "A Charles Dodgson/Arthur Conan Doyle mystery"--Jacket.; Sleuth Arthur Conan Doyle investigates the death of a retired sea captain in 1880s Portsmouth. A seance to contact the dead man's spirit ends with the medium dropping dead after whispering the word murder.

5. ———. The Problem of the Surly Servant. London: Robert Hale, 2002.

24 cm.;

6. ———. The Problem of the Surly Servant : a Charles Dodgson/Arthur Conan Doyle mystery. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2001.

22 cm.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Ruyle, John (46)

1. Accardo, Pasquale J, and Claire Accardo. The Spenserian Holmes being the annotated manuscript of "The hell of the Baskervilles". Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisconsin: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references (p. lxxviii-lxxix) and index;

2. Ruyle, John. The Adventure of the aluminum crotch an exploit of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Jezail, Bullett & Co, 1995.

3. ———. The Adventure of the beeping man an exploit of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Bennett & Morphy, 2000.

4. ———. The Adventure of the blanched shoulder an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Godfrey Emsworth, 1999.

5. ———. The Adventure of the blue garfunkel an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Morcar & Cusack, 1998.

6. ———. The Adventure of the devil's yard an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Leon Sterndale, 1998.

7. ———. The Adventure of the feral baronet an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Holder & Stevenson, 1995.

8. ———. The Adventure of the fiery pool an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Wilder & Hayes, 1999.

9. ———. The Adventure of the flabby grunge an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Fraser & Crocker, 1995.

10. ———. The Adventure of the mysterious fudge an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Hangdog Press, 1998.

11. ———. The Adventure of the peremptory spouse the recrudescence of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Maynooth & Co, 1994.

12. ———. The Adventure of the second brain an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Pycroft & Doran, 1996.

13. ———. The Adventure of the six Nixons an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Morse Hudson, 1995.

14. ———. The Adventure of the Tabby Mange an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Stanley Hopkins, 1997.

15. ———. The Adventure of the three rodents an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: The Speckled Bandicoot, 1966.

16. ———. The adventure of the wooden Nez Pierce. Berkeley: Willoughby Smith, 1997.

17. ———. The agent's last bow the Case-book re-cased. Berkeley: Brickfall & Amberley, 1994.

18. ———. Arrivals & departures jiggery- pokery. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1996.

19. ———. Baker Street antics observations. Berkeley: The Speckled Bandicott, 1999.

20. ———. Baker Street Bazaar demonstrations. Berkeley: Ash-Tray Press, 1999.

21. ———. Baker Street Galore! preoccupations. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1999.

22. ———. Beeing there impressions. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1997.

23. ———. Bees in my bonnet obsessions. Berkeley: The Bees' Knees Press, 1997.

24. ———. Bells, butlers, & others frolics. Berkeley: Brunton & Howells, 1998.

25. ———. Bottom of the barrel canonical capers. Berkeley: Slipshod Press, 1998.

26. ———. Bricks without clay Processions / by John Ruyle. Berkely: White Mason, 1998.

Scuttlebutt Mar 1998; "'Leans heavily on the untold adventures and other Holmesian topics on which we have little data,' John Ruyle reports."

27. ———. Bye bye birdy fear quartets. Berkeley: Iron Duke Company, 1992.

Citations: De Waal C8324;

28. ———. Chimney-child divagations & variations. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1999.

29. ———. Difficult oysters seven men in the same boat (to say nothing of the dog!) curious verse. Berkeley: Hangdog Press, 1994.

30. ———. Effable twaddle digressions. Berkeley: Owls' Hoot Press, 1998.

31. ———. Exits & entrances hocus-pocus. Berkeley, CA: Crow's Foot Press, 1996.

32. ———. Loose canons verse grim and gentle. Berkeley: Pontoon Press, 1995.

33. ———. The Man with the fisted grip an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley, CA: Hugh Boone, 1996.

34. ———. Mellow face an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Grant Munro, 1999.

35. ———. Mitigated bleat: observations on his last bow. Berkeley: Printer's Devil's Feet, 1994.

36. ———. Mongoose & mendicants celebrations & tribulations. Berkeley: Wood & Devoy, 1999.

37. ———. Sherlock unbound new poems. Berkeley: The Crow's Foot Press, 1997.

38. ———. Sir Arthur Agonistes whims & fancies. Berkeley, CA: Firedog Press, 1996.

39. ———. Splintered Parts. Berkeley, CA: The Pequod Press, 1995.

Scuttlebutt Apr 1995;

40. ———. Springtime for Sherlock and other verses. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 2001.

41. ———. Stix & stones hallucinations. Berkeley: Calaboose Press, 1999.

42. ———. Teddy & Arthur paradigmatic constructs. Berkeley: Amateur Mendicant Society, 1988.

43. ———. Tidewaiters & yeggmen occupations. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1999.

44. ———. Watson furioso progressions. Berkeley: Iron Dyke Company, 1998.

45. ———. The Wet-headed league an episode of Turlock Loams. Berkeley: Wilson & Clay, 1998.

46. ———. Wiggins & Company irregular verse. Berkeley: The imbecile Rodent, 1996.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Rybolt, Thomas R. (13)

1. "News & Announcements." Journal of chemical education 84, no. 4 (2007): 593-595.

The article offers news briefs related to chemistry in the U.S. A compendium of 15 stories by Thomas G. Waddell and Thomas R. Rybolt titled "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" has been translated into French by Paul Depovere. The American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of the History of Chemistry (HIST) has been soliciting nomination for its award, Citation for Chemical Breakthroughs. The Department of Chemistry at the University of Michigan is commemorating its 150th anniversary.

2. Waddell, Thomas G., and Thomas R. Rybolt. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes." Journal of chemical education 71, no. 12 (1994): 1049.

Presents a story describing a chemical mystery with an emphasis on physical properties and balancing reaction equations.

3. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: a Christmas story." Journal of chemical education 68, no. (1991): 1023-1024.

4. ———. "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Autopsy in Blue." Journal of chemical education 81, no. 4 (2004): 497-501.

A chemical problem is presented in the form of a mystery involving the fictional characters Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson. The mystery emphasizes qualitative inorganic analysis, forensic chemistry, and medicinal substances.

5. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Baker Street Burning." Journal of chemical education 75, no. 4 (1998): 484.

Presents a short story on chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes, relative to chemistry and qualitative organic analysis.

6. ———. "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Blackwater Escape." Journal of chemical education 80, no. 4 (2003): 401-406.

A chemical mystery with an emphasis on qualitative inorganic analysis, laboratory observations, and oxidation-reduction processes is presented. In the hypothetical scenario, Sherlock Holmes solves the mystery of how a criminal was able to dissolve an iron bar and escape from his cell.

7. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the case of the screaming stepfather." Journal of chemical education 69, no. (1992): 999-1001.

8. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the case of the stoichiometric solution." Journal of chemical education 70, no. (1993): 1003-1005.

A scientific problem emphasizing the use of stoichiometry calculations is presented in the form of a mystery story involving the well-known characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. A break in the story allows students and teachers to contemplate and solve the chemical mystery. This is followed by the Sherlock Holmes' solution.

9. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the ghost of Gordon Square." Journal of chemical education 77, no. 4 (2000): 471-474.

A chemical problem in mystery format in the context of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson is presented. Holmes demonstrates that the activities of a "ghost" are actually the work of a disgruntled employee playing chemical tricks.

10. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the shroud of Spartacus." Journal of chemical education 78, no. 4 (2001): 470-474.

Part of a series of articles in which a scientific problem is presented in mystery format in the context of the popular and beloved characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson. The mystery centers on a blood protein test, qualitative analysis, and the properties of biological substances.

11. ———. "Sherlock Holmes and the fraudulent ketone." Journal of chemical education 67, no. (1990): 1006-1008.

12. ———. "Sherlock Holmes and the Nebulous Nitro." Journal of chemical education 73, no. 12 (1996): 1157.

Another in a series of chemical adventures featuring Holmes.

13. ———. "Sherlock Holmes and the yellow prisms." Journal of chemical education 66, no. (1989): 981-982.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- S (44)

1. "Calendar." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 48 (2007): 9-9.

A calendar of events related to book publishing for December 9-15, 2007 is presented, including "Quirk's interactive Sherlock Holmes mystery The Crimes of Dr. Watson offers removable clues to solve a new who-dunit (featuring arson and murder) by Duane Swierczynski."

2. "Forward into Fall." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 31 (2007): 45-124.

A list of several books. Includes an item from Quirk Books: The Crimes of Dr. Watson: An Interactive Sherlock Holmes Mystery (Nov., $24.95) by John H. Watson, M.D., edited by Duane Swierczynski, allows readers to solve the mystery when Holmes goes missing and Watson is framed for murder.

3. "What the world is reading." Economist, no. (1996): 4/5p.

Looks at lists of bestselling books in Mexico and Brazil, with Holmes reference. "O Xango de Baker Street by Jo Soares transplants Sherlock Holmes to fin-de-siecle Rio de Janeiro in a comic detective tale."

4. Cooper, Ilene. "Adult books." Booklist 90, no. 18 (1994): 1668.

Reviews the book 'The Angel of the Opera: Sherlock Holmes Meets the Phantom of the Opera,' by Sam Siciliano.

5. Gunson, Eilidh. "Review--'The Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes, Volume 2' by Denis O. Smith." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 60-61.

6. Hall, John. "Review--'The Siam Question' by Timothy Francis Sheil." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 53-54.

7. Hobbs, Don. "Review (as Dugan Hobbenstein)--Die Schale des Zodiakus by D. O. Smith." The Holmes & Watson Report 2, no. 5 (1998): 15.

8. ———. "Review--A Samba for Sherlock by Jo Soares." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 10.

9. ———. "Review--Holmes Redux by David Scott." The Holmes & Watson Report 2, no. 6 (1999): 32.

10. ———. "Review--Mysteries Suspended: More Early Cases of Sherlock Holmes by Richard Stone." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 2 (2000): 9.

11. ———. "Review--Sherlock Holmes & the Titanic (sic) by William Seil." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 5 (2000): 24.

12. ———. "Review--The Case of the Devil's Hoofmarks by Allen Sharp." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 2 (2003): 23.

13. ———. "Review--The Charters Affair by James R. Stephanie." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 6 (2001): 7.

14. ———. "Review--The Diaries of Mrs. John H. Watson nee Morstan by Fraser Smyth." The Holmes & Watson Report 2, no. 2 (1998): 27.

15. ———. "Review--The Peshwar Lancers by S. M. Stirling." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 1 (2002): 11.

16. Moore, Claudia. "Book review: Adult books for young adults." School Library Journal 40, no. 12 (1994): 144.

Reviews the book 'Angel of the Opera: Sherlock Holmes Meets the Phantom of the Opera,' by Sam Siciliano.

17. Pendleton, Elsa. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 119, no. 10 (1994): 164.

Reviews the novel 'The Angel of the Opera: Sherlock Holmes Meets the Phantom of the Opera,' by Sam Siciliano.

18. Saberhagen, Fred. The Holmes-Dracula File. 3rd Tor ed. New York: Tor Fantasy, 2010.

17 cm.;

19. ———. Seance for a Vampire, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

21 cm.; "Wealthy British aristocrat Ambrose Altamont hires Sherlock Holmes to expose two suspect psychics. During the ensuing seance Altamont's deceased daughter Louisa reappears as a vampire - and Sherlock Holmes vanishes. With time running out, Watson feels he has no choice but to summon the only one who might be able to help - Holmes's vampire cousin, Prince Dracula..."--Back cover.

20. ———. Séance for a vampire. 1st ed. New York: TOR, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94002353; In the course of investigating a crooked spiritualist, Sherlock Holmes disappears, abducted by malign powers. Dr. Watson has to ask Prince Dracula's help to find him. By the author of Book of Swords

21. Satterthwait, Walter. Escapade. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95015462; "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Harry Houdini join forces to solve the murder of their host, killed in a locked room during a seance at his country manor house."

22. Schwartz, Irwin. The Piltdown confession: a novel. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94000801. Includes bibliographical references; "'A mildly entertaining yet ill-conceived fictional solution' to the Piltdown hoax, with Conan Doyle as a major character, but apparently not as the culprit."

23. Scott, David. Holmes redux new adventures of Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. Vaughn, WA: Red Apple Pub, 1997.

LC Control Number: 97066772; "Offers four short-story pastiches; Holmes helps Mycroft, and Irene, and others."

24. Seil, William. Sherlock Holmes and the Titanic tragedy a case to remember. London: Breese Books, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96173322;

25. Seitz, Stephen. Sherlock Holmes and the plague of Dracula. Shaftsbury, VT: Mountainside Press, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2006934241;

26. Sellers, Peter, and Robert J. Sawyer. Over the edge : the Crime Writers of Canada anthology. Lawrencetown Beach, N.S.: Pottersfield Press, 2000.

23 cm. Scuttlebutt Dec 2000.; "Includes Sawyer's Sherlockian time-travel pastiche 'You See But You Do Not Observe' (reprinted from the 1995 anthology Sherlock Holmes in Orbit)."

27. Semper, John. The singular affair of the missing ball, (A Sherlock Whippet mystery). Toluca Lake: Barker Street Press, 2005.

When a ball disappears during a game of fetch, Sherlock Whippet is called to the scene with his boxer companion and biographer, Dr. Dogson. Together, they uncover clues revealing that the missing ball is a scheme concocted by Professor Murry R. Catty, the evil cat burglar of London

28. Shaw, Murray. The case of the missing kippered herring. S.l: s.n, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Mar 1997; The inspector from Catland Yard brings Holmes a mystery of a kippered herring which has disappeared from the Kitty Kat Café to solve

29. ———. Sherlock Holmes Finds the Lost Dutchman Mine. New York: Mysterious Bookshop, 2001.

A pastiche set in the American West.

30. Shumway, P. C. Sherlock Holmes and The Kiss of Death. S.l.: BookSurge, 2005.

Three years after a London magician was hanged by an outraged audience, a doctor living in Dartmoor died suddenly, poisoned by the venom of an adder rare in England. An old friend, Dr. Arthur Bell, may be the next intended victim unless Holmes can intervene with the plans of the world's most clever magician

31. Siciliano, Sam. The angel of the opera Sherlock Holmes meets the Phantom of the Opera. New York: O. Penzler Books, 1994.

LC Control Number: 93044056; "The unforgettable place: Paris, 1890. The glittering scene: the labyrinthine Paris Opera. The irresistible premise: what if Sherlock Holmes, lured across the Channel by the beleaguered managers of the Opera House, unlocks the true secrets motivating the infamous Phantom?" "As the hunchbacked Quasimodo was the soul of Notre Dame, so is Erik - shadow ruler of the Opera's nether regions - the Opera's true soul. Living at the heights of passion, despising the concerns of ordinary men who are the acknowledged keepers of his domain in the eyes of the world, the Phantom - defiant and tormented genius that he is - poses a persistent threat to his unwilling landlords, lesser men who are not even certain they believe in his very existence.". "But, as is the case with all problems presented to the great Sherlock Holmes for solution, nothing is quite as it seems at first . . . as thrilling episode follows even more thrilling episode in a tempestuous drama, played out against a background of one of fiction's most romantically eerie settings. Sherlockians and the Phantom's fandom both will relish Sam Siciliano's sympathetic imagination and find themselves charmed by such reinvented characters as Christine Daae ("the angel") and her arrogant suitor, Raoul de Chagny. And every reader should welcome Holme's engaging new comrade, Henry Vernier, M.D., his cousin, who joins him for this memorable adventure."--Book jacket

32. ———. The angel of the opera: Sherlock Holmes meets the Phantom of the Opera. London: Hale, 1995.

Scuttlebutt July 1995; "The unforgettable place: Paris, 1890. The glittering scene: the labyrinthine Paris Opera. The irresistible premise: what if Sherlock Holmes, lured across the Channel by the beleaguered managers of the Opera House, unlocks the true secrets motivating the infamous Phantom?" "As the hunchbacked Quasimodo was the soul of Notre Dame, so is Erik - shadow ruler of the Opera's nether regions - the Opera's true soul. Living at the heights of passion, despising the concerns of ordinary men who are the acknowledged keepers of his domain in the eyes of the world, the Phantom - defiant and tormented genius that he is - poses a persistent threat to his unwilling landlords, lesser men who are not even certain they believe in his very existence.". "But, as is the case with all problems presented to the great Sherlock Holmes for solution, nothing is quite as it seems at first . . . as thrilling episode follows even more thrilling episode in a tempestuous drama, played out against a background of one of fiction's most romantically eerie settings. Sherlockians and the Phantom's fandom both will relish Sam Siciliano's sympathetic imagination and find themselves charmed by such reinvented characters as Christine Daae ("the angel") and her arrogant suitor, Raoul de Chagny. And every reader should welcome Holme's engaging new comrade, Henry Vernier, M.D., his cousin, who joins him for this memorable adventure."--book jacket

33. Silver, David, 1934-. A study in Silver: a second collection of bridge stories. Toronto: Master Point Press, 1998.

Scuttlebutt Mar 1998; "A collection of amusing bridge stories that echo authors such as Melville, Conrad, Bierce, and (four of the tales) Conan Doyle. Silver modestly claims that he has 'partnered all the leading Canadian bridge players of his generation, once.'"

34. Simmons, Alex, and Bill McCay. The Raven League Buffalo Bill wanted! New York: Sleuth/Razorbill, 2007.

LC Control Number: 2006101845; In late nineteenth-century London, young Archie Wiggins and the Raven League--a poor but plucky band of junior detectives--meet Buffalo Bill Cody and try to save him from being framed for an attack on a police constable

35. Simmons, Alex, Kevin Sprouls, and Bill McCay. The Raven League: Sherlock Holmes is missing. New York: Razorbill/Sleuth, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2006004959; Archie Wiggins is forced out of the Baker Street Irregulars and after forming another band, he and his new cohorts investigate the disappearance of Sherlock Holmes and a possible attempt on the life of Queen Victoria

36. Skene-Melvin, David. Crime in a cold climate: an anthology of classic Canadian crime. Toronto: Simon & Pierre, 1994.

LC Control Number: 95128086. Includes bibliographical references; With a reprint of Robert Barr's parody 'The Adventure of Sherlaw Kombs'

37. Smith, D. O., and Michael Ross. Die Schale des Zodiakus : eine Sherlock Holmes Erzählung. 1. Aufl. ed. Kempen: Baskerville Bücher, 1997.

15 cm. Pastiche of Sherlock Holmes./ Translation of: The adventure of the zodiac plate : being a reprint from the Reminiscences of John H. Watson, M. D. aus dem Englischen von Michael Ross.;

38. Stableford, Brian M. The hunger and ecstasy of vampires. Shingletown, CA: Mark V. Ziesing, 1996.

LC Control Number: 95062272; Scuttlebutt Mar 1997; "An imaginative tale of time travel and vampires, involving Count Dracula, H. G. Wells, Nikola Tesla, Sir William Crookes, M. P. Shiel, and others (who include an unnamed detective who lives in Baker Street, and his unnamed doctor friend)."

39. Stableford, Brian M. Sherlock Holmes and the vampires of eternity. Encino, California: Black Coat Press, 2009.

23 cm. Soldier's story -- Writer's story -- Count's story -- Explorer's story -- Detective's story.;

40. Stashower, Daniel. The dime museum murders : a Harry Houdini mystery. New York: Avon books, 1999.

18 cm. Scuttlebutt Aug 2000.;

41. Stout, Rex. Murder by the book. Large type ed. Thorndike, Me: G.K. Hall & Co, 1996.

LC Control Number: 95040094;

42. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--The 20th Century Limited Mystery by Philip A. Shreffler." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 1 (2001): 10, 20.

43. Symons, Julian. A three-pipe problem. London, England: House of Stratus, 2001.

Includes bibliographical references; Scuttlebutt 1994; "Small-time actor, Sheridan Haynes, had a rather unhealthy preoccupation with Sherlock Holmes. So when the chance came for him to play the famous detective in a TV series, it seemed his dreams had come true. And when London was plagued by a series of unsolved murders, well it seemed only natural for him to take his role into real life. Was this a case of a laughable and misguided actor, or was Sheridan actually on to something?"

44. White, Kathryn. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and the Titanic Tragedy' by William Seil." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 76-78.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Sinclair, Iain (6)

1. Sinclair, Iain. White Chappell: Paladin, 1988.

2. ———. White Chappell - Trazos Rojos: Sudamericana, 2005.

3. ———. White Chappell : scarlet tracings. London: Granta Books, 1998.

ill. ; 20 cm. First published in Great Britain by Goldmark in 1987.;

4. ———. White Chappell : scarlet tracings. Uppingham: Goldmark, 1987.

ill. ; 24 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001.; "A complex novel about antiquarian-book dealers, Jack the Ripper, and a hitherto-unknown first issue of A Study in Scarlet."

5. ———. White Chappell, scarlet tracings. London: Penguin, 2004.

Originally published: Uppingham: Goldmark, 1987.;

6. ———. White Chappell, scarlet tracings. London: Vintage, 1995.

20 cm. ;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Soares, Jô (3)

1. Soares, Jô. O xangô de Baker Street romance. São Paulo, Brazil: Companhia das Letras, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95833005. Includes bibliographical references (p. 345-349); Scuttlebutt Feb 1996; "A pastiche that brings Holmes and Watson to Rio de Janeiro to investigate the disappearance of a valuable Stradivarius during Sarah Bernhardt's first visit to the city."

2. Soares, Jô, and Daniela Ferioli. Una samba per Sherlock Holmes, (I coralli). Torino: Einaudi, 1996.

Includes bibliography (p. [271]-276);

3. Soares, Jô, and Clifford E. Landers. A samba for Sherlock. 1st American ed. New York: Pantheon, 1997.

LC Control Number: 97002944 //r97. Includes bibliographical references (p. [267]-271); "His first novel, about Sherlock Holmes' trip to Brazil in 1886, and his encounter with Sarah Bernhardt and a thoroughly nasty serial killer. The book is a thriller, and a parody of Holmes and Brazil and Brazilians, and its humor is broad, often vulgar, and sometimes quite dark. And already published in Brazil, France, Italy, and Germany, it appears to hold a Sherlockian record for the greatest number of translations before an English version."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Springer, Nancy (9)

1. "The Case of Bizarre Bouquets." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 22 (2007): 1205.

The article reviews the book "The Case of Bizarre Bouquets," by Nancy Springer. "In this third Enola Holmes mystery, the younger, teenage sister of Sherlock Holmes is determined to find the missing Dr. Watson on her own by deciphering the clues in the bizarre bouquets sent to his wife. As in the previous two titles, Enola uses disguises, codes, false names and her familiarity with London's seamy side to solve the case...."

2. "The Case of the Left-Handed Lady." School Library Journal 54, no. (2008): 55-55.

The article reviews the audiobook "The Case of the Left-Handed Lady," by Nancy Springer.

3. "The Case of the Peculiar Pink Fan." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 16 (2008): 203-203.

The article reviews the book "The Case of the Peculiar Pink Fan: An Enola Holmes Mystery," by Nancy Springer. "Although their own eccentricities are legendary, Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes fully expect their very much younger sister to take on the attributes of the stereotypical Victorian female. She will be schooled in womanly endeavors with an eye to a future as someone's wife--but 14-year-old Enola has ideas of her own...."

4. "Children's Books for Spring." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 7 (2008): 27-116.

List includes Nancy Springer's The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets (the Enola Holmes Mysteries) ($14.99, 9-up); The Boy Sherlock Holmes continues with Death in the Air by Shane Peacock ($19.95, 10-14); The Sherlock Files debuts with The 100-Year-Old Secret by Tracy Barrett ($15.95.8-12).

5. "Read-Alikes: Victorian Mysteries for Youth." Booklist 104, no. 17 (2008): 50-50.

This article reviews a number of books including The Case of the Missing Marquess: An Enola Holmes Mystery. By Nancy Springer. 2007. Philomel, $10.99 (9780399243042). "Clues and ciphers abound in true Holmesian fashion when Sherlock’s younger sister, possessing keen powers of observation herself, is enmeshed in a double mystery after bicycling off to London to avoid boarding school and investigate the disappearance of her mother."

6. Bilton, Karen T. "The Case of the Left-Handed Lady." School Library Journal 53, no. 12 (2007): 67-67.

The article reviews the audiobook "The Case of the Left-Handed Lady," by Nancy Springer, the second title in a series featuring Enola Holmes, the famed detective's younger sister.

7. Burkey, Mary. "The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets." Booklist 104, no. 17 (2008): 97.

Reviews the audiobook "The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets" by Nancy Springer. Read by Katherine Kellgren. 2008. 4hr. Recorded Books, CS, $30.75 (9781428182523); CD, $30.75 (9781428182578).

8. Cooper, Ilene. "The Case of the Peculiar Pink Fan: An Enola Holmes Mystery." Booklist 105, no. 4 (2008): 36.

Reviews the book "An Enola Holmes Mystery: The Case of the Peculiar Pink Fan" by Nancy Springer. "Enola Holmes, the younger sister of Sherlock Holmes, returns in her fourth mystery.... A rousing read with plenty of terrific Victorian detail."

9. Raska, Ginny. "Get 'Em While They're Hot!" Library Media Connection 27, no. 3 (2008): 24-25.

The article focuses on the most popular series books for teenagers in the U.S. Includes one with a Holmesian connection. "...Another series that appeals to girls is the great new Enola Holmes Mysteries by Nancy Springer, author of the popular Tales of Rowan Hood series. Based on the fictitious sister of Sherlock Holmes, the series kicks off with The Case of the Missing Marquess (Philomel, 2006), followed by The Case of the Left-Handed Lady (2007), and The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets (2008). The Case of the Peculiar Pink Fan is scheduled to appear in September...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- T (14)

1. "The Hellfire Conspiracy." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 21 (2007): 38-38.

The article reviews the book "The Hellfire Conspiracy," by Will Thomas. Includes a reference to Holmes. "At the start of Thomas's well-crafted fourth Barker and Llewelyn mystery to feature a London detective duo clearly modeled on Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson (after 2006's The Limehouse Text), a distraught guardsman, Major DeVere, consults Cyrus Barker, a smugly intellectual private enquiry agent, and his young apprentice, ex-con Thomas Llewelyn. The major's 12-year-old daughter has disappeared, and DeVere fears she has fallen victim to white slavers, though the sleuths suspect a serial killer may be at work...."

2. "Notes." Publishers Weekly 241, no. 29 (1994): 239.

Lists publications for August 1994. Ivan Concharov's 'The Precipice and 'An Ordinary Story'; 'Shuttered Heart,' by Meg Buchanan; 'Secrets in the Attic,' by Sita Mann; 'The Unopened Casebook of Sherlock Holmes,' by John Taylor; 'Highpockets,' by Douglas Savage; 'Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc; 'King of the World,' by Celia Fremlin.

3. Barrett, Mike. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Masquerade Murders by Frank Thomas." The Ritual, no. 14 (1994): 54-55.

4. Chapman, Paul M. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and the Chinese Junk Affair and Other Stories' by Roy Templeman." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 62-63.

5. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Lestrade and the Haunted House by M. J. Trow." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 3 (1999): 17.

6. McKuras, Julie. "Basil of Baker Street." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 1, 6.

Highlights the recent acquisition of the original type-written manuscripts of Eve Titus, complete with Ms. Titus' hand-written notes, of her five books: Basil of Baker Street, 1958, Basil and the Lost Colony, 1964, Basil and the Pygmy Cats, 1971, Basil in Mexico, 1976, and Basil in the Wild West, 1982. These five books were illustrated by Paul Galdone, whose original drawings for Basil of Baker Street were previously donated to the Children's Literature Research Collection (also at the University of Minnesota). Includes an illustration from the CLRC collection.

7. Olson, Kiki. "Murder on the seamy side of Atlantic City." St. Petersburg Times (Florida), June 5, 1994: 7D.

Brief review of Sherlock Holmes and the Maquerade Murders, by Frank Thomas, Otto Penzler Books, $21. 'When will writers follow the example of Arthur Conan Doyle and let Sherlock Holmes finally rest in peace and quit coming up with 'recently discovered memoirs' written by Dr. Watson? Just as the stories written by Conan Doyle after he 'resurrected' Holmes from the Reichenback cataract were never as crisp as his earlier works, books written in the style of Doyle (pardon, Watson) are generally tired, stale and stilted. Sherlock Holmes and the Masquerade Murders is just another example...."

8. Theaker, S. W. Professor Challenger in space. Birmingham: Silver Age, 2000.

18 cm. The monograph is a sequel to the events described in The Lost World, The Poison Belt and other stories of Professor Challenger by Arthur Conan Doyle.;

9. ———. Quiet, the tin can brains are hunting! Birmingham: Silver Age, 2001.

18 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2005.; "Mrs. Challenger is featured...with a brief appearance by the professor, and you can read both on-line at <www.silveragebooks.com> reprinted in Theaker's Quarterly Fiction (spring, summer, and autumn 2004). The stories are more fantasy than science-fiction."

10. Thoene, Jake, and Luke Thoene. The jewelled peacock of Persia. 1st ed, (The Baker Street mysteries). Nashville, Tenn: Moorings, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96002285; While investigating the dangerous and inexplicable occurrences surrounding an ancient jewelled artifact, Sherlock Holmes and his Baker Street Brigade find unexplained fires, falling masonry, and other sinister events

11. Thomson, June. The Case of the Scottish Tragedy. New York: Random House Audio Pub, 1998. Sound Recording 1 sound cassette (120 min.).

Read by Simon Jones; A new case for Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson solved by ingenuity and observation

12. ———. The secret chronicles of Sherlock Holmes. Large type ed. Bathe, Avon, England, Thorndike, Me., USA: Chivers Press. Thorndike Press, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94020458;

13. ———. The secret files of Sherlock Holmes. Large type ed. Bath, England, Hampton, N.H: Chivers Large Print. Curley Large Print, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94009306;

14. Travis, Aaron, Badboy (Firm), and Masquerade Books. Exposed: an anthology of erotic stories. 1st Badboy ed, (Badboy). New York: Badboy. Masquerade, 1993.

Contents: The adventure of the Ragged Youth (pp. 135-149) (w/ Holmes & Watson);

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Thomas, Donald (17)

1. "The Execution of Sherlock Holmes." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 7 (2007): 312-312.

The article reviews the book "The Execution of Sherlock Holmes," by Donald Thomas.

2. "The Execution of Sherlock Holmes and Other New Adventures of the Great Detective." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 11 (2007): 40-40.

The article reviews the book "The Execution of Sherlock Holmes and Other New Adventures of the Great Detective," by Donald Thomas.

3. "Forecasts: Fiction." Publishers Weekly 245, no. 18 (1998): 207.

Reviews the book 'The Secret Cases of Sherlock Holmes,' by Donald Thomas.

4. Conlon, John J. "The Execution of Sherlock Holmes." Magill Book Reviews, no. (2007): no page citation.

"Writing in the person of Dr. Watson, Donald Thomas carries on the great tradition of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by presenting five new cases featuring the world's most famous consulting detective, Sherlock Holmes. Sherlockians will revel in the level of accurate detail from the original stories while those who are not as familiar with the early cases will not be disadvantaged thanks to the clarity of Thomas's writing. The title case features the plot to destroy Holmes in which his would-be assassins appear to have thought of everything but Holmes's vast array of intellectual resources. Watson's earlier account of Holmes's death at Reichenbach Falls was erroneous: that four additional stories follow is a clue to this one's ending. 'The Case of the Greek Key' presents an ingenious exercise in code-breaking involving the British Admiralty, German spies, and Kaiser Wilhelm. 'The Case of the Peasenhall Murder' contains a seemingly impossible series of events and conflicting stories to untangle. 'The Case of the Phantom Parlor Maid' takes Holmes into the supernatural realm until he can reason out the problem, and 'The Queen of the Night' is a compelling tale of jewel thieves, duplicity, and the preparations for the coronation of Edward VII. In each of these cases Holmes and Watson live again exactly as they had in the writings of Conan Doyle but into a future Thomas, as a masterful story-teller, articulates splendidly. One could not hope for a better re-creation of the Baker Street duo."

5. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of the Crypt and Other Tales by Donald Thomas." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 5 (2003): 6.

6. ———. "Review--The Secret Cases of Sherlock Holmes by Donald Thomas." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 11.

7. Scott, Whitney. "Adult books: Fiction." Booklist 94, no. 19/20 (1998): 1735.

Reviews the book 'The Secret Cases of Sherlock Holmes,' by Donald Thomas.

8. ———. "The Execution of Sherlock Holmes." Booklist 103, no. 15 (2007): 33.

Reviews the book "The Execution of Sherlock Holmes," by Donald Thomas.

9. Thomas, Donald. Sherlock Holmes and the Ghosts of Bly And Other New Adventures of the Great Detective. New York: Pegasus Books, 2010.

10. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the King's Evil : and other new adventures of the great detective. 1st Pegasus trade paperback ed. New York: Pegasus Books, 2010.

21 cm. The case of the tell-tale hands -- The case of the king's evil -- The case of the Portuguese Sonnets -- The case of Peter the Painter -- The case of the Zimmerman telegram. Originally published: New York : Pegasus Books, 2009.; Five original tales inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's iconic character feature Holmes taking on such challenges as the famed siege of Sydney Street, a planned German invasion of America, and a supernatural curse.

11. Thomas, Donald Serrell. The secret cases of Sherlock Holmes. 1st Carroll & Graf ed. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1998.

24 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001; Seven mysteries featuring Sherlock Holmes in an international setting. In one, he seeks the blackmailer of an English prince, in another he clears the name of Captain Dreyfus of the French army. Contents: The ghost in the machine -- The case of the crown jewels -- The case of the unseen hand -- The case of the blood royal -- The case of the Camden Town murder -- The case of the missing rifleman -- The case of the Yokohama Club.

12. ———. The secret cases of Sherlock Holmes. Large type ed. Leicester: Ulverscroft, 1998.

22 cm. Originally published: London: Macmillan, 1997. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001.; The ghost in the machine -- The case of the crown jewels -- The case of the unseen hand -- The case of the blood royal -- The case of the Camden Town murder -- The case of the missing rifleman -- The case of the Yokohama Club.

13. ———. The secret cases of Sherlock Holmes. London: Macmillan, 1997.

22 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001; "A a collection of seven short stories that involve Holmes and Watson in mysteries in London, Dublin, Paris, and Yokohama."

14. ———. The secret cases of Sherlock Holmes. 1st Carroll & Graf pbk. ed. New York: Carroll & Graf, 1999.

21 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept. 2001.; Contents: The ghost in the machine -- The case of the crown jewels -- The case of the unseen hand -- The case of the blood royal -- The case of the Camden Town murder -- The case of the missing rifleman -- The case of the Yokohama Club.

15. ———. The secret cases of Sherlock Holmes. London: Pan, 1998.

18 cm. Originally published: London : Macmillan, 1997. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001.;

16. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the king's evil : and other new adventures of the great detective. New York: Pegasus Books, 2009.

24 cm. The case of the tell-tale hands -- The case of the King's evil -- The case of the Portuguese sonnets -- The case Peter the painter -- The case of the Zimmermann telegram.; Five original tales inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's iconic character feature Holmes taking on such challenges as the famed siege of Sydney Street, a planned German invasion of America, and a supernatual curse.

17. ———. Sherlock Holmes and the running noose. London: Macmillan, 2001.

22 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept. 2001.;

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Thomson, June (3)

1. Auswaks, Alex. "Crime Briefs." The Jerusalem Post, July 2, 1999: 12B.

Review of The Secret Documents of Sherlock Holmes by June Thomson. London, Allison & Busby. 233 pp. 5.99. "Avid readers of the Sherlock Holmes canon used to bemoan the fact that Dr. Watson frequently referred to cases which he said were still secret or he hadn't got round to reporting to the fans. Out of this came the numerous Sherlock Holmes pastiches, each of which is an attempt to guess what happened in that particular case. The very best of such pastiches is the work of June Thomson, who has recreated so accurately the world of Baker Street....I have a personal confession to make. I was never ever a Conan Doyle fan, but I love these pastiches."

2. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--'The Secret Journals of Sherlock Holmes' by June Thomson." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 110.

3. North, John. "Beyond the formula." The Toronto Star, August 19, 1995: J15.

Brief review. "...June Thomson has written excellent mystery novels and three collections of short stories whose central character is Sherlock Holmes, in the manner of the master, Conan Doyle. (Among crime fiction aficionados such stories are called pastiches.) Her latest book, Holmes And Watson, is that rare hybrid - the fictional biography. Thomson has winnowed the vast harvest of Holmesiana (both Conan Doyle's original material and the enormous output of critical and interpretive commentary) to produce a comprehensive account of the intertwined lives of detection's definitive duo...."

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Trow, M. J. (20)

1. Monfredo, Miriam Grace, and Sharan Newman. Crime through time. Berkley Prime Crime ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 1997.

LC Control Number: 97197215; Scuttlebutt Jul 1997. Contents: Death of a place-seeker / Lynda S. Robinson -- Archimedes' tomb / Steven Saylor -- Solomon's decision / Sharan Newman -- Murder at anchor / Edward Marston -- The hangman's apprentice / Leonard Tourney -- Suffer a witch / Miriam Grace Monfredo -- The lullaby cheat / Kate Ross -- Anything in the dark / Edward D. Hoch -- Bertie and the boat race / Peter Lovesey -- The high constable and the visiting author / Maan Meyers -- Look to the lady / Alanna Knight -- Mrs. Hudson's case / Laurie King -- Exit centre stage / M.J. Trow -- Decision of the umpire / Troy Soos -- Uncle Charlie's letters / Anne Perry -- Killing the critic / Gillian Linscott -- Portrait of the artist as a young corpse / Barbara Paul -- The Mamur Zapt and the Kodaker's eye / Michael Pearce -- Storm in a tea shoppe / Carola Dunn -- The enemy / Ken Kuhlken -- The soldier and his dead companion / Nicholas A. DiChario; "An anthology offering 21 new short stories, including Laurie R. King's 'Mrs. Hudson's Case' (with Mary Russell) and M. J. Trow's 'Exit Centre Stage' (with Inspector Sholto Lestrade)."

2. Trow, M. J. The adventures of Inspector Lestrade volume 1 in the Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, D.C: Regnery Publishing, Inc, 1998.

LC Control Number: 98011718;

3. ———. Brigade the further adventures of Lestrade, volume 2 in the Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, D.C: Regnery Publishing, Inc, 2000.

4. ———. Brigade: further adventures of Inspector Lestrade. Washington, DC: Regnery Pub, 1998.

A series of murders occur in 19th century England, all the victims having taken part in the famous charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean War. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard investigates.

5. ———. Lestrade and the brother of death, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, D.C: Regnery Pub, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99041316; "Recovering from a broken leg after his ignominious fall from the Titanic, Scotland Yard's Superintendent Lestrade goes to convalesce at the home of his betrothed, Fanny Berkely, and her father, Tom, Chief Constable of the county of Surrey." "It should have been a peaceful time - apart from Lestrade's lack of dexterity in steering his wheelchair - but an attempt on the life of his future father-in-law makes him realize that a policeman is never really off duty. What is even more puzzling is the arrival of a letter that simply reads "Four for the Gospel Makers" - and it isn't the first Lestrade has been sent.". "So begins one of Sholto Lestrade's most mystifying cases, a case that encompasses not only the present but the past. Lestrade walks dowm Memory Lane to the time when he was a young and very naive constable. He looks back on episodes in his career that never came to satisfactory conclusions and that hold other clues as to who the sender of the letters is - because whoever it is, is a cold-blooded killer."--Book jacket

6. ———. Lestrade and the dead man's hand volume 11 in the Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, D.C: Regnery Pub, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99059916;

7. ———. Lestrade and the devil's own volume XVI in the Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing, 2001.

LC Control Number: 00065311; ""Sholto Joseph Lestrade, I am arresting you on suspicion of the murder of Mrs. Millicent Millichip on January 13th last."" "Lestrade has never been arrested before. Nor, for that matter, has the old Scotland Yard detective been on death row. But when a woman dies in his arms on a foggy London day, the Fates are against him." "Millicent Millichip, it turns out, is not the only victim. She's just the first in a series of murders where the only clue is the Devil's calling card. And the Devil strikes in such diverse places as the croquet lawn at Castle Drogo, the theatre of war-games on Hounslow Heath, and the offices of Messrs Constable, publishers extraordinaire." "The condemned cell at Pentonville prison is a lonely place, even for a man with a loving family and friends. Some of those friends, working to save Lestrade from his execution, are rather powerful. But the questions is, are they powerful enough?"--Book jacket

8. ———. Lestrade and the devil's own volume XVI in the Lestrade mystery series. London: Constable, 1996.

""Sholto Joseph Lestrade, I am arresting you on suspicion of the murder of Mrs. Millicent Millichip on January 13th last."" "Lestrade has never been arrested before. Nor, for that matter, has the old Scotland Yard detective been on death row. But when a woman dies in his arms on a foggy London day, the Fates are against him." "Millicent Millichip, it turns out, is not the only victim. She's just the first in a series of murders where the only clue is the Devil's calling card. And the Devil strikes in such diverse places as the croquet lawn at Castle Drogo, the theatre of war-games on Hounslow Heath, and the offices of Messrs Constable, publishers extraordinaire." "The condemned cell at Pentonville prison is a lonely place, even for a man with a loving family and friends. Some of those friends, working to save Lestrade from his execution, are rather powerful. But the questions is, are they powerful enough?"--Book jacket

9. ———. Lestrade and the gift of the prince volume IX in the Lestrade mystery series, (A Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Pub, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99059357; "Murder is afoot among the footmen of Britain's Royal Household: a servant girl, Amy Macpherson, has been brutally slaughtered. And so Sholto Lestrade of Scotland Yard is once again on the trail of mystery. The intrepid investigator contends with the most baffling clues he has yet encountered. Worse still, everyone around him is convinced this is a case for the local police. But even when Lestrade is threatened by a fiendishly gruesome killer, he perseveres to get his man."--Book jacket

10. ———. Lestrade and the guardian angel, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, D.C: Regnery Pub, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99041315; "He is in his forty-third year and knee-deep in murder. Well, what's new? Sholto Lestrade of Scotland Yard wouldn't have it any other way." "The first fatality in a bizarre series of killings is a Captain of the Second Life Guards, found in the River Thames with a war medal wedged between his teeth. Then a dead Egyptologist is discovered with a scarab clamped between his molars. When a young soldier is found dead in the saddle (this time a locket is the dying mouthful), Lestrade is forced to impersonate a barrack-room lawyer." "His hunt for clues takes him on a near-fatal trip in a hot-air balloon, on a disastrous bicycle tour ending with a night in jail, and to London's East End, where he must prevent a confrontation between rival gangs."--Book jacket

11. ———. Lestrade and the hallowed house volume III in the Sholto Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing, Inc, 1999.

Britain has entered the twentieth century. Queen Victoria is dead and the Boer War rages on. Inspector Lestrade is called upon to investigate the brutal death of Ralph Childers, MP. It is but the first in a series of bizarre and perplexing murders that lead Lestrade around the country in the pursuit of his enquiries. The connection between the victims appears to be politics. Is someone trying to destroy the Government? It would seem so, particularly when a bomb is found in the Palace of Westminster. But who is responsible? The Fenians? Or have the Suffragettes decided upon a more drastic course of action to further their cause? During his investigations Lestrade encounters some old and some new faces. Amongst the new ones are the brother and cousin of the late Sherlock Holmes who died eleven years ago at the Reichenbach Falls. But is Holmes really dead? Dr. Watson doesn't think so. Someone wants to keep Holmes alive and Lestrade is forced to 'tread the boards' (playing himself) to discover the truth. And, as if things aren't serious enough, the King is kidnapped just before his coronation

12. ———. Lestrade and the kiss of Horus. London: Constable, 1995.

13. ———. Lestrade and the kiss of Horus: volume XV in the Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing, 2001.

LC Control Number: 00066497; ""And death shall come on soft wings to him that touches the tomb of the Pharaoh..." Archaeologist Howard Carter has made the discovery of the century in Egypt's Valley of the Kings - the tomb of King Tut. But all around him men are dying: Lord Carnavon, careless with his razor, falls prey to a mosquito bite; Alan le Clerk leaves the tomb in a hurry to die alone in the desert; Aaron G. String, the railroad magnate, blows his brains out just yards from the tomb's entrance." "And so it is that retired Chief Superintendent Sholto Lestrade is summoned back to duty. Lestrade flies to Egypt to solve a riddle every bit as impenetrable as that of the Sphinx. People remark on the funny geezer, in his bowler and Donegal coat, battling against sand, Egyptians in revolt, and the Curse of the Pharaohs..." "But can he avoid the Kiss of Horus?"--Book jacket

14. ———. Lestrade and the Leviathan volume IV in the Sholto Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, D.C: Regnery Publishing, Inc, 1999.

The year is 1910, and Superintendent Sholto Lestrade's lot is not a happy one. He has a number of vicious murders to solve, including those of a man hanged in a church bell tower, a cross-Channel swimmer, and his old sparring partner, Dr. Watson. Meanwhile, anarchists are threatening the peace of Europe, the whole of Scotland Yard is looking for "Peter the Painter," and a bloodthirsty cabbie lies in wait for the Assistant Commissioner. To top it all off, Lestrade gets roped into helping with the coronation of King George V. Lestrade is never frazzled, however, as he guides the Yard in unraveling these baffling mysteries

15. ———. Lestrade and the magpie: volume X in the Lestrade mystery series, (Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing, Inc, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99059915;

16. ———. Lestrade and the mirror of murder, (A Gateway mystery; Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Pub, 2001.

21 cm.;

17. ———. Lestrade and the mirror of murder. London: Constable, 1993.

23 cm.;

18. ———. Lestrade and the Ripper, (Gateway mystery: Sholto Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Pub, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99015926; "The year is 1888, and Jack the Ripper terrorizes London. All of the brutal killer's victims are discovered in the same district, Whitechapel, and all are prostitutes. But theirs aren't the only murders to perplex the brains of Scotland Yard. In Brighton, the body of one Edmund Gurney is also found dead."--Book jacket. "Foremost amongst the Yard's top men is the young Inspector Sholto Lestrade. It is to his lot that the unsolved cases of a deceased colleague fall - cases that include the murder of Martha Tabram, formerly a prostitute from Whitechapel, and that of Gurney."--Book jacket. "Leaving no stone unturned, Lestrade investigates with his customary expertise and follows the trail to the public school Rhadegund Hall. What he finds is murder."--Book jacket. "As the Whitechapel murders increase in number, so do those at Rhadegund Hall. What is the connection between them all? As if it weren't confusing enough, Lestrade is hampered by the parallel investigations of the great detective, Sherlock Holmes, aided by Dr. Watson. Who is the murderer of Rhadegund Hall, and are he and the man they call "Jack the Ripper" one and the same?"--Book jacket

19. ———. Lestrade and the sawdust ring volume 13 in the Lestrade mystery series, (A Gateway mystery: Lestrade mystery series). Washington, D.C: Regnery Publishing, 2000.

LC Control Number: 00059083; "Walk Up! Walk Up! Right this way for the greatest show on earth. It is 1879, and the young Detective-Sergeant Sholto Lestrade has his work cut out for him as he investigates mysterious going-on at "Lord" George Sanger's Circus. First, the best juggler in Europe is shot in full view of a thousand people. Then Huge Hughie the dwarf dies an agonizing death under the Ether Trick. Finally, the Great Bolus dies by swallowing the wrong sword. And all of this comes after two bodies are found with multiple slashes." "What is the link with Mr. Howard Vincent, founder of the Criminal Investigative Division? And has this anything to do with Disraeli, the latest occupant at Number Ten Downing Street?"--Book jacket

20. ———. Lestrade und Jack the Ripper: Rowohlt, 1993.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- V (3)

1. Barrett, Mike. "Review -- 'The Seventh Bullet' by Daniel D. Victor." The Musgrave Papers, no. 7 (1994): 121-122.

2. Leeper, Evelyn C. "Book Review--'The Seventh Bullet' by Daniel D. Victor." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 71 (1992): 44.

3. Victor, Daniel D. The Seventh Bullet, (The further adventures of Sherlock Holmes). London: Titan, 2010.

21 cm.; Sherlock Holmes' desire for a peaceful life in the Sussex countryside is dashed when true-life muckraker and author David Graham Phillips is assassinated, leaving behind little clues as to why he was murdered. The pleas of his sister draws Holmes and Watson to the far side of the Atlantic, where a web of deceit, violence and intrigue unravels as they embark on one of their most challenging cases.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Vanneman, Alan (3)

1. "Fall 2003 Hardcovers." Publishers Weekly 250, no. 32 (2003): 144.

Presents a listing of hardcover books published in the U.S. in fall 2003 including Carroll & Graf, Sherlock Holmes and the Hapsburg Tiara (Feb., $25) by Alan Vanneman. "Winston Churchill calls in Holmes and Watson, charging that Archduke Josef of Austria is an imposter."

2. Connors, Theresa. "Sherlock Holmes and the Hapsburg Tiara." Library Journal 130, no. 4 (2005): 125.

Reviews the audiobook "Sherlock Holmes and the Hapsburg Tiara," by Alan Vanneman.

3. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes and the Giant Rat of Sumatra by Alan Vanneman." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 1 (2002): 4.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- W (12)

1. Freeman, Judith. "Review -- The Science of Sherlock Holmes From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear: the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases by E. J. Wagner." The Serpentine Muse 22, no. 3 (2006): 20.

2. Greenfield, Daniel P. "The Science of Sherlock Holmes. From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases." Journal of Psychiatry & Law 36, no. 1 (2008): 117-120.

Review of the book. "The reader of this Journal who is interested in the history of science--forensic science, in this case--as well as in Sherlock Holmes--will find this book both informative and entertaining...."

3. Hall, John. "Review--'Dr. Mortimer and the Aldgate Mystery' by Gerard Williams." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 58-60.

4. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Dr. Mortimer & the Aldgate Mystery by Gerald Williams." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 20.

5. Hunter-Purvis, Mark. "Review--'The Singular Case of the Duplicate Holmes' by Jan Walker." The Ritual, no. 14 (1994): 60.

6. Roden, Barbara. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes: Travels in the Canadian West' by Ronald C. Weyman." The Ritual, no. 18 (1996): 65.

7. Waugh, Charles G., and Martin Harry Greenberg. Sci-fi private eye. New York: Penguin Group, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Feb 1997. The singing bell / Isaac Asimov -- The Martian crown jewels / Poul Anderson -- A scarletin study / Philip José Farmer -- The winner / Donald Westlake -- The Detweiler boy / Tom Reamy -- Time exposures / Wilson Tucker -- Getting across / Robert Silverberg -- War game / Philip K. Dick -- ARM / Larry Niven.;

8. Wheeler, Tom. The Arcanum. New York: Bantam Books, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2003063571; "In screenwriter Wheeler's cinematic debut novel, an occult thriller set in New York City in 1919, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his fellow members of a secret society known as the Arcanum--including magician Harry Houdini and voodoo priestess Marie Laveau--investigate a gruesome murder, rescue horror writer H.P. Lovecraft from jail, consult evil mystic Aleister Crowley, learn the truth behind the ancient Book of Enoch, try to solve the mystery of a tribe of lost angels and otherwise save the world. All the supernatural shenanigans, however, can't disguise that these characters, with their contemporary sensibilities, are crude caricatures of their real-life originals. Lovecraft, for example, is reduced to a perverse boyish demonologist, while Laveau is a sexpot who speaks in a Caribbean patois: "So, how we s'posed to get him outta that jail?" Each vividly written chapter is so obviously a film scene that credit should be given for art direction. The author uses nearly every landmark available in 1919 New York for a setting, but a wealth of well-researched period detail is no substitute for a true feeling for an era's zeitgeist."

9. Williams, Gerard. Dr Mortimer and the barking man mystery. London: Constable, 2001.

23 cm.; "His second pastiche starring Dr. Mortimer."

10. ———. Dr. Mortimer and the barking man mystery. 1st Carroll & Graf ed. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2001.

23 cm. Scuttlebutt Feb 2001.; "His second pastiche starring Dr. Mortimer."

11. Winges, Stefan. Der vierte König - ein Fall für Sherlock Holmes, (Historischer Kriminalroman). Köln: Emons, 2000.

21 cm. Scuttlebutt Dec 2000.; "Holmes is called in to unravel the theft of the relics of the Biblical magi from Cologne Cathedral."

12. Wodehouse, P. G. 1881-1975. (Pelham Grenville). Tales of Wrykyn and elsewhere :. Maidenhead: Porpoise Books, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Feb 1998. With illustrations by T.M.R. Whitwell.; "Offers 25 stories published in British magazines from 1901 to 1910, more than half of them reprinted for the first time. They are 'school stories' (published in boys' magazines), and they're great fun, and two of them are Sherlockian parodies featuring Burdock Rose and Wotsing; another story ('Pillington Detective') has nice Sherlockian echoes. And in other stories Wodehouse's characters show that they have read 'The White Company' and 'Rodney Stone'.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Waddell, Thomas G. (17)

1. "News & Announcements." Journal of chemical education 84, no. 4 (2007): 593-595.

The article offers news briefs related to chemistry in the U.S. A compendium of 15 stories by Thomas G. Waddell and Thomas R. Rybolt titled "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" has been translated into French by Paul Depovere. The American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of the History of Chemistry (HIST) has been soliciting nomination for its award, Citation for Chemical Breakthroughs. The Department of Chemistry at the University of Michigan is commemorating its 150th anniversary.

2. Rybolt, Thomas R., and Thomas G. Waddell. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes." Journal of chemical education 72, no. 12 (1995): 1090.

Describes a chemical mystery with an emphasis on scientific observation and the criminal use of chemistry. Presentation of a problem in the form and context of the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson; Problem of Woolthshrap prison concerning an alleged conspiracy that enabled one of the prisoners to communicate with the outside world; Solution to the mystery.

3. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the case of three." Journal of chemical education 79, no. 4 (2002): 448-453.

A scientific problem involving simple physical and chemical properties of metals is presented in mystery format in the context of the popular characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.

4. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the death puzzle at 221B Baker Street." Journal of chemical education 76, no. 4 (1999): 489-493.

A chemical mystery story featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes is presented. The mystery is focused on medicinal chemistry and qualitative analysis and revolves around lead poisoning caused by a ceramic teapot.

5. ———. "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Problem of Woolthsharp Prison." Journal of chemical education, no. (1996): 1090.

A chemical mystery story featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes is presented.

6. Waddell, Thomas G., and Thomas R. Rybolt. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes." Journal of chemical education 71, no. 12 (1994): 1049.

Presents a story describing a chemical mystery with an emphasis on physical properties and balancing reaction equations.

7. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: a Christmas story." Journal of chemical education 68, no. (1991): 1023-1024.

8. ———. "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Autopsy in Blue." Journal of chemical education 81, no. 4 (2004): 497-501.

A chemical problem is presented in the form of a mystery involving the fictional characters Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson. The mystery emphasizes qualitative inorganic analysis, forensic chemistry, and medicinal substances.

9. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Baker Street Burning." Journal of chemical education 75, no. 4 (1998): 484.

Presents a short story on chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes, relative to chemistry and qualitative organic analysis.

10. ———. "The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Blackwater Escape." Journal of chemical education 80, no. 4 (2003): 401-406.

A chemical mystery with an emphasis on qualitative inorganic analysis, laboratory observations, and oxidation-reduction processes is presented. In the hypothetical scenario, Sherlock Holmes solves the mystery of how a criminal was able to dissolve an iron bar and escape from his cell.

11. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the case of the screaming stepfather." Journal of chemical education 69, no. (1992): 999-1001.

12. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the case of the stoichiometric solution." Journal of chemical education 70, no. (1993): 1003-1005.

A scientific problem emphasizing the use of stoichiometry calculations is presented in the form of a mystery story involving the well-known characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. A break in the story allows students and teachers to contemplate and solve the chemical mystery. This is followed by the Sherlock Holmes' solution.

13. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the ghost of Gordon Square." Journal of chemical education 77, no. 4 (2000): 471-474.

A chemical problem in mystery format in the context of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson is presented. Holmes demonstrates that the activities of a "ghost" are actually the work of a disgruntled employee playing chemical tricks.

14. ———. "The chemical adventures of Sherlock Holmes: the shroud of Spartacus." Journal of chemical education 78, no. 4 (2001): 470-474.

Part of a series of articles in which a scientific problem is presented in mystery format in the context of the popular and beloved characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson. The mystery centers on a blood protein test, qualitative analysis, and the properties of biological substances.

15. ———. "Sherlock Holmes and the fraudulent ketone." Journal of chemical education 67, no. (1990): 1006-1008.

16. ———. "Sherlock Holmes and the Nebulous Nitro." Journal of chemical education 73, no. 12 (1996): 1157.

Another in a series of chemical adventures featuring Holmes.

17. ———. "Sherlock Holmes and the yellow prisms." Journal of chemical education 66, no. (1989): 981-982.

11F Parodies, Pastiches, Burlesques, Travesties and Satires -- Other Stories -- Z (1)

1. Zelazny, Roger. A night in the lonesome October. New York: William Morrow and Co, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93018414; "After years of unprepossessing folderol--the wearisome Nine Princes in Amber retreads are depressingly typical--Zelazny bursts forth with, well, 'Victorian light supernatural fantasy' just about covers it. Narrator Snuff, a guard dog who performs complex thaumaturgical calculations in his head, has many duties: to keep various Things firmly trapped in mirrors, wardrobes, and steamer trunks; to accompany his master, Jack--he of the magical blade--on weird collecting expeditions into the graveyards and slums of Victorian London; and--for a single hour each night--discuss the day's goings-on in human speech. Snuff's neighbors include: Jill the witch and her familiar, Graymalk the cat, with whom Snuff forms a friendly alliance; Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Frankenstein, Dracula, a werewolf, and a satanic vicar. The witches, detectives, doctors, vampires, etc., along with their equally industrious familiars, trade information and scheme for advantage as the full moon of Halloween approaches; at that time, a magical showdown to decide the fate of the Earth will occur. Some of the characters are 'openers,' determined to open a magical doorway allowing the Old Gods to reoccupy the Earth; others are 'closers,' equally resolved to keep the magical door nailed shut; and a few are involved yet stand outside the Game altogether. Snuff's problem is to discover who is which. Sparkling, witty, delightful: Zelazny's best for ages, perhaps his best ever."



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson

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