05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (282)

1. "100 Years Ago: "The Press....is a most valuable institution"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reprint of a letter written by Doyle to The Times, October 20, 1897 from Morley's Hotel, Trafalgar Square, London, WC

2. "100 Years Ago: "To Ada, from her old friend Arthur Conan Doyle, Jan. 18, '97"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses a photograph taken of Doyle in New York, during his 1894 tour of the United States and Canada and the mysteries associated with the inscription on the back of the photograph. Includes a reproduction of the photograph and inscription.

3. "100 Years Ago: Ada and the Napoleon of Photography." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A follow-up article on the mysteries presented in an inscription on the back side of a photograph taken of Doyle in New York. The photographer is identified as Napoleon Sarony, known for his photographs of celebrities in the late 19th century. The identity of the "Ada" of the inscription is still unknown, Ada Waller and Ada Pasby being the most likely candidates.

4. Abbreviated Bibliographic Check List of A. Conan Doyle. Canterbury, Kent: Tiger Books, 1993.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The information is restricted to first appearances of his articles and stories in magazines and newspapers and to the first editions of his books, and relies to a great extent on the Green/Gibson bibliography. The checklist is certainly much handier for the collector to carry along to bookshops than the more detailed bibliography, but has one serious defect: there is no index, and magazines are reported chronologically according to the first appearances of Conan Doyle item, so anyone finding a run of Pearson's, for example, will locate the check list of ACD's contributions to the magazine only by searching a three-page table of contents."

5. About a hundred years. East Barnet, Hertfordshire: Symposium, 1997. Sound Recording (CD) 1 sound disc (79 min., 40 sec.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. A history of sound recording, illustrated by vocal, instrumental, and spoken word recordings and examples of various recording devices. Compact disc. Program notes ([18] p. ; 12 cm.) on container insert. Recorded 1889-1943. //

6. "Books Received." SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 43, no. 4 (2003): 998-1017.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes reference to Doyle. Wynne, Catherine. The Colonial Conan Doyle: British Imperialism, Irish Nationalism, and the Gothic. Contributions to the Study of World Literature 114. Westport CT and London: Greenwood Press, 2002. Pp. ix + 212. $61.95. ISBN 0-313-32005-5.

7. "Books Received." SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 41, no. 4 (2001): 880-898.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes reference to Doyle. Barsham, Diana. Arthur Conan Doyle and the Meaning of Masculinity. The Nineteenth Century. Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2000. Pp. viii + 312. $84.95. ISBN 1-85928-264-4.

8. "The Case of Doyle's Lost Works is Finally Solved." Birmingham Post, March 17, 2004: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A lost hoard of personal papers belonging to Sherlock Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has been discovered in the offices of a legal firm in London. The collection of 3,000 items, which went missing 40 years ago during a legal dispute over his estate, includes personal letters, notes and hand-written manuscripts -80 per cent of which have never been published. The collection will go on display in May before being auctioned by Christie's for an estimated pounds 2 million...."

9. "A Chat With Conan Doyle." The Ritual, no. 18 (1996): 51-59.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. "Conan the Librarian." New Zealand Archivists 15, no. 2 (2004): 17-18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article presents information on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle a writer. A fascinating account of the story of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's personal archives is related in the Weekend Australian Magazine for 17-18 April 2004. The author, Philip Norman, recounts how the whereabouts of Conan Doyle's papers had been a mystery, but that the papers had now come to light and were to be auctioned on 19 May 2004 at Christie's in London.

11. "Did Conan Doyle play Dr Watson, on the case with a real Sherlock Holmes?". Daily Mail (London), January 3, 2000: 27.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Shortly before the black flag above the jail let the crowds swarming over Calton Hill know justice had been done, the condemned man made a remarkable request. Turning to Dr Henry Littlejohn, Edinburgh's chief medical officer who had come to witness the hanging, wife murderer Eugene Chantrelle said coolly: 'Give my compliments to Joe Bell. He did a good job in bringing me to the scaffold.' In 1878 the remark was widely reported, yet it remains a mystery. Joseph Bell was an eminent Victorian surgeon at Edinburgh's Royal Infirmary, who would amuse medical students by deducing the occupation of his patients from small clues in their appearance. This habit would later inspire a certain student called Arthur Conan Doyle to create the world's most famous detective in Sherlock Holmes. But could there have been more to it than that? Chantrelle's remark suggests Bell solved the murder, not those who took credit at the trial for proving the womanising alcoholic had disposed of his wife with a large dose of opium. If Bell was a real-life Sherlock Holmes, solving crimes that baffled the police, who was the real Doctor Watson who assisted in his secret detective work? The creator of a new BBC drama claims the model for Watson was Doyle himself, and that he and Bell were actively involved in solving crimes. In uncovering the evidence, screen writer David Pirie had to wrestle with mysteries that would have taxed even Holmes. Bell and Doyle were very private men and would in any case have been sworn to secrecy if they did special detective work for the Crown Office...."

12. Discovering cinema. [Los Angeles]: Flicker Alley, 2007. Visual Material 2 videodiscs (104 min).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. with b&w sequences; 4 3/4 in. DVD, all regions; Dolby digital stereo. Special feature titles & production dates from disc menus, durations from program notes. Originally produced separately for French television as: Premiers pas du cinema : á la recherche du son & Premiers pas du cinema : un rêve en couleur. Special features (ca. 174 min.): unique or historically-significant short films & film excerpts. Program notes include further discussion of the special features. Participants: Interviewees on Learning to talk: Julien Anton, Paolo Cherchi Usai, Maurice Gianati, Stephen Herbert. Interviewees on Movies dream in color: Paolo Cherchi Usai, Gian Luca Farinelli, Maurice Gianati, Stephen Herbert, Anthony L'Abbate, Dominique Paini. // Learning to talk: A historical survey of the development of sound in motion pictures. Movies dream in color: A historical survey of the development of color in motion pictures.

13. "English-Language Literatures." Reference & Research Book News 22, no. 2 (2007): 253-260.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A list of items related to English language literatures that were published in several journals is presented. Includes some articles with reference to Doyle and Holmes including: The narcissism of empire; loss, rage, and revenge in Thomas De Quincey, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, and Isak Dinesen. Simmons, Diane. Sussex Academic Press, ©2007 148 p., $57.50. "The five Victorian writers were instrumental in popularizing the imperial agenda of power and dominance, says Simmons (English, City U. of New York-Manhattan Community College), but were themselves deeply scarred, and as adults bolstered their fragile emotional states through fantasies of empire. She looks not only as the youthful experiences of the writers themselves, but also at child rearing attitudes during the British imperial period. Distributed in the US by ISBS." Modernist literature; challenging fictions. Mahaffey, Vicki. Blackwell Publishing, ©2007 242 p. $74.95 "Mahaffey (modern literature, U. of York) dares reader's to think of modern fiction not only as challenging to read but as a challenge to the fictions by which they live. She confronts a range of authors, from Doyle to Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, Djuna Barnes, Wilde and Rhys to explore modern occupations in partnering, whether as Holmes and Watson, author and reader, lover and loved, or husband and wife, in opacity and the uncontrollable urge to block understanding, and in those dark reaches within the reader's soul that are in fact the most opaque features of all. Combining commentary on literary works with that on art, gender, and society's restless for meaning after the decline of the need to be understood, Mahaffey provides a far-seeking and challenging read for those who nevertheless must be further challenged by the work in hand." Heidegger's bicycle; interfering with Victorian texts. Ebbatson, Roger. (Critical inventions) Sussex Academic Press, ©2006 172 p. $67.50 "Ebbatson (Loughborough U.) juxtaposes German philosopher Heidegger's notion of existence as a practical investment in the world that allows things to show up--among them a bicycle too rickety to ride--with the murder of a cycling German teacher named Herr Heidegger in the Sherlock Holmes canon. In each, he argues, the echo or mask is broken or cut adrift so that, for example, Holmes' forensic skill on an English moorside foreshadows the evil of the Final Solution so beloved by Heidegger a half century later. Distributed in the US by ISBS."

14. "Expensive, My Dear Watson. Sherlock Holmes Fans Gathered at an Auction in London." The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 25, 1995: E06.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A private collector from Chicago paid $33,000 yesterday for the 1887 edition of an annual Christmas publication that printed the first Sherlock Holmes story. The story, 'A Study in Scarlet,' was written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1886 when he was a physician making little or no money. The publishers of Beeton's Christmas Annual paid $40 for the copyright after it was rejected by several other houses. The book was part of a collection of memorabilia relating to the world-famous fictional detective. The collection was amassed by Stanley MacKenzie, who died this year aged 82. It fetched a total of $235,600, a representative of the Sotheby's auction house said...."

15. "Global Reach." American Libraries 36, no. 3 (2005): 22-22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents updates on libraries as of March 2005. Under the entry for Scotland, notes "Thanks in part to a GBP7.7-million ($33.2 million) grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund, the National Library in Edinburgh has purchased the literary archives of the John Murray publishing house, founded in London in 1768. Hailed as the most historically significant literary archive to become available in the past 100 years, the collection contains some 150,000 letters by such authors as Lord Byron. Charles Darwin, Jane Austen. Benjamin Disraeli, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Edith Wharton."

16. "Global Reach." American Libraries 35, no. 8 (2004): 23-23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents world news briefs on libraries as of September 2004. "What may be the world's largest collection of Arthur Conan Doyle memorabilia was donated August 6 to the Portsmouth Library' by the estate of writer Richard Lancelyn Green. The collection includes a full-size recreation of Sherlock Holmes's Baker Street study, and first editions of all Conan Doyle's works."

17. "A Man of Many Mysteries." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 09/20/, 2000: A24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on the accusations of writer Rodger Garrick-Steele that novelist Sir Arthur Conan Doyle stole the idea for the 1901 Sherlock Holmes novel 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' from his friend Bertram Fletcher Robinson. Reaction from the Sherlock Holmes Society.

18. "Milngavie to Nowhere." The Herald (Glasgow), July 31, 2007: 10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The good burghers of Milngavie, to the north-west of Glasgow, were given a glimpse of the future in July 1930, when George Bennie unveiled a full-size working prototype of his innovative Railplane....Bennie's prototype, which was built above a railway sidings on the London and North-Eastern Railway Company line at Kilmardinny, ran for around a quarter of a mile. The overhead monorail track was constructed by The Teeside Bridge and Engineering Works, and the aluminium-sheathed carriage was built by William Beardmore of Dalmuir....In the same month that the Bennie Railplane entered public life, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson, exited. Sir Arthur, who was born in Edinburgh in 1859, died at his home near Crowborough, Sussex, on July 7, 1930. Doyle, who trained as a doctor at Edinburgh University, worked as a ship's surgeon before beginning general practice in Portsmouth, where he began writing the Sherlock Holmes stories. The first of these, A Study in Scarlet, brought the impecunious young medic L20. The Herald's obituary, published on July 8, 1930, summed up his career as a writer: 'None of Conan Doyle's work was literature of the first class, and he was never taken very seriously by the critics; but in Sherlock Holmes he created a genuine character and produced a genuine atmosphere.'"

19. "Modern Fiction Studies Biannual Index: Volumes 48 (2002) and 49 (2003)." MFS Modern Fiction Studies 50, no. 2 (2004): 542-549.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a reference to Doyle. Huh, Jinny. "Whispers of Norbury: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Modernist Crisis of Racial (Un)Detection." 49.3: 550-80.

20. "Mystery of Sherlock Holmes' missing papers." The Irish Times, March 20, 2004: 20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Forty years after their disappearance, the lost personal papers of the author of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, have been found in London. They will be put up for auction by Christie's in May of this year and are sure to generate interest from his fans worldwide. They are expected to make about (pounds) 2 million. The collection consists of the contents of Sir Arthur's writing desk at the time of his death, personal letters to his family, handwritten manuscripts (the bulk of which were never published) and various memorabilia relating to his life. The collection, which was lost in a lawyer's office in London, caused great excitement in Christie's Books and Manuscripts Department when it had the job of opening the dozen or so cardboard boxes which contained it. Many of these papers were listed in the 1949 biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by Dickson Carr but they were lost fairly soon afterwards and as a result, have been unavailable to contemporary researchers...."

21. "A new home for Sherlock Holmes." Daily Mail (London), August 6, 2004: 19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle memorabilia, including a hint of how Sherlock Holmes got his name, is moving. Writer Richard Lancelyn Green, who died in March, has left the 20,000 items, worth more than Pounds 2million, to Portsmouth library...."

22. "Newsbrief: Sherlock's home." The Independent (London), May 19, 1994: no page citation.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A plaque commemorating the creator of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is to be unveiled this month by his daughter, Lady Bromet, at 2 Upper Wimpole Street, where her father wrote several books, including `A Scandal in Bohemia' and `The Red Headed League'."

23. "On the literary front." TLS, no. (2005): 12-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents commentary on the role of leading British writers in the war of words and ideas that coincided with the First World War. How unpublished files in the National Archives provide insight into the careers of Arnold Bennett, John Buchan, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling and H.G. Wells; Examples of the writings.

24. "Papers of Sherlock Holmes creator sell for half of what auction house expected." National Post (Canada), May 20, 2004: A15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A collection of long-lost papers giving a rare glimpse into the private life of Sherlock Holmes' creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was sold at auction in London for almost (ps)1-million ($2.3- million) yesterday, about half of what had been estimated. The 3,000 letters, notes and manuscripts fetched (ps)948,546, auction house Christie's said....The auction has ignited a furor among politicians and Holmes enthusiasts, with some saying the collection should have been bequeathed to the nation rather than sold off piecemeal. It took place against the backdrop of the bizarre death of a leading Holmes expert...."

25. "Reviews." Contemporary Review 272, no. 1584 (1998): 52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews several books. Includes reference to Doyle in British Literary Culture and Publishing Practice 1880-1914 by Peter D. McDonald. (Cambridge University Press. GBP37.50/US$59.95. ISBN 0-521-57149-9.) "This volume is part of the 'Cambridge Studies in Publishing and Printing History' and tackles the period which saw the collapse of mid-Victorian publishing (serialisation, part issues and subscription libraries) and the emergence of a style of publishing largely still with us. To tell his story the author first describes the 'literary field in the 1890s' and then concentrates, in three chapters, on three writers: Joseph Conrad, Arnold Bennett and Arthur Conan Doyle...."

26. "Save those love letters!". Writer 117, no. 11 (2004): 10-10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents information on personal papers and love letters owned by writers that were sold at several auctions. Love letter from James Joyce to his wife; Collection of personal papers of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; Family photo album belonging to A. A. Milne.

27. Sherlock Holmes collection. Narberth, PA: Alpha Video Distributors, Inc., 2002. Visual Material 5 videodiscs (272 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in. DVD. Films originally produced, 1943-1946. "ALP0901D." Participants: Basil Rathbone, Nigel Bruce. Director, Roy William Neill. // A DVD release of four Sherlock Holmes films from the 1940's, and a 1927 video of Arthur Conan Doyle talking about Sherlock Holmes and Doyle's psychic experiences.

28. "Sherlock Holmes Creator Helps Unlock Home Rule Mystery." Belfast News Letter (Northern Ireland), May 21, 2004: 20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Personal papers belonging to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle have given an insight into his views on Home Rule for Ireland. The letters, notes and manuscripts went under the hammer this week at Christie's, fetching pounds 1m. Doyle - famous as the creator of the world's most famous detective, Sherlock Holmes - stood twice for Parliament as a Unionist, the Conservative Party having changed its name after the first Home Rule Bill, endorsing tariff reform and supporting one parliament for the UK. By 1912, the year of the Ulster Covenant, he had a change of heart...."

29. Short story criticism: excerpts from criticism of the works of short fiction writers. Vol. 12. Detroit, Mich: Gale Research Co, 1988.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 88641014 //

30. "Speakers' Corner." British Heritage 24, no. 7 (2003): 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents letters to the editor published in December 2003 issue of the journal "British Heritage." In some aspects, the few particulars mentioned above do indeed seem to describe Craigmillar Castle, located just south-east of central Edinburgh, Scotland. Reference to Doyle and Holmes. "Memories can be imprecise, and perhaps the name that Ms Murray recalls from her days in the service was not that of the building, but of the local residential development of Cragmillar that took its name from the castle. The neighborhood dates from the 1920s and it could be that a local boarding school was indeed commandeered, as were so many public buildings, for use by the military. In fact, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of the Sherlock Holmes stories, attended a boarding school in the general vicinity and the Craigmillar Park Association is currently engaged in efforts to help save from demolition the nearby house in which he also lived."

31. The spoken word. historic recordings of writers born in the 19th century / Writers. London: British Library, 2003. Sound Recording 1 sound disc.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- National Sound Archive. digital ; 4 3/4 in. "Historic recordings from the British Library Sound Archive"--Container. Compact disc. // "This CD offers a survey of the earliest generation of English-language writers whose voices have survived for posterity. The writers selected for inclusion were all born before 1900 and are arranged here in the chronological order of their births"--Container insert. Contents: Bernard Shaw -- Arthur Conan Doyle -- Rudyard Kipling -- H.G. Wells -- Max Beerbohm -- G.K. Chesterton -- W. Somerset Maugham -- Edgar Wallace -- John Buchan -- Harley Granville Barker -- E.M. Forster -- P.G. Wodehouse -- Virginia Woolf -- James Joyce -- Compton Mackenzie -- Hugh Walpole -- Agatha Christie -- Vita Sackville-West -- J.R.R. Tolkien -- Rebecca West -- Aldous Huxley-- J.B. Priestley -- Noël Coward.

32. "A tangled skein." Economist 371, no. 8376 (2004): 77-78.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The author reports on a controversial auction of private papers of author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle at Christie's in London this week. The long unseen collection shows that Conan Doyle was not only one of the most popular writers of the 20th century--he has still outsold J.K. Rowling and J.R.R. Tolkien put together--but a public figure who took an active interest in politics and war, championed many private causes and gave GBP250,000 (millions in today's money) to further the interests of spiritualism. Befittingly, the auction has not been without controversy, not least thanks to the mysterious death of Richard Lancelyn Green, a former chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, who was found garrotted in his locked bedroom in March. There was not enough evidence for the coroner to rule it was suicide, but enough for believers in the" Conan Doyle curse" to suspect foul play worthy of Holmes's attention. Lancelyn Green believed that some of the papers in the auction had rightfully been left to the British Library, and he told the Times newspaper that he had written to Christie's asking them not to go ahead with the sale, which Christie's denies. Would-be Conan Doyle biographers, as well as the British Library, have expressed disappointment that the material in the auction has now been dispersed.

33. Thru the pages ... [Week in history]. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba, 1994. Visual Material 20 videocassettes (570:09 min.) ; 1/2 in.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Faculty of Arts.; Film Studies Program. "A week in history", as seen through the University of Manitoba, Elizabeth Dafoe Library Archival holdings./ The body of the programs consists of Dr. Bennett, University of Manitoba Archives, scanning the pages of the newspapers from the week that is being featured. Dr. Bennett reads and introduces various items from international and local news, social news and classified ads. The Narration is continued by students from the Film Studies Program at the University. // These programs depict historical and cultural events in Manitoba, Canada and the world from a Manitoba point of view. The programs also recognize and acknowledge the unique and essential role played by the Archives & Special Collections Department of the Libraries of the University of Manitoba.

34. "Travel: Grand Tour; Holmes falls for Moriarty (literally)." Independent on Sunday (London), May 5, 2002: 24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Great writers and their adventures in Literature. This week, Arthur Conan Doyle kills off his hero....Arthur Conan Doyle, below, later resurrected his most famous character after protests from fans. Includes a brief biographical sketch of Doyle, an excerpt from "The Final Problem" and tourist information on London and tours to Switzerland.

35. "Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle." Victorian Studies 47, no. 4 (2005): 609-611.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of book by Lawrence Frank, with remark "Applying methods of close reading to both scientific and literary texts, Frank argues that Edgar Allen Poe, Charles Dickens, and Arthur Conan Doyle 'promoted a new, emerging worldview that was secular and naturalistic.'"

36. "Victorian Studies: Index to Volume 44 (2001-2002)." Victorian Studies 44, no. 4 (2003): 743-753.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes two references to Doyle. Sussman, Herbert. Review: Barsharn, Arthur Conan Doyle and the Meaning of Masculinity; Barsharn, Diana, Arthur Conan Doyle and the Meaning of Masculinity, 536-39.

37. War without end. [Alexandria, Va.]: PBS Home Video, 1996. Visual Material 1 videocassette (58 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 1/2 in. The Great War and the shaping of the 20th century ; episode 8. VHS format. Originally presented as an episode of the television mini-series The Great War and the shaping of the 20th century. "A KCET/BBC co-production in association with the Imperial War Museum." Closed captioned. Participants: Narrator: Salome Jens. directed by Blaine Baggett ; written by Blaine Baggett & Margaret Koval & Jay Winter ; produced by Margaret Koval. // Broken hopes, broken families, broken lives: the world at the end of the Great War was full of them. This final episode explores the aftermath of the war and the failed peace. For the"lost generation", the war would be without end. Living reminders were everywhere: men with missing limbs, mutilated faces, and shaking bodies. And then there were the dead, most who remained hundreds, sometimes thousands of miles away on the battlefields where they fell. The question "Why did they have to die?" would haunt the generation of survivors. People dealt with grief in different ways. Artists painted what they had seen. Writers tried writing it out of their systems. Millions of the bereaved sought relief from their ghostly memories through spiritualism -- communicating with the dead. Among the main proponents was Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes, who gave up writing to devote himself to the movement. For some German soldiers, a bitter memory was the march home from the war. They had come back as an army, defeated but unbowed. Many of them believed they had been betrayed at home -- "stabbed in the back". This accusation would launch the political career of Adolf Hitler and bring on the second global war of the 20th century.

38. Agathocleous, Tanya. "London Mysteries and international conspiracies: James, Doyle, and the aesthetics of cosmopolitanism." Nineteenth-Century Contexts 26, no. 2 (2004): 125-148.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses the striking commonalities between the writings of British fiction writers Henry James and Arthur Conan Doyle. Authors' fascination with aesthetic perception, international conspiracy, and the mysteries of urban life; Their literary depiction of the city of London, its contrast of wealth and poverty, and its place in world history; Association between the concept of cosmopolitanism and aestheticism.

39. Aykroyd, Lucas, Clifford S. Goldfarb, and Brian S. Brodie. "'Bookshelf' Reviews of The Abominable Wife and Other Unrecorded Cases of Mr. Sherlock Holmes, The Spenserian Holmes: Being the Annotated Manuscript of the Hell of the Baskervilles, Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle and The Hounds Collection: Volume IV." Canadian Holmes 23, no. 1 (1999): 38-42.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

40. Ayoub, Nina C. "New Scholarly Books." Chronicle of Higher Education 51, no. 38 (2005): A16-A19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents information on scholarly books published in the U.S. in 2005. Includes item with reference to Doyle. Representing Scotland in Literature, Popular Culture, and Iconography: The Masks of the Modern Nation, by Alan Riach (Palgrave Macmillan; 280 pages; $69.95). "Explores images of Scottishness in media from the canonical literature of Scott, Conan Doyle, and other writers to such contemporary British television programs as Edge of Darkness."

41. ———. "New Scholarly Books." Chronicle of Higher Education 49, no. 47 (2003): A16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents information on several books, including one with a reference to Doyle. Capital Offenses: Geographies of Class and Crime in Victorian London, by Simon Joyce (University of Virginia Press; 288 pages; $39.50). "Describes how Conan Doyle, Dickens, Wilde, and other writers of the period challenged social commentators' views of the relationship among crime, class, and neighborhood."

42. ———. "New Scholarly Books." Chronicle of Higher Education 47, no. 19 (2001): A17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a list and summaries of several books including Arthur Conan Doyle and the meaning of Masculinity, by Diana Barsham (Ashgate Publishing; 312 pages: $84.95). "Discusses Doyle's life, writings, and personal rivalries in a study of the author's attempts to embody the ideals of British manhood; topics include the relationship between Doyle's histories of the Boer War and World War I and his Sherlock Holmes stories, here read as a secret autobiography."

43. ———. "New Scholarly Books." Chronicle of Higher Education 46, no. 29 (2000): A24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Lists books including Modernism, Romance, and the "Fin de Siecle": Popular Fiction and British Culture, by Nicholas Daly (Cambridge University Press; 228 pages; $59.95), with reference to Doyle. "Links the 'romance revival' of the late 19th and early 20th centuries to Britain's efforts to come to terms with a 'new imperialism'; focuses on such writers as Arthur Conan Doyle, H. Rider Haggard, and Bram Stoker."

44. ———. "New Scholarly Books." Chronicle of Higher Education 45, no. 30 (1999): A25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews scholarly books including Membranes: Metaphors of Invasion in Nineteenth-Century Literature, Science, and Politics, by Laura Otis (Johns Hopkins University Press; 248 pages; $45). "Uses examples from literary, political, and scientific texts to argue that the biological cell became a major metaphor in 19th-century culture; focuses on works by four physician-writers: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, S. Weir Mitchell, Santiago Ramon y Cajal, and Arthur Schnitzler."

45. Baden-Powell of Gilwell, Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell. Scouting for boys : a handbook for instruction in good citizenship. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Originally published: London : Horace Cox, 1908. National bibliography no: GBA4-Z4629. Edited with an introduction and notes by Elleke Boehmer. // "It's not known whether Arthur Conan Doyle and Major-General Robert Baden-Powell actually met, in South Africa or elsewhere, but Baden-Powell is mentioned in Conan Doyle's history of The Great Boer War, and Conan Doyle is mentioned in Baden-Powell's Scouting for Boys. Baden-Powell suggested that Scouts read the Sherlock Holmes stories to learn observation and deduction, in what Christopher Hitchens has called (in the June issue of The Atlantic Monthly) 'one of the very few books of the twentieth century that actually led to the formation of a worldwide movement.'"

46. Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack. "Recent Work in Critical Theory." Style 32, no. 4 (1998): 535.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a bibliography of published books based on materials coming into Northern Illinois University libraries between August 1997 and August 1998. Includes entries for Doyle and reference to Holmes. Booth, Martin. The Doctor, the Detective, and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Biography of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1997. "Booth offers a new study of the biographical and literary lives of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Booth devotes particular attention to Conan Doyle's formative years in which he suffered a poverty-stricken childhood at the hands of an alcoholic father. After abandoning his medical training, Conan Doyle finally pursued the literary career which earned him great wealth and fame. Booth also discusses the qualities that ensured Conan Doyle's success, including his enormous self-confidence and stubbornness, as well as his refusal to pass up any opportunity for adventure." Kestner, Joseph A. Sherlock's Men: Masculinity, Conan Doyle, and Cultural History. Aldershot: Ashgate, 1997. "Kestner examines constructions of masculinity throughout Conan Doyle's nine volumes of short stories from 1887 through 1927 and the publication of The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes. In addition to discussing the manner in which popular culture conveys the masculine gender, Kestner demonstrates Conan Doyle's interest in addressing masculinity in social, historical, legal, literary, educational, marital, and aesthetic contexts. Kestner explores such concepts as the notion of the gentleman, the role of reason, the nature of heroism, the ideology of chivalry, and the functions of law and punishment." McDonald, Peter D. British Literary Culture and Publishing Practice, 1880-1914. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1997. "McDonald examines the radical transformation of British literary culture from 1880 to 1914. Using works by such figures as Joseph Conrad, Arnold Bennet, and Arthur Conan Doyle, McDonald discusses the cultural politics inherent in the period. McDonald demonstrates that the discursive qualities of their texts cannot be fully appreciated without understanding the material conditions of their production." Thoms, Peter. Narrative and Power in Nineteenth-Century Detective Fiction. Athens: Ohio UP, 1998. "Thoms argues that some of the most significant nineteenth-century works of detective fiction not only helped to establish the genre, but also to subvert its structural conventions as well. Using works by Godwin, Poe, Dickens, Collins, and Conan Doyle, Thoms contends that the detective's figurative writing emerges out of a desire to exert control over others and occasionally over himself. Additionally, Thorns reveals the manner in which early detective fiction grapples with the very issue of storytelling itself."

47. ———. "Recent work in critical theory." Style 30, no. 4 (1996): 584.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents an alphabetically arranged bibliography that annotates several books on critical theory, published between June 1995 and July 1996. Includes entries with reference to Doyle. Belford, Barbara. Bram Stoker: A Biography of the Author of Dracula. New York: Knopf, 1996. "Belford traces the life of Bram Stoker through her analysis of his public and private faces. In addition to discussing Stoker's life as the innovative manager of London's Lyceum Theatre and his place among Victorian society's glitterati, Belford explores the writer's private obsessions in his novels with such forbidden subjects as seduction, rape, necrophilia, incest, and voyeurism. Belford also examines Stoker's place among the writers of his day, including Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, James Whistler, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and George Bernard Shaw." Kerrigan, John. Revenge Tragedy: Aeschylus to Armageddon. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1996. "Kerrigan investigates the centrality of revenge tragedy in Western culture from the works of Homer and Nietzche through Greek drama and Sylvia Plath. In addition to interpretive forays into film and postmodernism, Kerrigan provides close readings of revenge tragedy, using the works of Shakespeare, Samuel Richardson, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, among others. Kerrigan also demonstrates the ways in which evolving attitudes toward retribution continue to shape and reconstitute tragedy in Western culture."

48. ———. "Recent work in critical theory." Style 29, no. 4 (1995): 568.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a listing of four hundred eighty-seven published monographs and articles that treat on critical theory, including an entry that reference Doyle. Orel, Harold. The Historical Novel from Scott to Sabatini: Changing Attitudes Toward a Literary Genre. London: Macmillan, 1995. "Orel survey the genre of historical fiction in the works of a wide range of literary figures. including Sir Walter Scott, Sir Walter Besant, Richard Doddridge Blackmore, Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Stanley John Weyman, Anthony Hope, Sir Henry Rider Haggard, and Rafael Sabatini. Orel discusses the relationship between research and imagination in the composition strategies of these novelists, while also assessing the significance of language and character in their works."

49. Bassett, Troy J., and Christina M. Walter. "Booksellers and Bestsellers: British Book Sales as Documented by The Bookman, 1891-1906." Book History 4, no. (2001): 205-236.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes multiple references to Doyle.

50. Beard, Matthew. "An Elementary Explanation for Sherlock Holmes." The Independent (London), July 11, 2002: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The inspiration for the characters in Sherlock Holmes books has intrigued devotees of the detective novel for nearly two centuries. The explanation behind their creation seems elementary. The Scottish author's alma mater, Stonyhurst College, near Clitheroe in Lancashire, has revealed Doyle may have taken names from the school register....The author may even have drawn inspiration for the setting of The Hound of the Baskervilles from the school building, which bears a startling resemblance to Baskerville Hall. Details of Doyle's schooldays emerged after Stonyhurst recruited a curator to compile a permanent archive to the writer, which will open in September...."

51. Bensley, D. Alan. "Why great thinkers sometimes fail to think critically." Skeptical Inquirer 30, no. 4 (2006): 47-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // It is somewhat paradoxical that Sherlock Holmes was a literary creation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, says D. Alan Bensley, an associate professor of psychology at Frostburg State University, in an essay about critical thinking. After all, he says, Sherlock Holmes was a shrewd detective with uncanny reasoning abilities, while Conan Doyle often exhibited "dramatic lapses in his own critical thinking."

52. Bergem, Phillip G. "Arthur Conan Doyle: Connections to the Latter-Day Saints and Other Matters." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 1 (2004): 39-42.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

53. ———. A bibliographic listing of stories, poems, and other writings of A. Conan Doyle. 1st ed. Minneapolis, Minn: Privately printed, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

54. ———. The family and residences of Arthur Conan Doyle. 2nd ed. St. Paul, Minn, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 51-54) // An organized list of Arthur Conan Doyle's ancestral and descendant information in non-text format, with added text. Conflicting information from various authorities is cited as found. Includes a chronological list of Doyle family residences, military service, and grave markers

55. Betzner, Ray. "Arthur Conan Doyle in Society." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 76 (1994): 6-11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

56. Beyer, Rick. The greatest stories never told : 100 tales from history to astonish, bewilder, & stupefy. 1st ed. New York: HarperResource, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 19 cm. Based on the television program: Timelab 2000. Includes bibliographical references (p. 200-208). Scuttlebutt Apr 2005. // "Based the History Channel's 'Timelab 2000" series, and offers two pages on 'the curious case of the doctor who gave birth to a superstar' (the doctor being Joseph Bell, and the superstar being Sherlock Holmes); it's certain not a story never told, but it might astonish, bewilder, and stupefy someone."

57. Binyon, Tj. "If only he'd listened to Holmes." The Evening Standard (London), February 21, 2000: 56.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower (Allen Lane/The Penguin Press, 18.99). "...Stashower's book is certainly a worthy addition to the long shelf of Conan Doyle biographies. Elegant and scholarly, it is, perhaps, the sanest and most balanced of all...."

58. Birch, Dinah. "Elementary love." TLS, no. 5458 (2007): 3-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the books "Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower, and Charles Foley.

59. Blau, Peter E. "About Golf, and Rudyard Kipling, and Vermont, and Other Things." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 8-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

60. Bliss, Laurel M. "Book Reviews: Arts & Humanities." Library Journal 124, no. 3 (1999): 152.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

61. Boström, Mattias. Tretton kriminella klassiker : författarporträtt : [John Dickson Carr, Raymond Chandler, G. K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie, Conan Doyle, Dashiell Hammett, Ross Macdonald, Ellery Queen, Dorothy Sayers, Georges Simenon, Sjöwall/Wahlöö, Rex Stout, Stieg Trenter], (Deckarserien). Lund: BTJ förlag, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. //

62. Brown, Allan. "The curious case of old Conan Doyle." Sunday Times (London), August 22, 2004: 4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Observations on Doyle, Edinburgh, the fate of various Doyle papers, the Christie's auction, Richard Lancelyn Green, Owen Dudley Edwards, and Charles Foley.

63. Buitenhuis, Peter. "The First World War and the Language of Fiction." European Contributions to American Studies [Netherlands] 10, no. (1986): 99-111.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Contrasts the work of old-school authors Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Edmund Gosse, and Rudyard Kipling, who worked as propagandists during World War I, with that of Ernest Hemingway, Charles Harrison, John Dos Passos, and E. E. Cummings, all of whom experienced the war directly. The language of the propagandists reaffirmed and reasserted old values and covered the reality of the war with a romantic and patriotic facade. The younger writers faced the problem of finding a way to express the disparity between reality and propaganda. Using romantic language and romantic images as a springboard, the younger writers replaced nationalism, patriotism, and imperialism with self-reliance, skepticism, irony, and aestheticism.

64. Burke, James. "Connections." Scientific American 278, no. 1 (1998): 113.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Look at the views of James Burke as he relate to the question on who came up first with the idea of evolution. Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...McParlan's work was not, however, to go totally unrecognized. In 1914 he became the internationally acclaimed hero of a novel entitled Valley of Fear. Well, he would have been such but for the fact that the author ended up naming the book's detective protagonist something else. McParlan's heroics were fictionally appropriated by (the already internationally famous) Sherlock Holmes. Given McParlan's fate, it's ironic that Valley of Fear was to be Sherlock's last case, too. After which his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, turned to expressing himself through a different medium. The kind that sat around tables and got up to what I was playing at the other night. Because in 1914 Doyle stopped writing and took over where Wallace and Lodge had left off: he became a leading light in the Society for Psychic Research...."

65. Burr, Robert C. "Review--Sir Arthur Conan Doyle at the Cinema by Scott Allen Nollen." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 2 (1997): 24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The major adaptations of all of Conan Doyle's literary works are fully covered here, as is a 1927 one-reel documentary in which the author talks about his work and his psychic beliefs. The focus is on how faithful each adaptation is to the author's own work and the overall effectiveness of the film.

66. Cannon, Peter, and Jeff Zaleski. "Mystery Notes." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 12 (2002): 46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a list of several mystery books. They Died in Vain: Overlooked, Underappreciated and Forgotten Mystery Novels, edited by Jim Huang; The Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Reader: From Sherlock Holmes to Spiritualism, edited by Jeffrey Meyers; Angels of Darkness: A Drama in Three Acts, by Arthur Conan Doyle.

67. Carey, John. "Outwitted by his own creation." The Sunday Times (London), August 26, 2007: 39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes by Andrew Lycett and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters edited by Daniel Stashower, Jon Lellenberg and Charles Foley.

68. Caron, Claude. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1859-1930 impérialisme, criminalité et société dans la littérature populaire, (Mémoires et thèses). Montréal: Université du Québec à Montréal, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Comprend des réf. bibliogr. Thesis/dissertation (deg). //

69. Chalmers, John. "You write the festival reviews." The Independent (London), August 7, 2006: 20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the exhibit in Edinburgh, "Conan Doyle and Joseph Bell: The Real Sherlock Holmes," Surgeons' Hall Museums. "This is a small but fascinating exhibition on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his teacher, the surgeon Joseph Bell, who was his inspiration for Sherlock Holmes. Bell's ability to learn much about his patients simply from his powers of observation is legendary, and several examples are given in this show...."

70. Chaney, Lisa. Hide-and-seek with angels: a life of J. M. Barrie. London: Hutchinson, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2005434852. Includes bibliographical references (p. [375]-389) and index //

71. ———. Hide-and-seek with angels: a life of J.M. Barrie. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006042355. Includes bibliographical references (p. [387]-391) and index. Contents: 'It's no' him, it's just me...' -- The happiest years of his life -- 'Literature was my game...' -- 'To be forever known...' -- A serious purpose -- 'Genius in him...' -- Mary -- 'You must decide...' -- Dreams and reality -- American and fame -- Sylvia -- The boy castaways -- A second chance -- Origins -- Making a masterpiece -- 'I'm youth I'm joy...' -- Disquiet -- 'The saddest most terrible night...' -- The end of a marriage -- A kind of family -- War -- 'Something in ourselves...' -- Cynthia and Michael -- Beyond the reach of time -- Release //

72. Chapman, Paul M. "A Literary Mosaic: Arthur Conan Doyle as Literary Pioneer and Synthesizer." The Ritual, no. 27 (2001): 34-46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

73. ———. "Review--'The Doctor, The Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle' by Martin Booth." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 66-68.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

74. ———. "A Study in Friendship: Conan Doyle and Bram Stoker." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 71-81.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

75. ———. "Through the Stage Door: The Dramatic Ventures of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 38-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

76. Clinch, Minty. "The Snow Special: Short Breaks - in Search Of...; Conan Doyle in the Swiss Alps; did You Know, the Creator of Sherlock Holmes was also a Pioneer of Skiing?" Independent on Sunday (London), November 2, 2003: 4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Conan Doyle? On skis? I thought he'd be a pipe and slippers man. Even in the world of eminent Victorians, Dr Arthur Conan Doyle stood out as a Renaissance man, a natural extrovert with diverse talents fuelled by huge reserves of energy, enthusiasm and wit. Less well charted is his flirtation with skiing, an intensive two-year fling that established him as a winter sports prophet and pioneer. The affair reached its zenith on 23 March 1894, when the creator of Sherlock Holmes became the first Englishman to cross the 2,440m Maienfelder Furka pass above Davos and ski down to Arosa on the other side. Rising before 4am, he headed for the village of Frauenkirch, accompanied by his guides, Tobias and Johannes Branger, making the trip for a second time...."

77. Coles, Bill. "Sherlock Holmes Still Lives." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 02/24, 2007: P16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article features writer Arthur Conan Doyle and his Sherlock Holmes detective stories.

78. Cook, William. "Close to home: A bit more than naval-gazing: When you think of Portsmouth, what comes to mind? Its redoubtable historic warships, perhaps. Chances are, it's not designer shopping, contemporary art - or Portsmouth FC's first goalkeeper, Arthur Conan Doyle." The Guardian (London), Apr 12, 2008: 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "From the crow's nest of Portsmouth's new Spinnaker Tower, you get a great view of the Isle of Wight, but the most spectacular sight is right beneath your feet, more than 100 metres below. Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard is a slice of living history, featuring several fasci nating museums, housed in the original dockside buildings that were the powerhouse of the royal navy for several centuries. Most riveting is Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory, moored beside the Victorian battleship HMS Warrior, and Henry VIII's favourite warship, the Mary Rose. [Richard Lancelyn Green]'s bequest has provided a cultural catalyst for a city with a far more varied cultural life than its robust public image as a military harbour would suggest. Portsmouth was also the birthplace of Britain's greatest novelist, Charles Dickens. The handsome house where he was born is now a museum. And if you prefer fine art to literature, the local artist WL Wyllie was one of the finest maritime painters of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. There are some splendid examples of his work Portsmouth's City and Royal Naval Museums, most notably his epic panorama of the Battle of Trafalgar. There's first class stand-up comedy at Jongleurs and the Wedgwood Rooms, and the cathedral is a gem. 'It was a place in which a man might very well spend a happy life,' wrote [Arthur Conan Doyle], of Portsmouth. Or, he might have added, a very enjoyable weekend."

79. Cooke, Catherine, and Alvin E. Rodin. "Arthur Conan Doyle in London, Part I, In Baker Street and Beyond." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 73 (1993): 16-27.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

80. Cornwell, Tim. "'Scotland 'Should Retake Holmes'." The Scotsman, March 19, 2005: 19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Scotland is to be urged to exploit Sherlock Holmes as a national cultural icon in an effort to promote Scottish writing worldwide. The chairman of Scotland's cultural commission will next week single out Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional detective as a prime example of 'Scottish rationalism'. James Boyle will outline his vision of how Scotland can promote its arts and culture around the world in a lecture at the Scottish Parliament...."

81. Cowan, James. "Conan Doyle saw greatness in Canada: Toronto library acquires collection of author's notes during visits here." National Post (Canada), November 18, 2004: A9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle loved Canada -- its landscape, its government, its literature. The creator of Sherlock Holmes came to North America three times between 1894 and 1922, travelling for different reasons but almost exclusively by private rail car. In 1914, he was headed to the National Reserve in Jasper, Alta., as an invited guest of the Canadian government. He stopped at Canadian Clubs along the way -- in Winnipeg, Fort William, Ont., and Hamilton, among other cities -- delivering speeches on literature....Doyle's speaking notes were among the items acquired last spring by the Toronto Public Library at an auction at Christie's in London and directly from the Doyle estate. Toronto has the only public library collection in the world dedicated to Arthur Conan Doyle, contained in a wood-panelled room on the fifth floor of the Toronto Reference Library...."

82. Cox, Don Richard. "The Artistic Failure of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 75 (1994): 11-27.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

83. Cox, Jim. "Book Review Teller of Tales by Daniel Stashower." Baker Street West 1 6, no. 2 (2000): 35-40.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

84. Crawford, MaryAnn Krajnik. "Introduction: Shaw Scholarship: "Here and Now" and at the 2004 International Shaw Society (ISS) Conference." SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies 25, no. (2005): 1-8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes conference paper with reference to Doyle. "Papers were given by Lagretta Lenker ("Shaw's Best Play?")...Alan Andrews ("Shaw and Conan Doyle"), Rodelle Weintraub ("What Makes Johnny Run? Man and Superman as Pre-Freudian Dream Play")..."

85. Crignon, Hélène. De Sherlock Holmes au professeur Challenger : inquietant, fantastique et fiction speculative dans l'oeuvre de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859 - 1930). S.l.: s.n., 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

86. Dahlinger, S. E. Violets & vitriol essays: about Sherlock Holmes and Conan Doyle. Ashcroft, B.C: Calabash Press, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references. Contents: Aspects of Ballarat / Karen Anderson; Exploited Women in The Hound of the Baskervilles / Beth Austin; Lunar Ladies: Sherlock Holmes and His female clients / Diana Barsham; Russian Roulette a SCANdalous Discussion / Nancy Beiman and Mia Stampe; A Perennial Toast / Paula S. Cohen; Mrs. Hudson, The Woman of Baker Street / Deborah Clark; The Bedside Manner / Catherine Cooke; The. . . Dweller on the Threshold / Susan E. Dahlinger; Canonical Scribbles / Roberta Davies; Science and Sir Arthur (or D is for Dinosaur) / Judith Freeman; Christian Names / Naomi Hayashi; Holmes's Wardrobe / Naomi Hayashi; Plum's Sherlock: Conan Doyle's Influence on Pelham Grenville Wodehouse / Marilyn MacGregor; How the Brigadier Wooed the Ladies / Dayna McCausland; The Compliments of the Season / Julie McKuras; Old Woman Be Damned / Rosemary Michaud; Past Remembering / Sarah Montague; Autolycus in Chicago / Susan Rice; Through a Glass Darkly / Barbara Roden; Mrs. Beeton / Julia Carlson Rosenblatt; The Monster Within: Pseudo-Gothic Tales of the Canon / Barbara Rusch; The Yellow Face / Hiromi Sasabe; The Long Island Cape (Re) Visited / Marina Stajic; Adversarial Women: Worthy and Unworthy Opponents / Lynne E. Walker // In a volume timed to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the birthday of Sherlock Holmes, a collection of essays written entirely by women on Holmes and his creator, on Irene Adler, on Mrs. Beeton, on Vincent Starrett, on P.G. Wodehouse, and on many more topics

87. Dahlinger, Susan E., and Leslie S. Klinger. "Arthur Conan Doyle, Fletcher Robinson & The Hound." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 7-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

88. Dalrymple, Theodore. "Sheer delight in doing evil." BMJ: British Medical Journal 334, no. 7607 (2007): 1325-1325.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents the author's reaction to having read the book "The Resident Patient," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, which centers on a doctor named Trevelyan who visits Sherlock Holmes and Watson to discuss a patient named Blessington. A discussion of the story's plot, which centers on the fact that Blessington is really a criminal named Sutton, is presented. The author's involvement in being a witness in a case where a man hanged another man and attempted to make the incident look like suicide is discussed.

89. Davies, David Stuart. "Conan Doyle and the Actors." The Ritual, no. 16 (1995): 46-50.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

90. Dekoning, Ivo A. "In the Footsteps of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 153-167.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

91. Del Bianco, Mauro, and Gianfranco De Turris. Sherlock Holmes eroe solare esoterismo e spiritismo in Arthur Conan Doyle, (La bottega delle meraviglie). Roma: Il Torchio, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references //

92. Dillstone, Don. "Arthur Conan Doyle and Irene Adler." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 2 (2000): 9-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

93. Donald, Ann. "Who's that cat in the deer hat?" The Herald (Glasgow), July 8, 2000: 19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes ranks alone in the distinguished genre of crime fiction creations - if only for his class A drug habit and eccentric apparel of deerstalker and pipe. This week's celebration of the Baker Street clever clogs and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, hung on the flimsy premise that Doyle popped his clogs 70 years ago. Given the riches languishing in the BBC's own radio drama vaults, it was remiss of the powers-that-be to deprive us of at least one rendition of Basil Rathbone's blinding interpretation of the great detective. However, Radio 4 was obviously intent on plunging into the real-life mire with The Secret History of Conan Doyle and The Real Sherlock Holmes. The mystery clouding Doyle's own life was pierced by Humphrey Carpenter's investigation...."

94. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Lew David Feldman, and Manson & Woods Christie. The Conan Doyle Collection, Wednesday 19 May 2004, (Catalogue of auction). London: Christie's, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Contents: Lots 1-8, Early life -- 9-37, Literary career -- 38-51, Theatre -- 52-59, Causes and public life -- 60-65, Spiritualism -- 66-73, Military -- 74-79, Sport and travel -- 80-90, Family life -- 91-120, Correspondence -- 121-135, Biography // The titles in this catalogue are the residual material owned by Anna Doyle's beneficiaries. Cf. p. 9

95. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Jon L Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower, and Charles Foley. Arthur Conan Doyle a life in letters. New York: Penguin Press, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007014692. Includes bibliographical references and index. Contents: The schoolboy (1867-1876) -- The medical student (1876-1882) -- The struggling doctor (1882-1884) -- Cracking the oyster (1884-1890) -- "Author of Sherlock Holmes" (1891-1893) -- Putting Holmes behind him (1894-1896) -- Country life (1896-1898) -- War in South Africa (1899-1900) -- Politics and honours (1900-1902) -- The final Hindhead years (1903-1907) -- Windlesham to the outbreak of war (1907-1914) -- The World War (1914-1918) -- His last crusade (1918-1920) -- Epilogue : Conan Doyle's final decade //

96. ———. Arthur Conan Doyle his life in letters. New York: Penguin Press, 2008.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007014692. Contents: The schoolboy (1867-1876) -- The medical student (1876-1882) -- The struggling doctor (1882-1884) -- Cracking the oyster (1884-1890) -- "Author of Sherlock Holmes" (1891-1893) -- Putting Holmes behind him (1894-1896) -- Country life (1896-1898) -- War in South Africa (1899-1900) -- Politics and honours (1900-1902) -- The final Hindhead years (1903-1907) -- Windlesham to the outbreak of war (1907-1914) -- The World War (1914-1918) -- His last crusade (1918-1920) -- Epilogue : Conan Doyle's final decade //

97. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Jeffrey Meyers, and Valerie Meyers. "The Sir Arthur Conan Doyle reader : from Sherlock Holmes to spiritualism." New York: Cooper Square Press, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. A study in scarlet, part -- A scandal in Bohemia -- The los amigos fiasco -- The case of Lady Sannox -- How the brigadier came to the castle of gloom -- How the brigadier slew the brothers of Ajaccio -- From the Stark Munro letters -- The king of the foxes -- The Brazilian cat -- The brown hand -- The adventure of the empty house -- The adventure of the dancing men -- From the crime of the Congo -- From the lost world -- The poison belt -- Danger! -- From a visit to three fronts -- From the wanderings of a spiritualist. Includes bibliographical references (p. 499-500). // "Offers a wide-ranging sample of his writings, from an excerpt from A Study in Scarlet (1887) to an excerpt from The Wanderings of a Spiritualist (1921), including Sherlockian and non-Sherlockian short stories, and there's an excellent introduction setting the contents in context."

98. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Malcolm R Payne, Philip Weller, and Conan Doyle (Crowborough) Establishment. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Groombridge Place: an examination of some conections between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Groombridge Place. East Sussex, England: Conan Doyle (Crowborough) Establishment, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Contents: Introduction / Malcolm Payne with extracts from a letter by Dame Jean Conan Doyle -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Crowborough / Malcolm Payne -- The Birlstone Triangle / Philip Weller -- The Ghost of the moat / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Includes bibliographical references //

99. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Daniel Stashower, Jon L Lellenberg, and Charles Foley. Arthur Conan Doyle a life in letters. London: HarperPress, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references and index. Contents: The schoolboy (1867-1876) -- The medical student (1876-1882) -- The struggling doctor (1882-1884) -- Cracking the oyster (1884-1890) -- "Author of Sherlock Holmes" (1891-1893) -- Putting Holmes behind him (1894-1896) -- Country life (1896-1898) -- War in South Africa (1899-1900) -- Politics and honours (1900-1902) -- The final Hindhead years (1903-1907) -- Windlesham to the outbreak of war (1907-1914) -- The World War (1914-1918) -- His last crusade (1918-1920) -- Epilogue : Conan Doyle's final decade // Until her death in 1920, Arthur Conan Doyle's mother, Mary Foley, was the person he most often confided with, as over a thousand of their letters attest. The story of his efforts to create a medical practice, writing short stories as a pasttime, is followed by a chronicle of growing success. Further correspondence reveals a man of high morals, who stalwartly held his convictions on politics, Spiritualism, and a determination to right the wrongs he found in the world

100. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Robert Whitfield. Memories and Adventures. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks, 1999. Sound Recording 10 sound cassettes (1 1/2 hr. ea.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 1 7/8 ips. Unabridged. Read by Robert Whitfield. //

101. Doyle, Georgina. Out of the shadows the untold story of Arthur Conan Doyle's first family. Ashcroft, B.C: Calabash Press, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 368-373) and index //

102. Drabelle, Dennis. "Master of Deduction." The Washington Post, January 30, 2000: X04.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of The Doctor and the Detective: A Biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, by Martin Booth. St. Martin's. 371 pp.

103. Duncan, Raymond. "Lost papers of Conan Doyle sell for GBP 1m." The Herald (Glasgow), May 20, 2004: 10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Long-lost papers providing a compelling insight into the private life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the Scots-born creator of Sherlock Holmes, have been sold at auction for just under (pounds) 1m. The 3000 personal letters, notes and manuscripts, missing for 40 years, had been expected to fetch around double that figure, but Christie's in London said last night that 104 of the 135 lots were sold, fetching a total of (pounds) 948,546...."

104. Edington, Shane R. The uneasy relationship of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the English criminal justice system as observed in the canon. s.l.: s.n., 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references //

105. Edwards, Owen Dudley. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Holmes : a study in Lothian cultural imperialism. [Scotland?]: Leisure Services Dept. of Lothian Regional Council, 1980.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 20 x 21 cm. // " ... lecture delivered by Owen Dudley Edwards in ... the University of Edinburgh at 7:30 p.m. on 6th March 1980"--P. [ii].

106. Ellwood, Robert S. Swedenborg and Sherlock Holmes. Urbana, OH: Urbana University, 2001. Visual Material 1 videocassette (ca. 90 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 1/2 in. Swedenborg lecture series ; 2001; VHS. Introduction by Dr. Steve Cooley. // Dr. Ellwood compares the relationship between Swedenborg and the detective writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who created the incomparable Sherlock Holmes. Doyle became an avid spiritualist. Dr. Ellwood also discusses the empirical or observational side of Swedenborgianism and its founder.

107. Engel, Elliot. Detecting Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: a light & enlightening literary program. Raleigh, NC: Authors Ink, 1999. Sound Recording 1 sound disc (47 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. // "Dr. Engel reveals that the creator of Sherlock Holmes led a fascinating life which rivaled the suspense and surprises in his detective fiction."

108. ———. Detecting Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: a light & enlightening look. Raleigh, NC: Authors Ink, 2000. Sound Recording 1 sound cassette (48 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. // Dr. Engel reveals the fascinating life led by the creator of Sherlock Holmes, a life which rivaled the suspense and surprises of his detective fiction.

109. Feay, Suzi. "Notes & Theories: She's buying a stairway to heaven and other ghost stories." The Independent on Sunday, Jul 24, 2005: 46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "I'm interviewing [Julian Barnes] on stage at the Ways With Words festival about his new novel Arthur and George. Its protagonist, Arthur Conan Doyle, tackles a celebrated Victorian miscarriage of justice la mode de Sherlock Holmes. The Edalji case, featuring a mild-mannered Birmingham solicitor accused of cattle mutilation, was every bit as significant to British cultural life and the legal system as the Dreyfus case was to France. But there is another, weirder strand to this complex and interesting novel, and I've amused Barnes and clearly ruffled at least one audience member by referring to Doyle's ardent spiritualist beliefs as 'batty'. Doyle was a devout believer in table-rapping, ectoplasm and voices beyond the grave, and was famously hoaxed by two schoolgirls who said they'd been photographing fairies...."

110. Feigelman, Jennifer. "Graphic Classics: Arthur Conan Doyle." School Library Journal 51, no. 11 (2005): 177-177.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "Graphic Classics: Arthur Conan Doyle," vol. 2, edited by Tom Pomplun, illustrated by Rick Geary.

111. Ferguson, Brian. "Another string to the bow of Holmes's legacy." The Scotsman, January 14, 2009: 3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "For more than 170 years, a sycamore stood in the garden where the young Arthur Conan Doyle was inspired to write his first stories. As a schoolboy, the creator of Sherlock Holmes would clamber on the branches of the tree in the grounds of Liberton Bank House in Edinburgh. But now the sycamore has to be cut down because of disease, to the dismay of the staff and pupils at the special school that has recently moved into the 18th-century building. However, a memorial to the tree and its links to Conan Doyle is to be created. Dunedin School has commissioned the creation of a violin from the sycamore's wood, in tribute to Doyle's celebrated detective and his penchant for playing the instrument. It is hoped the GBP 1,800 violin, to be created by the Edinburgh-based instrument maker Steve Burnett, will be completed in time for the 150th anniversary of Conan Doyle's birth in May...."

112. Fitzgerald, Michael. The genesis of artistic creativity Asperger's syndrome and the arts. London, Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2005001022. Includes bibliographical references (p. 242-248) and indexes. Contents: Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) -- Hans Christian Andersen (1805-75) -- Herman Melville (1819-91) -- Lewis Carroll (1832-98) -- William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) -- Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) -- George Orwell (1903-50) -- Bruce Chatwin (1940-89) -- Spinoza (1632-77) -- Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) -- Simone Weil (1909-43) -- A.J. Ayer (1910-89) -- Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-91) -- Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) -- Erik Satie (1866-1925) -- Béla Bartók (1881-1945) -- Glenn Gould (1932-82) -- Vincent van Gogh (1853-90) -- Jack B. Yeats (1871-1957) -- L.S. Lowry (1887-1976) -- Andy Warhol (1928-87) //

113. Foden, Giles. "Review: Book of the week: The case of the mysterious author: Giles Foden is glad that a new biography of Conan Doyle focuses on work rather than wacky beliefs." The Guardian (London), September 22, 2007: 7.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Andrew Lycett's biography, Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes by Andrew Lycett: 525pp, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, GBP20. "...Conan Doyle has found a biographer of distinction in Andrew Lycett, who has previously written lives of Rudyard Kipling, Ian Fleming and Dylan Thomas. Lycett's brilliant piece of detective work on the author of the Sherlock Holmes stories now allows us to judge his literary worth against that of his peers and properly to set him in the context of his times...." Mention also made of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower "and Conan Doyle's great-nephew Charles Foley (HarperCollins, pounds 25)."

114. Foot, Monica. "Life of Conan the Victorian; The Doctor, the Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle. a Biography of Arthur Conan Doyle. by Martin Booth (Coronet Paperback. Pounds 7.99)." Birmingham Post, May 9, 1998: 36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the book. "...A fascinating biography, which has not, apparently, exhausted all the family's archives, for some are still in copyright, and, as yet, unavailable."

115. Fordyce, Rachel. "Dissertations of Note." Children's Literature 32, no. (2004): 270-284.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Compilation of recent doctoral disserations of note, including one with a reference to Doyle: Halloran, Jennifer Ann. "Keeping the Peace: Detective Fiction and the British Imperial Project, 1844-1939." Ph.D. diss. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2002. 205 pp. DAI 63: 931A. "Among other authors, Halloran looks at the works of Poe, Dickens, and Arthur Conan Doyle and shows that the three historical periods they represent produced 'a type of fictional detective who reflected and reinforced the same fantasies of control found in the contemporary discourses of empire, such as travel writing, exploration, narratives, and memoirs.'"

116. Forman, Ross G. "The Narcissism of Empire: Loss, Rage and Revenge in Thomas De Quincey, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling and Isak Dinesen." Victorian Studies 50, no. 4 (2008): 723-725.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "The Narcissism of Empire: Loss, Rage and Revenge in Thomas De Quincey, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling and Isak Dinesen," by Diane Simmons. "In The Narcissism of Empire, Diane Simmons looks to a set of canonical authors on imperialism to see how their childhood problems, rages and frustrations, feelings of abandonment, and desires for revenge manifest themselves in their literary production...."

117. Frank, Lawrence. "Dreaming the Medusa: Imperialism, primitivism, and sexuality in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four." Signs: Journal of Women in Culture & Society 22, no. 1 (1996): 52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses author Arthur Conan Doyle's treatment of the issues of imperialism, primitivism and sexuality in his book The Sign of Four. Characterization of detective Sherlock Holmes; Characterization of women in Doyle's published works; Projection of a Victorian anxiety about women; Description of India and the Indian culture.

118. ———. "The Hound of the Baskervilles, the Man on the Tor, and a metaphor for the mind." Nineteenth-Century Literature 54, no. 3 (1999): 336.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Examines a dramatization of a nineteenth-century debate between opposing naturalistic accounts of the human mind reflected in The Hound of Baskervilles, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Influence of Darwinian thought on the 'Man of the Tor' episode; Metaphor of mind offered by the episode; Association of enlightenment rationalism with Romantic consciousness.

119. ———. Victorian detective fiction and the nature of evidence the scientific investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle, (Palgrave studies in nineteenth-century writing and culture). Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2002044800. Includes bibliographical references (p. 208-240) and index // "An academic examination of the relationships between detective fiction and 19th-century scientific texts; three of the seven chapters are devoted to Conan Doyle."

120. Fraser, Robert. Victorian quest romance Stevenson, Haggard, Kipling, and Conan Doyle, (Writers and their work). Plymouth, U.K: Northcote House, in association with the British Council, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 99218991. Includes bibliographical references (p. 84-90) and index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Late Victorian quest romance has recently attracted renewed attention from critics. Much of this interest has centred on its politics of gender, and its vision of Empire. This book prefers to view the genre in the light of debates within the then nascent sciences of Anthropology and Archaeology. Starting with a discussion of the nature of romance, it goes on to interpret the romances of Stevenson, Haggard, Kipling and Conan Doyle as encounters with lost or buried pasts. By describing such encounters with remote places and times, so it argues, these authors were asking their readers disconcerting questions about humankind, and about their own culture's institutions and beliefs. The book ends by considering the implications of such a view for the whole colonial enterprize."--book jacket. "Relates 'The Lost World' to contemporary 'quest romances' by other authors."

121. Freeling, Nicolas. Criminal convictions: errant essays on perpetrators of literary license. 1st ed. Boston: D.R. Godine, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 94006430. Contents: Crime and metaphysics -- Stendhal -- Charles Dickens -- Joseph Conrad -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Rudyard Kipling -- Raymond Chandler -- Dorothy L. Sayers -- Georges Simenon -- Apologies pro vita sua //

122. Friedland, Martin L. The death of old man Rice: a true story of criminal justice in America. New York: New York University Press, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 94006024; Scuttlebutt 1994. Includes bibliographical references (p. [383]-423) // "'Old man Rice' was William Marsh Rice, a wealthy Texan who died under suspicious circumstances in New York in 1900, bequeathing a great deal of money to found what was to become Rice University in Houston (depending on which of his wills was accepted as valid), and the book provides a fascinating account of the arrest of Albert T. Patrick for first-degree murder, and his trial and conviction and many appeals. And a demonstration that some aspects of the relationships among money, media, and justice have not changed a bit since then. And there's a connection to Conan Doyle: one of the points at issue during the trial and appeals involved embalming, and one of Patrick's supporters seems to have written to Dr. Joe Bell, who in turn contacted Sir Arthur: Friedland found a letter from Conan Doyle in an embalmers' magazine published in 1907 that said that 'there seems to have been a gross miscarriage of justice.'"

123. Gardner, Martin. The night is large collected essays, 1938-1995. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96010732; Scuttlebutt Feb 1997. Includes bibliographical references and index // Includes his essay "The Irrelevance of Conan Doyle."

124. Garrick-Steele, Rodger, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The House of the Baskervilles. Bloomington, Ind.: 1st books library, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 597-603) // An editor of the Express newspaper, Bertram Fletcher Robinson, wrote a story, 'An Adventure on Dartmoor,' which may be the original tale Doyle turned into The Hound of the Baskervilles. Garrick-Steele speculates on Doyle's career, postulating plagiarism, adultery, blackmail, and murder in the career of Holmes's creator

125. Gibson, Brian Neil. "From Samoa to Uffa: The Untold Tale of Robert Louis Stevenson and Arthur Conan Doyle." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 3 (2003): 24-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

126. Goldfarb, Clifford S. "Arthur Conan Doyle and Napoleon: A Case of Hero-Worship?" Canadian Holmes 21, no. 4 (1998): 4-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

127. ———. "Conan Doyle and the Mummy's Curse." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 1 (1996): 6-12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

128. ———. The great shadow: Arthur Conan Doyle, Brigadier Gerard and Napoleon. Ashcroft, B.C: Calabash Press, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibiliographical references and index // "A detailed and interesting examination of all of Conan Doyle's writings about the man who terrified and ruled most of Europe in the early years of the 19th century, and who was still both hated and admired at the end of the century, when he appeared in or influenced many of Conan Doyle's short stories, novels, and plays. Goldfarb discusses both the writings and their author, and his research and sources, and does it well."

129. ———. "A three-pipe life." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), Jan 19, 2008: D8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes, by Andrew Lycett.

130. Grant, Graham. "Could Sherlock Holmes' creator also be a killer?; Expert claims Conan Doyle stole classic plot then murdered real author." Daily Mail (London), July 26, 2008: 47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // It has all the ingredients you would expect of a classic Sherlock Holmes story. A national newspaper editor dies suddenly and a knight of the realm is suspected of his murder, triggered by infidelity, blackmail and fear of exposure. But according to one psychologist, author and Holmes enthusiast, this is no fictional plot - and the killer was none other than Holmes' Edinburgh-born creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Dr Rodger Garrick-Steele claims Sir Arthur stole the idea for his most famous Holmes novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles, from his friend Fletcher Robinson - then had him poisoned when he threatened to reveal the truth...."

131. Green, Richard Lancelyn, John Michael Gibson, and Graham Greene. A bibliography of A. Conan Doyle. New rev. & expanded with addenda and corrigenda ed. Boston: Hudson House, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 82003541. Includes index //

132. Green, Richard Lancelyn, Anthony D Howlett, Catherine Cooke, Christopher Roden, and Barbara Roden. Conan Doyle of Wimpole Street the story behind the commemorative plaque at 2 Upper Wimpole Street, London. Penyffordd, Chester, England: Arthur Conan Doyle Society, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

133. Greenwood, Therese. "Arthur Conan Doyle, Grant Allen and Wolfe Island." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 3 (2003): 19-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

134. Grimston, Jack. "Conan Doyle hidden archive could fetch E2.9m at auction." Sunday Times (London), March 14, 2004: 13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A campaign by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, to have British soldiers in the first world war issued with body armour has been revealed in a long-unseen collection of his papers that has turned up on the London auction market. Inspired by his own medieval tales, Conan Doyle, who had been a medic in the Boer war, believed armour would reduce the slaughter on the western front. He sent letters on the subject to David Lloyd George, the prime minister, and Sir Douglas Haig, the commander-in- chief. The 3,000 items in the archive, to be sold by Christie's in May, include written exchanges between Conan Doyle and his family and notebooks for many of his works. One is a sketch for A Study in Scarlet, the first Holmes story, which is expected to fetch between Pounds 100,000 and Pounds 150,000 (E146,000 and E220,000). There are also letters from famous figures such as Rudyard Kipling, Oscar Wilde, Theodore Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. The collection is valued at about Pounds 2m (E2.953m). Jane Flower, manuscripts consultant at Christie's, said it was the best archive she had seen at auction in 30 years. But the collection, which is being sold by distant relatives of the author, is likely to be broken up, with much of it going abroad...."

135. Gunn, Neil. "Arthur Conan Doyle, the Scot Who Created Sherlock Holmes." The Highlander - The Magazine of Scottish Heritage 48, no. 3 (2010): 10-14.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // An overview of Doyle's life and work.

136. Hall, Charles, and Peter Blythe. Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in Edinburgh. Edinburgh: the author, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Jul 1997 // "Offers interesting discussions of Sherlockian and Doylean plays performed in Edinburgh (mostly during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe), Conan Doyle's speeches and lectures in Edinburgh, and memorials to him in Edinburgh, with amusing artwork by Hall."

137. Halsema-Kubes, W. "Een Ursula-beeld door Henrik Douvermann." Bulletin van het Rijksmuseum XXIII, no. 2 (1975): 63-66.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A statue of S. Ursula by Henrik Douvermann formerly in the collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has been given to the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam in honor of Arthur van Schendel on his retirement as Director General. Discusses Douvermann's style, his female figures of 1518-ca.1525, and dates the work to ca.1510. Attributes a previously unpublished statue of a female saint holding an open book in her left hand (sold in Amsterdam, 1907, present location unknown) to Douvermann on the basis of a stylistic comparison with the S. Ursula. (Bulletin van het Rijksmuseum)

138. Hanks, Robert. "Books: Elementary, my dear Barnes; Julian Barnes's new novel resurrects Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and a real-life mystery." The Independent (London), Jul 8, 2005: 20-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Arthur & George. "...The quality in Arthur & George I liked the most apart, of course, from Barnes's preternaturally smooth and readable prose was the way it avoids condescension to the past, always going with the grain of the characters' beliefs. One aspect of this is Barnes's treatment of Conan Doyle's sex life, never bowing to the modern orthodoxy that regards Victorian morals as purely a matter of repression and hypocrisy. Another is his treatment of religion. Barnes himself says he has never had 'even glimmerings' of belief, but he presents without irony George's devout Anglicanism and Conan Doyle's wackier spiritualist creed...."

139. Hapgood, Lynne. "The Literature of the Suburbs: Versions of Repression in the Novels of George Gissing, Arthur Conan Doyle and William Pett Ridge, 1890-1899." Journal of Victorian Culture 5, no. 2 (2000): 287.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses the nature and function of repression in suburban novels of the 1890s in Victorian England. Ways in which repression was realized as a literary mode and political intervention; Focus on the writings of Arthur Conan Doyle, William Pett Ridge and George Gissing; Fictional strategies that encode physical and psychological constraint.

140. Hardyment, Christina. "Books: a Word in Your Ear; Arthur Conan Doyle: a Life by Hesketh Pearson Read by Tim Pigott- Smith Naxos, C3hrs, Pounds 8.99." The Independent (London), October 6, 2001: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The fact that Hesketh Pearson knew Conan Doyle, and that his life of the man who invented Sherlock Holmes was written before many of the Doyle papers disappeared into a lawsuit in which they are still unmeshed, gives his 1943 biography an interest all its own. Pearson makes good use of Doyle's 1924 autobiography, Memories and Adventures, so that we get a satisfying sense of the voice of a man who was, it seems, more mild Dr Watson than drug-addicted detective....But Doyle was a gentleman of the old school, dedicated to chivalric causes; his only regret was that people loved Holmes too much and Brigadier Gerard, his own favourite of his creations, too little. David Timson has abridged Pearson's words skilfully; Tim Pigott- Smith is a fine choice as reader. Let's hope Naxos will add Brigadier Gerard's exploits to their four sets of Sherlock Holmes's adventures."

141. Hargan, Jim. "Dartmoor of the Baskervilles." British Heritage 19, no. 5 (1998): 52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Provides information on the hounds of Dartmoor, with reference to The Hound of the Baskervilles. When Conan Doyle first heard about the hounds; Folk tales surrounding the hounds of Dartmoor; How Conan Doyle set about writing a book about this folk tale; Places of interest in Dartmoor.

142. Harris, Edward D. Creative healers : a collection of essays, reviews, and poems from the Pharos, 1938-1998. Menlo Park, CA: Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 1st ed. col. ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Compiled and edited by Edward Day Harris, Jr. Scuttlebutt Mar 2005. // "The contents include C. Frederick Kittle's 'There's More to Doyle Than Holmes!' reprinted from the winter 1997 issue of The Pharos (the journal of the honor medical society)."

143. Higgs, Michael L., and Rosemary Lear. On the rack with Conan Doyle and other journeys, (Premium Petrel). Vancouver: Hansom Press, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Added Title: The petrel flyer //

144. Hitchens, Christopher. Unacknowledged legislation : writers in the public sphere. London, New York: Verso, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 25 cm. Includes index. Scuttlebutt Feb 2001. // "Has a chapter on 'The Case of Arthur Conan Doyle'; it's his long review of Daniel Stashower's biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Teller of Tales, reprinted from the N.Y. Review of Books (Nov. 4, 1999)."

145. ———. Unacknowledged legislation : writers in the public sphere. London, New York: Verso, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. I. "In praise of ... ": The Wilde side -- Oscar Wilde's socialism -- Lord Trouble -- George Orwell and Raymond Williams -- Oh, Lionel! [P.G. Wodehouse] -- Age of ideology -- The real thing [Michael Frayn] -- The cosmopolitan man [Gore Vidal] -- After-time -- Ireland -- Stuck in neutral -- A regular bull [Whittaker Chambers] -- Not dead yet [Salman Rushdie] -- Against sinister perfectionism [Robert Conquest, Ezra Pound] -- Mid off, not right on [V.S. Naipaul]. -- II. "In spite of themselves ... ": Old man Kipling -- Critic of the booboisie [H.L. Mencken] -- Goodbye to Berlin [Isaiah Berlin, Marxism, Zionism] -- The grimmest tales [Roald Dahl, censorship of children's books] -- The importance of being Andy [Warhol] -- How unpleasant to meet Mr. Eliot -- Powell's way [Anthony Powell] -- Something about the poems [Philip Larkin] -- The egg-head's egger-on [Saul Bellow] -- Bloom's way [Allan Bloom] -- Lightness at midnight [Martin Amis on Stalin]. -- III. "Themes ... ": Hooked on Ebonics -- In defence of plagiarism -- Ode to the West Wing. -- IV.: "For their own sake ... ": O'Brian's great voyage [Patrick O'Brian, Master and Commander series] -- The case of Arthur Conan Doyle -- The road to West Egg [Great Gatsby] -- Rebel in evening clothes [Dorothy Parker]-- The long littleness of life [Isherwood]. -- V. "Enemies list ... ": Running on empty [Tom Wolfe] -- Unmaking friends [Norman Podhoretz] -- Something for the boys [Tom Clancy] -- The cruiser [Conor Cruise O'Brien]. Originally published: London ; New York : Verso, c2000. // "Has a chapter on 'The Case of Arthur Conan Doyle'; it's his long review of Daniel Stashower's biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Teller of Tales, reprinted from the N.Y. Review of Books (Nov. 4, 1999)."

146. Hodges, Jeremy. "Crime and compassion; Seventy years on from the death of the man who created Sherlock Holmes, how three women moulded the life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Daily Mail (London), July 4, 2000: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Shortly before his death 70 years ago, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle rose from his sickbed and went into the garden of his country home to pick a single snowdrop. Suddenly the 71-year-old creator of Sherlock Holmes collapsed, clutching his heart. As a doctor was sent for, Doyle's thoughts were fixed on the delicate flower he had picked as his annual gift to his second wife Jean, to remind her of the day they met. Little could be further from the image of the lean, scientific investigator Doyle created. Yet while Sherlock Holmes is still the world's most famous detective, his creator remains largely a man of mystery. In his native city of Edinburgh, there is a statue of Holmes, but none of Doyle. The BBC is running a 70th anniversary Conan Doyle season on TV and Radio 4 this week, but there are no plans for any commemorative event in Edinburgh. Perhaps it is because Doyle, unlike the famous creation that overshadows him, was a private man, and never more so than in his relationships with women...."

147. Hodgkinson, Thomas. "Books: Sherlock Holmes the Aesthete; Teller of Tales: the Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower Allen Lane Pounds 18.99." The Independent (London), February 27, 2000: 51.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Stashower's biography of Doyle.

148. Hogarth, Dennis. "Edgar Allan Poe: The Father of the Modern Detective Story and His Influence Upon Arthur Conan Doyle." Baker Street West 1 4, no. 2 (1998): 7-11, 13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

149. Horne, Marc. "Letter makes real Holmes elementary." The Sunday Times (London), April 16, 2006: 13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "He wore a deerstalker hat and cloak, frequently gazed through a magnifying glass and boasted a razor-sharp mind, but, as far as history can tell, he never smoked a pipe or uttered the immortal words: 'Elementary, my dear Watson.' A new archive to be displayed in Edinburgh this summer shows the remarkable extent to which Sir Arthur Conan Doyle drew inspiration for Sherlock Holmes from his cerebral university tutor...."

150. Hounion, Morris. "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Library Journal 133, no. 3 (2008): 105-105.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article reviews the book "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett.

151. Hughes, David. "More than meets the eye, Watson." Spectator 284, no. 8953 (2000): 41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

152. Huh, Jinny. "Whispers of Norbury: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Modernist Crisis of Racial (Un) Detection." Modern Fiction Studies 49, no. 3 (2003): 550-580.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article discusses works of author Arthur Conan Doyle. It illustrates how author Henry Highland Garnet and Africa/Africans may have affected Doyle in his struggle with race politics, his continuing anxiety with the epistemology of Blackness. Doyle articulates constant struggle of the photographer and his tools with the object of the photographic gaze. The article emphasizes that the emergence of the science/detection method is in specific response to the anxieties uprooted by modernity. Twentieth-century critics reveal that racial anxieties or "whispers of Norbury" are still very much a menace, threatening to explode at the blink of an unseeing eye.

153. Hunter-Purvis, Mark. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in Edinburgh' by Charles Hall and Peter Blythe." The Ritual, no. 15 (1995): 55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Offers interesting discussions of Sherlockian and Doylean plays performed in Edinburgh (mostly during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe), Conan Doyle's speeches and lectures in Edinburgh, and memorials to him in Edinburgh, with amusing artwork by Hall."

154. Huntington, Tom. "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Edinburgh." British Heritage 23, no. 3 (2002): 33.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents the life and works of writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in Edinburgh, Scotland. Full name of Doyle; Alma mater of Doyle; Family background; Problems with alcoholism.

155. James, P. D. "Book review / From diagnosis to deduction; The Doctor, the Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle by Martin Booth, Hodder & Stoughton, pounds 20." The Independent (London), August 23, 1997: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...It was a full and interesting life, well lived, but it is doubtful whether either his virtues or his eccentricities would have justified this or previous biographies were it not for his creation of a single fictional character, Sherlock Holmes. This is not a judgement which would have afforded satisfaction to Conan Doyle. In placing this achievement in relation to the author's life, Martin Booth has had to rely on previously published records and material, since for some decades biographers have been denied access to Conan Doyle's private papers. Given this prohibition it would be unreasonable to expect new insights and fresh discoveries. Booth has written a conscientious and comprehensive account of his subject's life from the material available; if we wish to find our way to the essential man, we need look little further than his work...."

156. Jamieson, Teddy. "Return to the Lost World of Conan Doyle; If you want to retrace the footsteps of Sherlock Holmes's creator in his native Edinburgh, you'll need to do a little detective work." The Herald (Glasgow), January 31, 2009: 12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...Me, I'm trying to get my head round Conan Doyle's Edinburgh and [Allan] Foster, who's hugely knowledgeable and entertaining company, is the man to help me. Sherlock Holmes's creator was born in the city (in 1859, making this the 150th anniversary of his birth) and studied medicine here before leaving Scotland. Foster knows where Conan Doyle bought his books and where he took a drink. And this bright blue Monday morning he's agreed to show me around the Edinburgh that the author knew...."

157. Jann, Rosemary. "Sherlock's Men: Masculinity, Conan Doyle, and Cultural History (review)." Victorian Studies 42, no. 2 (2000): 314-316.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Sherlock's Men: Masculinity, Conan Doyle, and Cultural History, by Joseph A. Kestner; pp. viii + 250. Aldershot and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 1997, GBP45.00, $72.95.

158. Judd, Denis, and Keith Terrance Surridge. The Boer War. Princeton, NJ: Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2003. Sound Recording 1 sound disc.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital, mono. ; 4 3/4 in. Originally published: New York, N.Y. : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003, c2002. 1st Palgrave Macmillan ed. Includes bibliographical references (p. 323-331). Distribution is restricted to RFB & D members who have a documented print disability such as a visual impairment, learning disability or other physical disability. Denis Judd & Keith Surridge. // "The Boer War," Fought between British forces and the Dutch descendents in South Africa from 1899 to 1902, was an epic war of heroism, but also one of bungling, cunning, and barbarism. It had an extraordinary cast of characters - not only leading men like Churchill, Kruger, Rhodes, Smuts, Botha, and Kitchener, but also minor characters like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Gandhi, and Emily Hobhouse. The war revealed the ineptitude of the British military and widespread anti-Semitism. It exposed the corrupt underside of imperialism and brought into being the most dreaded of all war time creations, the concentration camp. [In this book, the authors'] history of the Boer War presents a ... view of the conflict and debunks several myths. There was not, for instance, a straight-forward divide between Boers and British. Many Boers fought on the British side, and many British were pro-Boer, denouncing their own side's "methods of barbarism." In fact, in the history of the two communities, the war was an uncharacteristically violent collision. Although it led to some long-standing resentments, the overriding aim of both sides was to maintain European supremacy and to keep Africans and Indians "in their place." The sensitivity the British displayed to the Afrikaner volk in the peace treaty is evidence of this as was the continued division of power and spoils that lasted until the end of the Apartheid era. This new history of the Boer War is a gripping retelling of this military conflict. Even more importantly, it is the chronicle of a dispute with aftereffects that haunted the world throughout the entire twentieth century.-Dust jacket.

159. Jury, Louise. "Conan Doyle's Manuscripts Reveal a Meticulous Chronicler." The Independent (London), December 2, 2004: 22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Recently acquired papers and manuscripts belonging to Sherlock Holmes's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, reveal him to be a meticulous chronicler of the minutiae of his life. He detailed seances he attended, the books he read, the cricket matches he played in (including bowling out W G Grace), the number of words he wrote and what he was paid in a series of notebooks which are part of a treasure trove of more than 2,000 documents obtained by the British Library this year...."

160. Kegley, Jerry. "Arthur Conan Doyle and the Second Boer War." Baker Street West 1 7, no. 2 (2001): 24-27.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

161. Kehoe, John. "The Case of the Murderous Author." Biography 4, no. 5 (2000): 114.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Focuses on the reasons for the attempts of author Arthur Conan Doyle to kill his fictitious character [sic], Sherlock Holmes. Background of the character's creation and development; Public outcry over the publication of the book 'The Final Problem,' which related Holmes' death."

162. Kemp, Peter. "Conan Doyle to the rescue." Sunday Times (London), June 26, 2005: 37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...When cattle in the vicinity are viciously slashed, things take an even more macabre turn. Soon the press is clamouring about The Great Wyrley Outrages. It sounds like a case for Sherlock Holmes. And, indeed, the sleuth who eventually sets out to disentangle the gruesome affair is Sherlock Holmes's creator, Arthur Conan Doyle. Unlike Holmes's exploits, though, the situation at the centre of Julian Barnes's richly accomplished new novel isn't fantasy but fact. Taking a real-life whodunit, Arthur & George transforms it into a dazzling exercise in detective fiction of more kinds than one...."

163. Kerr, Alison. "Anything but elementary." The Herald (Glasgow), June 26, 2000: 13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Tribute is being paid this week to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the world's favourite detective, and a complex character in his own right For over a century, the world has been fascinated and captivated by the character and adventures of Sherlock Holmes, literature's most famous private detective. With his astounding powers of deduction and phenomenal intuition skills, Holmes paved the way, not only for the hundreds of literary detectives of the twentieth century, but also for the superhuman heroes of comic books and cartoon strips. Holmes was the creation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the Scottish doctor turned writer who died 70 years ago this month, an anniversary which is being marked from Saturday with a short season of programmes on Radio 4...."

164. Kestner, Joseph A. "'Real' men: Construction of masculinity in the Sherlock Holmes narratives." Studies in the Literary Imagination 29, no. 1 (1996): 73.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents an analysis of several Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, and his attempt to construct masculinity. Discussion of several of the Holmes narratives about art; Excerpts from 'Copper Beeches,' 'The Empty House' and 'A Case of Identity'; Construction of masculinity; Views on realism.

165. ———. Sherlock's men masculinity, Conan Doyle, and cultural history. Aldershot, Brookfield, Vt: Ashgate, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97018794. Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-236) and index. Scuttlebutt July 1998 // "An academic examination of the Canon's reflections of the sociology of Britain during the reigns of Victoria, Edward VII, and George V; Kestner concludes that 'for readers of the Strand and above all for male readers, these nine volumes constructed, interrogated, debated and critiqued the construction of male gender in culture for 40 years, from 1887 to 1927.'"

166. Key, Jack D., Marc A. Shampo, and Robert A. Kyle. "Doyle, Holmes, and Watson--a 'Special' Trinity." Mayo Clinic proceedings 80, no. 6 (2005): 722-722.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "This article focuses on physicians Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, John Watson and William Sherlock Holmes. Arthur Conan Doyle was both a physician and a versatile author of historical novels, short stories, volumes of poems, plays, histories, science fiction, and publications on occult science. Holmes and Watson are 2 of the most immediately recognizable figures in popular culture. Their images have been adapted countless times for innumerable purposes. Biographical data concerning them can be drawn from the research efforts of Holmesian authorities. Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, and John Watson were honored on a set of 4 stamps showing scenes from the adventures of Sherlock Holmes."

167. Kimball, Miles A. "'A Benefactor of the Race': Sherlock Holmes, Voyeurism, and Victorian Readers." Kentucky Philological Review 9, no. (1994): 16-22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

168. Kington, Miles. "When the Writer Becomes the Star." The Independent (London), July 25, 2005: 32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...'Well,' said Pranger, 'it's very odd when the writer becomes the star. Almost always, the fictional creation outshines the creator. Harry Potter overshadows Rowling. James Bond is big, Ian Fleming is small. Who remembers who created Tarzan? And until now Conan Doyle has been blotted out by the wretched Sherlock Holmes. But suddenly, Conan Doyle has bounced back. 'There was a novel which came out the other day by Julian Barnes, all about a real-life case in which Conan Doyle really did help to prove that a man had been wrongfully imprisoned. Conan Doyle as true life Sherlock Holmes. Good story. Surprised it hasn't been turned into a musical by Lloyd Webber or Ben Elton. And then there is this renewed attempt to prove that Conan Doyle was a murderer.'..."

169. Klinger, Leslie S., ed. Life and Times of Mr. Sherlock Holmes, John H. Watson, M.D., Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Other Notable Personages: A Table of Significant Events. Beverly Hills: Daypark Press, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

170. Knightley, Phillip. The first casualty : the war correspondent as hero and myth-maker from the Crimea to Iraq. 3rd ed. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. "The miserable parent of a luckless tribe" 1854-1856 -- The first challenge 1861-1865 -- The golden age 1865-1914 -- Quite another game 1899-1902 -- The last war 1914-1918 -- Enter America 1917-1918 -- The remedy for bolshevism in bullets 1917-1919 -- The real scoop 1935-1936 -- Commitment in Spain 1936-1939 -- "Their finest hour" 1939-1941 -- The struggle for mother Russia 1941-1945 -- Remember Pearl Harbor 1937-1945 -- Never again 1940-1945 -- Korea, the United Nations' war 1950-1953 -- Algeria is French 1954-1962 -- Vietnam 1954-1975 -- War is fun 1954-1975 -- Britannia rules the news 1975-1989 -- The deadly video game 1990-1991 -- The military's final victory March-June, 1999 -- No more heroes March-April, 2003. Includes bibliographical references (p. 549-552) and index. //

171. ———. "The first casualty : the war correspondent as hero and myth-maker from the Crimea to Kosovo." Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. Originally published: London : Prion Books, 1975. Includes bibliographical references (p. 529-532) and index. With an introduction by John Pilger. //

172. ———. The first casualty : the war correspondent as hero and myth-maker from the Crimea to Kosovo. Rev. / with a new introduction by John Pilger. ed. London: Prion, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. Previous ed.: London : André Deutsch, 1975. Includes bibliographical references and index. // "Conan Doyle's reporting on the Boer War and the First World War is mentioned briefly."

173. ———. The first casualty : the war correspondent as hero, propagandist myth-maker from the Crimea to the Gulf War II. New ed. London: Andre Deutsch, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 20 cm. Previous ed.: London: Prion, 2000. Introduction by John Pilger. //

174. Kobayashi, Tsukasa, and Akane Higashiyama. "Doyle's Unconscious Exposed in the Holmes Stories (translated by Harold Brown from Esperanto)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 181-185.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

175. Krasner, James. "Arthur Conan Doyle as Doctor and Writer." Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 33, no. 4 (2000): 19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Examines the nature of the medical and detective fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle, a doctor turned writer. Value of narrative approach to engagements between doctor and patient; Utilization of storytelling in medical practice by medical ethicists; Factors influencing the writings of Doyle; Depiction of the different features of medical life in Doyle's works.

176. Laws, Roz. "The Week: Murder Mystery; Why Conan Doyle Killed Off Sherlock Holmes." Sunday Mercury, July 24, 2005: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Imagine the fuss if TV executives decided to axe Coronation Street. Or if JK Rowling killed off Harry Potter. That's the modern-day equivalent of what happened in 1893 when Arthur Conan Doyle shocked his fans. He sent his infamous creation of Sherlock Holmes to his death at the Reichenbach Falls, prompting public outrage, scandalised headlines in the press and even hate mail. The backlash was so great that he was later forced to resurrect his hero. Now a new feature-length drama, The Strange Case Of Sherlock Holmes And Arthur Conan Doyle (BBC2, Wednesday), shows what was in Doyle's mind when he made the decision...."

177. Levy, Paul. "Personal Journal; Review / Book: Strong Novels Vie For Man Booker." Wall Street Journal, Oct 7, 2005: P.1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...The favorite, at 5 to 4, is Julian Barnes's supremely well- constructed 'Arthur & George' (Jonathan Cape, 352 pages, GBP 17.99). A true story of Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and his involvement in the real-life mystery of George Edalji, a gentle, half-Parsee lawyer accused of brutality to animals, this is one of Mr. Barnes's richly complex fictions, like his 'Flaubert's Parrot' or 'A History of the World in 101/2 Chapters,' rather than the more straightforward works (which I also love, such as 'Before She Met Me' or 'Talking It Over'). For my money, Mr. Barnes is the best novelist of his talented generation; we're in the hands of a master, but there is something bloodless about this tightly plotted, completely controlled narrative, with its on-purpose, single loose end that tells the reader that not everything, including Conan Doyle's being a sucker for spiritualism, is as tidy as it seems...."

178. Lewis, Peter. "It's elementary my dear Watson, I've been misunderstood." Daily Mail (London), March 24, 2000: 60.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower (Penguin Press, 18.99). "Everyone knows the standard portrait of the creator of Sherlock Holmes: he was the bluff Scottish doctor with no patients who based his immortal detective on his onetime teacher, Dr Joseph Bell of Edinburgh. He killed off Holmes because he was tired of him, reluctantly brought him back to make a fortune and spent the rest of his life writing unread historical novels and going barmy about spirits and fairies. So a book about the other side of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is overdue. This well-told tale by an American crime writer is constantly surprising and shrewdly entertaining. It left me viewing Conan Doyle with enhanced respect as an honourable and quixotic man...."

179. Liebman, Arthur, and David H. Galerstein. "The Sign of the Moonstone." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 71-74.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some observations on the influence of Wilkie Collins on Doyle and the parallels between Collins' The Moonstone and Doyle's The Sign of Four.

180. Lindenstruth, Gerhard. Arthur Conan Doyle: eine illustrierte bibliographie der veroffentlichungen im Deutschen sprachraum. Giessen, Germany: Verlag Munniksma, Lindengasse, 1993.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

181. ———. Arthur Conan Doyle: eine illustrierte Bibliographie der Veröffentlichungen in deutschen Sprachraum, (Das Phantasmaskop). Amsterdam: Verlag Munniksma, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

182. Lister, David. "Was Sherlock Holmes born of an ill mind?" The Times (London), February 19, 2007: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "His most famous creation was a master detective who applied his forensic intellect and powers of deduction to solve the most baffling of murder mysteries. But while Sherlock Holmes believed that reason made everything 'elementary', his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was at times so irrational and deluded that he may have been suffering from schizophrenia, according to a new biography. Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Sherlock Holmes, by Andrew Norman, a former GP turned biographer, uses the Edinburgh-born writer's medical records, family history and fictional works to suggest that his obsession with the occult was the result of a mental illness inherited from his father...."

183. Lord, Graham. "Begorra, c'est elementaire, Miss Watson." The Sunday Times (London), May 19, 1996: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes has been claimed by the French, but could have been Irish - and what about the doctor? Sherlock Holmes was not only partly French he probably came from Ireland. Pukka chaps who believe the great Baker Street detective was 100% British were appalled to learn on Thursday that a new Paris exhibition claims Holmes as French and says his grandmother, Emilie Vernet, died on the guillotine during the French revolution. Now the secretary of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, Commander Geoffrey Stavert, suggests the detective was an Irishman...."

184. Lyall, Sarah. "A new case worthy of Sherlock himself." International Herald Tribune, May 19, 2004: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "For 25 years the cardboard boxes, 15 of them, sat in a corner of a London solicitor's office, gathering dust while lawyers argued about who they belonged to and scholars dreamed about what was inside. But the auction on Wednesday of their contents 3,000 letters, manuscripts, papers and other items belonging to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes has provoked another angry fight and a mystery almost worthy of Holmes himself. The Conan Doyle archive, which includes the author's unpublished first novel, a rich cache of family letters and handwritten literary notebooks full of research and musings about works in progress, is expected to fetch about l1 million, according to Christie's, which is handling the sale. But even as the auction house plays host to excited Conan Doyle collectors, it has been criticized by some scholars and members of Parliament for allowing the sale to go ahead when, they say, several important legal questions remain unresolved...."

185. ———. "A Tussle Over a Cache of Conan Doyle's Artifacts Ends With an Auction." New York Times, May 19, 2004: E.1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Similar to her article in the International Herald Tribune. "...The unavailability of the material has frustrated and tantalized Conan Doyle scholars for years. A 1949 biography by the American mystery writer John Dickson Carr drew on the papers and included a list without going into detail about their contents, and a French biographer read them in the 1960's, but no researchers have been allowed to see them since. 'Having access to these papers will really open things up,' Miss Cooke said. But like some other Conan Doyle scholars, she is troubled by the sale, she said. There is the fear that the collection would be broken up and sold to anonymous collectors uninterested in making them available to academics. And there is a concern about the murky disposition of what remains of Conan Doyle's prodigious estate...."

186. Lycett, Andrew. "Adultery, My Dear Watson." The Guardian (London), Sep 15, 2007: 22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

187. ———. "...and Clues from a Master Detective." The Times (London), September 29, 2007: 15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...The ingredients that make this consulting detective's exploits as fresh today as when they were written (mostly more than a century ago) are an engaging mixture of character, incident, dialogue and plot -the last providing the structure that allows the stories to unfold. The first person to analyse this was Ronald Knox, who initiated the mock serious scrutiny of the 'canon' in 1911 when he addressed the Gryphon Club in Oxford on Studies in the Literature of Sherlock Holmes...."

188. MacDonald, Marianne. "Sherlock Holmes fan wins his case in US golf case." The Independent (London), July 25, 1995: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "One of the world's most important collections of Sherlock Holmes memorabilia sold for almost pounds 150,000 at Sotheby's yesterday, but confirmed fears that many of the best items would go abroad. The books, posters, pipes and magazines had been amassed by Stanley MacKenzie, an expert "Sherlockian". His wife put up the collection for auction after his death aged 82 in February. It was the most significant sale of Holmes memorabilia for 15 years and attended by fans and experts from across the world. Many smaller collectors were dismayed by the prices many of the books, magazines and posters fetched. In many cases these were double the estimate, but sometimes more...."

189. Machinal, Hélène. Conan Doyle : De Sherlock Holmes au professeur Challenger, (Interférences). Rennes: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

190. Mahoney, Mark. "Death and cricket." American Editor 82, no. 4 (2007): 5-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article states that the "Independent of London" reported the publication of an entire book of strange obituaries about human and nonhuman individuals involved in the cricket sport. The book is a collection of strange obituaries published by the Wisden Cricketers' Almanack of cricket-related obituaries 1892. The book includes the obituaries of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Anthony Ainley, Donald Eligon, Alexander Miller-Hallett, George Cecil Petter, and for a cat named "Peter the Cat."

191. McArthur, Douglas. "Hot on the trail of the master of deduction A white company? A scarlet study? Five orange pips? Look for these -- and Sherlock Holmes himself -- in the countryside that Arthur Conan Doyle once called home." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), June 5, 1999: F3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Account of a tour with Philip Weller. "My friend Peter is a Sherlockian, North America's term for otherwise sane folk who go gaga over Sherlock Holmes. The guide he had prearranged for a day tour in southern England was a Holmesian -- the British name for people similarly obsessed...."

192. McCarter, Jeremy. "One-Hit Wonder." New York Times Book Review 157, no. 54174 (2007): 15-15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the books "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

193. McDermid, Val. "Crime and the literary solution;Scotland is the spiritual home of the crime thriller but, after Wilkie Collins, the genre's greatest exponent remains an enigma." The Sunday Herald, February 20, 2000: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower (Penguin, 18.99). "Sherlock Holmes, like Coca Cola, is a brand name recognised across the globe. There are societies dedicated to studying the canon; a monthly magazine devoted to all matters Sherlockian; websites and newsgroups on the internet that discuss the great detective; and hundreds of novels and short stories picking up the character where his creator left off. Since the death of Conan Doyle, Holmes has been resurrected to meet Freud, to solve the Jack the Ripper murders, even to marry a young heiress 40 years his junior. And the house where Conan Doyle grew up in Edinburgh is marked not by a statue to the man himself, but by one of Holmes. But who is the man behind the myth? That is the question Daniel Stashower attempts to answer in this new biography...."

194. McDonald, Peter D. British literary culture and publishing practice, 1880-1914, (Cambridge studies in publishing and printing history). Cambridge, U.K, New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96039743. Includes bibliographical references (p. 217-227) and index //

195. McIntyre, Ian. "Elementary clues to a study in obstinacy." The Times (London), December 21, 1995: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Conan Doyle, by Michael Coren, Bloomsbury, Pounds 18.99. "A new life of the man who created Sherlock Holmes fails to explain his abiding obsession with spiritualism, argues Ian McIntyre....Coren, praised here and in America for his biographies of Wells and Chesterton, defines his intention as being to describe Conan Doyle the man an amalgam of the doctor, the adventurer, the journalist and above all the spiritualist. He concedes that it is what Holmes once called 'quite a three-pipe problem'. The conclusion at the end of this too-brief biographical sketch must be that on this occasion Coren did not have enough tobacco in his pouch."

196. McKuras, Julie. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on a file in the John Bennett Shaw Collection labeled "Conan Doyle Signature Hoax" involving a mystery that took place in Shrewsbury in 1915 and apparently went unnoticed until 1951.

197. ———. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the 1949 publication of John Dickson Carr's biography, The Life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

198. ———. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights an article by Gertrude Bacon in the June 1899 Strand Magazine entitled "Pigs of Celebrities" that features artwork by Arthur Conan Doyle.

199. McLaughlin, Joseph. Writing the urban jungle: reading empire in London from Doyle to Eliot. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 99043698. Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-228) and index // "Two of the book's seven chapters are 'Holmes on the Range: Frontiers Old and New in 'A Study in Scarlet'' and 'The Romance of Invasion: Cocaine and Cannibalism in 'The Sign of Four''.

200. McPherson, Lynn. "Sherlock Holmes Author 'Killed His Rival'." Sunday Mail, July 27, 2008: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It reads like the plot from one of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes novels. A top writer steals the idea for his most famous novel from a friend - then has him killed. But Holmes enthusiast Dr Rodger Garrick-Steele is convinced that's exactly what the legendary Scots writer did a century ago. He claims Conan Doyle stole the outline of The Hound Of The Baskervilles from his friend, former Daily Express editor Fletcher Robinson. And when Robinson threatened to expose the author, Conan Doyle had him poisoned...."

201. McVeigh, Tracy. "Sleuth calls for Conan Doyle's love rival to be dug from grave: Behind the fictions penned by the creator of Sherlock Holmes lies a bizarre literary tale of intrigue and mystery." The Observer, October 15, 2000: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Was Britain's greatest crime-writer and creator of the world's best-known detective novel also a killer and adulterer? The allegations have been dismissed as 'ludicrous' by the Sherlock Holmes Society, but now author Rodger Garrick-Steele is hoping to prove his case beyond doubt with the proceeds of a film planned on the subject. For 11 years he has gathered evidence to show that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle actually poisoned a man whose work he then plagiarised. The modern-day sleuth plans to have the alleged victim's body exhumed and tested to prove his theory...."

202. Mendick, Robert. "Was Conan Doyle a Killer and a Thief?; Scotland Yard Detectives to Investigate Allegation of Dark Secret Behind the Greatest of Sherlock Holmes' Mysteries." The Independent (London), September 10, 2000: 3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "'When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' Now the enduring maxim of that most cerebral of detectives Sherlock Holmes is being put to the test. It is a mystery as dark as any of those for which his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is so justly celebrated - or is he? For Scotland Yard detectives are to investigate the death, almost a century ago, of a close acquaintance of the writer - and the man accused of murder is Conan Doyle himself. And the motive? According to the research, he stole the work, The Hound of the Baskervilles - and then poisoned the true author to cover up the plagiarism...."

203. Menegaldo, Gilles, and Jean-Pierre Naugrette. R.L. Stevenson et A. Conan Doyle : aventures de la fiction : actes du colloque de Cerisy [11-18 septembre 2000], (Terres fantastiques; Littérature). Rennes: Terre de brume, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. (certaines en coul.) ; 24 cm. Comprend des références bibliographiques et un index. sous la direction de Gilles Menegaldo & Jean-Pierre Naugrette. //

204. Metress, Christopher. "Book reviews." Victorian Studies 37, no. 4 (1994): 622.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Critical Essays on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,' edited by Harold Orel.

205. Meyer-Bolzinger, Dominique. Une méthode clinique dans l'enquête policière : Holmes, Poirot, Maigret, (Collection Travaux & thèses; Paralittérature). Liège [Belgium]: Éditions du Céfal, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. Based on the author's doctoral thesis, entitled "L'Amateur d'indices. La méthode clinique du détective, dans les romans de Conan-Doyle, Agatha Christie et Georges Simenon", submitted to the Université de Haute-Alsace (Mulhouse) on 13 June 2001 (see t.p. verso). Includes bibliographical references. //

206. Michelson, Theresa. "Reviews: Non-fiction." Book Report 18, no. 2 (1999): 66.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'The Mysterious Case of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Cynthia Adams. "Young aficionados of Sherlock Holmes will be interested in this biography of Arthur Conan Doyle, which begins with his early life as a poor boy growing up in Edinburgh, the eldest son in a large Roman Catholic family. Giving sufficient attention to the roots and development of Doyle's creative gifts as a writer and storyteller, Adams shows how Doyle created and developed the character of Sherlock Holmes while working as a medical doctor, why he killed him off at the height of Holmes' popularity, and how he brought this incredibly popular fictional detective back for an adoring public. She succeeds in making major contemporary events in which Doyle was involved, such as the Boer War, understandable to a young audience. Doyle's complexity as a writer and an individual are suggested in the narrative, but the shortness of the biography allows Adams time only for a straightforward, uncomplicated treatment of his life. If Doyle is studied in your curriculum, this book will get some use from Sherlock Holmes fans. Recommended."

207. Millar, Anna. "The tragic case of Conan Doyle." The Scotsman, no. (2007).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article about an upcoming book, Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Sherlock Holmes, to be published on March 5. "A former GP last night sparked a literary row after claiming to have unearthed proof that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was schizophrenic. Doctor turned author Andrew Norman makes the claim in a new book, which uses Conan Doyle's medical records, family history and fictional works as evidence for his claim. Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Sherlock Holmes, a biography due out next month, alleges that the Edinburgh-born author inherited the mental condition from his father Charles...."

208. Moskowitz, Sam. "Studies in Science Fiction: Arthur Conan Doyle." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 33-46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

209. Muller, Alexandra. "Sleuthing Conan Doyle." New Criterion 26, no. 10 (2008): 25-29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews two books related to surgeon and writer Arthur Conan Doyle including "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

210. Murray, Stuart. Rudyard Kipling in Vermont: birthplace of The jungle books. Bennington, Vt, Hanover, N.H: Images from the Past. Centinel Co, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97018692. Includes bibliographical references (p. 181-184) and index // Contains several interesting mentions of ACD including one about ACD's visit to Vermont in 1894. The book states "During Conan Doyle's visit, Rudyard wrote 'The Mother Lodge' completing these verses in only one sitting, which was unusual for him." Since both men were Freemasons, and the poem is about a Masonic lodge, this has led at least one Doylean to "wonder what, if any, discussion took place between the two concerning the poem, and if ACD had any input into it." In response to this Doyle biographer, Andrew Lycett, noted that it was an "[i]nteresting idea - but not quite accurate. The diary of Kipling's wife Carrie reveals that in October 1894 he was working on "The Mother Lodge" which he 'wrote right off" in a day. (Don't have this diary in front of me, but I seem to recall it gives an exact date.) Conan Doyle did not arrive at the Kipling house in Vermont until 28th November, the eve of Thanksgiving, when as Memories and Adventures records the two men had an enjoyable meeting, playing golf etc. Kipling read him his poem "McAndrew's Hymn" 'which he had just done', amazing him with 'his dramatic power which enabled him to sustain the Glasgow accent throughout, so that the angular Scottish greaser simply walked the room.' This doesn't mean that the two authors didn't also speak about "The Mother Lodge" (which was clearly written in October). But I know no evidence of this."

211. Norman, Andrew. Arthur Conan Doyle beyond Sherlock Holmes. Stroud: Tempus, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-186) and index //

212. O'Hagan, Simon. "Books: the Game's Afoot! it could be a Case for Sherlock Holmes ; Arthur & George by Julian Barnes Cape GBP17.99 GBP16.99 (P&P)." Independent on Sunday (London), July 3, 2005: 23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the book. "...Indeed, it's one of Barnes's best, a beautiful and engrossing work which brings together some classic Barnesian themes (love, identity), introduces some new ones (spirituality, guilt and innocence), and hangs them all on a real-life miscarriage of justice from 100 years ago that was always going to be a gift for the first writer to spot its potential for re-imagining...."

213. Ohara, Gerald F. "Sherlock Holmes; the Alberta Connection." Alberta History [Canada] 36, no. 3 (1988): 11-14.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Sir Arthur Conan Doyle visited Alberta in 1914 and 1923, and left his mark in the form of a proposed golf course, a Jasper church dedication, and a poem called "The Athabasca Trail." He also kept a diary describing his experiences and wrote a book, Memories and Adventures.

214. Olding, Alan C. "Letter to the Editor ('The 100th Anniversary of the Death of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle')." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 144.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

215. Otis, Laura. Membranes metaphors of invasion in nineteenth-century literature, science, and politics, (Medicine & culture). Baltimore, Md: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 98029763. Includes bibliographical references and index. Scuttlebutt Feb 1999 // Between 1830 and 1930, improvements in microscopes made it possible for scientists to describe the nature and behavior of cells. Although Robert Hooke had seen cells more than 150 years earlier, new cultural stresses on individuality made nineteenth-century Western society especially receptive to cell and germ theory and encouraged the very technologies that made cells visible. Both scientists and nonscientists used images of cell structure, interaction, reproduction, infection, and disease as potent social and political metaphors. In particular, the cell membrane - and the possibility of its penetration - informed the thinking of liberals and conservatives alike. In Membranes, Laura Otis examines how the image of the biological cell became one of the reigning metaphors of the nineteenth century. Exploring a wide range of scientific, political, and literary writing, Otis uncovers surprising connections among subjects as varied as germ theory, colonialism, and Sherlock Holmes's adventures. At the heart of her story is the rise of a fundamental assumption about human identity: the idea that selfhood requires boundaries showing where the individual ends and the rest of the world begins. Chapter on "Arthur Conan Doyle: An Imperial Immune System."

216. Otter, Charlotte. "Holmes hounded by lovelorn women." Daily Mail (London), October 23, 2008: 26.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes received marriage proposals from women convinced he was a real person. The revelation comes in a newly released recording of an interview with the fictional detective's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Speaking to a BBC presenter in May, 1930 - just weeks before his death - he told how he had modelled his hero on Scots forensic science pioneer Joseph Bell. The Edinburgh-born author said: 'The result was Sherlock Holmes and the result surprised me very much as I learned that many schools of detection working around the world, from France, Egypt and China, founded their system on that of Holmes. 'For many, he seemed like a real person and I even received letters addressed to him which included proposals of marriage.' The rare recording - believed to be Conan Doyle's sole radio interview - has been released on a set of British Library CDs featuring the voices of leading 20th century UK and American authors...."

217. Owen, Richard. "Sherlock Holmes and the curious case of a scholar who detects the Bible in Conan Doyle's tales." The Times (London), November 7, 2002: 20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...The Sherlock Holmes novels were partly based on biblical stories and themes, despite Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's professed rejection of Christianity, according to a book by a Vatican scholar. Mario Palmaro, who teaches philosophy at the Regina Apostolorum Pontifical University in Rome, argues that Conan Doyle was influenced 'both consciously and unconsciously' by his early education by Jesuits. In particular, Supernatural, My Dear Watson: Sherlock Holmes and the Case of God claims that Holmes's struggle to the death with his archenemy Moriarty, and his subsequent revival in other books, mirrors Christ's Resurrection....'

218. Pascal, Janet B. Arthur Conan Doyle beyond Baker Street, (Oxford portraits). New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 99036643. Includes bibliographical references (p. 151-154) and index //

219. Paterson, Peter. "Conan the barbarian." Daily Mail (London), July 28, 2005: 53.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The Strange Case Of Sherlock Holmes And Arthur Conan Doyle (BBC2). "To make a story from the life of a real historical character, it is usually best to ignore the obvious and attribute his actions and behaviour to the most complicated explanation. Especially if you are contracted to fill 90 minutes of primetime TV. Filling the allotted span seemed to be a burden for last night's psychodrama, The Strange Case Of Sherlock Holmes And Arthur Conan Doyle...."

220. Pearce, D. N. "The illness of Dr George Turnavine Budd and its influence on the literary career of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Journal of Medical Biography 3, no. 4 (1995): 236-238.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

221. ———. "Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle and cocaine." J Hist Neurosci 3, no. 4 (1994): 227-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

222. Pendreigh, Brian. "Family's 'shame' gave birth to Sherlock Holmes; New TV drama claims drunken father was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's model for his drug-abusing detective." The Sunday Herald, November 28, 2004: 7.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A new television drama about Sherlock Holmes starring some of Scotland's top acting talent will suggest the fictional detective was based on author Arthur Conan Doyle's alcoholic father. The similarities between Holmes and Charles Doyle were never acknowledged by the author, who enjoyed fame and fortune while his father was secretly shut away in a mental institution. The drama's producer, Richard Downes, believes Charles Doyle's death in 1893 may have caused Conan Doyle to suffer a nervous breakdown and kill off his father's literary alter ego - only to resurrect him eight years later after sorting out his own personal demons...."

223. ———. "What's the big Holmes secret? It's elementary; New BBC drama claims Conan Doyle's alcoholic father explains flaws in the great detective." Mail on Sunday (London), November 28, 2004: 44-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes was the hero of dozens of classic detective novels, baffling the hapless Dr Watson with his powers of deduction. But the image of the cold, calculating Victorian gentleman always sat slightly awkwardly with his mood swings and his liking for cocaine. Now BBC producer Richard Downes believes he may have solved the mystery, controversially attributing Holmes's darker side to author Arthur Conan Doyle's alcoholic father...."

224. Peters, Catherine. The king of inventors: a life of Wilkie Collins. London: Secker & Warburg, 1991.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: gb 91057396. Includes bibliographical references (p. 475-488) and index //

225. Pfeiffer, John R., and Richard E. Winslow Iii. "A Continuing Checklist of Shaviana." Shaw: The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies 23, no. (2003): 181-201.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Lists books by and about the Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw. Includes one entry (p. 200) with reference to Doyle. 'The Titanic.' The Chronicles of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. April 2002. 19 April 2003; www.siracd.com/life_titanic.shtml. "This article is virtually entirely devoted to a recollection of the disagreement between Shaw and Doyle about how the Titanic disaster was characterized in the press. This entry is offered as an example of the choice to mention GBS by this Doyle Web site, reporting as well in a sidebar that Shaw once called Sherlock Holmes 'a drug addict without a single amiable trait.'"

226. Pirie, David. "The dark secrets of Conan Doyle." Sunday Times (London), June 10, 2001: 10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Although Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, ranks among the most famous of all Victorian writers, his life is shrouded in as much mystery as one of his stories. The pictures we have of a crusty Victorian grandee give no hint that poor Arthur almost certainly grew up in the full knowledge of his mother's infidelity with a young lodger, who supplanted his drunken, insane father at the head of his family's breakfast table. Instead, countless biographers have rehearsed what is known, even though this has largely been controlled by Conan Doyle himself, for not a single researcher has had unhampered access to his personal papers. Indeed, following bitter legal battles, these papers have not been seen for half a century, and nobody can say for sure where they are, or if they have been destroyed. In researching my novel, The Patient's Eyes (as well as the original Murder Rooms television drama and those that follow this autumn), I have been consistently amazed by what I have found. That Conan Doyle suppressed many facts, especially about his early life, has never been in doubt. But even in the published writing, such as his autobiography, there are many clues to the truth...."

227. Powell, Adam. "Where did Conan Doyle first meet Sherlock and Moriarty? Elementary school my dear Watson; Solved, mystery that baffled Holmes fans." Daily Mail (London), June 24, 2002: 31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Their names are inseparably linked in literary history. Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty - the world's greatest detective and the evil genius whose name has become a byword for a criminal mastermind. But until now the inspiration for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's two greatest creations has remained a mystery. However a simple glance at the attendance register for Stonyhurst College in 1868 has revealed that the then plain Arthur Doyle spent three years at school with a Patrick Sherlock and two Moriarty brothers, John and Michael. The logic, as Holmes would say, is elementary...."

228. Press, Charles. Looking over Sir Arthur's shoulder: how Conan Doyle turned the trick. Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisc: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references and index // "A collection of essays analyzing the techniques and appeal of the Sherlock Holmes stories."

229. Propson, David. "Sir Arthur Conundrum Doyle." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 12/08, 2007: W12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the books "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

230. Pugh, Brian W. A chronology of the life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle : May 22nd 1859 to July 7th 1930. [Lewes]: B. W. Pugh, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., ports. ; 30 cm. Privately printed by the author. Includes several lists of works by A. C. Doyle. Includes bibliographical ref. and index. //

231. Pugh, Brian W., Philip Weller, and Gary Lovisi. "Book Review (Doylean Links With London and Naples)." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 156-157.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

232. Purdon, Charles J. "Arthur Conan Doyle and Marksmanship." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 3 (1996): 11-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

233. Ramsey, Terry. "Elementary flaws spoil this Holmes." The Evening Standard (London), July 27, 2005: 19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of "The Strange Case Of Sherlock Holmes And Arthur Conan Doyle," BBC2. "Television is in its summer doldrums at the moment (as I am sure you will have noticed), which means we have to be grateful for any new, adventurous, individual drama that comes our way. But exactly how much gratitude we should feel for this confused - and confusing - work is questionable. That's not to say its version of the life of Victorian writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and his relationship with his most famous character, Sherlock Holmes, doesn't have its memorable moments - just that it also has some very frustrating ones...."

234. Redmond, Christopher. "Book Review--'Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Interviews and Recollections,' edited by Harold Orel." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 75 (1994): 40-43.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

235. Redmond, Christopher, and Doug Wrigglesworth. Welcome to Canada, Mr. Sherlock Holmes : Arthur Conan Doyle in Canada, Occasional paper (Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection). [Toronto, Ont.]: Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection of the Toronto Public Library, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., ports. ; 22 cm. "Delivered as [sic] the Cameron Hollyer Memorial Lecture for the Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Toronto Public Library, April 21, 2005"--cover. "Published... on the occasion of the ACD@35 Conference, October 2006"--verso t.p. //

236. Richardson, David. "Literary Agent, Redactor, or." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 5 (2003): 4-6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

237. Roden, Barbara. 'I am inclined to think...' musings on Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle. Ashcroft, B.C: Calabash Press, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 59). Scuttlebutt Feb 2004. // "A collection of essays published from 1988 to 2001 in Sherlockian and Doylean periodicals, on topics that range from Saucy Jack to Oliver Onions to 'The Captain of the Pole-Star'."

238. Roden, Christopher. "Review--'The Hilltop Writers' by W. R. Trotter." The Ritual, no. 18 (1996): 70-71.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

239. Rodin, Alvin E., Catherine Cooke, and Kevin Brown. "Arthur Conan Doyle in London, Part II, St. Mary's Hospital: Medicine, Spiritualism and Sion." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 74 (1994): 37-48.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

240. Rosenblum, Trudi Miller. "Adult Audio For Fall." Publishers Weekly 248, no. 32 (2001): 35.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a list of several audiotapes for adults including Naxos Audiobooks Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life by Hesketh Pearson. Read by Tim Pigott-Smith. Abridged, two cassettes, 2.5 hours, $13.98; two CDs, $15.98. Oct.

241. Sawyers, June. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Booklist 104, no. 5 (2007): 14.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "A Life in Letters: Arthur Conan Doyle."

242. Seaman, Donna. "Maps and Legends: Essays on Reading and Writing along the Borderlands." Booklist 104, no. 13 (2008): 28.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "Essays on Reading and Writing along the Borderlands: Maps and Legends" by Michael Chabon. "...He offers a fresh and affecting take on Arthur Conan Doyle and pays witty and provocative tribute to M. R. James, a seemingly serene British author of superb horror and ghost stories...."

243. Simmons, Clare A. "Tennyson and Conan Doyle: Two Medieval Worlds, One Empire." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 74 (1994): 26.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

244. Simmons, Diane. "The curse of empire: Grandiosity and guilt in the stories of Arthur Conan Doyle." Psychoanalytic Review. Electronic; 89, no. 4 (2002): 533-556.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Argues that during the later years of empire, English popular literature took on the task of managing a repressed but corrosive guilt over imperial "loot," a constant battle against a feared "curse" of empire. One of the writers to step up to that challenge was Arthur Conan Doyle, whose phenomenally popular detective, Sherlock Holmes, not only provides near magical solutions to problems besetting the English, but also explains guilt in terms of foreign contamination. The author explores the view of the imperial relationship as a narcissistic one in which it is the dual sense of self--the alternation between grandiosity on one hand, and a terrified sense of guilt, loss, and vulnerability to destruction on the other--that is the hallmark of narcissistic disturbance. A further understanding of this disturbance may provide a tool with which to probe the psychology of the British imperial public and finally the role of Sherlock Holmes in managing imperial duality. If the dangers in the Sherlock Holmes stories described by the author reveal a narcissistic vulnerability, then this vulnerability is balanced by a study in grandiosity, the omniscient and omnipotent detective Sherlock Holmes.

245. ———. The narcissism of empire loss, rage, and revenge in Thomas De Quincey, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling and Isak Dinesen. Brighton England, Portland, Or: Sussex Academic Press, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006014015. Includes bibliographical references (p. 133-139) and index //

246. Smith, Jonathan. Fact and feeling Baconian science and the nineteenth-Century literary imagination, (Science and literature). Madison, Wis: University of Wisconsin Press, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 94014014. Includes bibliographical references and index // "A scholarly discussion of the perceived (misperceived, in Smith's opinion) conflict between the scientific method and the arts. He finds interesting parallels (between Hutton's geological uniformitarianism and Eliot's The Mill on the Floss, for example), and the book ends with a chapter on Sherlock Holmes as a scientific detective. Smith explores the influence of Huxley, Tyndall, and Darwin on Conan Doyle and Holmes, and notes Albert Einstein's tribute to 'the admirable stories of Conan Doyle.'"

247. Smith, Kevin. Sherlock Holmes was a Pompey Keeper: the extraordinary history of the early Portsmouth FC. Tiverton, Devon: Halsgrove House, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Jan 2005 // March 6, 1886, two days before he wrote the first words of "A Study in Scarlet," Arthur Conan Doyle played his 31st game for the Portsmouth Football Association, nicknamed "The Original Pompey." Doyle was an avid player in the early days of the game, before the rules were written. "We could put up a very fair team in the field, and were runners-up for the County Cup the last season that I played," Conan Doyle wrote, remembering his playing association football in Portsmouth, adding that "I was always too slow, however, to be a really good back, though I was a long and safe kick." "A detailed history of the team on which Conan Doyle played, first listed as A. C. Smith and then by his own name, and the team's success continued after Conan Doyle departed."

248. Snyder, Laura J. "Sherlock Holmes: scientific detective." Endeavour 28, no. 3 (2004): 104-108.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes was intended by his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, to be a 'scientific detective'. Conan Doyle criticized his predecessor Edgar Allan Poe for giving his creation -- Inspector Dupin -- only the 'illusion' of scientific method. Conan Doyle believed that he had succeeded where Poe had failed; thus, he has Watson remark that Holmes has 'brought detection as near an exact science as it will ever be brought into the world.' By examining Holmes' methods, it becomes clear that Conan Doyle modelled them on certain images of science that were popular in mid- to late-19th century Britain. Contrary to a common view, it is also evident that rather than being responsible for the invention of forensic science, the creation of Holmes was influenced by the early development of it." [Abstract from author]

249. Sodeman, William A., Jr. "Sherlock Holmes and tropical medicine: A centennial appraisal." American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene 50, no. 1 (1994): 99-101.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Sir Arthur Conan Doyle incorporated an unidentified tropical disease as a murder weapon in the Sherlock Holmes story, "The Dying Detective," written in 1913. Documentary and circumstantial evidence suggests that the disease mentioned was melioidosis. The description of the newly identified disease occurred shortly before Doyle's death. Doyle's other works at the time reflect a consistent interest in tropical disease.

250. Stashower, Daniel. "100 Years Ago: Is "S.S.T." the Love-child of Bigfoot?" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 2, 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Comments and observations on the article "Is Doyle a Plagiarist?" in a 1901 issue of The University of Virginia Magazine by an anonymous author, S. S. T., that "presents his readers with the assertion that Conan Doyle has plagiarized the essential elements of the character of Sherlock Holmes from Poe’s fictional sleuth, C. Auguste Dupin."

251. Steinmann, Sylvie, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Fonds Arthur Conan Doyle : base de données images pour la partie iconographie du fonds. [Geneva?]: [School of Information Science?], 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM. CD-ROM: Arthur Conan Doyle [Média électronique] : base de données images. - 1 disque optique électronique (CD-ROM) ; 12 cm. Travail de diplôme Ecole d'information documentaire Genève./ Titre de la cassette du CD-ROM: Base de données images pour la partie iconographie du fonds Arthur Conan Doyle. //

252. Strebeigh, Fred. "To His Modern Fans, Sherlock is Still Worth a Close Look." Smithsonian 17, no. 9 (1986): 60-66, 68-69.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Author of historical works and of studies of spiritualism, British physician Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) is remembered chiefly for his prolific outpouring of detective stories about the fictional Sherlock Holmes, who, in the century after the first tale was published, remains a hero to his fans around the world, most particularly in the United States.

253. Sully, Andrew. "The 08 Olympics. . . 1908, that is." 7 August 2008, no. (2008): 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Discusses the 1908 Olympic Games, and ACD's possible involvement in helping Dorando Pietri across the finish line in the marathon is mentioned. The article does use the word 'possibly', and also gives a brief mention of ACD's attempts to help Pietri after the games; a quote from the author is given in a sidebar."

254. Sussman, Herbert L. "Arthur Conan Doyle and the Meaning of Masculinity, and: Conrad and Masculinity (review)." Victorian Studies 44, no. 3 (2002): 536-539.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Arthur Conan Doyle and the Meaning of Masculinity, by Diana Barsham; pp. viii + 312. Aldershot and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 2000, GBP49.50, $69.95; and Conrad and Masculinity, by Andrew Michael Roberts; pp. xi + 250. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2001, GBP45.00, $55.00. Multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

255. Sutherland, John. "Literary lives." New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm. Scuttlebutt May 2002. // "A collection of essays from supplements to the Dictionary of National Biography, including an essay by A. Cochrane on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (first published in 1937)."

256. ———. "The mysterious waller." Tls, no. (1997): 30.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'The Doctor, The Detective, and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Biography of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Martin Booth.

257. Sveum, Richard J. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the publication of the final installment of Grant Allen's "Hilda Wade" and makes some additional observations on Allen and Doyle's friendship with Allen.

258. Taves, Brian. "Forgotten Influences of Jules Verne on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Baker Street West 1 3, no. 3 (1997): 9-10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

259. Terr, Stephen. "Millennium memories: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Evening Times (Glasgow), January 3, 2001: 10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Very brief biographical sketch of Doyle.

260. Terras, Donald J., and C. Frederick Kittle. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes : Essays and Art on the Doctor and the Detective. [Chicago]: Northeastern Illinois University Press, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- C. Frederick Kittle Collection of Doyleana (Newberry Library) ; ill., ports. ; 26 cm. Dr. Kittle and Dr. Doyle : kinsmen through medicine and belle letters / by Robert Cotner -- Have you a 'reminiscences' in your attic / by Raymond L. Betzner -- A doctor's unjaundiced look at the Victorian medical scene (or, Eschewing the syringe for the pen) / by Ely M. Liebow -- Down the slopes with Conan Doyle at Davos (the birth of skiing) / by C. Frederick Kittle -- The magic doors / by Julie McKuras -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle on stamps / by Marshall Blankenship -- Military intelligence? Jumbo shrimp? What about amateur mendicant? / by Susan Rice -- The romance of medicine for doctors Doyle and Kittle / by Richard J. Sveum -- Arthur Conan Doyle visits Chicago, 1894 / by C. Frederick Kittle -- Kittle collection of Doyleana, Newberry Library Chicago. Core collection -- Appendix. A chronology of books by Arthur Conan Doyle: 1859-1930. "Commemorating the Kittle Collection of Doyleana, Newberry Library, April 11, 2003."/ Laid in: Program for Doyle exhibit dinner, April 11, 2003./ Includes bibliographical references. Compiled and edited by Donald J. Terras. //

261. Thomas, Ronald R. "The Fingerprint of the Foreigner: Colonizing the Criminal Body in 1890s Detective Fiction and Criminal Anthropology." ELH 61, no. 3 (1994): 655-83.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Extensive reference to Doyle and Holmes. "This essay examines the relationship between George Eliot's representation of the Jewish body in "Daniel Deronda" and Francis Galton's photographic race-science. It argues that, for both Eliot and Galton, Jewish racial identity is, paradoxically, defined..."

262. Thompson, Kenneth. "Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle (review)." Victorian Studies 47, no. 4 (2006): 609-611.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle, by Lawrence Frank; pp. x + 249. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003, GBP47.50, $90.00. Contains multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

263. Thoms, Peter. Detection & its designs: narrative & power in 19th-century detective fiction. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97035273. Includes bibliographical references (p. 169-174) and index // "The author uses Conan Doyle as one of several early detective-fiction authors, and devotes a chapter to "The Hound of the Baskervilles".

264. Toronto Reference Library, and Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection. The magic door. Toronto, Ont., Canada: Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Toronto Reference Library, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

265. Travis, Alan. "G-men rallied to aid Sherlock Holmes : Scotland Yard turned to FBI to find Conan Doyle collection." The Guardian (London), February 15, 2001: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "J. Edgar Hoover called in his special network of 'G-men' when Scotland Yard turned to the FBI for help in solving the case of the disappearance of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's crime library from his house at Crowborough in Sussex. The Metropolitan police case file released yesterday at the public record office shows that Conan Doyle's two sons and heirs, Denis and Adrian, appealed for Scotland Yard's help in 1945 when an American magazine led them to suspect that the collection of real crime stories their father had used to create the plots and character of Sherlock Holmes stories had been stolen...."

266. Trump, Simon. "Conan Doyle Accused of Baskerville Betrayal." The Toronto Star, September 11, 2000: E 07.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Rodger Garrick-Steele, a writer from Dawlish, Devon, has spent 11 years researching a new book on [Arthur Conan Doyle]'s relationship with Bertram Fletcher Robinson, a journalist and the largely unsung co- author of The Hound Of The Baskervilles. He claims Conan Doyle colluded with his publishers to deny Fletcher Robinson recognition for devising the plot and supplying much of the local detail. Christopher Frayling, rector of the Royal College of Art and an authority on Conan Doyle, also believes Fletcher Robinson was unfairly treated...." Article also appeared in the Ottawa Citizen the previous day.

267. Tweedie, Neil. "Vengeful butler is prime suspect in Holmes' last case." The Daily Telegraph (London), February 15, 2001: 12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It was a whodunnit worthy of fiction's greatest detective. The crime library of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes, vanishes with a treasure map shortly before his death only to resurface on the far side of the Atlantic in the hands of an American collector. Was it the work of the author himself, or could it have been the final revenge of the butler he dismissed? The mystery of the 79 books came to occupy the finest minds in Scotland Yard and the FBI when the British enlisted the help of J Edgar Hoover to establish who had stolen the raw material for the adventures of literature's most famous sleuth. The story, contained in Scotland Yard files released at the Public Record Office yesterday, began in June 1946, when Insp Symes of the Metropolitan Police CID was visited by Sir Arthur's sons, Denis and Adrian...."

268. Valente, Joseph. "The Colonial Conan Doyle: British Imperialism, Irish Nationalism and the Gothic (review)." Victorian Studies 46, no. 4 (2005): 694-696.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of The Colonial Conan Doyle: British Imperialism, Irish Nationalism and the Gothic, by Catherine Wynne; pp. 224. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2003, $75.00.

269. Wachter, Phyllis Ethel, and William Todd Schultz. "Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2002-2003." Biography 26, no. 4 (2004): 625-711.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a reference to Doyle. Simmons, Diane. "The Curse of Empire: Grandiosity and Guilt in the Stories of Arthur Conan Doyle." Psychoanalytic Review 89.4 (2002): 533- 56. "Examines Doyle's history of loss and his 'narcissistic dualism' to gain an understanding of the psychic life of the British public during the high point of imperialism."

270. Weller, Philip. The Hampshire Papers. Fareham, Hampshire: Sherlock Publications, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Loose-leaf reprints of Hampshire newspaper articles by and about Conan Doyle.

271. Weller, Philip, and Gianluca Salvatori. Sotto ordini del medico e sotto il sole Italiano : una lettera da Arthur Conan Doyle a William Gillette = Under doctor's orders and under the Italian sun : a letter from Arthur Conan Doyle to William Gillette, (Studies in Scarlet; n. 1). Firenze: Uno Studio in Holmes, Tipolitografia Pegaso, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 21 cm. Printed in an edition of 221 copies. "The following volume set in Baskerville font ... comprises in addition to the facsimile of a letter from Arthur Conan Doyle to William Gillette. Notes by Philip Weller in English. Translated into awful Italian by Gianluca Salvatori."--Colophon. "Printed in Florence by Tipolitografia Pegaso on the day of Saint Matilde in the year 2002."--Colophon. Bound in printed paper wrappers. //

272. White, Kathryn. "Review--'Myth and Modern Man in Sherlock Holmes: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Uses of Nostalgia' by David S. Payne." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 111-113.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

273. ———. "Sherlockian Seeds: Arthur Conan Doyle at Stonyhurst." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 38-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

274. Whittington-Egan, Richard. "The Man Behind Sherlock Holmes." Contemporary Review 289, no. 1687 (2007): 518-519.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett.

275. Wilson, A. N. "In Holmes's shadow." TLS, no. (2000): 36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

276. Wilson, Frances. "Man of mystery." New Statesman 137, no. 4860 (2007): 54-54.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Conan Doyle: the man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett.

277. Winks, Robin W., and Maureen Corrigan. Mystery and suspense writers the literature of crime, detection, and espionage, (The Scribner writers series). New York: Scribner's Sons, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 98036812. Contents: v. 1. Margery Allingham to John D. MacDonald -- v. 2. Ross MacDonald to women of mystery. Includes bibliographical references and index // Includes a 30-page essay on Arthur Conan Doyle by Owen Dudley Edwards.

278. Woods, Audrey. "Mystery Attends Conan Doyle Auction; Sale Follows Strange Death of Sherlock Holmes Scholar." St. Louis Post-Dispatch (St. Louis, MO), May 16, 2004: A.15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts got a rare glimpse into the private world of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as thousands of personal papers - from his passport to his jotted-down story ideas - went on display Friday. At the same time, the archive has become entwined in a mystery worthy of Conan Doyle's celebrated fictional detective: the bizarre death of a Holmes scholar. The papers are to be auctioned Wednesday, perhaps to disappear again into the obscurity of private ownership, a fate that had obsessed Richard Lancelyn Green, a former chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London...."

279. Wrigglesworth, Doug. Arthur Conan Doyle in Canada : travels in Canada by the creator of Sherlock Holmes, including an annotated bibliography of related holdings in the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection of the Toronto Public Library, Occasional paper (Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection of the Toronto Public Library). Toronto, Ont.: Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., ports. ; 22 cm. Scuttlebutt Jul 2005. //

280. Wyatt, Neal. "The Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Reader (Book)." Library Journal 127, no. 9 (2002): 97.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book The Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Reader: From Sherlock Holmes to Spiritualism, by Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Jeffrey and Valerie Meyers.

281. Wynne, Catherine. The colonial Conan Doyle: British imperialism, Irish nationalism, and the gothic, (Contributions to the study of world literature). Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2001058344. Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]-205) and index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2005 // "An academic examination of the many Irish aspects, allusions, and echoes in Conan Doyle's writings."

282. Zinoman, Jason. "A Court Full of Chaos, a Trial Crammed With Questions." New York Times, May 28, 2008: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of 'Prisoner of the Crown' playing through July 6, 2008 at the Irish Repertory Theater. "The 1916 trial of Sir Roger Casement had everything a dramatist could want: salacious revelations, media manipulation, star cameos (George Bernard Shaw and Arthur Conan Doyle were among those appealing for clemency), political intrigue and a central character wrapped in mystery. Sir Roger (played here by Philip Goodwin) was an Irish patriot and former British diplomat who was arrested on charges of treason during World War I after returning from Germany, where he was seeking aid for the Irish independence movement. During the trial, in which he was convicted, the government released his diaries. Those revealed a homosexual private life and were circulated, as the courtroom drama 'Prisoner of the Crown' suggests, in an effort to influence public opinion. 'Was that really why they hanged Sir Roger?' a narrator asks leadingly early on." [Abstract from publisher]

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies (1)

1. Lellenberg, Jon L., ed. The Quest for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: thirteen biographers in search of a life. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1987.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 87009529. Includes bibliographical references and index. Citations: De Waal C4400. With a foreword by Jean Conan Doyle. //

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Booth (9)

1. Barrow, Andrew. "Similarity is Almost Invariably a Clue." Spectator 279, no. 8821 (1997): 35.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the books 'The Doctor, the Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Martin Booth and 'Playing the Game: A Biography of Sir Henry Newbolt,' by Susan Chitty.

2. Booth, Martin. The doctor and the detective: a biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. 1st U.S. ed. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. [355]-357) and index //

3. ———. The Doctor and the Detective: a biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. New York: Thomas Dunne Books, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Originally published: The doctor, the detective, and Arthur Conan Doyle. London : Hodder and Stoughton, c1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. [355]-357) and index. //

4. ———. The Doctor, the Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle : a biography of Arthur Conan Doyle. 1st U.S. ed. New York: St. Martin's, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [355]-357) and index. //

5. ———. The Doctor, the Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle : a biography of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Coronet, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., ports. ; 18 cm. Originally published: London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1997. Includes bibliographical references and index. //

6. ———. The Doctor, the Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle : a biography of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [355]-357) and index. //

7. Cooksey, Thomas L. "Book Reviews: Arts & Humanities." Library Journal 125, no. 1 (2000): 102.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'The Doctor and the Detective: A Biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Martin Booth.

8. Macintyre, Ben. "The Mystery of the Stradivarius of Scotland Yard." The Times (London), August 7, 1997: 33.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of The Doctor, the Detective and Arthur Conan Doyle by Martin Booth, Hodder & Stoughton, Pounds 20 ISBN 0 340 64897 X. "Japanese tourists drift down Baker Street in ever-increasing numbers looking for the home of Sherlock Holmes. The stories of the fictional detective have been translated into virtually every language, including Esperanto, Eskimo and Pitman's shorthand. The Scotland Yard database is called 'Holmes', and letters still arrive there requesting the detective's help. Holmes has even invaded the German dictionary with 'sherlockieren', meaning 'to deduce. Sherlock Holmes is probably the single most popular character in literary history, far better-known than his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. As Martin Booth observes in his admirably balanced, new biography of the author, no one would have been more surprised and probably peeved at the astonishing breadth of the Sherlock Holmes cult than Conan Doyle himself, who regarded that aspect of his prodigious oeuvre as 'a lower stratum of literary achievement'. He was desperate to kill off the detective, did so, and then reluctantly resurrected him again. Mr Booth makes a valiant, but only partially successful case in support of Conan Doyle's assertion that his historical novels, poetry and works of history formed a most substantial contribution to literature. Measured against the Sherlock Holmes canon, the first of the blockbuster phenomenon, these are thin and often wildly cranky...."

9. Zaleski, Jeff, and Paul Gediman. "Forecasts: Nonfiction." Publishers Weekly 246, no. 51 (1999): 72.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book The Doctor and the Detective: A Biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, by Martin Booth.

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Carr (4)

1. Carr, John Dickson. Kenan Dao'er di yi sheng. 1st ed, (Fu'ermosi tan an quan ji). Taibei Shi: Lian pu wen hua shi ye gu fen you xian gong si, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Cover title./ Translation of: The life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Kenan Daoer de yi sheng Yuehan Dikesheng Ka'er zhu ; Wang Zhiyi yi = The life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle / by John Dickson Carr. / Uniform Title: Life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Chinese //

2. ———. The life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- "Bibliographical archives": p. 285-295 //

3. ———. The Life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Princeton, NJ: Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2007. Sound Recording Sound disc.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital, mono, ; 4 3/4 in. Originally published: New York : Carroll & Graf, 2003, c1949. 2nd Carroll & Graf trade paperback ed. Includes bibliographical references (p. 285-295). Distribution is restricted to RFB&D members who have a documented print disability such as a visual impairment, learning disability or other physical disability. // [This book] takes Doyle from his school days at Stonyhurst to Edinburgh University and eventually a medical practice at Southsea, where he invented the eccentric and brilliantly scientific criminal investigator Holmes.... [The book] also explores the private tragedy of Doyle's first marriage, his forays into politics, his infatuation with spiritualism, his literary ambitions, and intimate dinner-table conversations with friends like H.G. Wells and King Edward VII. -Back cover.

4. Carr, John Dickson, and Daniel Stashower. The life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. 2nd Carroll & Graf ed. New York: Carroll & Graf, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes biographical references ( p. 285-295) and index //

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Coren (7)

1. Bemrose, John. "A life with Sherlock." Maclean's 109, no. 6 (1996): 60.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the biography Conan Doyle, by Michael Coren.

2. Byfield, Virginia. "The man who created Holmes." Alberta Report / Newsmagazine 23, no. 20 (1996): 39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Conan Doyle,' by Michael Coren.

3. Carpenter, Humphrey. "Give us a clue." The Sunday Times (London), November 12, 1995: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Michael Coren's biography of Doyle.

4. Coren, Michael. Conan Doyle. London: Bloomsbury, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 206-207); Scuttlebutt Nov 1995 // "It's both entertaining and informative. Authors aren't responsible for publisher's blurbs, so don't be put off by claims that it's a definitive biography, or that Conan Doyle was an atheist, or that Conan Doyle loved another woman throughout his marriage (Coren notes in the text that he did not have access to the family archives, and does not suggest that Conan Doyle was an atheist, and reports that Conan Doyle married Louise Hawkins in 1885 and first met Jean Leckie in 1897). Coren has some new information discovered in G. K. Chesterton's papers, but otherwise depends greatly on previous biographers (but there also is some evidence that Coren wrote more than his publisher was willing to publish, perhaps aiming at a general public more than at Sherlockians and Doyleans, who may be disappointed at finding little material that is truly new)."

5. Craig, Patricia. "Elementary." New Statesman & Society 9, no. 385 (1996): 40.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book, 'Conan Doyle,' by Michael Coren.

6. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--'Conan Doyle' by Michael Coren." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 75-76.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Marchand, Philip. "Holmes' creator made a great Watson The young Conan Doyle got his start penning magazine stories based on blood and thunder popular fiction Conan Doyle." The Toronto Star, January 13, 1996: K14.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Michael Coren's biography of Doyle. "Not long after Arthur Conan Doyle published the first of his Sherlock Holmes stories in 1887, he met Oscar Wilde at a literary dinner party in London. Oddly enough, as Michael Coren notes in Conan Doyle, his biographical study of the Scottish author, the two got on famously....Such a significant character could not have come from the brain of an insignificant man, and Coren, a noted broadcaster and print journalist living in Toronto, underlines just what a fascinating and multifaceted character Arthur Conan Doyle was. To be sure, Doyle was nowhere near as brilliant as G. K. Chesterton, or as accomplished a fiction writer as H. G. Wells, the subjects of Coren's two previous biographies. But Coren has chosen for his third biography a man whose life, embodying so many of the confusions and passions of an era, exceeds in interest both Chesterton's and Wells'...."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Lycett (17)

1. "A man divided." Economist 385, no. 8549 (2007): 98-99.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article reviews the books "Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg.

2. "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 41 (2007): 53-53.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the Doyle biography by Andrew Lycett. Free Press, $30 (416p) ISBN 978-0-7432-7523-1

3. "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 19 (2007): 1037-1037.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett.

4. "Reviewed Elsewhere." Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 30, no. 4 (2007): 670-723.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews several books from different sources including Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes. Andrew Lycett . London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2007. 525 pp. "In the public mind Conan Doyle is forever associated with his cerebral detective and loyal assistant Dr. Watson. Yet throughout his productive life Doyle considered himself foremost as the author of medieval tales and historical novels. For him, the Sherlock Holmes short stories and the ghostly Hound of the Baskervilles were a welcome source of additional income until he tired of his own creation and had the detective conveniently killed, only to have to resuscitate him at the urging of his many readers, including Queen Victoria. But the reality of Doyle’s life was much darker. As Lycett points out in his excellent biography, Doyle spent all his life pulled between the factual and the imaginative. The central paradox of his life was his 'becoming a spiritualist so soon after creating the quintessentially rational Sherlock Holmes.' Through spiritualism, Doyle sought to contact the recently bereaved but also to insulate himself from daily reality. Much of his later writing was marked by strange theories such as The Coming of the Fairies and The Case for Spirit Photography. Nevertheless, he was a shrewd investor, and died both famous and wealthy. Guardian Weekly, Oct. 5-11, 2007: 34-35.

5. "Top 10 Biographies." Booklist 104, no. 19 (2008): 29-29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article reviews the books "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett, "The Pirate Queen: Queen Elizabeth I, Her Pirate Adventures, and the Dawn of Empire," by Susan Ronald, and "The Tenth Muse: My Life in Food," by Judith Jones.

6. "The World of Paperbacks." Contemporary Review 290, no. 1691 (2008): 521-524.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Lists a few titles related to Doyle and Holmes. "Also from Phoenix we have...Andrew Lycett's Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes (GBP10.99) whose hardback edition was hailed in this journal as 'the best and . . . certainly the fullest' biography of the writer...Vintage Classics have brought out Arthur Conan Doyle's famous novel. The Hound of the Baskervilles and have included with it not only the short story, The Adventure of the Speckled Band, which Doyle judged his best story, but an introduction by Ruth Rendell and all for GBP5.99....The life of Arthur Conan Doyle is arguably best seen in his correspondence and Harper Perennial has brought out Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters (GBP12.99), edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley. The review of the hardback edition praised this 'valuable collection', based on Doyle's letters to his mother, letters which were 'frank and revealing'and which showed his 'many and varied interests'...."

7. Alberge, Dalya. "The spirited beginning of Sherlock Holmes." The Times (London), September 15, 2007: 28.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes may have been the epitome of scientific reason, but Arthur Conan Doyle, his creator, was obsessed by seances and spiritualism. Notebooks describing his earliest contact with mediums and psychic phenomena have emerged this week, 120 years after he wrote them, proving that his interest in seances had started 30 years earlier than previously thought. The author was working as a doctor in Portsmouth when he attended his first seance in 1887, the year that he published his first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet....The contents of the notebooks, which date from 1885 to 1889, are disclosed in a new biography, Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes, by Andrew Lycett...."

8. Christensen, Bryce. "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Booklist 104, no. 5 (2007): 14.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes" by Andrew Lycett.

9. Elborn, Geoffrey. "Conan Doyle - the Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes." The Sunday Herald, September 9, 2007: 43.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Andrew Lycett's biography. "...Doyle's fiction will always be dominated by the most celebrated detective in the world, a character he grew to despise and prematurely kill off, and who remains more famous than Doyle himself. His other writing will be read because of Holmes and better understood as a result of Lycett's brilliant analysis."

10. Gilchrist, Jim. "Not so elementary." The Scotsman, no. (2007): 22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "'I think when I started out, inevitably, I had a fairly naive view of him,' says [Andrew Lycett], 'based on the available evidence, which tended to present this rather upright English gentleman, forever taking up causes and, of course, his life dominated by writing Sherlock Homes.' We're talking in London, at the Primrose Hill flat of his partner, the literary photographer Sue Greenhill, and he has just obliged our own photographer by donning a T-shirt emblazoned with the single word 'Elementary'. Doyle (whose immortal detective never actually use the phrase 'elementary my dear [John H Watson]', until an 1899 stage dramatisation by the American actor William Gillette) would turn out to be rather more complicated than Lycett expected. 'Now, after looking into his life in some detail, I suppose I'm more aware of the warts-and-all aspect of his character, and that there were these contradictions. I'm much more aware of his sheer complexity and, in a way, I look to Edinburgh as a metaphor for that. It was Robert Louis Stevenson who alighted on the 'divided city' aspect of Edinburgh and you get that in Conan Doyle's character - the fascination with the supernatural alongside that strong belief in reason and science.' But even the field of Conan Doyle scholarship turned out not to be without its dark side: during Lycett's period of research, a leading Doyle scholar and archivist, Richard Lancelyn Green, was found dead amid strange circumstances. Amid the conspiracy theories, Lancelyn Green's own massive collection, as he had bequeathed, went to the City of Portsmouth, where Doyle practised as a doctor and where Lycett was eventually able to access it - though not without some help from the actor and broadcaster Stephen Fry, who is patron of the collection. Among so much fresh documentary material the biographer was able to 'flesh out the details' of the author's close relationship with his second wife while his first, Louise, was dying of tuberculosis. The established picture was one of Doyle, although fond of [Jean Leckie], doing the honourable thing of the day. Lycett refers to Leckie as Doyle's 'mistress', but how certain is he that, prior to Louise's death and his marriage to Leckie in 1907, theirs was a physical affair? 'I think he was in this awful dilemma. He had this wife who was ill, who I don't think he was very passionate about but who he respected and liked. He did his best for her in many ways, taking her abroad to try and ensure she'd live longer. However, during this period he met and fell in love with this younger, attractive and in many ways more suitable woman.'"

11. Goldfarb, Clifford S. "Reviewed Elsewhere." Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 31, no. 2 (2008): 313-365.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Several excerpts from various books are presented which include Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes. Andrew Lycett. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2007. 527 pp. $39.95. The review is by Clifford Goldfard and appeared in the Globe and Mail, Jan. 19, 2008 page D8. "...this is certainly the best biography we have had, and well worth reading by anyone interested in the life and times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, fans of Victorian and Edwardian literature and Sherlockian enthusiasts."

12. Guttman, Jon. "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." British Heritage 29, no. 4 (2008): 58-58.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "The Man who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett.

13. Johri, Vikram. "The Mystery of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." St. Petersburg Times (Florida), November 18, 2007: 10L.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...Arthur Conan Doyle is best known as the creator of Sherlock Holmes, the Baker Street sleuth who, along with his sidekick, Dr. Watson, solved many an intractable mystery. Many readers know less about other facets of Doyle's personality, notably his late-life interest in the occult - areas biographer Andrew Lycett explores in The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes...."

14. Lycett, Andrew. Conan Doyle the man who created Sherlock Holmes. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

15. ———. The man who created Sherlock Holmes: the life and times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. 1st Free Press hardcover ed. New York: Free Press, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007034816. Includes bibliographical references (p. 479-509) and index //

16. McCarter, Jeremy. "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 31, no. 1 (2008): 177-177.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett.

17. Sims, Michael. "Beyond Baker Street; Remembering Conan Doyle only as the inventor of Sherlock Holmes is a crime." The Washington Post, January 27, 2008: T9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, by Andrew Lycett (Free Press. 557 pp. $30) and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley (Penguin Press. 706 pp. $37.95).

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Miller (1)

1. "The Adventures of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Biography." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 20 (2008): 1104-1104.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "The Adventures of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Biography," by Russell Miller. "Balanced, highly readable biography of Sherlock Holmes's phenomenally prolific creator, who began his career as a hardheaded physician and ended it with a daffy devotion to Spiritualism and an adamant advocacy for existence of fairies."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Pascal (1)

1. "Resources for the classroom." Curriculum Review 39, no. 9 (2000): 12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Offers information on teaching and educational resources. Includes mention of both Doyle and Holmes in notice of Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Baker Street. "Whenever there was excitement or danger, wherever important events were taking place, wherever he felt he could be useful, Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) could be found near the front lines, enthusiastically doing twice as much work as anyone else, having a wonderful time. And helping to lift everyone else's spirits. Nevertheless, whether he was harpooning whales in the Arctic, competing with German officers in a road race, introducing skis to the Alps, stitching wounds on the front lines, or fighting to save a wrongly condemned man from the gallows, in the eyes of the public, he was always the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and the public never let him forget it. But as readers of Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Baker Street will learn, the Holmes tales were only a tiny part of the author's literary output and something he never took very seriously. This first biography of the man written for young adults takes a seriously engaging look at Doyle." (Oxford University Press)

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Pearsall (1)

1. Dillon, David A. "Conan Doyle (Book)." Library Journal 102, no. 22 (1977): 2501.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Conan Doyle: A Biographical Solution,' by Ronald Pearsall.

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Pearson (2)

1. Pearson, Hesketh, and Tim Pigott-Smith. Arthur Conan Doyle a life. [Germany?]: NAXOS Audiobooks, 2001. Sound Recording (CD) 2 sound discs (2 hr., 38 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Classic literature with classical music. Compact discs. Abridged. Book published in 1943 under title: Conan Doyle, his life and art. Read by Tim Pigott-Smith. Abridged by David Timson; produced by Nicolas Soames; edited by Sarah Butcher. //

2. Pearson, Hesketh, David Timson, and Tim Pigott-Smith. Arthur Conan Doyle a life. [Redhill, Surrey, U.K.]: Naxos AudioBooks, 2001. Sound Recording (cassette) 2 sound cassettes (ca. 2 hr., 38 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, Dolby processed. Classic literature with classical music. Abridgement of: Conan Doyle, his life and art / by Hesketh Pearson; abridged by David Timson. Recorded at Motivation Sound Studios, London. Read by Tim Pigott-Smith. // Though most well-known as the creator of Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle was also responsible for many other works, including short stories, science fiction, and historical fiction. In this comprehensive biography, drawn heavily from Doyle's own autobiographical works and information from Doyle's circle of friends and family, Pearson considers how Doyle's life is reflected in his many books-- including his background as a doctor and his enduring (and public) belief in spiritualism.

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Simmons (1)

1. "Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2002 --2003." Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 26, no. 4 (2003): 625-711.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Features books on biography. Includes following reference: Simmons, Diane. "The Curse of Empires Grandiosity and Guilt in the Stories of Arthur Conan Doyle." Psychoanalytic Review 89.4 (2002): 533-56. "Examines Doyle's history of loss and his 'narcissistic dualism' to gain an understanding of the psychic life of the British public during the high point of imperialism."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Stashower (13)

1. "The Gullible Creator of Sherlock Holmes." The Toronto Star, May 16, 1999: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Daniel Stashower's Teller of Tales. "...As a London bookseller told American Daniel Stashower, author of Teller Of Tales: The Life Of Arthur Conan Doyle, 'Doyle went a bit potty at the end, didn't he?' Certainly it's intriguing, to say the least, that the creator of the world's ultra-rational detective and thinking machine ended up seeing fairies at the bottom of his garden. Not at all elementary, you might say (which Holmes wouldn't, since it turns out he never used that much abused phrase). Yet there must surely be something in the connection between Sherlock Holmes and his incongruous author. After all, both are spun from the same ectoplasm (Doyle, I mean). So it was in anticipation of a daring and maybe even creepy ride that I turned to Teller Of Tales, which spends about a quarter of its bulk on the issue. Only to be disappointed...."

2. "Reviewed Elsewhere." Biography 23, no. 3 (2000): 583-638.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes Doyle reference. Doyle, Arthur Conan. Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. Daniel Stashower. London: Allen Lane/Penguin, 1999. 472 pp. GBP18.99. "Stashower is wonderfully gentle and quite sympathetic to Doyle. . . ." He is "particularly good at describing the way in which Conan Doyle . . . entered into the weird world of the paranormal. . . . [T]his is a good, solid and above all sympathetic introduction" to the life. A. N. Wilson. TLS, Feb. 25, 2000: 36

3. "Reviewed Elsewhere." Biography 23, no. 1 (1999): 264-301.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes Doyle reference. Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. Daniel Stashower. New York: Holt, 1999. 472 pp. $32.50. "Daniel Stashower's rather jaunty biography returns us to the days of George Gissing and New Grub Street, the age of an awakening mass literacy and of popular fiction magazines like The Strand, the perhaps latent connection between Victorian optimism and the stirrings of science fiction." Christopher Hitchens. NYRB, Nov. 4, 1999: 25

4. "Teller of Tales (Book)." Publishers Weekly 246, no. 11 (1999): 41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

5. Stashower, Daniel. Teller of Tales : the life of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Allen Lane, the Penguin Press, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Originally published: New York : Henry Holt, 1999. Includes bibliographical references and index. //

6. ———. Teller of Tales : the life of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Allen Lane, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Originally published: New York: Henry Holt, 1999. //

7. ———. Teller of Tales : the life of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Penguin, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., ports. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. //

8. ———. Teller of Tales : the life of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Penguin, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., facsim., ports. ; 20 cm. Originally published: New York: Henry Holt, 1999; London: Allen Lane, 2000. Includes bibliographical references and index. //

9. ———. Teller of tales: the life of Arthur Conan Doyle. 1st ed. New York: Holt, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 98035059. Includes bibliographical references and index // "This biography examines the extraordinary life and strange contrasts of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the struggling provincial doctor who became the most popular storyteller of his age."--Book jacket. "From his youthful exploits aboard a whaling ship to his often stormy friendships with such figures as Harry Houdini and George Bernard Shaw, Arthur Conan Doyle lived a life as gripping as one of his own adventures. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written, Teller of Tales sets aside many myths and misconceptions to present a vivid portrait of the man behind the legend of Baker Street, with a particular emphasis on the Psychic Crusade that dominated his final years - the work that Conan Doyle himself felt to be "the most important thing in the world.""--Book jacket

10. ———. Teller of tales: the life of Arthur Conan Doyle. 1st Owl Books ed. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 98035059. Includes bibliographical references and index // "This biography examines the extraordinary life and strange contrasts of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the struggling provincial doctor who became the most popular storyteller of his age." "From his youthful exploits aboard a whaling ship to his often stormy friendships with such figures as Harry Houdini and George Bernard Shaw, Arthur Conan Doyle lived a life as gripping as one of his own adventures. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written, Teller of Tales sets aside many myths and misconceptions to present a vivid portrait of the man behind the legend of Baker Street, with a particular emphasis on the Psychic Crusade that dominated his final years - the work that Conan Doyle himself felt to be "the most important thing in the world.""--Book jacket

11. Stashower, Daniel, and Richard Matthews. Teller of tales the life of Arthur Conan Doyle. Newport Beach, CA: Books on Tape, 2001. Sound Recording 11 sound cassettes (ca. 90 min. each).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Unabridged. Read by Richard Matthews. // A biography of Arthur Conan Doyle, the 19th century physician, portraying him as more than the creator of Sherlock Holmes. He wrote historical novels, he ran for parliament, he served as a medical officer in the Boer War and he crusaded for spiritualism.

12. Taylor, D. J. "Under investigation." Sunday Times (London), February 13, 2000: 39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. by Daniel Stashower. "...Teller of Tales is a highly competent recapitulation of most of the known facts about Conan Doyle - possibly a bit too enthusiastic about the spiritualist fixation, which could have been done at half the length. As an attempt to see him in the round, Stashower's study is never less than interesting. And yet, however thoroughly put through his paces, however cunningly introduced to aspects of the modern dressage, you fear that its subject turns out to have been a one-trick pony after all."

13. Walton, David. "Sherlock Holmes's Maker." The New York Times Book Review, May 2, 1999: 34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of "Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle" by Daniel Stashower.

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Biographies -- Stavert (1)

1. Rawlinson, Nora, and Charles Bishop. "A Study in Southsea (Book)." Library Journal 113, no. 13 (1988): 160.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'A Study in Southsea: The Unrevealed Life of Doctor Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Geoffrey Stavert.

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Adrian Conan Doyle (2)

1. Doyle, Adrian Conan. "Thoughts From A. Conan Doyle -- the other one." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 3 (1998): 27-29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Travis, Alan. "G-men rallied to aid Sherlock Holmes : Scotland Yard turned to FBI to find Conan Doyle collection." The Guardian (London), February 15, 2001: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "J. Edgar Hoover called in his special network of 'G-men' when Scotland Yard turned to the FBI for help in solving the case of the disappearance of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's crime library from his house at Crowborough in Sussex. The Metropolitan police case file released yesterday at the public record office shows that Conan Doyle's two sons and heirs, Denis and Adrian, appealed for Scotland Yard's help in 1945 when an American magazine led them to suspect that the collection of real crime stories their father had used to create the plots and character of Sherlock Holmes stories had been stolen...."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Anna Maria (1)

1. Brennan, Bonaventure R. S. M. It commenced with two: the story of Mary Ann Doyle, first companion of Catherine McAuley. Dublin: Sisters of Mercy, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Jul 2002. // "The Doyles were an interesting family. James and Catherine Tynan Doyle of Dublin had six children, one of them the artist John Doyle (the grandfather of Arthur Conan Doyle); another was a daughter, Anna Maria Doyle, who isn't mentioned in any of biographies of Sir Arthur. But his grand-aunt now has her own biography....Anna Maria was born in Dublin in 1801; she met Catherine McAuley in 1827, and they became nuns in 1831, Anna Maria taking the name Sister Mary Ann. She helped found the Sisters of Mercy, and served the poor in Ireland until her death in 1866."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Charles Altamont Doyle (5)

1. Beveridge, A. "What Became of Arthur Conan Doyle's Father?: The Last Years of Charles Altamont Doyle." Journal of the Royal College of Physicians Edinburgh 36, no. (2006): 264-270.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "This paper examines the fate of Arthur Conan Doyle's father, Charles Altamont Doyle, a Victorian illustrator, who spent his last years as an asylum inmate. Based on new archival research, it looks at the reasons for his institutionalisation and what befell him during his stay. It will consider Doyle's claim that he was wrongfully confined and also the suggestion that his family were responsible for having him committed. Finally, the paper will examine the nature of Doyle's condition and the creative work he produced whilst an asylum inmate."

2. Grant, Graham. "Why was Sherlock Holmes killed off in his prime? The true answer is less than elementary." Daily Mail (London), January 8, 2005: 38-39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...Browsing through the deluge of angry letters from loyal readers in the pages of national newspapers that appeared after Holmes's 'death', Conan Doyle was also grieving not just for Holmes, but also for his father, Charles Altamont Doyle....Now the story of Conan Doyle's 'lost' father is to be explored in a new BBC drama, which begins shooting soon. The Strange Case of Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle, starring Dundonian Brian Cox as the author's mentor, the surgeon Joseph Bell, and Douglas Henshall as Holmes, aims to explain why Conan Doyle killed off his celebrated detective...."

3. Shattuck, Kathryn. "Close Reading: Letters by Richard Doyle and Family at the Morgan Library." New York Times, May 14, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the 79 Doyle-brother letters held by the Morgan Library and Museum: 51 by Richard, 25 by Henry and 3 by Charles, the father of Arthur Conan, who once owned all the letters.

4. Stuttaford, Andrew. "Feywatch." National Review 50, no. 25 (1998): 52-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the exhibition "Victorian Fairy Painting" at the Frick Collection in New York City in 1998. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...It is no coincidence that a number of the most striking works on display at the Frick are by painters who were outsiders. The greatest of them all, Richard Dadd, murdered his father. His obsessively detailed masterpiece, The Fairy Feller's Master Stroke, was the product of nine years' work in a lunatic asylum. That's also where Charles Doyle (father of the creator of Sherlock Holmes) ended up. His Self-Portrait, A Meditation, shows a man all too aware that the spirits surrounding him are the product of a troubled mind...."

5. Susina, Jan. ""Like the fragments of coloured glass in a kaleidoscope": Andrew Lang Mixes Up Richard Doyle's In Fairyland." Marvels & Tales 17, no. 1 (2003): 100-119.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article focuses on Richard ("Dicky") Doyle, but there is a passing reference to ACD in the fourth footnote: "John Doyle's 'Political Sketches' appeared under the initials HB. The Doyles were a large artistic family of five brothers and two sisters who were trained at home in art by the father. James Doyle tried his hand as a historical painter, but found more success with his Historical Baronage of England (1866). Henry Doyle also worked as a painter and illustrator, but eventually became the director of the National Gallery of Ireland. Charles Altamont Doyle--father of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the author of the Sherlock Holmes detective series--had some success as both a painter and a book illustrator, but suffered a mental breakdown and was admitted to the Monrose Royal Lunatic Asylum. There Charles, like his more successful brother Dicky Doyle, continued to paint fairies. Charles Doyle's diary was discovered and published as Doyle Diary (1978); his illustrations provide an eerie nightmare version that mirrors the more light-hearted fairy world created by his brother Dicky."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Charles Foley (2)

1. Brown, Allan. "The curious case of old Conan Doyle." Sunday Times (London), August 22, 2004: 4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Observations on Doyle, Edinburgh, the fate of various Doyle papers, the Christie's auction, Richard Lancelyn Green, Owen Dudley Edwards, and Charles Foley.

2. Picker, Leonard. "Epistolary, My Dear Watson." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 32 (2007): 54-54.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // An interview with Charles Foley, nephew of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes fiction. He details how he was first exposed to the writings of his great-uncle. Foley also describes his uncle's image created from reading his uncle's letters to his mother. He then cites the indications the letters gave him as to what Doyle thought were his greatest achievements.

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Denis Conan Doyle (2)

1. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "Tilting at Windmills: Denis Conan Doyle and the Baker Street Irregulars." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana, no. (2002): 5-64.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Travis, Alan. "G-men rallied to aid Sherlock Holmes : Scotland Yard turned to FBI to find Conan Doyle collection." The Guardian (London), February 15, 2001: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "J. Edgar Hoover called in his special network of 'G-men' when Scotland Yard turned to the FBI for help in solving the case of the disappearance of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's crime library from his house at Crowborough in Sussex. The Metropolitan police case file released yesterday at the public record office shows that Conan Doyle's two sons and heirs, Denis and Adrian, appealed for Scotland Yard's help in 1945 when an American magazine led them to suspect that the collection of real crime stories their father had used to create the plots and character of Sherlock Holmes stories had been stolen...."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Georgina Doyle (1)

1. Doyle, Michael. ""A certain gracious lady"." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 11-14.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The author, a member of The Stormy Petrels of British Columbia, meets a member of Arthur Conan Doyle's family.

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Henry Doyle (2)

1. Shattuck, Kathryn. "Close Reading: Letters by Richard Doyle and Family at the Morgan Library." New York Times, May 14, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the 79 Doyle-brother letters held by the Morgan Library and Museum: 51 by Richard, 25 by Henry and 3 by Charles, the father of Arthur Conan, who once owned all the letters.

2. Susina, Jan. ""Like the fragments of coloured glass in a kaleidoscope": Andrew Lang Mixes Up Richard Doyle's In Fairyland." Marvels & Tales 17, no. 1 (2003): 100-119.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article focuses on Richard ("Dicky") Doyle, but there is a passing reference to ACD in the fourth footnote: "John Doyle's 'Political Sketches' appeared under the initials HB. The Doyles were a large artistic family of five brothers and two sisters who were trained at home in art by the father. James Doyle tried his hand as a historical painter, but found more success with his Historical Baronage of England (1866). Henry Doyle also worked as a painter and illustrator, but eventually became the director of the National Gallery of Ireland. Charles Altamont Doyle--father of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the author of the Sherlock Holmes detective series--had some success as both a painter and a book illustrator, but suffered a mental breakdown and was admitted to the Monrose Royal Lunatic Asylum. There Charles, like his more successful brother Dicky Doyle, continued to paint fairies. Charles Doyle's diary was discovered and published as Doyle Diary (1978); his illustrations provide an eerie nightmare version that mirrors the more light-hearted fairy world created by his brother Dicky."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- James Doyle (1)

1. Susina, Jan. ""Like the fragments of coloured glass in a kaleidoscope": Andrew Lang Mixes Up Richard Doyle's In Fairyland." Marvels & Tales 17, no. 1 (2003): 100-119.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article focuses on Richard ("Dicky") Doyle, but there is a passing reference to ACD in the fourth footnote: "John Doyle's 'Political Sketches' appeared under the initials HB. The Doyles were a large artistic family of five brothers and two sisters who were trained at home in art by the father. James Doyle tried his hand as a historical painter, but found more success with his Historical Baronage of England (1866). Henry Doyle also worked as a painter and illustrator, but eventually became the director of the National Gallery of Ireland. Charles Altamont Doyle--father of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the author of the Sherlock Holmes detective series--had some success as both a painter and a book illustrator, but suffered a mental breakdown and was admitted to the Monrose Royal Lunatic Asylum. There Charles, like his more successful brother Dicky Doyle, continued to paint fairies. Charles Doyle's diary was discovered and published as Doyle Diary (1978); his illustrations provide an eerie nightmare version that mirrors the more light-hearted fairy world created by his brother Dicky."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Jean Conan Doyle (6)

1. "Air Commandant Dame Jean Conan Doyle." The Times (London), January 30, 1998: 22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Princess Alice Duchess of Gloucester was represented by Dame Jean Maxwell-Scott at a service of thanksgiving for the life of Air Commandant Dame Jean Conan Doyle held yesterday at St Clement Danes, Strand. The Rev David Mackenzie, Resident Chaplain, officiated. Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael Stear, President of the Naval 8/208 Squadron Association, and Air Commodore C.R. Fowler, Adviser Women Royal Air Force, also representing the Chief of the Air Staff, read the lessons. Air Chief Marshal Sir Lewis Hodges gave an address. The Lord-Lieutenant of Greater London and Lady Bramall attended. Among others present were: Mr and Mrs Michael Pooley, Mr Charles Foley, Mr Peter Foley, Mr and Mrs Robert Foley, Mrs John Doyle, Mr and Mrs Michael Beggs, Mr Richard Doyle, Mr and Mrs Richard Pooley, Mrs Marcus Humphrey....Mr B Wright (Sherlock Holmes Festival, Crowborough) and Mrs Wright, Mrs G Nassau (Conan Doyle Trust, Crowborough), Mrs F Brown, Miss T Lunn, Mr J Thrift, Mr G Budd (Conan Doyle Society) Mr A D Howlett and Mr S Davies (Sherlock Holmes Society) Mr J Berwanger (Chicago Sherlock Holmes Society), Mrs R O Kennee (Sherlock Holmes Society of London, USA), Miss D Watherspoon (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Trust), Mr and Mrs Payne (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Study Group), Mr P Harkness ( Sherlock Holmes Detective Maga zine ), Mr N Utechin ( Sherlock Holmes Journal), Mr D Harris (Crowborough Council)...."

2. "Dame Jean Conan Doyle 1912-1997." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 50-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. "Obituaries." St. Petersburg Times (Florida), November 20, 1997: 7A.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Brief notice on the death of Dame Jean Conan Doyle.

4. Davies, David Stuart. "Air Commander Dame Jean Conan Doyle DBE Lady Bromet." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): Insert, 3 pages.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Underwood, Peter. "My Friend Dame Jean Conan Doyle." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 128-131.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Upton, Jean. "Dame Jean Conan Doyle 1912-1997." The Serpentine Muse 14, no. 2 (1998): 6-9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- John Doyle (1)

1. Susina, Jan. ""Like the fragments of coloured glass in a kaleidoscope": Andrew Lang Mixes Up Richard Doyle's In Fairyland." Marvels & Tales 17, no. 1 (2003): 100-119.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article focuses on Richard ("Dicky") Doyle, but there is a passing reference to ACD in the fourth footnote: "John Doyle's 'Political Sketches' appeared under the initials HB. The Doyles were a large artistic family of five brothers and two sisters who were trained at home in art by the father. James Doyle tried his hand as a historical painter, but found more success with his Historical Baronage of England (1866). Henry Doyle also worked as a painter and illustrator, but eventually became the director of the National Gallery of Ireland. Charles Altamont Doyle--father of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the author of the Sherlock Holmes detective series--had some success as both a painter and a book illustrator, but suffered a mental breakdown and was admitted to the Monrose Royal Lunatic Asylum. There Charles, like his more successful brother Dicky Doyle, continued to paint fairies. Charles Doyle's diary was discovered and published as Doyle Diary (1978); his illustrations provide an eerie nightmare version that mirrors the more light-hearted fairy world created by his brother Dicky."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Mary Doyle (1)

1. Pyne, Kathleen. "Portrait of a collector as an agnostic: Charles Lang Freer and connoisseurship." Art Bulletin 78, no. 1 (1996): 75.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Explores the ideological origins of Charles Lang Freer's essentialist rhetoric in the agnostic discourse of aestheticism. Investigation on how Freer's collecting was shaped by the evolutionary beliefs promoted by the Northeastern Anglo-American elite; Bernard Berenson's philosophy of art; Interchanges between Freer, Berenson and Ernest Fenollosa. Includes a passing reference to Mary Doyle. "...The ground swell of spiritualism, Theosophy, and mind cure within the circles of Boston brahmins and the northeastern intelligentsia in this period reflects the inroads of agnosticism and the restless searching among liberal Protestants for viable religious beliefs in the face of Darwinian science. In 1893 Freer carried out a private reading course in the occult religion of Theosophy, and during a trip to Japan in 1895 began a study of Buddhism, which he continued after his return to Detroit. At his death in 1919 Freer's library contained a wealth of tomes that answered his need for reassurance of the existence of the human soul: for example, The Complaint: or, Night-Thoughts on Life, Death, and Immortality (1791) by Edward Young (at least two copies); the Upanishads; the Emersonian poetry and essays of writers such as Bliss Carman and Hamilton Wright Mabie, who regarded a spiritual force in nature and art as a source of therapy for the mind overtaxed by the strenuousness of work; and spiritualist testimonials such as Mary Conan Doyle's Visit to Heaven, Kandinsky's Art of Spiritual Harmony, and Maeterlinck's Inner Beauty...."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Family -- Richard Doyle (5)

1. Doyle, Richard, and Victoria and Albert Museum. Richard Doyle and his family an exhibition held at the Victoria and Albert Museum, 30th November 1983 to 26th February 1984. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1983.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 84144298. Bibliography: p. 72. Citations: De Waal C4551 //

2. Engen, Rodney K. Richard Doyle, (The Artist and the critic series). Stroud, Glos: Catalpa Press, 1983.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 84183388 //

3. Lenhoff, Howard M., and Paul P. Wang. "Williams syndrome and the brain." Scientific American 277, no. 6 (1997): 68.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on the cognitive abilities of persons suffering from Williams syndrome. Results of studies on musical ability in Williams children; How the abilities of persons affected with Williams syndrome can shed some light on the organization and adaptability of the normal brain. INSETS: The making of a cognitive profile; Williams syndrome: An inspiration for some pixie legends? Inset includes a passing reference and photograph to Doyle's uncle, Richard. "PHOTO (COLOR): The depiction of an elf at the right is the 19th-century work of Richard Doyle, an uncle of the Sherlock Holmes creator."

4. Shattuck, Kathryn. "Close Reading: Letters by Richard Doyle and Family at the Morgan Library." New York Times, May 14, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the 79 Doyle-brother letters held by the Morgan Library and Museum: 51 by Richard, 25 by Henry and 3 by Charles, the father of Arthur Conan, who once owned all the letters.

5. Susina, Jan. ""Like the fragments of coloured glass in a kaleidoscope": Andrew Lang Mixes Up Richard Doyle's In Fairyland." Marvels & Tales 17, no. 1 (2003): 100-119.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article focuses on Richard ("Dicky") Doyle, but there is a passing reference to ACD in the fourth footnote: "John Doyle's 'Political Sketches' appeared under the initials HB. The Doyles were a large artistic family of five brothers and two sisters who were trained at home in art by the father. James Doyle tried his hand as a historical painter, but found more success with his Historical Baronage of England (1866). Henry Doyle also worked as a painter and illustrator, but eventually became the director of the National Gallery of Ireland. Charles Altamont Doyle--father of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the author of the Sherlock Holmes detective series--had some success as both a painter and a book illustrator, but suffered a mental breakdown and was admitted to the Monrose Royal Lunatic Asylum. There Charles, like his more successful brother Dicky Doyle, continued to paint fairies. Charles Doyle's diary was discovered and published as Doyle Diary (1978); his illustrations provide an eerie nightmare version that mirrors the more light-hearted fairy world created by his brother Dicky."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Fiction -- Barnes, Julian (22)

1. "Books for Christmas." Community Care, no. 12/8 (2005): 44-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents information on several books, including Untold Stories by Alan Bennett, Arthur and George by Julian Barnes, Munch by Himself by Iris Muller Westermann, Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, Leadership by Peter Gilbert and Human Traces by Sebastian Faulks.

2. "Conan Doyle, man of action." The Gold Coast Bulletin, Apr 22, 2006: 18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Reading about the infamous Dreyfus Case, the celebrated incident in which writer Emile Zola came to the aid of a French military officer wrongly accused of treason, author [Julian Barnes] discovered parallels to an incident in the life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes. While Conan Doyle believed that Edalji was the victim of bigoted police, Edalji himself did not see it as an issue of colour, something that made the story all the more interesting for Barnes. Barnes' research involved reading about Conan Doyle and relying on tour guides to evoke certain settings for the story. Conan Doyle is said to have come up with endings for his complex whodunnits before writing them and Barnes recalls using a similar approach."

3. "G2: Lawson on TV: The man who wouldn't die." The Guardian (London), July 25, 2005: 17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Just a few weeks after the publication of Julian Barnes's splendid novel about [Arthur Conan Doyle] as a real-life detective comes David Pirie's drama The Strange Case of Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle. This is the latest biographical variation from Pirie who explored in a previous film Doyle's relationship with the apparent model for [Holmes]: the Scottish doctor, Sir Joseph Bell."

4. Feay, Suzi. "Notes & Theories: She's buying a stairway to heaven and other ghost stories." The Independent on Sunday, Jul 24, 2005: 46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "I'm interviewing [Julian Barnes] on stage at the Ways With Words festival about his new novel Arthur and George. Its protagonist, Arthur Conan Doyle, tackles a celebrated Victorian miscarriage of justice la mode de Sherlock Holmes. The Edalji case, featuring a mild-mannered Birmingham solicitor accused of cattle mutilation, was every bit as significant to British cultural life and the legal system as the Dreyfus case was to France. But there is another, weirder strand to this complex and interesting novel, and I've amused Barnes and clearly ruffled at least one audience member by referring to Doyle's ardent spiritualist beliefs as 'batty'. Doyle was a devout believer in table-rapping, ectoplasm and voices beyond the grave, and was famously hoaxed by two schoolgirls who said they'd been photographing fairies...."

5. Hanks, Robert. "Books: Elementary, my dear Barnes; Julian Barnes's new novel resurrects Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and a real-life mystery." The Independent (London), Jul 8, 2005: 20-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Arthur & George. "...The quality in Arthur & George I liked the most apart, of course, from Barnes's preternaturally smooth and readable prose was the way it avoids condescension to the past, always going with the grain of the characters' beliefs. One aspect of this is Barnes's treatment of Conan Doyle's sex life, never bowing to the modern orthodoxy that regards Victorian morals as purely a matter of repression and hypocrisy. Another is his treatment of religion. Barnes himself says he has never had 'even glimmerings' of belief, but he presents without irony George's devout Anglicanism and Conan Doyle's wackier spiritualist creed...."

6. Hargreaves, Tracy. "'We Other Victorians': Literary Victorian Afterlives." Journal of Victorian Culture 13, no. 2 (2008): 278-286.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The article explores how 20th century writers have portrayed Victorians and the Victorian period. It examines the works of authors such as Virginia Woolfe and John Galsworthy and discusses the social, political and family issues that were raised in the 20th century regarding life in the Victorian period. It discusses the representation of Victorian life on television in the 1950s and 1960s and what the afterlife of the Victorian period has allowed social and cultural commentators to reexamine about the values and morals of the Victorians." Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...The classic text has been re-imagined.... Emily Brontë resurfaces in Jane Urquhart’s Changing Heaven: A Novel, Clare Boylan’s Emma Brown: A Novel From the Unfinished Manuscript of Charlotte Bronte appeared in 2004, Maryse Conde transplants Wuthering Heights to Windward Heights, Emma Tennant imagines Heathcliff’s Tale, Caleb Carr and Jamyang Norbu add to the Sherlock Holmes canon (The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes and Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years respectively) as of course did Julian Barnes in Arthur and George. Wilkie Collins and Charles Dickens were intertextually present in Sarah Waters’ Fingersmith...."

7. Hoffert, Barbara. "Fiction." Library Journal 130, no. 18 (2005): 63.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // An annotated bibliography of fiction titles is provided. Includes Barnes, Julain. Arthur & George. Knopf. 2005. c.391p. ISBN 0-307-26310-X. $24.95. "As all Sherlockians know, in 1906 Arthur Conan Doyle took on the case of George Edalji, a reserved young lawyer, half Scottish and half Indian, who was wrongly accused of mutilating animals--and in the process helped set up Britain's Court of Appeals. Perhaps it is not so surprising that the author of Flauben's Parrot would choose to reconstruct not just this case but the lives of both participants; what is surprising is the almost deadpan way he does it--and that his approach works so well. Barnes tells the life stories of Arthur and George with almost clinical precision, alternating between them from school age on. The storm gathers slowly; one learns the details of the mutilations and how the case was built so incongruously against the upright and deeply myopic George, even as Arthur is whiling away his time as famed writer and romancer of Miss Jean Leckie. The book picks up like a whirlwind when Arthur and George meet at last; and though a few early passages can seem a bit leisurely, it finally make powerful sense to see how these men arrived where they did. A beautifully modulated work; highly recommended." Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal

8. ———. "Prepub Alert." Library Journal 130, no. 14 (2005): 114-116.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews several books that have yet to be published including Barnes, Julian. Arthur & George. Knopf. Jan. 2006. 384p. ISBN 0-307-26310-X. $24.95. "George grows up a poor vicar's son and eventually crosses paths with Arthur, who grows up to create Sherlock Holmes. With a 100,000-copy first printing and a ten-city tour."

9. Judd, Elizabeth. "Arthur & George." Atlantic 297, no. 1 (2006): 179-179.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A review of Julian Barnes' Arthur & George.

10. Kakutani, Michiko. "Sherlock's Creator Gives Sleuthing a Try." New York Times, January 10, 2006: E1-E8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The author reviews the book "Arthur & George," by Julian Barnes.

11. Kehe, Marjorie. "How would Sherlock Holmes fare in real life?" Christian Science Monitor, Jan 17, 2006: 13-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of "Arthur & George" by Julian Barnes.

12. Kemp, Peter. "Conan Doyle to the rescue." Sunday Times (London), June 26, 2005: 37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...When cattle in the vicinity are viciously slashed, things take an even more macabre turn. Soon the press is clamouring about The Great Wyrley Outrages. It sounds like a case for Sherlock Holmes. And, indeed, the sleuth who eventually sets out to disentangle the gruesome affair is Sherlock Holmes's creator, Arthur Conan Doyle. Unlike Holmes's exploits, though, the situation at the centre of Julian Barnes's richly accomplished new novel isn't fantasy but fact. Taking a real-life whodunit, Arthur & George transforms it into a dazzling exercise in detective fiction of more kinds than one...."

13. Kington, Miles. "When the Writer Becomes the Star." The Independent (London), July 25, 2005: 32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...'Well,' said Pranger, 'it's very odd when the writer becomes the star. Almost always, the fictional creation outshines the creator. Harry Potter overshadows Rowling. James Bond is big, Ian Fleming is small. Who remembers who created Tarzan? And until now Conan Doyle has been blotted out by the wretched Sherlock Holmes. But suddenly, Conan Doyle has bounced back. 'There was a novel which came out the other day by Julian Barnes, all about a real-life case in which Conan Doyle really did help to prove that a man had been wrongfully imprisoned. Conan Doyle as true life Sherlock Holmes. Good story. Surprised it hasn't been turned into a musical by Lloyd Webber or Ben Elton. And then there is this renewed attempt to prove that Conan Doyle was a murderer.'..."

14. Levy, Paul. "Personal Journal; Review / Book: Strong Novels Vie For Man Booker." Wall Street Journal, Oct 7, 2005: P.1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...The favorite, at 5 to 4, is Julian Barnes's supremely well- constructed 'Arthur & George' (Jonathan Cape, 352 pages, GBP 17.99). A true story of Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and his involvement in the real-life mystery of George Edalji, a gentle, half-Parsee lawyer accused of brutality to animals, this is one of Mr. Barnes's richly complex fictions, like his 'Flaubert's Parrot' or 'A History of the World in 101/2 Chapters,' rather than the more straightforward works (which I also love, such as 'Before She Met Me' or 'Talking It Over'). For my money, Mr. Barnes is the best novelist of his talented generation; we're in the hands of a master, but there is something bloodless about this tightly plotted, completely controlled narrative, with its on-purpose, single loose end that tells the reader that not everything, including Conan Doyle's being a sucker for spiritualism, is as tidy as it seems...."

15. O'Hagan, Simon. "Books: the Game's Afoot! it could be a Case for Sherlock Holmes ; Arthur & George by Julian Barnes Cape GBP17.99 GBP16.99 (P&P)." Independent on Sunday (London), July 3, 2005: 23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the book. "...Indeed, it's one of Barnes's best, a beautiful and engrossing work which brings together some classic Barnesian themes (love, identity), introduces some new ones (spirituality, guilt and innocence), and hangs them all on a real-life miscarriage of justice from 100 years ago that was always going to be a gift for the first writer to spot its potential for re-imagining...."

16. O'Reilley, Mary Rose. "Revising Thérëse." Literary Review 51, no. 4 (2008): 3-20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // An essay is presented on the memoir "The Story of a Soul," by Thérèse Martin. It discusses the childhood and monastic experience of Saint Thérèse as she wrote in her memoir and reflects on masochistic pietism. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...In his novel, Arthur and George, the contemporary British author, Julian Barnes, situates his hero, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as a dutiful Catholic in this transitional epoch. Conan Doyle inquires of his more skeptical friend, George, 'What is the church threatened by?' 'By science,' replies George...."

17. Parini, Jay. "Eyes on the Prizes." Chronicle of Higher Education 52, no. 7 (2005): B20-B20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents the author's views about the Man Booker Prize, bestowed on one lucky novelist each October at a banquet watched by almost a million people on prime-time national television. Statement of John Sutherland, chairman of the prize committee that the strength of the year's competition can be measured by the fact that three good books by previous Man Booker winners were finally not selected; Information that the three former winners who didn't make the cut from the long list are writers J.M. Coetzee, Ian McEwan, and Salman Rushdie, and their exclusion has engendered a good deal of criticism; Argument that the winner is often someone whose reputation has already been established, or who commands special attention because the subject of the book itself happens to be hot. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...In spite of the unreality of the contest for the Booker, I find myself eagerly reading through the novels on the shortlist....And finally there is Julian Barnes, whose novel about an incident in the life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle lifts the historical novel to new heights...."

18. Scrivener, Richard. "Reading for Pleasure." Bookseller, no. 5213 (2006): 24-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article presents views of the author on the book "Arthur and George," by Julian Barnes. "'Arthur and George' is two intertwined biographies, of English writer Arthur Conan Doyle and writer George Edalji, wrongly imprisoned for seven years on charges of livestock mutilation. Barnes' forensic writing deftly introduces to two men who inhabit different worlds in the same country. Arthur, while not cut out for greatness, has the opportunities to experience life through travel, education and war, while George is restricted to a quiet existence as the obedient son of a Midlands vicar."

19. Solomon, Deborah. "Rewriting History." New York Times Magazine 155, no. 53432 (2005): 17-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents a series of questions and answers with Julian Barnes. The author discusses his new book "Arthur & George," based on the true story of George Edjali, who was accused of a crime and defended by Arthur Conan Doyle. Barnes also talk about writing mysteries under the pseudonym Dan Kavanagh.

20. Taylor, Ihsan. "Paperback Row." New York Times, Jan 14, 2007: 24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Arthur & George, by Julian Barnes. (Vintage International, $14.95.) The Arthur in Barnes's extraordinary novel is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes. The other title character is George Edalji, a half-Indian solicitor who was convicted of a series of livestock mutilations in his rural parish in 1903. Barnes dissects early-20th-century English society as he spins the real-life detective story of how Arthur took up George's case and tried to exonerate him. (Doyle's work on the case helped lead to the creation of a Court of Criminal Appeal in 1907.) ''Arthur & George'' was a Man Booker Prize finalist in 2005; our reviewer, Terrence Rafferty, called it a ''cracking good yarn.'' [Abstract from publisher]

21. Torgovnick, Marianna. "Supporting Roles." Chronicle of Higher Education 54, no. 20 (2008): B14-B15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the novels "The Scandal of the Season," by Sophie Gee, "Loving Frank," by Nancy Horan, and "Hotel de Dream: A New York Novel," by Edmund White. Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...A flurry of notable books since 1998 have included famous authors as characters, among them Michael Cunningham's The Hours, a commercially successful re-creation in contemporary terms of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway; Colm Toibin's The Master, about Henry James from the time he wrote Guy Domville (a play that failed) through his closest female friend's suicide; and Julian Barnes's Arthur & George, about a real-life mystery solved by the creator of Sherlock Holmes. They differed from books like The Agony and the Ecstasy in their choice of artist and, even more, in their temporal scope and plot. Virginia Woolf, Henry James, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are big names, to be sure. But they are not names like Michelangelo or Van Gogh (the subject of Stone's Lust for Life), synonymous in the public mind with genius...."

22. Wyatt, Neal, and Jeff Ayers. "Do the Time, Read the Crime." Library Journal 132, no. 14 (2007): 184-184.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Lists a number of true crime books including one related to Doyle. "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and George Edalji, a man accused of writing threatening letters, cross paths in Julian Barnes's Booker-nominated Arthur & George (Vintage. 2007. ISBN 978-1-4000-9703-6. pap. $14.95). Edalji was convicted in 1903 on the basis of his race (his father was Parsi) rather than hard evidence. Doyle hears about the case and tries to prove Edalji's innocence. The actual case resulted in the establishment of the British Court of Appeals."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Fiction -- Brandreth, Gyles (11)

1. "Fall 2008 Trade Paperbacks." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 26 (2008): 122-157.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews several books including Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder (Touchstone, Sept., $14) by Gyles Brandreth. "Imagines Wilde as a detective aided by Arthur Conan Doyle."

2. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 4 (2008): 4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth. Includes passing references to Doyle. "...When a beautiful boy of the streets is brutally murdered and then his body disappears, Wilde enlists the investigative help of Robert Sherard, his faithful biographer, and Arthur Conan Doyle, a brilliant young author Wilde has just met. 'The challenge--and the excitement--has been to create a truthful portrait of Wilde, an atmospheric evocation of London and Paris in the late 1880s and an exciting murder mystery all at the same time,' says the author. 'Being a biographer has helped, I think. I want my portrait of Oscar Wilde--and Conan Doyle and their circle--to be accurate, truthful, human, sometime humorous and revealing.'..."

3. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 40 (2007): 38-38.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Short review of the book by Gyles Brandreth (Touchstone), $14 paper (368p) ISBN 978-1-4168-3483-9 with a passing reference to Doyle. "Oscar Wilde makes a stylish sleuth in this is clever series debut from Brandreth, a British author best known as a biographer (John Gielgud: An Actor's Life, etc.). Narrating the tale from his old age, poet Robert Sherard enjoys recalling the summer of 1889, when his friend Wilde was still celebrated and happily married. After discovering the butchered body of handsome young Billy Wood, Wilde fetches Sherard and his new friend Arthur Conan Doyle, but upon returning to the scene, they find neither body nor blood...."

4. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of no Importance." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 23 (2007): 1220-1220.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth.

5. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 27 (2008): 40-40.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder," by Gyles Brandreth. "...At a May 1892 meeting of the Socrates Club, a group founded by Wilde and including such luminaries as Arthur Conan Doyle and Bram Stoker, the members play "murder," a game that involves writing the name of a "victim" on a piece of paper and trying to guess who chose whom and why...."

6. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 14 (2008): 43-43.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder," by Gyles Brandreth. "As in Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance (2008), he enlists the assistance of Doyle, who ironically plays Watson to the playwright's Holmes."

7. Fletcher, Connie. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Booklist 104, no. 5 (2007): 29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance" by Gyles Brandreth. "In this wow of a history-mystery, Brandreth (a former MP, BBC broadcaster, and biographer) gives us nothing less than the most credible Sherlock Holmes since the master of deductive reasoning toppled into Reichenbach Falls--except the uncannily brilliant sleuth is not Holmes but Oscar Wilde. Wilde gets to demonstrate his Holmesian knack for discovering the telling detail to his new friend Arthur Conan Doyle, whose recent 'Study in Scarlet' has skyrocketed him to fame. The mystery that engages Wilde is the murder of a 16-year-old artists’ model and male prostitute, Billy Wood (whose demise was the inspiration for The Portrait of Dorian Gray), with whom Wilde had an appointment. Wilde discovers the naked body of the model in the middle of a squalid flat; when he, enlisting Doyle as witness, returns later, the scene has been entirely cleaned and the body removed...."

8. ———. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Booklist 104, no. 22 (2008): 46-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder" by Gyles Brandreth. "...Brandreth heightens the effect by having one of Wilde’s friends, Arthur Conan Doyle, play the role of dumbfounded Watson to Wilde’s brilliant Sherlock. Sharing the Watson role is narrator-poet Robert Sherard, who writes of Wilde’s exploits..."

9. Gunn, Drewey Wayne. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of no Importance." Lambda Book Report 16, no. 1 (2008): 24-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth.

10. ———. "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder." Lambda Book Report 16, no. 3 (2008): 31-31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder," by Gyles Brandreth. Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...Since another one of the main characters is Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes fans get the added pleasure of an extended conceit that some of Oscar's best lines become the source for dialogue Holmes will subsequently deliver in Doyle's stories...."

11. Vicarel, Jo Ann. "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance." Library Journal 132, no. 18 (2007): 48-48.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance," by Gyles Brandreth. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. Brandreth, Gyles. Oscar Wilde and a Death of No Importance. Touchstone: S. & S. Jan. 2008. c.347p. ISBN 978-1-4165-3483-9. pap. $14. "In 1889 London, writer Oscar Wilde finds the corpse of a male artist's model in a house used by men for assignations. Wilde later returns with friends Robert Sherard and Arthur Conan Doyle, but the body has vanished, the room cleaned, and the police declare that nothing has happened...."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Fiction -- Rogow, Roberta (1)

1. Klett, Rex E., and Eric Bryant. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 123, no. 8 (1998): 143.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book The Problem of the Missing Miss, by Roberta Rogow. (St. Martin's. May 1998. c.272p. ISBN 0-312-18553-7. $21.95.) "First novelist Rogow pairs an aging Charles Dodgson (a.k.a. Lewis Carroll) and a youthful, impetuous Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle (willing to pursue a mystery at the expense of his honeymoon). They meet in late 19th-century Brighton, where Lord Marbury's daughter, meant to spend some time with Dodgson, is abducted by opponents of the upcoming Criminal Amendment Bill. The abduction spawns murder, but Doyle and Dodgson have difficulty convincing police that the daughter is in danger. Part of the fun here lies in the reluctant partnership, but there are other spunky characters to watch as well. A good Victorian historical."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Letters (8)

1. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 32 (2007): 52-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

2. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 18 (2007): 973-973.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg and edited by Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

3. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Library Journal 132, no. 20 (2007): 114.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters. Penguin Pr: Penguin Group (USA). 2007. c.608p. ed. by Jon Lellenberg & others, index. ISBN 978-1-59420-135-6. $37.95.

4. "A man divided." Economist 385, no. 8549 (2007): 98-99.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article reviews the books "Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg.

5. "The Mythmaker." New Republic 238, no. 4 (2008): 46-50.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

6. "The World of Paperbacks." Contemporary Review 290, no. 1691 (2008): 521-524.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Lists a few titles related to Doyle and Holmes. "Also from Phoenix we have...Andrew Lycett's Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes (GBP10.99) whose hardback edition was hailed in this journal as 'the best and . . . certainly the fullest' biography of the writer...Vintage Classics have brought out Arthur Conan Doyle's famous novel. The Hound of the Baskervilles and have included with it not only the short story, The Adventure of the Speckled Band, which Doyle judged his best story, but an introduction by Ruth Rendell and all for GBP5.99....The life of Arthur Conan Doyle is arguably best seen in his correspondence and Harper Perennial has brought out Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters (GBP12.99), edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley. The review of the hardback edition praised this 'valuable collection', based on Doyle's letters to his mother, letters which were 'frank and revealing'and which showed his 'many and varied interests'...."

7. Rodgers, Marion Elizabeth. "A. Conan Doyle." The Washington Times, December 16, 2007: B6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters byJon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower, Charles Foley. "Even if you are not a member of the Baker Street Irregulars, that popular society of Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts, you will find this collection of previously unpublished letters from Holmes' creator fascinating reading. For while much is known about Holmes - 'the world's most famous man who never was' - less has been revealed about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, whose life rivaled that of any fiction. As a physician, sportsman, war correspondent, military historian, crusader for social justice and spokesman for spiritualism, his days were full of drama...."

8. Sims, Michael. "Beyond Baker Street; Remembering Conan Doyle only as the inventor of Sherlock Holmes is a crime." The Washington Post, January 27, 2008: T9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, by Andrew Lycett (Free Press. 557 pp. $30) and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley (Penguin Press. 706 pp. $37.95).

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Residences -- East Sussex -- Crowborough (3)

1. Bull, Andy. "Travel: Home from Holmes; Deep in Conan Doyle country, something stirs. No hellhound, no mystery; it's a festival." The Independent (London), June 20, 1998: 21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Even for Sherlock Holmes, this would have been a real two-pipe puzzler. After all, the peeling sign on the side door at the Crowborough Cross declared that this was the Conan Doyle Bar. So it would be reasonable to deduce - given the generally accepted concept of the theme pub, and that that the little hilltop Sussex town of Crowborough will play host in just two weeks' time to the annual Sherlock Holmes Festival - that there would be a spot of branding inside...."

2. Longrigg, Clare. "Game's afoot to woo tourists." The Guardian (London), July 5, 1997: 5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Literary theme parks and spin-offs are a blossoming business in the tourist-starved British hinterland. After Hardy's Wessex, Dickens's London and the Brontes' Yorkshire, a new stop has been added to the tour: Conan Doyle's Crowborough. This weekend, the Sherlock Holmes festival will claim the Victorian detective for its own...."

3. McGrory, Daniel. "Conan Doyle's town detects its fortune." The Times (London), July 5, 1997: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A Sussex town with ambitions to be a big tourist attraction will double its population this weekend as 25,000 visitors descend to celebrate the creator of Sherlock Holmes. The great detective might have been puzzled at why Crowborough waited so long to cash in on its connections with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who lived there during his last 23 years. Julian Roup, who conceived the idea of the world's only annual Sherlock Holmes festival, said: 'Interest in England's greatest sleuth just gets bigger every year and we are sitting on a literary brand name worth millions that is worshipped the world over - and until recently have done nothing about it. For years Baker Street has cashed in and its links are purely fictitious. We are sitting on the real thing.'..."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Residences -- Edinburgh (1)

1. Jamieson, Teddy. "Return to the Lost World of Conan Doyle; If you want to retrace the footsteps of Sherlock Holmes's creator in his native Edinburgh, you'll need to do a little detective work." The Herald (Glasgow), January 31, 2009: 12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...Me, I'm trying to get my head round Conan Doyle's Edinburgh and [Allan] Foster, who's hugely knowledgeable and entertaining company, is the man to help me. Sherlock Holmes's creator was born in the city (in 1859, making this the 150th anniversary of his birth) and studied medicine here before leaving Scotland. Foster knows where Conan Doyle bought his books and where he took a drink. And this bright blue Monday morning he's agreed to show me around the Edinburgh that the author knew...."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Residences -- Edinburgh -- Liberton Bank House (18)

1. "Big Mac Not Palatable to Sherlock Holmes Fans." Chicago Tribune, Dec 9, 1999: 18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th Century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack Wednesday when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won...."

2. "Food Notes." Sunday Gazette - Mail, Dec 29, 1999: 3.D.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "In this case, you could say McDonald's didn't have a clue. An 18th century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.'"

3. "Gourmandise." Buffalo News, Jan 9, 2000: E.3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to City Hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.'"

4. "Holmes Creator's House Saved." The Toronto Star, January 1, 2000: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir [Arthur Conan Doyle] once lived has been saved from a Big Mac attack. The city of Edinburgh has slapped a preservation order on the house after an appeal from fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site...."

5. "McDonalds Toy with Conan Plan." Daily Mail (London), January 15, 2000: 31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Burger chain McDonald's last night accepted for the first time that a historic Scottish house due to be flattened for a fast food restaurant was once the home of Sherlock Holmes' creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In a statement the company said after advice from archaeological and heritage experts it agreed Conan Doyle had lived in the house between the ages of five and seven. But despite the acceptance of the 'cultural value of this heritage asset' the company has not abandoned plans to sell hamburgers from the site of the 18th century house at Nether Liberton, Edinburgh...."

6. "No place for Holmes." The Evening Standard (London), December 7, 1999: 12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The motive would puzzle even Sherlock Holmes. The oldest known home of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is being demolished to make way for a McDonald's. The fact that the stone cottage in Edinburgh once housed the writer who gave us the world's most celebrated opium-smoker hasn't saved it from being sacrificed on the altar of 'progress'...."

7. "Outrage as Mcdonald's Eyes Home of Sherlock Holmes' Creator." Birmingham Post, December 6, 1999: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sherlock Holmes fans yesterday protested at plans to demolish the oldest surviving home of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and replace it with a burger restaurant. The house where the creator of the fictional detective spent part of his childhood faces the threat of being demolished to make way for a McDonald's restaurant, they said. Campaigners have banded together to persuade Edinburgh council to refuse the application when it is considered next year...."

8. "Scottish mansion wins preservation; escapes plans for a McDonald's." Journal Record (Oklahoma City, OK), Dec 10, 1999: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack Wednesday when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.'"

9. "Sherlock Holmes creator's home saved from McDonald's." Pantagraph (Bloomington, IL), Dec 9, 1999: C.4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack Wednesday when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.'"

10. "'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic,' and Edinburgh still has author's home." Star Tribune (Minneapolis), Dec 9, 1999: 09.A.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack Wednesday when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the creator of Sherlock Holmes, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a restaurant on the site, appealed to City Hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.'"

11. "Value deal: Holmes defeats an arch-villain." York Daily Record, Dec 29, 1999: D.01.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.' So does good, old red meat. Agricultural officials say consumers are returning to meat counters, buying more pork and beef to put on their tables as a strong economy puts more money in their pockets to spend at the grocery store."

12. Ferguson, Brian. "Another string to the bow of Holmes's legacy." The Scotsman, January 14, 2009: 3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "For more than 170 years, a sycamore stood in the garden where the young Arthur Conan Doyle was inspired to write his first stories. As a schoolboy, the creator of Sherlock Holmes would clamber on the branches of the tree in the grounds of Liberton Bank House in Edinburgh. But now the sycamore has to be cut down because of disease, to the dismay of the staff and pupils at the special school that has recently moved into the 18th-century building. However, a memorial to the tree and its links to Conan Doyle is to be created. Dunedin School has commissioned the creation of a violin from the sycamore's wood, in tribute to Doyle's celebrated detective and his penchant for playing the instrument. It is hoped the GBP 1,800 violin, to be created by the Edinburgh-based instrument maker Steve Burnett, will be completed in time for the 150th anniversary of Conan Doyle's birth in May...."

13. Grant, Clare. "Conan barbarians; Fight on against plan to flatten author's home." Daily Mail (London), December 6, 1999: 35.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It is a three-pipe mystery worthy of the great Sherlock Holmes himself. Despite his world-renown, the former home of the great detective's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, could be demolished to make way for a McDonald's restaurant. Edinburgh City Council has already allowed his birthplace to be demolished and replaced with a roundabout. Then it gave permission for the great man's second home to be converted to a ladies' toilet. Now it is considering plans to knock down his boyhood home, Liberton Bank House, for the U.S-based burger chain's latest outlet...."

14. Gray, Chris. "Conan Doyle Fans Detect Victory in the Case of the Childhood Home." The Independent (London), May 30, 2001: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Fans OF Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are on the verge of winning a battle to stop McDonald's building an outlet next to his childhood home. The author lived at Liberton Bank House in Edinburgh with his mother during the 1860s while his father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was institutionalised because he had epilepsy. The Sherlock Holmes Society hope the cottage, which is derelict and stands next to a post-war shopping centre, can be turned into a small museum. They believe it will never be restored if the McDonald's outlet is built...."

15. Leeman, Sue. "Edinburgh preserves Conan Doyle home." Tulsa World, Dec 9, 1999: 9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack Wednesday when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.' Article appeared in a number of other newspapers, e.g. Austin American Statesman, The Oregonian, The Ottawa Citizen, etc.

16. ———. "No happy meals for Sherlock Holmes." Austin American Statesman (Austin, TX), Dec 9, 1999: D.7.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack Wednesday when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.' McDonald's said it had only recently learned that Conan Doyle lived at the Liberton Bank House during the 1860s, from the ages of 5 to 7, but had gone ahead with plans to develop the site owned by Pearl Assurance."

17. ———. "Sherlock Holmes writer's home saved from Golden Arches." Fort Worth Star - Telegram, Dec 9, 1999: 18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack yesterday when Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society, which is based in London. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.'..."

18. Rodley, Aidan. "McDonald's ideal Holmes exhibition?" Daily Mail (London), August 5, 2000: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The McDonald's fast food chain say they will include Sherlock Holmes memorabilia as part of their design if they are allowed to develop a restaurant on the site where Sherlock Holmes' creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived. The burger giant has put forward amended designs for a 75-seater restaurant at Liberton Bank House, Edinburgh, where the author lived as a boy in the 1860s. The plans includes displays of Holmes exhibits in the proposed restaurant. The company sparked an outcry last year when it announced plans to destroy the house. The Edinburgh City Council put a preservation order on the building and Historic Scotland opted to re-list it. The latest plan promises to incorporate the building into the design of the restaurant. McDonald's has claimed the plans are a reasonable compromise, but Dr Allen Simpson, co-ordinator of the campaign to save the building, said it was unacceptable. Dr Simpson said he expected the people of Edinburgh to be outraged when the McDonald's plans were made public. He said: 'The question the council will have to face is whether the building of McDonald's would degrade the setting of the house. What we have to bear in mind is that this city has so few associations left with Conan Doyle.' The house where Conan Doyle was born in 1859 was demolished to make way for a roundabout. A spokesman for McDonald's said: 'Our plans seem to us to be a very reasonable compromise. 'The Cameron Toll site is, aside from the Liberton Bank House issue, a perfect location for us.'

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Residences -- Surrey -- Undershaw (8)

1. "One Hundred Years Ago: "...a considerable mansion" (ACD)." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses Doyle's home, Undershaw. Includes two photographs, one of Undershaw during construction and the other of Doyle's other home, Windlesham (miscaptioned as Undershaw in the article).

2. Barnes, Julian. "Sherlock Holmes and the case of the property developers." The Guardian (online edition: The Guardian Unlimited), July 8, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article discusses the attempt of the Victorian Society, by application to English Heritage, to have Doyle's house, Undershaw, in Hindhead, Surrey listed as Grade I in response to a planning application to break up Undershaw into several smaller homes.

3. Bruxner, Pamela, and Bob Ellis. Going for a soldier : a day excursion by the Sherlock Holmes Society of London to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and Undershaw. [London]: Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 30 cm. Edited by Pamela Bruxner ; produced by Bob Ellis. //

4. Davies, Catriona. "Sherlock Holmes heritage threatened by homes plan." The Daily Telegraph (London), July 6, 2006: 5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Article discusses the attempt of the Victorian Society, by application to English Heritage, to have Doyle's house, Undershaw, in Hindhead, Surrey listed as Grade I in response to a planning application to break up Undershaw into several smaller homes.

5. ———. "Sherlock Holmes heritage threatened by homes plan." The Daily Telegraph (London), July 6, 2006: 5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Developers and conservationists are in dispute over plans to convert Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Surrey house, where he wrote The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Return of Sherlock Holmes, into four homes. Campaigners say that the unique history of Undershaw, built at Hindhead in 1897, is under threat if permission is granted to divide it...."

6. King, Linda. "A Postcard of ACD's House Hindhead (From the Collection of Linda King)." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 109.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Marriott, Guy, Michael Whelan, Christopher Roder, Steven Rothman, Roger Johnson, Jon L. Lellenberg, and Daniel Stashower. "Reply: Letters and emails: It's no mystery why Conan Doyle's house must be preserved." The Guardian (London), July 17, 2006: 29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "We write in support of the Victorian Society's appeal to English Heritage to raise the listed status of Arthur Conan Doyle's house Undershaw in Hindhead, Surrey, to Grade I (Sherlock Holmes and the case of the property developers, July 8). Representing the worldwide interest in Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes, we recognise that even though the recent application for listed building consent has been withdrawn, the house still desperately needs the protection that the higher grading will bring...."

8. Miller, Phil, and Kurt Bayer. "Anger at refusal to list Conan Doyle's house." The Herald (Glasgow), February 7, 2007: 5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The Scottish crime writer Ian Rankin has accused Tessa Jowell, the Culture Minister, of 'literary snobbery' over her refusal to protect the former home of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes. Ms Jowell's department of culture, media and sport (DCMS) has decided not to give Grade I-listed status to Undershaw, the Surrey home Conan Doyle built for his ill wife and where he wrote The Hound of the Baskervilles in 1902...."

05A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Residences -- Surrey -- Windlesham (1)

1. "One Hundred Years Ago: "...a considerable mansion" (ACD)." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses Doyle's home, Undershaw. Includes two photographs, one of Undershaw during construction and the other of Doyle's other home, Windlesham (miscaptioned as Undershaw in the article).

05B Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- George Edalji, Oscar Slater and Other Cases (31)

1. "Books for Christmas." Community Care, no. 12/8 (2005): 44-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents information on several books, including Untold Stories by Alan Bennett, Arthur and George by Julian Barnes, Munch by Himself by Iris Muller Westermann, Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, Leadership by Peter Gilbert and Human Traces by Sebastian Faulks.

2. "Conan Doyle, Detective: True Crimes Investigated by the Creator of Sherlock Holmes." Publishers Weekly 253, no. 38 (2006): 55-55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Conan Doyle, Detective: True Crimes Investigated by the Creator of Sherlock Holmes," by Peter Costello.

3. "Conan Doyle, man of action." The Gold Coast Bulletin, Apr 22, 2006: 18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Reading about the infamous Dreyfus Case, the celebrated incident in which writer Emile Zola came to the aid of a French military officer wrongly accused of treason, author [Julian Barnes] discovered parallels to an incident in the life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes. While Conan Doyle believed that Edalji was the victim of bigoted police, Edalji himself did not see it as an issue of colour, something that made the story all the more interesting for Barnes. Barnes' research involved reading about Conan Doyle and relying on tour guides to evoke certain settings for the story. Conan Doyle is said to have come up with endings for his complex whodunnits before writing them and Barnes recalls using a similar approach."

4. Barnes, Julian. Arthur & George. 1st British ed. London: Jonathan Cape, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Sept. 2005. // "It's a novel, offering a joint biography of Arthur Conan Doyle and George Edalji from their childhoods onward, and it is well-written and imaginative, firmly grounded on the facts of the case of George Edalji, but also thoroughly inventive when it comes to thoughts and conversations. And it's a handsome book, with an attractive decorated-cloth cover that one seldom sees on commercial books today."

5. ———. Arthur & George. 1st American ed. New York: Knopf, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2005048771 //

6. Barnes, Julian, and Nigel Anthony. Arthur & George. Hampton, NH: Sound Library/BBC Audiobooks America, 2006. Sound Recording (CD) 14 sound discs (ca. 17 hrs. 17 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact disc. Complete & unabridged. Title and description from container. Read by Nigel Anthony. //

7. ———. Arthur & George. [Hampton, N.H.]: BBC Audiobooks America, 2006. Sound Recording (CD) 4 sound discs (5 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Abridged. Compact discs. Read by Nigel Anthony. // Chronicles the lives of two boys--one who is forgotten by history, and one who becomes the creator of the world's most famous detective--as they pursue their separate destinies until they meet in a remarkable alliance.

8. ———. Arthur & George. Hampton, NH: Chivers Audio Books/BBC Audiobooks America, 2006. Sound Recording (CD) 14 sound discs (17 hr., 13 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact discs. Unabridged. Read by Nigel Anthony. // Chronicles the lives of two boys--one who is forgotten by history, and one who becomes the creator of the world's most famous detective--as they pursue their separate destinies until they meet in a remarkable alliance.

9. ———. Arthur and George. Kingstown, RI: BBC Audiobooks America, 2006. Sound Recording (cassette) 12 sound cassettes (17 hr., 17 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, digitally mastered. Complete & unabridged. Read by Nigel Anthony. //

10. Berry, John Stevens. "The Strange Case of George Edalji." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 106-108.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

11. Chapman, Paul M. "Review--The Oscar Slater Murder Story: New Light on a Classic Miscarriage of Justice by Richard Whittington-Egan." The Ritual, no. 27 (2001): 58-59.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

12. Dunn, Dave, Trevor S. Raymond, and Clifford S. Goldfarb. "Bookshelf: Reviews of Forensic Detective: How I Cracked the World's Toughest Cases, Joe Sherlock: Kid Detective, and Conan Doyle and the Parson's Son: The George Edalji Case." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 1 (2006): 9-12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

13. Feay, Suzi. "Notes & Theories: She's buying a stairway to heaven and other ghost stories." The Independent on Sunday, Jul 24, 2005: 46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "I'm interviewing [Julian Barnes] on stage at the Ways With Words festival about his new novel Arthur and George. Its protagonist, Arthur Conan Doyle, tackles a celebrated Victorian miscarriage of justice la mode de Sherlock Holmes. The Edalji case, featuring a mild-mannered Birmingham solicitor accused of cattle mutilation, was every bit as significant to British cultural life and the legal system as the Dreyfus case was to France. But there is another, weirder strand to this complex and interesting novel, and I've amused Barnes and clearly ruffled at least one audience member by referring to Doyle's ardent spiritualist beliefs as 'batty'. Doyle was a devout believer in table-rapping, ectoplasm and voices beyond the grave, and was famously hoaxed by two schoolgirls who said they'd been photographing fairies...."

14. Hall, Catherine. "Asians in Britain: 400 Years of History (review)." Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History 4, no. 1 (2003).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a reference to Doyle. "This is not the book to read for the latest post-colonial interpretations, and indeed it neglects much recent literature. But Visram has pieced together a wealth of material which gives us important insights into the long relation between South Asia and Britain. Many of her stories stay in the mind and disrupt easy assumptions. Take the case of George Edalji, a solicitor in Birmingham at the end of the nineteenth century. The son of an Indian Anglican vicar in Staffordshire, who had received his living (a rural mining village) courtesy of his English wife's family connections, he was educated at a local grammar school and at Mason College, later to become Birmingham University. A brilliant student, he won Law Society prizes and was able to establish his own practice in Birmingham in 1899. His family, however, had never been accepted and were subjected to years of racial harassment in the form of hoaxes and anonymous letters. In 1903 George Edalji was arrested, charged with maiming animals which had been mutilated in his home village. Despite a convincing alibi he was found guilty, sentenced to seven years penal servitude and struck off the Solicitors' register. The family began a long campaign for his release and after three years he was freed but without explanation. Eventually cleared by a Special Commission established after wide publicity, ranging from petitions signed by thousands in the Midlands to the support of Arthur Conan Doyle, he was eventually cleared and reinstated in his profession. The case reminds us of the long history of mixed race relationships, of the presence of South Asian professionals in Birmingham long before the post-war migration, of the persistence of racial persecution in this country, and of the ways in which it has been challenged, not only by South Asians themselves but also by their white British supporters."

15. Hanks, Robert. "Books: Elementary, my dear Barnes; Julian Barnes's new novel resurrects Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and a real-life mystery." The Independent (London), Jul 8, 2005: 20-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of Arthur & George. "...The quality in Arthur & George I liked the most apart, of course, from Barnes's preternaturally smooth and readable prose was the way it avoids condescension to the past, always going with the grain of the characters' beliefs. One aspect of this is Barnes's treatment of Conan Doyle's sex life, never bowing to the modern orthodoxy that regards Victorian morals as purely a matter of repression and hypocrisy. Another is his treatment of religion. Barnes himself says he has never had 'even glimmerings' of belief, but he presents without irony George's devout Anglicanism and Conan Doyle's wackier spiritualist creed...."

16. Hoffert, Barbara. "Fiction." Library Journal 130, no. 18 (2005): 63.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // An annotated bibliography of fiction titles is provided. Includes Barnes, Julain. Arthur & George. Knopf. 2005. c.391p. ISBN 0-307-26310-X. $24.95. "As all Sherlockians know, in 1906 Arthur Conan Doyle took on the case of George Edalji, a reserved young lawyer, half Scottish and half Indian, who was wrongly accused of mutilating animals--and in the process helped set up Britain's Court of Appeals. Perhaps it is not so surprising that the author of Flauben's Parrot would choose to reconstruct not just this case but the lives of both participants; what is surprising is the almost deadpan way he does it--and that his approach works so well. Barnes tells the life stories of Arthur and George with almost clinical precision, alternating between them from school age on. The storm gathers slowly; one learns the details of the mutilations and how the case was built so incongruously against the upright and deeply myopic George, even as Arthur is whiling away his time as famed writer and romancer of Miss Jean Leckie. The book picks up like a whirlwind when Arthur and George meet at last; and though a few early passages can seem a bit leisurely, it finally make powerful sense to see how these men arrived where they did. A beautifully modulated work; highly recommended." Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal

17. ———. "Prepub Alert." Library Journal 130, no. 14 (2005): 114-116.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews several books that have yet to be published including Barnes, Julian. Arthur & George. Knopf. Jan. 2006. 384p. ISBN 0-307-26310-X. $24.95. "George grows up a poor vicar's son and eventually crosses paths with Arthur, who grows up to create Sherlock Holmes. With a 100,000-copy first printing and a ten-city tour."

18. Judd, Elizabeth. "Arthur & George." Atlantic 297, no. 1 (2006): 179-179.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A review of Julian Barnes' Arthur & George.

19. Kakutani, Michiko. "Sherlock's Creator Gives Sleuthing a Try." New York Times, January 10, 2006: E1-E8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The author reviews the book "Arthur & George," by Julian Barnes.

20. Kehe, Marjorie. "How would Sherlock Holmes fare in real life?" Christian Science Monitor, Jan 17, 2006: 13-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of "Arthur & George" by Julian Barnes.

21. Kemp, Peter. "Conan Doyle to the rescue." Sunday Times (London), June 26, 2005: 37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...When cattle in the vicinity are viciously slashed, things take an even more macabre turn. Soon the press is clamouring about The Great Wyrley Outrages. It sounds like a case for Sherlock Holmes. And, indeed, the sleuth who eventually sets out to disentangle the gruesome affair is Sherlock Holmes's creator, Arthur Conan Doyle. Unlike Holmes's exploits, though, the situation at the centre of Julian Barnes's richly accomplished new novel isn't fantasy but fact. Taking a real-life whodunit, Arthur & George transforms it into a dazzling exercise in detective fiction of more kinds than one...."

22. Kington, Miles. "When the Writer Becomes the Star." The Independent (London), July 25, 2005: 32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...'Well,' said Pranger, 'it's very odd when the writer becomes the star. Almost always, the fictional creation outshines the creator. Harry Potter overshadows Rowling. James Bond is big, Ian Fleming is small. Who remembers who created Tarzan? And until now Conan Doyle has been blotted out by the wretched Sherlock Holmes. But suddenly, Conan Doyle has bounced back. 'There was a novel which came out the other day by Julian Barnes, all about a real-life case in which Conan Doyle really did help to prove that a man had been wrongfully imprisoned. Conan Doyle as true life Sherlock Holmes. Good story. Surprised it hasn't been turned into a musical by Lloyd Webber or Ben Elton. And then there is this renewed attempt to prove that Conan Doyle was a murderer.'..."

23. Levy, Paul. "Personal Journal; Review / Book: Strong Novels Vie For Man Booker." Wall Street Journal, Oct 7, 2005: P.1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...The favorite, at 5 to 4, is Julian Barnes's supremely well- constructed 'Arthur & George' (Jonathan Cape, 352 pages, GBP 17.99). A true story of Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and his involvement in the real-life mystery of George Edalji, a gentle, half-Parsee lawyer accused of brutality to animals, this is one of Mr. Barnes's richly complex fictions, like his 'Flaubert's Parrot' or 'A History of the World in 101/2 Chapters,' rather than the more straightforward works (which I also love, such as 'Before She Met Me' or 'Talking It Over'). For my money, Mr. Barnes is the best novelist of his talented generation; we're in the hands of a master, but there is something bloodless about this tightly plotted, completely controlled narrative, with its on-purpose, single loose end that tells the reader that not everything, including Conan Doyle's being a sucker for spiritualism, is as tidy as it seems...."

24. Masters, Rosalind. "ACD and the Stonor Case." The Ritual, no. 15 (1995): 31-35.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

25. O'Hagan, Simon. "Books: the Game's Afoot! it could be a Case for Sherlock Holmes ; Arthur & George by Julian Barnes Cape GBP17.99 GBP16.99 (P&P)." Independent on Sunday (London), July 3, 2005: 23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the book. "...Indeed, it's one of Barnes's best, a beautiful and engrossing work which brings together some classic Barnesian themes (love, identity), introduces some new ones (spirituality, guilt and innocence), and hangs them all on a real-life miscarriage of justice from 100 years ago that was always going to be a gift for the first writer to spot its potential for re-imagining...."

26. Scrivener, Richard. "Reading for Pleasure." Bookseller, no. 5213 (2006): 24-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This article presents views of the author on the book "Arthur and George," by Julian Barnes. "'Arthur and George' is two intertwined biographies, of English writer Arthur Conan Doyle and writer George Edalji, wrongly imprisoned for seven years on charges of livestock mutilation. Barnes' forensic writing deftly introduces to two men who inhabit different worlds in the same country. Arthur, while not cut out for greatness, has the opportunities to experience life through travel, education and war, while George is restricted to a quiet existence as the obedient son of a Midlands vicar."

27. Solomon, Deborah. "Rewriting History." New York Times Magazine 155, no. 53432 (2005): 17-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents a series of questions and answers with Julian Barnes. The author discusses his new book "Arthur & George," based on the true story of George Edjali, who was accused of a crime and defended by Arthur Conan Doyle. Barnes also talk about writing mysteries under the pseudonym Dan Kavanagh.

28. Taylor, Ihsan. "Paperback Row." New York Times, Jan 14, 2007: 24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Arthur & George, by Julian Barnes. (Vintage International, $14.95.) The Arthur in Barnes's extraordinary novel is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes. The other title character is George Edalji, a half-Indian solicitor who was convicted of a series of livestock mutilations in his rural parish in 1903. Barnes dissects early-20th-century English society as he spins the real-life detective story of how Arthur took up George's case and tried to exonerate him. (Doyle's work on the case helped lead to the creation of a Court of Criminal Appeal in 1907.) ''Arthur & George'' was a Man Booker Prize finalist in 2005; our reviewer, Terrence Rafferty, called it a ''cracking good yarn.'' [Abstract from publisher]

29. Weaver, Gordon. Conan Doyle and the parson's son the George Edalji case. Cambridge: Vanguard Books, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006445221. Includes bibliographical references //

30. Wyatt, Neal, and Jeff Ayers. "Do the Time, Read the Crime." Library Journal 132, no. 14 (2007): 184-184.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Lists a number of true crime books including one related to Doyle. "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and George Edalji, a man accused of writing threatening letters, cross paths in Julian Barnes's Booker-nominated Arthur & George (Vintage. 2007. ISBN 978-1-4000-9703-6. pap. $14.95). Edalji was convicted in 1903 on the basis of his race (his father was Parsi) rather than hard evidence. Doyle hears about the case and tries to prove Edalji's innocence. The actual case resulted in the establishment of the British Court of Appeals."

31. Zaleski, Jeff, and Peter Cannon. "Mystery Notes." Publishers Weekly 248, no. 39 (2001): 73.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews several books on mystery. The True Crime Files of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Stephen Hines; The Sedgemoor Strangler and Other Stories of Crime, by Peter Lovesey; The Black Coat: A 1948 Murder Mystery Comedy, by Constance and Gwenyth Little; The Mouse in the Mountain, by Norbert Davis.

05D Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Medical Practice and Medical Writings (12)

1. "Cecil Helman." Lancet 361, no. 9376 (2003): 2252.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Growing up in a family of a dozen doctors in South Africa, the author, Cecil Helman, learned early on that medicine was not just about science. In medical practice, one never quite knows who might walk through the door next: the problems they may bring, the stories they may tell...." Passing reference to Doyle: "As Dr Foster, the general practitioner in Arthur Conan Doyle's story A Medical Document, puts it: 'There's no need for fiction in medicine, for the facts will always beat anything you can fancy.'"

2. "Relations of Literature and Science, 1991-1992." Configurations 2, no. 2 (1994): 373-431.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. Roden, A. E., et al. "Humanism and Values in the Medical Short Stories of Arthur Conan Doyle." South Med J 85 (May 1992): 528-537; Westmoreland, B.F. "Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Bell, and Sherlock Holmes: A Neurologic Connection." Arch Neurol 48 (1991): 325-329.; Oderwald, A. K. "The Physician and Sherlock Holmes." J R Soc Med 84 (1991): 151-152; Roszell, Calvert. "The Devil's Foot and the Dweller at the Threshold." BSJ 41 (1991): 100-103.

3. Brody, Howard. "Book review--'Conan Doyle's Tales of Medical Humanism and Values,' edited by Alvin E. Rodin and Jack D. Key." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 70 (1992): 35-37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Donaldson-Evans, Mary. "Medical Progress and Social Reality: A Reader in Nineteenth-Century Medicine and Literature (review)." Nineteenth Century French Studies 30, no. 1 (2001): 176-177.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews Furst, Lilian R., ed. Medical Progress and Social Reality: A Reader in Nineteenth-Century Medicine and Literature. Albany: State U of New York P, 2000. Pp. 314. ISBN 0-7914-4804-5 Doyle mentioned within contents of the book under review. "...In all but two cases, the texts are excerpted from longer works. Two short stories ('The Steel Windpipe,' by Mikhail Bulgakov, and 'The Doctors of Hoyland,' by Arthur Conan Doyle) are reproduced in their entirety...."

5. Doyle, Arthur Conan. Sous la lampe rouge : contes et récits de la vie médicale, (Un endroit où aller). Arles: Actes Sud, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Trad. de: Under the red lamp./ Bibliogr.: p. 376. Traduits de l'anglais par Christine Le Boeuf ; postface de Dominique Sassoon. / Uniform Title: Under the red lamp. French. //

6. Goldman, John. "Chronic myeloid leukemia - Therapy in the 20th and 21st centuries." Leukemia & lymphoma 48, no. 12 (2007): 2287-2288.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article discusses the effective therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The second reference points to a work by Doyle. Conan Doyle A. Notes on a case of leucocythaemia. Lancet 25 March 1882;490.

7. Krasner, James. "Arthur Conan Doyle as Doctor and Writer." Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 33, no. 4 (2000): 19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Examines the nature of the medical and detective fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle, a doctor turned writer. Value of narrative approach to engagements between doctor and patient; Utilization of storytelling in medical practice by medical ethicists; Factors influencing the writings of Doyle; Depiction of the different features of medical life in Doyle's works.

8. Markel, Howard. "The Medical Detectives." New England Journal of Medicine 353, no. 23 (2005): 2426-2428.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article discusses medical history in Germany. A conference in August 1890, which was sponsored by Kaiser Wilhem II, offered physicians a program of lectures. Dr. Robert Koch, a University of Berlin professor who discovered the causes of anthrax, tuberculosis, and cholera, was a celebrated speaker at the event. Arthur Conan Doyle describes the excitement over Koch's remedy for tuberculosis, "Koch's lymph," in his 1924 autobiography. Conan Doyle's efforts to meet Koch and his colleague, Dr. Ernst von Bergmann, at the University of Berlin are detailed. Koch's lymph, which is now referred to as tuberculin, was a diagnostic tool before the development of the purified-protein-derivative test.

9. Pearce, D. N. "The illness of Dr George Turnavine Budd and its influence on the literary career of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Journal of Medical Biography 3, no. 4 (1995): 236-238.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. Saler, Michael T. "Round the Red Lamp." TLS, no. 5460 (2007): 26-26.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Round the Red Lamp & Other Medical Writings," by Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Robert Darby.

11. Savitt, Todd Lee. Medical readers' theater : a guide and scripts. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 23 cm. edited by Todd L. Savitt. // "An interesting anthology of dramatizations of short stories intended for use in educating health-care students who are encouraged to discuss the productions; one of the scripts is Gregory A. Watkins' adaptation of Conan Doyle's 'The Doctors of Hoyland.'"

12. Silverstein, Arthur M. "Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle and the Case of Congenital Syphilis." Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49, no. 2 (2006): 209-219.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "In 1894, Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote 'The Third Generation,' a short story involving the transmission of congenital syphilis from generation to generation. Analysts of his writings have interpreted the pathogenetic mechanism invloved in modern terms: infection of mother by father and then transplacental infection of the fetus. However, a review of the contemporary literature and the history of the concepts of congenital and 'hereditary' syphilis demonstrates that the late 19th-century understanding of the process involved a Lamarckian transmission of paternal infection, via the sperm at the moment of conception. It was undoubtedly this concept that Doyle learned in medical school in the late 1870s and that provided the background to his story."

05E Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Other Writings (190)

1. "100 Years Ago: For a Song?". Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights publication of Songs of Action, a collection of poetry and "The Song of the Bow," sheet music based on the same ballad of the outland bowmen found in Doyle's The White Company.

2. "'Boxed In' Semantic Indifference to Atrocity." Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law 40, no. 1 (2008): 137-145.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...Under King Leopold II of Belgium, an economic enterprise evolved in the Congo that, by the turn of the twentieth century, saw the deaths of untold millions. Largely ignored, it took the likes of novelists, such as Joseph Conrad, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Mark Twain to call attention to what was taking place in central Africa...."

3. "Editorial." Antioch Review 66, no. 2 (2008): 205-206.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...There is even an excellent anthology of work about medicine that Iain Bamforth brought together in 2003 under the rubric The Body in the Library: A Literary Anthology of Modern Medicine. It contained a varied array of essays, commentaries, and poems from writers as diverse as Anton Chekhov (a physician), Conan Doyle (another doctor), George Orwell (Eric Blair), Philip Larkin (librarian), and Susan Sontag (who died recently)...." The Doyle piece in Bamforth's anthology is "Curse of Eve."

4. "Holmes 'First Draft' is Printed." Birmingham Evening Mail, March 31, 2001: 9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A short story thought to be the first ever written by Sherlock Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has been published for the first time. The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe was originally rejected for publication by an Edinburgh-based magazine almost 125 years ago, when Conan Doyle was an 18-year-old medical student. The hand-written book, which featured an early version of the author's most famous creation, Sherlock Holmes, remained in the archive of Blackwoods Magazine because Doyle did not include a stamped self-addressed envelope when he sent it in...."

5. "In Short." New York Times, Mar 4, 1984: A.22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Uncollected Stories: The Unknown Conan Doyle. Compiled and introduced by John Michael Gibson and Richard Lancelyn Green. (Doubleday, $14.95.) This attractive collection of magazine stories demonstrates once again that Sherlock Holmes was by no means the only thing Arthur Conan Doyle was up to during his half-century career. Although tales like 'Uncle Jeremy's Household' and 'The Cabman's Story' have enticing hints of Holmesian ratiocination, most of these 33 excursions into melodrama, horror, history and satire travel far beyond the circumscribed world of drawing room mystery....the book contains enough forgotten stories to make it valuable...."

6. "Mystery Notes." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 14 (2004): 45-46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a list of mystery books. Murder Is No Mitzvah: Short Mysteries About Jewish Occasions, edited by Abigail Browning, collects a dozen Jewish-themed crime stories, 11 of which first appeared in either Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine or Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine. The one classic tale, "The Jew's Breastplate," is by Arthur Conan Doyle. (St. Martin's Minotaur/Dunne, $23.95 288p ISBN 0-312-32506-1)

7. "Publishing, Library Science, Bibliography." Reference & Research Book News 23, no. 3 (2008): 336-342.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews several books including Sherlock Holmes on stage: a chronological encyclopedia of plays featuring the great detective. Kabatchnik, Amnon. Scarverow Pr., ©2008 197 p. $55.00 "Retired from teaching theater at various prestigious US universities, Kabatchnik cites and describes each of the four plays Arthur Conan Doyle himself wrote about the Victorian London detective he created, along vidth 38 written by others, some of them one-act plays. Each article describes the context in which the play was written, points out references and other connections to the published stories, summarizes the action, discusses the production history and reception, and identifies the plajnvright."

8. "Recent Work in Critical Theory: Feminist and Gender Studies." Style 34, no. 4 (2000): 598.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Provides information on several books on feminist and gender studies. Includes Paula M. Krebs' Gender, Race, and the Writing of Empire (Cambridge University Press, 1999). "Through the writings of Arthur Conan Doyle, Olive Schreiner, H. Rider Haggard, and Rudyard Kipling, Krebs addresses the Boer War of 1899-1902 and the struggles to maintain an imperialist hegemony in a twentieth-century world."

9. "SF/Fantasy/Horror Notes." Publishers Weekly 247, no. 44 (2000): 52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents list of books released in November and December 2000 in the United States, including The Mammoth Book of Haunted House Stories. "Peter Haining has edited The Mammoth Book of Haunted House Stories, which includes stories by such classic authors as M.R. James, L.P. Hartley and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and by such modern masters as Ramsey Campbell, Basil Copper and James Herbert. As to be expected from a distinguished anthologizer like Haining, this is a top-drawer collection." (Carroll & Graf, $11.95 paper 512p ISBN 0-7867-0791-7)

10. "What's going on: Theatre." Performing Arts & Entertainment in Canada 32, no. 2 (1999): 43.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents updates on theater in Canada. Includes the Shaw Festival production of Doyle's Waterloo.

11. Winter spirits: a collection of ghost stories for the holidays and beyond. Grand Haven, MI: Brilliance Corp., 1994. Sound Recording 6 sound cassettes (9 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Analog, 1 7/8 ips. Subtitle from publisher's label on container. Unabridged. In container (23 cm.) Read by Tom Cassaletto, Sandra Burr, Leanor Reizen, Jim Bond, Roger Dressler, and Michael Page. //

12. Allen, Moira. "@Deadline." Writer 114, no. 6 (2001): 12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Covers issues related to writing and writers as of June 2001. Includes reference to the publication of The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe by Doyle.

13. Axel-Lute, Melanie. "Masterworks of Crime & Mystery (Book)." Library Journal 107, no. 17 (1982): 1899.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Masterworks of Crime and Mystery,' by Arthur Conan Doyle. "These are non-Sherlock Holmes stories, some of them only marginally criminal or mysterious, and probably more interesting to students of literature than to casual mystery readers. On the whole, however, an interesting, unusual, occasionally humorous collection."

14. Bear, Greg. Dinosaur summer. New York: Aspect, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97012318 // "Conan Doyle's 'Lost World' was a factual account of the Challenger expedition, but by 1947 nobody cares about dinosaurs any more, and the last dinosaur circus in America is closing, and there's an attempt to return the dinosaurs to the Lost World, filmed for National Geographic by John Ford."

15. Bergen, Lara Rice, David Koepp, and Michael Crichton. Find your way to The lost world, Jurassic Park. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96080492 // The reader is invited to choose among different plot endings for the story of a trip to the island where the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park still survive

16. Bland, Joellen. "The Mummy." Plays 60, no. 5 (2001): 55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents the play 'The Mummy.' "From a story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Adapted for round-the-table reading..."

17. Bledsoe, Glen, and Karen E Bledsoe. Classic mysteries II a collection of mind-bending masterpieces, (Lowell House classics). Los Angeles: Roxbury Park/Lowell House Juvenile, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 99071488. Contents: The abscence of Mr. Glass / G.K. Chesterton -- The mysterious death on The Underground Railway / The Baroness Orczy -- The beetle hunter / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The black narcissus / Fred M. White -- The arrest of Arséne Lupin / Maurice Leblanc // A collection of mystery stories which feature unusual central characters, including a gentleman burglar and a figure known only as the "Old Man."

18. Blessed, Brian. Quest for the Lost World. London: Boxtree, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. (some col.), ports. ; 25 cm. TV tie-in. Includes index. Scuttlebutt Apr 2000 // "Brian Blessed was in Venezuela, filming 'The Lost World' for BBC television; it would appear that he was exploring rather than acting. Blessed has written a fine account of his expedition and notes that he first fell in love with the romance of the Lost World as a schoolboy, when he had a chance to listen to the BBC radio dramatization of the book."

19. ———. Quest for the Lost World. London: Boxtree, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill., ports. (chiefly col.) ; 20 cm. Includes Index. // "Brian Blessed was in Venezuela, filming 'The Lost World' for BBC television; it would appear that he was exploring rather than acting. Blessed has written a fine account of his expedition and notes that he first fell in love with the romance of the Lost World as a schoolboy, when he had a chance to listen to the BBC radio dramatization of the book."

20. Blumberg, Jess. "Abandoned Ship." Smithsonian 38, no. 8 (2007): 20-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article focuses on the abandoned ship Mary Celeste, which was found 400 miles east of the Azores on December 5, 1872 by the British Brig Dei Gratia. A discussion of various theories, including those that focused on mutiny, pirates, sea monsters and killer water spouts, is presented. A 2007 investigation into the mystery which was performed by Anne MacGregor and Phil Richardson, which resulted in the documentary "The True Story of the Mary Celeste", which was partly funded by Smithsonian Networks, is discussed. Includes references to Doyle. "...Arthur Conan Doyle's 1884 short story based on the case posited a capture by a vengeful ex-slave...The story of the Mary Celeste might have drifted into history if Conan Doyle hadn't published "J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement" in 1884; his sensationalistic account, printed in Cornhill Magazine, set off waves of theorizing about the ship's fate. Even Attorney General Solly-Flood revisited the case, writing summaries of his interviews and notes. But the mystery remained unsolved...."

21. Bold, Valentina. "The Year's Publications 2003: a Selected List." Scottish Studies Review 5, no. 1 (2004): 136-152.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a list of Scottish publications in 2003. Included in list are: Arthur Conan Doyle. The Tragedy of the Korosco. London: Hesperus. ISBN 1 8439 1039 X pbk; Lawrence Frank. Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens and Doyle. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 1 4039 1139 8 hbk.

22. Briefel, Aviva. "Hands of Beauty, Hands of Horror: Fear and Egyptian Art at the Fin de Siècle." Victorian Studies 50, no. 2 (2008): 263-271.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This essay examines the gothicization of Egyptian manual productions in late-Victorian mummy narratives. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Victorian observers were fascinated by the intricate manual labor required to eviscerate, embalm, and adorn the body and ornament its sarcophagus and various accoutrements. When a group of Oxford scholars in Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story 'Lot No. 249' (1894) discovers a mummy, one of them expresses his admiration for the embalmer’s skill: 'A very conscientious worker he must have been. I wonder how many modern works will survive four thousand years?'....I want to suggest that the aesthetic horror of the hand in mummy narratives emanates from its ambiguous position as an artifact that is itself a source of production. The hand reminds its viewers both of the impressive (and now obsolete) manual craftsmanship that produced it and of the hand’s own creative capacities. It is a human-made thing that exhibits its own ability to make. As one of the characters in Conan Doyle’s 'Lot No. 249' observes regarding the mummy, 'Perhaps these very hands helped to build the stones into the pyramids'....'

23. Browning, Abigail. Murder is no mitzvah. 1st ed. New York: Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Minotaur, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2003062544. Contents: The bread of affliction / Michael Kahn -- Comes the revolution / Gregory Fallis -- A Sabbath flame / Ronald Levitsky -- The Rabbi and the Sorcerer / Russell William Asplund -- The Lipkin-Wexler affair / Louis Weinstein -- Kaddish / Batya Swift Yasgur -- Funny story / Larry Beinhart -- The Jew's breastplate / Arthur Conan Doyle -- Kaddish for the kid / Max Allan Collins -- Where does a Golem go? / Bernice F. Weiss -- Mom remembers / James Yaffee -- The Christmas mitzvah / Doug Allyn //

24. Buitenhuis, Peter. The great war of words : British, American, and Canadian propaganda and fiction, 1914-1933. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1987.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Includes index. Bibliography: p. [193]-194. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Includes discussion of Conan Doyle's writing about the Boer War and the Great War."

25. ———. The great war of words : British, American, and Canadian propaganda and fiction, 1914-1933. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1988.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Paper reprint of 1987 ed. Includes bibliographical references (p. [183]-194) and index. // "Includes discussion of Conan Doyle's writing about the Boer War and the Great War."

26. ———. The great war of words : literature as propaganda, 1914-18 and after. London: B.T. Batsford, 1989.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., ports. ; 23 cm. First published: Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press, 1987. // "Includes discussion of Conan Doyle's writing about the Boer War and the Great War."

27. ———. "The great war of words British, American and Canadian propaganda and fiction, 1914-1933." In (Canadian electronic library), xviii, 199 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm. Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia Press, 1987.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Grande Prairie Regional College Internet Access http://site.ebrary.com/lib/gprc/Doc?id=10210514 University of Alberta Access http://site.ebrary.com/lib/albertacel/Doc?id=10210514 Includes bibliographical references and index. Reproduction: Electronic document. // "Includes discussion of Conan Doyle's writing about the Boer War and the Great War."

28. Casaletto, Tom, Sandra Burr, Leanor Reizen, Jim Bond, Roger Dressler, and Michael Page. Dark Holidays: a collection of ghost stories. Grand Haven, MI: Brilliance Audio, 1994. Sound Recording 8 sound discs (9 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Brilliance Audio on compact disc. Read by Tom Casaletto, Sandra Burr, Leanor Reizen, Jim Bond, Roger Dressler, and Michael Page. // "Sixteen unabridged tales of spirits to playfully darken the holidays and add chill to a winter's night."

29. Chabon, Michael. "You Must Read This: Charmed by a dashing brigadier." 2008, no. Jan 31: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Author Michael Chabon writes about one of Doyle's other creations, Brigadier Gerard. An excerpt from the article: "...But did you know that in between gleefully killing off Holmes and somewhat reluctantly reviving him, Arthur Conan Doyle created another great fictional character, one who easily rivals Holmes -- if not for intelligence, then for heroism, bravery and dash? A character who exceeds Holmes in the one trait in which the great detective, by his own admission, was always deficient: a rich and lovable humanity. This hero, a handsome, charming and resourceful cavalry officer serving in the Grand Army of Napoleon, has only one tragic flaw, though in his own eyes, of course, it is his glory and his single greatest advantage in life: He is a Frenchman. His name is Brigadier Etienne Gerard, and he starred in 17 short stories that Conan Doyle wrote, with a palpable sense of liberation, after pushing Holmes off that Alpine ledge...." Includes an excerpt from chapter one of The Exploits and Adventures of Brigadier Gerard.

30. Chandran, K. Narayana. "Reviews." Studies in Short Fiction 31, no. 3 (1994): 514.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the books 'Folktales From India: A Selection of Oral Tales From Twenty-two Languages,' edited by A.K. Ramanujan and 'The Penguin Book of Indian Ghost Stories,' edited by Ruskin Bond. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Ruskin Bond collects 21 ghost stories, nine of them by non-Indians (mostly British) and the rest by Indian-English writers. All of the stories are set in India except A. Conan Doyle's "Brown Hand" in which an Indian ghost stalks the foggy streets of London..."

31. Chesney, George Tomkyns. La bataille de Dorking : roman. Montréal: Éditions du Colporteur, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 14 cm. La bataille de Dorking / Sir George T. Chesney -- La bataille / J.-H. Rosny, aîné -- Danger! / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Traduction de: The battle of Dorking./ Tirage limité à 35 ex. //

32. Clausson, Nils. "The Simple Art of Stealing: The Case of Raymond Chandler's Purloined 'Rats behind the Wainscoting.'." ANQ 19, no. 3 (2006): 32-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This essay states that novelist Raymond Chandler had borrowed some of his ideas for the novel 'The Big Sleep' from 'The Mystery of Cloomber,' a novella by Arthur Conan Doyle. Rats behind the wainscoting, one of the most famous images in Chandler's novel 'The Big Sleep' was taken from 'The Mystery of Cloomber.' 'The Big Sleep' is about the Sternwoods, a doomed family over whom death hovers ominously. What Chandler borrowed from Doyle's novella is the mood of inevitable doom that is beyond the characters' power to prevent or even understand.

33. Connors, Theresa, and Mark Annichiarico. "Audio reviews." Library Journal 121, no. 13 (1996): 134.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the sound recording 'The Lost World,' by Arthur Conan Doyle.

34. Costello, Peter. Conan Doyle, Detective: True Crimes Investigated by the Creator of Sherlock Holmes. New York: Carroll & Graf, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

35. Crichton, Michael. The lost world: a novel. 1st trade ed. New York: Knopf. Distributed by Random House, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 95032034 //

36. ———. Michael Crichton's Jurassic world. 1st ed. New York: Knopf, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97073821. Contents: Jurassic Park -- The lost world //

37. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--'The Blood-Stone Tragedy' by Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Christopher and Barbara Roden." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 117.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

38. Doyle, Arthur Conan. The Adventures Of Gerard. Library Edition: Tantor Media Inc, 2005. Sound Recording.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

39. ———. Challenger and company : the complete adventures of Professor Challenger and his intrepid team. [England?]: Leonaur, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. The lost world -- The poison belt -- The land of mists -- The disintegration machine -- When the world screamed. // The lost world. In Maple White's sketch book are drawings of the prehistoric beasts, birds and ape men which he has seen on his travels. Professor Challenger, excited when he sees the drawings, decides to find out if there is a Lost World in the Amazon forest where dinosaurs, pterodactyls and ape men still exist. The poison belt. "Nothing could be done. The thing was universal and beyond our human knowledge or control. It was death--painless but inevitable--death for young and old, for weak and strong, for rich and poor, without hope or possibility of escape." Just returned from his famous adventure in the Lost World, the resourceful Professor George Challenger faces his greatest danger yet: the planet will pass through a belt of poisonous ether, and mankind might not survive. Despite the professor's dire warnings about the coming catastrophe, no one listens. As the poison enters the atmosphere, terror and madness sweep the globe. Cities are wracked by riots, societies crumble, and soon all communication ceases. Professor Challenger and his friends, barricaded in a sealed room, can only watch their planet die. The land of mists. The death of his wife brings Malone, Enid, and Professor Challenger into the realm of spiritualism, both real and fake. The disintegration machine. Malone and Professor Challenger interview a Latvian scientist who has invented a machine which breaks down human bodies into molecular clouds and then reassembles them. Professor Challenger sets off to prove that the Earth itself is a living entity by giving it a painful shock.

40. ———. The collected Brigadier Gerard stories. Munslow, Shropshire: Hearthstone, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96127611; Scuttlebutt Nov 1995 // "Has an informative introduction by John Whitehead and presents the saga in chronological order."

41. ———. The complete Brigadier Gerard, (Barnes & Noble Library of essential reading). New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006271648. Contents: The exploits of Brigadier Gerard -- The adventures of Brigadier Gerard. Includes bibliographical references (p. 383-384) //

42. ———. The complete Brigadier Gerard. Edited by Owen Dudley Edwards, (Canongate Classics 57). Edinburgh: Canongate Books, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Contents: The exploits of Brigadier Gerard -- The adventures of Brigadier Gerard. Edited and introduced by Owen Dudley Edwards. //

43. ———. The Complete Brigadier Gerard Stories. Edinburgh: Canongate, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

44. ———. The complete Professor Challenger stories. the lost world, the poison belt , the land of mist, the disintegration machine, when the world screamed. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Fredonia, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. The lost world.--The poison belt.--The land of mist.--The disintegration machine.--When the world screamed. [First published in 1952]. //

45. ———. Estudios del natural: los casos que Sherlock Holmes no pudo resolver. Barcelona: Grijalbo Mondadori, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Apr 1995 // A Spanish translation of Strange Studies From Life and Other Narratives: The Complete True Crime Writings of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Jack Tracy and published by Gaslight in 1988

46. ———. Exploits of Brigadier Gerard. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

47. ———. "A fine sprit [sic] of tolerance". Spokane, Wash.: Arthur H. Clark Co., 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Introduced by Michael W. Homer. // "This keepsake containing the accounts of Arthur Conan Doyle on the Mormons has been produced to accompany the collector's edition of On the way to somewhere else: European sojourners in the Mormon West, 1834-1930, volume 8 of the Kingdom in the West series, published by the Arthur H. Clark Company. Only 55 copies have been printed, signed and numbered..."--P. [23]. Includes bibliographical references.

48. ———. The haunted grange of Goresthorpe. Ashcroft, BC: Arthur Conan Doyle Society, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm. //

49. ———. Kyoryu no sekai = The lost world, (Kodomo no tame no sekai bungaku no mori, 23). Tokyo: Shueisha, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Language: Japanese. Asa C. Doiru saku. Uchida Chikashi yaku. [e, Ikeda Tatsuo]. //

50. ———. La grande ombre, (Collection l'Aube poche). [La Tour-d'Aigues]: Éditions de l'Aube, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Traduit de l'anglais./ Trad. de: The great shadow. / Uniform Title: Great shadow. French. //

51. ———. Le crime du Congo belge : Suivi par au Congo français, de Félicien Challaye. Paris: Nuits rouges, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., map ; 20 cm. "23"--Spine./ Includes bibliographical references. Postface de Colette Braeckman ; trauction nouvelle de Jean-Claude Lamoureux. / Uniform Title: Crime of the Congo. French. //

52. ———. Le Monde perdu, (Science-fiction (éditions J'ai lu)). Paris: J'ai lu : Pierre Lafitte, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 18 cm. / Uniform Title: Lost world. French. Traduit de l'anglais par Louis Labat. //

53. ———. Le monde perdu, (De l'autre côté...). Clermont-Ferrand: Éditions Paleo, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. Trad. de: The lost world. Traduit de l'anglais par Gilles Vauthier ; illustré par Zaïtchick. / Uniform Title: Lost world. French. //

54. ———. The lost world. 1st ed. Jackson Hole, WY: Archeion Press, LLC, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007942280 //

55. ———. The lost world. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 215). Introduction by Allen Grove. //

56. ———. Lost World. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

57. ———. The Lost World. [Oxford]: Oxford University Press, 2002. Sound Recording 1 sound cassette.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Dominoes.; 2. //

58. ———. The lost world / the poison belt. Sandy, Utah: Quiet Vision Pub., 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm. //

59. ———. The lost world ; and, The poison belt, (Pocket classics). Stroud: A. Sutton, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- maps ; 20 cm. //

60. ———. The Lost World and other stories. Ware: Wordsworth Editions, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Sept 1995 //

61. ———. The lost world being an account of the recent amazing adventures of Professor George E. Challenger, Lord John Roxton, Professor Summerlee, and Mr. E.D. Malone of the "Daily-Gazette". 2002 Modern Library paperback ed ed. New York: Modern Library, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2002026306. Includes bibliographical references. Scuttlebutt Feb 2004. // "With an introduction by Michael Crichton and notes by Julia Houston. It's taken almost ten years since Crichton's own The Lost World was published, for him to comment at length on Conan Doyle's book, and the commentary is insightful and interesting. 'Conan Doyle did something far more influential than invent a character,' Crichton suggests, 'he invented a particular kind of fantasy story, and demonstrated a successful way to tell it.'"

62. ———. The lost world being an account of the recent amazing adventures of Professor George E. Challenger, Lord John Roxton, Professor Summerlee, and Mr. E.D. Malone of the Daily Gazette, (Oxford popular fiction). Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 94027530 //

63. ———. The Maracot Deep and Other Stories. Newcastle: CSP Classic Texts, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

64. ———. The Mystery of Cloomber. Mineola, NY : Dover; Newton Abbot : David & Charles [distributor], 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- With a new introduction by Mike Ashley. //

65. ———. Our African winter. London: Duckworth, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It's an interesting account of the family's tour of eastern and southern Africa in 1928-1929."

66. ———. The poison belt. Thirsk: House of Stratus, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. //

67. ———. The poison belt, (Modern voices). London: Hesperus, 2008.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

68. ———. The poison belt : being an account of another adventure of Professor George E. Challenger, Lord John Roxton, Prof. Summerlee, and Mr. E.D Malone, the discoverers of 'The Lost World', (An Alan Rodgers Book). Doylestown, PA: Wildside Press, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm. //

69. ———. The poison belt : being an account of another amazing adventure of Professor Challenger, (Bison frontiers of imagination series). Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 20 cm. Introduction to the Bison Books edition by Katya Reimann. //

70. ———. The refugees : a tale of two continents, Huguenot inheritance series. Neerlandia, Alta. ; Pella, Iowa: Inheritance Publications, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Illustrated by T. de Thulstrup. // A small band of religious-freedom-seeking Huguenots escape France, only to hazard dangerous sea voyages, stranding on an iceberg, and a perilous trek through Canadian forests, to avoid both Catholic Frenchmen and Indians.

71. ———. Songs of the Road. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

72. ———. Tales for a winter's night. Large type ed. South Yarmouth, Ma.: Curley Pub., 1991.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. "Curley large print"--P. [4] of cover. // "Offers of eight of Conan Doyle's non-Sherlockian stories from Round the Fire Stories. (Jacques Barzun and Wendell Hertig Taylor suggested in their Catalog of Crime that the stories in that book 'are worth reading even around a radiator.'"

73. ———. The terror of John Blue Gap. 1st. ed. Los Angeles, CA: Best Sellers Illustrated, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ID: 4494; Sir Arthur Conan Doyle ; [edited by] Stephen Stern.; 0604; p. cm //

74. ———. Tragediia passazhirov "Korosko" / Uniform Title: Tragedy of the Korosko. Russian. Moskva: Geleos, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Tragediia passazhirov "Korosko" -- Rasskazy: Nachalo voennoi kar’ery Gilari Dzhoisa ; Tre korrespondenta ; Znamia svobody ; Bochonok ikry ; Khoziain Shato-Nuara ; Ten’ griadushchego. [perevod s angliiskogo M.B. Antonovoi, P.A. Gelevy]. //

75. ———. The tragedy of the Korosko. Bloonington, Ind.: Gaslight Publications, 1983.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 23 cm. "Originally published in March 1898 by Smith, Elder & Co. (London) and in May 1898 under the title 'A Desert Drama' by J.B. Lippincott Co. (Philadelphia)." Afterword by Dale L. Walker ; illustrations by Sidney Paget. //

76. ———. The tragedy of the Korosko. London: Hesperus, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 20 cm. //

77. ———. The tragedy of the Korosko. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Fredonia Books, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. "Reprinted from the 1898 ed."--T.p. verso. //

78. ———. Ushinawareta sekai: Rosuto warudo, (Hayakawa bunko SF). Tokyo: Hayakawa Shobo, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Language: Japanese. Translation of: The lost world. Asa Konan Doiru. Kajima Shozo yaku. //

79. ———. War in South Africa. [S.l.]: General Books, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

80. ———. The white company ; and, Sir Nigel, (Barnes & Noble library of essential reading). New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- maps ; 21 cm. The white company -- Sir Nigel. Includes bibliographical references (p. 773-774). Introduction by Douglas Elliott. //

81. ———. The White Company ; Sir Nigel. Common reader ed. Pleasantville, N.Y.: Akadine Press, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm. Introduction by George MacDonald Fraser. //

82. ———. Zateriannyi mir / Uniform Title: Lost world. Russian, (Moe pervoe sobranie sochinenii). Moskva: OLMA-PRESS, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 27 cm. Zateriannyi mir -- Otravlennyi poias -- Marakotova bezdna -- Otkrytie Rafalza Khou -- Rasskazy. Translation of: The lost world ; The poison belt ; Maracot Deep ; one unindentified novel, and, Short stories. Otravlennyi poias.; Marakotova bezdna.; Otkrytie Rafalza Khou. //

83. ———. Zateriannyi mir. Otravlennyi poias. Marakotova bezdna / Uniform Title: Lost world. Russian, (Biblioteka prikliuchenii). Moskva: EKSMO-PRESS, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Otravlennyi poias.; Marakotova bezdna. //

84. ———. Ztracený svet. Vyd. 1. ed, (Knihovnicka.cz). Brno: Tribun, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. Prelozeno z anglictiny. / Uniform Title: Lost world. Cesky //

85. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and R. W. Allard. Sir Nigel : roman, (D'aujourd'hui étranger). Paris: Phébus, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. Trad. de : Sir Nigel. Trad. de l'anglais par R.W. Allard. / Uniform Title: Sir Nigel. French. //

86. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and John Bolen. The ring of Thoth & other tales. [San Clemente, CA]: Tantor Media, 2002. Sound Recording; Computer File Date of Entry: 20070824 1 sound disc (8 hr., 6 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Digital ; 4 3/4 in. Unabridged classics. System requirements: CD/MP3 player or PC with MP3-capable software. Compact disc, MP3 format. Performed by John Bolen. "5 minute tracks." // "From the Arctic to Egypt to Australia, Doyle tells thrilling tales of crime, suspense, mysterious secrets, and humor"--Container.

87. ———. The ring of Thoth and other tales. [San Clemente, CA]: Tantor Media, 2002. Sound Recording 7 sound discs (8 hr., 6 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Digital ; 4 3/4 in. Unabridged classics. Compact disc. Originally published 1890. "3 minute tracks." Performed by John Bolen. // From the Arctic to Egypt to Australia, Doyle tells thrilling tales of crime, suspense, mysterious secrets, and humor.

88. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and John Bollen. The adventures of Gerard. [San Clemente, CA]: Tantor Media ; Newport Beach, CA : Distributed by Books on Tape, 2001. Sound Recording (CD) 6 sound discs.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Book originally published in 1903. Unabridged. Read by John Bollen. //

89. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Chaz Brenchley, and Felix Bennett. The Lost World. North American ed, (Real reads). New York: Skyview Books, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- col. ill. ; 21 cm. Includes bibliographical references. retold by Chaz Brenchley ; illustrated by Felix Bennett. // In this retelling, Professor Challenger leads an expedition to explore an isolated plateau rising above the Amazon jungles where they discover dinosaurs, primitive ape-men, and prehistoric monsters-Publisher.

90. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Walter Covell. Tales of the supernatural. Van Wyck, SC: NorthStar Pub. Co., 1996. Sound Recording 4 sound cassettes (ca. 360 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Analog. "Unabridged on four 90-minute cassettes"--container. Reader: Walter Covell. // Seven short stories representative of Doyle's non-Holmes work.

91. ———. Tales of the supernatural. Newport Beach, CA: Books on Tape, 1996. Sound Recording 6 sound cassettes (1 hr. each).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Analog. Unabridged. Read by Walter Covell. Uniform Title: Short stories. Selections. // Fifteen stories dealing with spiritualism, Egyptian magic, psychometry, and other occult domains.

92. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Robert Darby. Round the red lamp and other medical writings. 1st Valancourt Books ed. Chicago: Valancourt Books, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007006692. Includes bibliographical references //

93. Doyle, Arthur Conan, John De Lancie, Leonard Nimoy, Roxann Dawson, Richard Doyle, Marnie Mosiman, Ethan Phillips, Dwight Schultz, Armin Shimerman, and Peter Erskine. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The lost world. [New York]: Simon & Schuster Audio, 1997. Sound Recording 2 sound discs (ca. 2 hr.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Digital ; 4 3/4 in. Based on the novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Compact discs. Starring Leonard Nimoy and John de Lancie ; featuring Roxann Dawson, Richard Doyle, Marnie Mosiman, Ethan Phillips, Dwight Schultz, Armin Shimerman. Performed at Creation Entertainment's Grand Slam V Star Trek Convention in Pasadena, Calif. on March 22, 1997. Script by Nat Segaloff & John de Lancie ; music composed and performed by Peter Erskine. Uniform Title: Lost world. //

94. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Ian Duncan. The lost world being an account of the recent amazing adventures of Professor George E. Challenger, Lord John Roxton, Professor Summerlee, and Mr. E.D. Malone of the Daily gazette, (Oxford world's classics). Oxford England, New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97032932. Includes bibliographical references (p. [xxiii]-xxiv) //

95. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Bob E. Flick, and Perry Jacob. The Lost World. [Topanga, CA]: Ziggurat Productions, 1997. Sound Recording 2 sound cassettes.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. "Audio movie"--Container. Participants: Full cast production with original music sound effects and sonic soundscape imagery performed by Third Ear Radio Theatre. Produced, engineered, sound effects, and original music by Bob E. Flick ; produced, directed, and sound effects by Perry Jacob. //

96. ———. The Lost World. [Topanga, CA]: [Star Quest Entertainment?], 1996. Sound Recording 2 sound cassettes.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Produced, engineered, sound effects, and sonic soundscape design, original music composed and performed by Bob E. Flick ; produced, directed, and sound effects by Perry Jacob ; cover illustration by Eleanor Kish. In one container. //

97. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Shelly Frasier. Beyond the city. [San Clemente, Calif.]: Tantor Media, 2001. Sound Recording (CD) 4 sound discs (3 hrs., 49 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. "Unabridged classics." Compact disc. In container (14 x 16 cm.). Narrated by Shelly Frasier. // "Destiny brings three peculiar households together in the placid English country side. The desire for money and romance drives these Victorians beyond the natural boundaries of their middle class lives .. . the web of lust and deceit draws these accidental neighbors closer ..."--Container label.

98. ———. Beyond the city. [San Clemente, CA]: Tantor Media, 2001. Sound Recording (CD) 1 sound disc (3 hr., 49 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Unabridged classics; Mp3 format. System requirements: CD/mp3 player or PC with mp3-capable software. Compact disc. "5 minute tracks." Performed by Shelly Frasier. // "Destiny brings three peculiar households together in the placid English country side. The desire for money and romance drives these Victorians beyond the natural boundaries of their middle class lives. As the web of lust and deceit draws these accidental neighbors closer, a financial scandal befalls one of them"--Container label.

99. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Flo Gibson. The Lost World. Washington, D.C.: Audio Book Contractors, 1999. Sound Recording 5 sound cassettes (7 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, 1 7/8 ips. Narrated by Flo Gibson. In container (23 cm.). //

100. ———. Through the magic door. Washington, DC: Audio Book Contractors Inc., 2002. Sound Recording 4 sound cassettes (300 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Analog. Narrated by Flo Gibson. // Originally published in 1907, 'Through the magic door' is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's heartfelt and instructive tour of his personal library.

101. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Philip Gooden. The lost world and other thrilling tales, (Penguin classics). London, New York: Penguin, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 20 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. xxvi-xxvii). Edited with an introduction and notes by Philip Gooden. // The lost world -- The poison belt -- The terror of Blue John Gap -- The horror of the heights.

102. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Paul Hecht. The Lost World. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books, 1995. Sound Recording 6 sound cassettes (8.5 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Unabridged. Narrated by Paul Hecht. //

103. ———. The poison belt. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books, 1996. Sound Recording 3 sound cassettes (3.5 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Unabridged. Narrated by Paul Hecht. //

104. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Reinhard Hillich. Tatort Ägypten ein Drama in der Wüste. 1. Aufl. ed. Schweinfurt: Wiesenburg-Verl., 2008.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Tragedy of the Korosko (German). Hrsg., aus dem Engl. übers. sowie mit Anm. vers. von Reinhard Hillich. Textill. von Sidney Paget. //

105. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Stephen Hines. The true crime files of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. 1st ed. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2001037517. Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-290) //

106. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Yuichi Hirayama. The annotated Jelland's voyage. Tokyo: The Shoso-in Press, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 20). Edited by Hirayama Yuichi. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Offers a reprint of Arthur Conan Doyle's only story set in Japan, with annotations and an interesting discussion of the historical and literary background of the story."

107. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Alexander John. Round the fire stories. Oxford, England: ISIS Audio Books ; Wrentham, MA : Sold in the United States by Dual Dolphin Pub., 1994. Sound Recording 7 sound cassettes.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ISIS Audio Books. analog, stereo., Dolby processed. // Seventeen stories of suspense and adventure, chosen by the author, dealing with murder, madness, ghosts, unsolved crimes, diabolical traps, and other horrors.

108. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Leslie S. Klinger, and Daniel Stashower. The apocrypha of Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. Indianapolis: Gasogene, 2009.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle ; edited, with annotations by Leslie S. Klinger. ill. ; 26 cm. The Sherlock Holmes reference library. Introduction by Daniel Stashower -- The field bazaar -- The man with the watches -- The lost special -- How Watson learned the trick -- The Stonor case -- The crown diamond: an evening with Sherlock Holmes -- The tall man: a plot for a Sherlock Holmes story -- Angels of darkness. Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-176) // "Though most [of these tales] were excluded from his collected works, Conan Doyle brought his usual skill and wit to bear...."--Introduction.

109. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Francis Lacassin, and Gilles Vauthier. Les Exploits du Pr Challenger : et autres aventures étranges, (Bouquins). Paris: R. Laffont, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Traduit de l'anglais. La couverture porte en plus : "Le Monde perdu. La Ceinture empoisonnée. La Machine à désintégrer ... Contes de pirates." Notes bibliogr. Bibliogr. : p. [1147]-1150. édition établie par Francis Lacassin ; [traduit de l'anglais par Gilles Vauthier ... [et al.]]. //

110. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Rodrigo Lacerda, and Iná Camargo Costa. A nuvem da morte Translated Title: The poison belt. São Paulo: Nova Alexandria, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

111. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Robert Latour. La Compagnie blanche : roman, (D'aujourd'hui étranger). Paris: Phébus, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. Trad. de : The White company. Trad. de l'anglais par Robert latour. / Uniform Title: White company. French. //

112. Doyle, Arthur Conan, J. R. Lavas, and Zdenek Burian. The lost world of Arthur Conan Doyle. Collector's anniversary ed. Auckland, N.Z.: John R. Lavas, 2002.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 22 x 30 cm. Limited ed. of 500. Illustrated by J. R. Lavas and Zdenek Burian. Scuttlebutt Oct 2003. // "A collector's edition marking the 90th anniversary of the publication of the original story, the 168-page book has many new illustrations, in color and in black-and-white."

113. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Michel Marcheteau. Extraordinary tales = Histoires extraordinaires, (Langues pour tous). Paris: Pocket, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 18 cm. When the world screamed = Le jour où la terre hurla -- The lost special = Un train spécial disparaît -- The bully of Brocas Court = La brute de Brocas Court. Histoires extraordinaires. Choix, traduction et notes par Michel Marcheteau. //

114. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Lidia Owczarzak, Bronislaw Falk, and Katarzyna Karina Chmiel. Trujace pasmo i inne opowiadania / Uniform Title: Poison belt. Polish, (Klasyka dziecieca). Warszawa: Prószynski i S-ka, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Trujace pasmo (The poison belt) -- Eksperyment profesora Challengera -- Motor Browna-Pericorda (The great Brown-Pericord motor). Ilustracje: Katarzyna Karina Chmiel. przelozyli Lidia Owczarzak i Bronislaw Falk. //

115. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Sidney Paget. A desert drama being the tragedy of the Korosko. [S.l.]: Kessinger Publishing, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm. Reprint. Originally published: Philadelphia : J.B. Lippincott Co, 1898. With a thirty-two full-page illustrations by S. Paget. //

116. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Nathaniel Parker. The Lost World. [London]: Penguin, 1998. Sound Recording 2 sound cassettes (ca. 180 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, Dolby processed. Puffin audiobooks. Abridged. Read by Nathaniel Parker. //

117. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Roy Pilot, and Alvin E Rodin. The annotated Lost world: the classic adventure novel. 1st ed. Indianapolis, Ind: Wessex Press, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references and index //

118. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Michael Prichard. The Lost World. [Old Saybrook, CT]: Tantor Media, 2003. Sound Recording 7 sound discs (8 hr., 13 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact disc. Read by Michael Prichard. //

119. ———. The Lost World. [Old Saybrook, CT]: Tantor Media ; Chagrin Falls, Ohio : Findaway World, 2003. Sound Recording 1 sound media player (ca. 8 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 9 x 6 cm. + Includes: 1 extra AAA battery. Issued on Playaway, a dedicated audio media player; requires headphones for use. Playaway. Read by Michael Prichard. //

120. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Nick Rawlinson. The White Company. Oxford, England: ISIS Audio Books ; West Seneca, NY : Ulverscroft Large Print Books (USA), Inc., 2004. Sound Recording 14 sound cassettes (ca. 16 hr., 40 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Analog. Complete and unabridged. Originally published in 1891. Read by Nick Rawlinson. // "The White Company is a motley group of English mercenaries, fighting under the leadership of Sir Nigel Loring. Bound by an unquestioning respect for social order, patriotism and a lust for adventure, the company makes its way to France to fight in the local wars. Encountering pirate ships and other dramas during their crossing, they finally land at Bordeaux and become involved with the fighting at the siege of the Château of Villefranch du Périgord and in the Spanish Pyranees."--Container.

121. ———. The White Company. Oxford, England: ISIS Audio Books ; West Seneca, NY : Ulverscroft Large Print Books, 2004. Sound Recording 15 sound discs (16 hrs., 35 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact discs. Complete and unabridged. Read by Nick Rawlinson. Digitally recorded at the Isis studios in Oxford, England. //

122. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Carl Rigg. Four Short Stories. [S.l.]: NAXOS Audiobooks, 1995. Sound Recording 2 sound discs (2:34:29).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Abridged by Lesley Young ; produced by Perry Keenlyside. "Classic literature with classical music" -- Container. "Classic fiction" -- Container. Read by Carl Rigg. //

123. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Christopher Roden, and Barbara Roden. The captain of the 'Pole-Star' : weird and imaginative fiction. Ashcroft, B.C.: Ash-Tree Press, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- port. ; 24 cm. The haunted grange of Goresthorpe -- The American's tale -- The captain of the 'Pole-Star' -- The winning shot -- The silver hatchet -- Selecting a ghost -- J. Habakuk Jephson's statement -- The blood-stone tragedy -- John Barrington Cowles -- The Great Keinplatz experiment -- Cyprian Overbeck Wells -- The ring of Thoth -- A pastoral horror -- The speckled band -- 'De Profundis' -- Lot No. 249 -- The Los Amigos fiasco -- The case of lady Sannox -- The lord of Chateau Noir -- The parasite -- The striped chest -- The fiend of the cooperage -- The new catacomb -- The sealed room -- The retirement of Signor Lambert -- The Brazilian cat -- The brown hand -- Playing with fire -- The legent of the hound of the Baskervilles -- The leather funnel -- The silver mirror -- The terror of Blue John Gap -- The blighting of Sharkey -- Through the veil -- How it happened -- The horror of the Heights -- The bully of Brocas Court -- The lift. Includes bibliographical references (p. 459-460). Edited, with an introduction by Christopher Roden and Barbara Roden ; and with a preface by Michael Dirda. //

124. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and David Skene Melvin. Waterloo a case-book on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's historical play. 1st ed. Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisconsin: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references //

125. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Olaf R. Spittel. Ein gefährlicher Ausflug Roman, (Ausgewählte Werke; Bd. 2). Barnstorf: Ver. 28 Eichen, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Hergestellt on demand. Tragedy of the Korosko (German). Hrsg. von Olaf R. Spittel. [Ubers. aus dem Engl. von Ferdinand Mangold] //

126. ———. Im Giftstrom Roman, (Ausgewählte Werke; Bd. 3). Barnstorf Ver. 28 Eichen, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Hergestellt on demand. Hrsg. von Olaf R. Spittel. [Ubers. aus dem Engl. von Leopold Wölfling (d.i. Leopold Ferdinand Salvator)] //

127. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Jules Verne. Adventure Stories, (Read-along books). New York; London: Priddy, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- The lost world -- Treasure island -- Around the world in eighty days. Compact disc. Touch-and-feel book. Adapted from the classic stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson and Jules Verne. //

128. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and William Sutherland. Tales for a winter's night. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks, 2001. Sound Recording 6 sound discs.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Digital ; 4 3/4 in. Short stories originally published in the Strand magazine, July 1898-January 1899 and in book entitled "Round the fire stories" in 1908. Unabridged. Read by William Sutherland. Uniform Title: Round the fire stories. // Stories of suspense and adventure, chosen by the author, dealing with murder, madness, ghosts, unsolved crimes, diabolical traps, and other horrors.

129. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Ismène Toussaint. Les réfugiés : roman historique. Montréal: Stanké, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 21 cm. Traduction de: The refugees. Traduit et adapté de l'anglais par Ismène Toussaint. //

130. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Philip Weller. Sir John French an appreciation, (Rupert Books monograph series). Cambridge: Rupert Books, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references. Added Title: Daily chronicle //

131. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Robert Whitfield. Memories and Adventures. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks, 1999. Sound Recording 10 sound cassettes (1 1/2 hr. ea.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 1 7/8 ips. Unabridged. Read by Robert Whitfield. //

132. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Fred Williams. The Lost World. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audio Books, 1994. Sound Recording 6 sound cassettes (ca. 9 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Unabridged. Read by Fred Williams. //

133. ———. The poison belt. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks, 1997. Sound Recording 5 sound discs.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Unabridged. Compact discs. "Originally published in the United Kingdom, 1913"--Container. Read by Fred Williams. //

134. ———. The poison belt. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks, 1999. Sound Recording 4 sound cassettes (360 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Unabridged. Read by Fred Williams. //

135. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Lesley Young, and Carl Rigg. Four Short Stories. [Unterhaching, Germany]: Naxos AudioBooks, 1995. Sound Recording 2 sound cassettes (2 hr., 34 min., 43 sec.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, Dolby processed. Naxos AudioBooks: NA205014 (NA205014, NA205024). Abridged by Leslie Young. Read by Carl Rigg. // Presents four short stories of mystery and suspense which take place in England during the early 1900s. Includes instrumental interludes.

136. Doyle, Arthur Conan Sir. Through the Magic Door. Common reader ed. Pleasantville, NY: Akadine Press, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 18 cm. // Originally published in 1907, 'Through the magic door' is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's heartfelt and instructive tour of his personal library.

137. Elliott, Doug, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf': Reviews of The Annotated Lost World and The Unpublished Solar Pons." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 1 (1996): 29-33.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

138. Feigelman, Jennifer. "Graphic Novels." School Library Journal 51, no. 11 (2005): 177.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a review with a reference to Holmes and Doyle. Pomplun, Tom, ed. Graphic Classics: Arthur Conan Doyle. vol 2. 2nd ed. illus. by Rick Geary, et al. 144p. Eureka. 2005. pap. $11.95. ISBN 0-9746648-5-5. Gr 8 Up "Doyle's prose and poetry are brought to life in this exciting volume. It has some overlap from the first volume (Eureka, 2002), but also includes some truly outstanding new tales. In 'The Ghosts of Goresthorpe Grange,' a man believes that his house is occupied by spirits and seeks out the help of a medium. Ultimately, he is drugged and swindled, and the dreamlike style of the art reinforces this mood. In 'Two Great Brown-Pericord Motor,' two men create an invention and become fiercely jealous and protective of it, until disaster erupts. This volume also contains two Sherlock Holmes stories and thrilling tales of sea adventures. Though each one is illustrated by a different artist, the writing ties the collection together nicely. Unlike the earlier volume, this one utilizes a consistent comic format throughout. The artists have deftly captured the themes and moods of each piece in the black-and-white illustrations done in a wide range of styles and techniques. This assortment of tales may attract new readers to Doyle's work."

139. Gabriel, Gary. Other places, other times late 19th century & early 20th century British & European short stories. Fort Lee, NJ: Lend-a-Hand Society, 2001. Sound Recording 6 sound cassettes.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. AudioDrama 101 ; v. 5. Participants: Voices of Tally Brolin, Anne Costello, Clayelle Dalferes, Herb Duncan, David Fulford, Tom Gerard, Bruce Bayley Johnson, Donald Kimmel, Vivian Landau, Jack Luceno, David Magee, Alexander Marshall, Fritz Michel, Corinne Orr, Jean Richards, Murray Roberts, Larry Robinson, Connie Roberick, Connie Roderick, Dan Stevens. Recorded, edited & mixed by John Rockwell at Cinema Sound Ltd., New York City. Produced & directed by Gary Gabriel. //

140. Greenberg, Martin. For the Good of the Firm : legal thrillers. Los Angeles: NewStar Media Inc. :; Produced and distributed by NewStar Pub., 1999. Sound Recording 4 sound cassettes (ca. 6 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, digitally mastered, Dolby processed. Unabridged short stories. Various performers. [edited by Martin Greenberg]. //

141. Haining, Peter. Supernatural sleuths: stories of occult investigators. London: W. Kimber, 1986.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 88100444. Contents: The ghost detective / Mark Lemon -- Selecting a ghost / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The story of the Moor Road / E. and H. Heron -- A victim of higher space / Algernon Blackwood -- Case of the haunting of Grange / Sax Rohmer -- The telepather / Henry A. Hering -- The poltergeist / Seabury Quinn -- The sinister shape / Gordon MacCreagh -- Panic in Wild Harbor / Gordon Hillman -- The case of the bronze door / Margery Lawrence -- The case of the red-headed women / Dennis Wheatley -- Apparition in the sun / Joseph Payne Brennan //

142. Hall, John. "The Maggot in the Brain: Conan Doyle's 'The Parasite'." The Ritual, no. 26 (2000): 52-58.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

143. Harmidarow, Walter, Doug Wrigglesworth, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf': Reviews of The Scroll of the Dead, The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Dying Detective and Waterloo: a Case-Book on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Historical Play." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 2 (1998): 42-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

144. Hayman, Randy. "Tips for Lost Students." Science Fiction Studies 32, no. 3 (2005): 516-518.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "The Lost World," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

145. Herman, Gail, Michael Crichton, and David Koepp. The lost world, Jurassic Park the junior novelization. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96080493 //

146. Holzer, Hans. Tales at midnight true stories from parapsychology casebooks and journals, (Courage classics). Philadelphia, Penn: Courage Books, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 93085540. Scuttlebutt July 1995 // "...gives the some of the results of Holzer's career as a ghost-hunter, and ends with Conan Doyle's essay 'The Law of the Ghost' (first published in 1919). "

147. Jones, Thomas. "Short Cuts." London Review of Books 27, no. 4 (2005): 22-22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses issues on the inclusion of the story "J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement" by Arthur Conan Doyle in the appendix of the book "Mary Celeste: The Greatest Mystery of the Sea," by Paul Begg. Overview of the "Statement"; Theme of the book; Influence of the book on modern literature.

148. Joyce, Peter. Mysterious and Macabre. Middlesex, England: Assembled Stories, 1998. Sound Recording 6 sound cassettes (6 hr., 50 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, Dolby processed. Read by Peter Joyce. //

149. Kaye, Marvin. The Game is afoot: parodies, pastiches and ponderings of Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 93044057. Contents: In the Island of Uffa / Poul Anderson; Sherlock Holmes Umpires Baseball; The Mystery of Pinkham's Diamond Study / John Kendrick Bangs; From the Diary of Sherlock Holmes / Maurice Baring; The Adventure of the Two Collaborators / James Barrie; How Holmes Came to Play the Violin / Jacques Barzun; The Gibraltar Letter / Sam Benady; Sherlock Holmes in Oz / Ruth Berman; The Dynamics of an Asteroid / Robert Block; The Adventure of the Bogle-Wolf / Anthony Boucher; The Strange Case of the Tongue-Tied Tenor / Carole Bugge; The Adventure of the Conk-Singleton Papers / John Dickson Carr; The Unmasking of Sherlock Holmes / Arthur Chapman; The Adventure of the Circular Room / August Derleth; The Field Bazaar / Arthur Conan Doyle; The Sinister Cheesecake / Craig Shaw Gardner; The Singular Adventure of the Unexpected Doorscraper / Kenneth Grahme; The Stolen Cigar Case / Bret Hart; The Enchanted Garden / H. F. Heard; The Theft of the Persian Slipper / Edward D. Hoch; The Problem of the Purple Maculas / James C. Iraldi; The Succored Beauty / William B. Kahn; The Histrionic Holmes / Marvin Kaye; The Adventure of the Missing Countess / Jon Koons; An Irreducible Detective Story / Stephen Leacock; the Umbrosa Burglary / R. C. Lehmann; The Moriarty Gambit / Fritz Lieber; A La Sherlock Holmes / Charles Loomis; The Sign of the '400' / R. K. Munkittrick; The Adventures of Shamrock Jones / O'Henry; The Adventure of the Marked Man / Stuart Palmer; Sherlock Holmes and the Drood Mystery / Edmund Pearson; Journal of a Shurka Physician / Daniel M. Pinkwater; Mrs. Hudson Speaks / ZaSu Pitts; The Really Final Solution / Nick Pollota; Daydream / Basil Rathbone; The Strange Case of the Megatherium Thefts / S. C. Roberts; Our American Cousins / Roberta Rogow; The Tibetan Adventures of Sherlock Holmes / Amanda Russell; The Murder of Conan Doyle / Ray Russell; The Adventure of the Death-Fetch / Darrell Schweitzer; The Dilemma of the Distressed Savoyard / Crighton Sellars; The Adventure of the Second Swag / Luke Sharp; The Adventure of the Unique Hamlet / Vincent Starrett; Sussex Interview / P. M. Stone; The Struldbrugg Reaction / John Sutherland; Bur Our Hero Was Not Dead / Manly Wade Wellman; The Adventure of the Clothes-line / Carolyn Wells; A Letter From Mycroft Holmes / Jon White //

150. King, W. D. Henry Irving's Waterloo theatrical engagements with Arthur Conan Doyle, George Bernard Shaw, Ellen Terry, Edward Gordon Craig : late-Victorian culture, assorted ghosts, old men, war, and history. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 92031013; Scuttlebutt May 1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. 285-294) and index // "A fascinating and rewarding book. Arthur Conan Doyle adapted his story 'A Straggler of '15' (1891) into the one-act play 'A Story of Waterloo' and sent it to Henry Irving, who quickly bought the rights to the play and made it famous, performing it hundreds of times in London and on tour from 1894 until his death in 1905. But today it is best known (and often remembered only) for the scathing review that George Bernard Shaw gave Irving's performance when the play opened in London in 1895. One of the reasons why King's book is so fascinating and rewarding is that King stresses the fundamental change from the 'actor's theater' that Irving represented so well to the 'author's theater' that Shaw was about to launch and lead. And the book is full of real people, including Ellen Terry and Bram Stoker and Edward Gordon Craig and Napoleon, and King tells his and their story well, offering a fine look at what drama was like a century ago."

151. Kipling, Rudyard, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Stevenson Robert Louis, Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Allan Poe, H. G. Wells, and William Conrad. Escape. Vol. 1. Plymouth, MN: Adventures in Cassettes, 1994. Sound Recording 6 sound cassettes.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog ; 1 7/8 ips. //

152. Lacassin, Francis. Conan Doyle : inédits et introuvables, (Bouquins). Paris: R. Laffont, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Le mystère de Cloomber -- L'oncle Jérémie et les siens -- Mystères et aventures -- Le parasite -- Raffles haw -- Girdlestone et Cie -- Idylle de banlieue -- Les lettres de Stark Munro -- Un duo. Édition établie par Francis Lacassin. //

153. Leeson, D. M. "Playing at War: The British Military Manoeuvres of 1898." War in History 15, no. 4 (2008): 432-461.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "For more than a century now the British army has been criticized for its performance in the South African War of 1899-1902. In recent years, however, this consensus has been challenged: revisionist historians have argued that criticism of the late Victorian army and its commanders has been unfairly harsh. But a detailed study of the military manoeuvres held on Salisbury Plain in September 1898 indicates that the army's critics have not been so unfair after all. The results of these exercises were decidedly mixed, and generals such as Sir Redvers Buller went on to repeat their mistakes in South Africa the following year." [Abstract from author]. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Clearly, the British Army did not fully appreciate the 'appalling power' of its new machine weapons. Indeed, some British officers conducted operations as if their infantry and artillery were still armed with muzzle-loading smooth-bore muskets and cannon. 'In the Salisbury Plain manoeuvres of 1898,' wrote Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 'I saw with my own eyes lines of infantry standing and firing upon each other at short ranges without rebuke either from their officers or from the umpires.'..." The citation is from Doyle's The Great Boer War (London, 1900), p. 517.

154. Leigh-Hunt, Barbara, Derek Jacobi, Hugh Laurie, Martin Jarvis, Joanna David, Kerry Shale, Nigel Hawthorne, Rosalind Ayres, Sukanta Subuddhi, Oscar Wilde, Jerome K. Jerome, Jacobs W. W., E. Nisbet, Rudyard Kipling, Alphonse Daudet, Katherine Mansfield, E. F. Benson, M. R. James, John Buchan, Edgar Allan Poe, Edgar Wallace, Nathaniel Hathorne, Arthur Conan Doyle, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Guy de Maupassant. Great Classic Stories [22 unabridged classics]. Auburn, CA: Audio Partners, 2005. Sound Recording 6 sound discs (7.5 hr.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Subtitle from container. Read by Barbara Leigh-Hunt, Derek Jacobi, Hugh Laurie, Martin Jarvis, Joanna David, Kerry Shale, Nigel Hawthorne, Rosalind Ayres and others. //

155. Lipton, James. An exaltation of larks : the ultimate edition. New York: Penguin, 1993.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Scuttlebutt Jul 2005. // "First published in 1968, revised in 1977 and 1991, the book explores 'the venereal game' (which is not quite what you may think it is). Lipton notes in his introduction that Conan Doyle once played the game, and quotes at length from Sir Nigel, in which young Nigel demonstrates his knowledge of collective nouns, such as a cete of badgers, a skulk of foxes, etc."

156. Lovisi, Gary. "Lost Works of 'The Lost World'." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 184-185.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

157. ———. "The Lost World and Professor Challenger in Paperback." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 39-43.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

158. Malahide, Patrick, Jack Shepherd, and Brian Cox. Classic Tales of Horror, Crime & Murder. London; Englewood Cliffs, NJ: CSA Telltapes; Media Books, 2000. Sound Recording 9 sound discs. (9 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. "19 unabridged stories"--Container. Read by Patrick Malahide (Horror) ; Jack Shepherd (Crime) ; Brian Cox (Murder). //

159. Martin, Tom, and Barry Moser. Great Ghost Stories. Orlando, FL: Magnetix Corp., 2001. Sound Recording 1 sound cassette.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- mono., NAB standard. Books of wonder. Participants: Tom Martin. Audience: Grades 6-9 and older readers. Must have program eligibility; Access through the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress. selected by Barry Moser. // A collection of ghost stories by such authors as H.G. Wells, Madeleine L'Engle, and Bram Stoker.

160. Mason, Jane B, Michael Crichton, and David Koepp. The lost world, Jurassic Park the movie storybook. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96080479 //

161. Morrison, Philip. "Dinosaur Tracks and Traces/The Lost World & The Poison Belt: Professor Challenger Adventures by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Book)." Scientific American 261, no. 3 (1989): 188.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Dinosaur Tracks and Traces,' edited by David D. Gillette and Martin G. Lockley.

162. Penzler, Otto. Fangs, (The vampire archives). New York: Vintage Books, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 18 cm. Introduction / Otto Penzler -- Down among the dead men / Gardner Dozois, Jack Dann -- Drink my red blood / Richard Matheson -- The hound / H.P. Lovecraft -- The parasite / Arthur Conan Doyle -- The giaour / Lord Byron -- The master of Rampling Gate / Anne Rice -- The vampire maid / Hume Nisbet -- Special / Richard Laymon -- A week in the unlife / David J. Schow -- Princess of darkness / Frederick Cowles -- The girl with the hungry eyes / Fritz Leiber -- The room in the tower / E.F. Benson -- Carmilla / Sheridan Le Fanur -- The sad story of a vampire / Erick Stenbock -- Necros / Brian Lumley -- Human remains / Clive Barker -- The stone chamber / H.B. Marriott Watson -- The werewolf and the vampire / R. Chetwynd-Hayes -- Aylmer Vance and the vampire / Alice and Claude Askey -- The drifting snow / August Derleth. "The stories in this book were originally published as part of The Vampire Archives in the United States by Vintage Books ... in 2009"--T.p. verso. Edited and with an introduction by Otto Penzler. // Presents an anthology of twenty works about vampires, including contributions by H.P. Lovecraft, Anne Rice, Richard Laymon, and Clive Barker.

163. Plumley, George. Classic Humorous Ghost Stories. Vancouver, BC: Stuffed Moose Audio, 1995. Sound Recording 1 sound cassette.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. All stories dramatized for audio by George Plumley. Various performers. //

164. ———. Spirited yarns classic humorous ghost stories. Vancouver, BC: Stuffed Moose Audio, 1995. Sound Recording sound cassettes.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. All stories dramatized for audio by George Plumley. Various performers. //

165. Poe, Edgar Allan, Gaston Leroux, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu. Horror Classics. Redmond, WA: Topics Entertainment, 2001. Sound Recording 8 sound cassettes (ca. 11 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Audio Book Collection. "Featuring Gaston Leroux's "The phantom of the opera"--Case artwork. //

166. Preller, James, Molly Jackel, Marilyn McCabe, and Michael Crichton. The Lost world, Jurassic Park the complete dinosaur scrapbook. New York: Scholastic Inc, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97177455. Includes bibliographical references (p. 62-63) //

167. Ramirez, Luz Elena. British representations of Latin America. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007001326. Includes bibliographical references (p. [191]-201) and index. Contents: A survey of Americanist literature -- Schomburgk's 1848 edition of Ralegh's Discovery of Guiana -- The rhetoric of Andean development in Joseph Conrad's Nostromo -- Science and commerce in Arthur Conan Doyle's The lost world -- No "accident of geography": Mexican and British relations in Malcolm Lowry's Under the volcano -- Graham Greene's Americanist vision: Mexico, Argentina, and Panama //

168. Rogers, Michael. "Book Reviews Classic Returns." Library Journal 126, no. 11 (2001): 108.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews several reprinted books. 'An Irresistible Impulse,' by Barbara Delinsky; 'Exploits and Adventures of Brigadier Gerard,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; 'The Bride of Lammermoor,' by Sir Walter Scott; 'The House of Windsor,' by Andrew Roberts; 'Augustus: The Golden Age of Rome,' and 'Hannibal,' by G.P. Baker; Others.

169. ———. "Book reviews: Classic returns." Library Journal 117, no. 6 (1992): 154.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'The Horror of the Heights & Other Tales of Suspense,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Chronicle, 1992. ISBN 0-8118-0144-6.

170. ———. "Classic Returns." Library Journal 123, no. 18 (1998): 130.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents numerous brief reviews of reprinted books. 'The Lost World,' by Arthur Conan Doyle; 'Take Five,' by D. Keith Mano; 'Valperga,' by Mary Shelley.

171. ———. "A Duet with an Occasional Chorus. (Book)." Library Journal 115, no. 7 (1990): 129-129.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "A Duet With an Occasional Chorus," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. (Gaslight Pub., distributed by Vanguard Pr. [Conan Doyle Centennial Series] 1990. ISBN 0-934468-48-6)

172. ———. "The Foundling/The Return/The Mystery of Cloomber." Library Journal 130, no. 6 (2005): 134-134.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews three books. "The Foundling," by Charlotte Bronte; "The Return," by Joseph Conrad; "The Mystery of Cloomber," by Arthur Conan Doyle.

173. ———. "The Lost World / When the World Screamed & Other Stories. (Book)." Library Journal 115, no. 17 (1990): 110-110.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews two books about the spirit world by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. "The Lost World" (Academy Chicago, 1990. ISBN 0-89733-331-4); "When the World Screamed & Other Stories." (Chronicle, 1990. ISBN 0-87701-652-6)

174. ———. "Our African Winter/Expedition to the Zambesi/My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia... (Book)." Library Journal 127, no. 2 (2002): 138.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews several books of travel writing. 'Our African Winter,' by Arthur Conan Doyle; 'Expedition to the Zambesi,' by David Livingstone and Charles Livingstone; 'My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia,' by Henry M. Stanley; 'The Great Navigators of the 18th Century,' by Jules Verne.

175. ———. "Pirates of Venus/The Poison Belt (Book)." Library Journal 127, no. 4 (2002): 146.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews two science fiction books. 'Pirates of Venus,' by Edgar Rice Burroughs; 'The Poison Belt,' by Arthur Conan Doyle.

176. ———. "Round the Five Stories. (Book)." Library Journal 116, no. 13 (1991): 151-151.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "Round the Fire Stories," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Chronicle, 1991. ISBN 0-87701-883-9.

177. ———. "Through the Magic Door (Book review)." Library Journal 125, no. 12 (2000): 148.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Through the Magic Door,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

178. Segaloff, Nat, John De Lancie, Leonard Nimoy, Roxann Dawson, Richard Doyle, Marnie Mosiman, Ethan Phillips, Dwight Schultz, Armin Shimerman, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Alien Voices presents Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The lost world. New York: Simon & Schuster Audio, 1997. Sound Recording (cassette) 2 sound cassettes (2 hr.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, stereo., Dolby processed. Fully dramatized adaptation, based on the novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Participants: Leonard Nimoy, John de Lancie, Roxann Dawson, Richard Doyle, Ethan Phillips, Marnie Mosiman, Dwight Schultz, Armin Shimerman. [script by Nat Segaloff & John de Lancie ; produced by Alien Voices ; directed by Leonard Nemoy]. //

179. Shepherd, Jack, and Brian Cox. Classic Stories of Crime & Murder. London: CSA Telltapes ; Englewood Cliffs, NJ ; Media Books, 2001. Sound Recording 4 sound cassettes (ca. 6 hours).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital, Dolby processed. Cassettes 1-2 read by Jack Shepherd; Cassettes 3-4 read by Brian Cox. //

180. Simon, Linda. Dark light: electricity and anxiety from the telegraph to the X-ray. 1st ed. Orlando: Harcourt, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2003019994. Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-345) and index // "A social history of the introduction of electric power in 19th-century America, with discussion of fact and fiction (including Conan Doyle's stories 'Crabbe's Practice' and 'The Los Amigos Fiasco')."

181. Smith, R. Dixon. "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and The Lost World." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 2 (2001): 28-31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

182. Smothers, Bonnie. "News and views." Booklist 92, no. 13 (1996): 1111.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses developments related to literature as of March 1, 1996. Release of a new edition of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's 'The Annotated Lost World'; Lecture given by film editor Walter Murch in Sydney, Australia; HarperCollinsWorld's publication of the diaries of Samuel Pepys.

183. Southworth, Bruce E. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some observations on the non-Sherlockian book by Doyle, A Duet With an Occasional Chorus, the storm that arose between Doyle and the critic Robert William Nicoll, and various editions held by the Collections.

184. Staudohar, Paul D. Boxing's best short stories. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Rose into cauliflower / by Mel Matison -- The last blow / by Octavus Roy Cohen -- The Croxley master / by A. Conan Doyle -- The higher pragmatism / by O. Henry -- Sonny Liston was a friend of mine / by Thom Jones -- Twenty-five bucks / by James T. Farrell -- Bred for battle / by Damon Runyon -- Heart / by Neil McMahon -- A piece of steak / by Jack London -- Thicker than water / by Paul Gallico -- Return to Kansas City / by Irwin Shaw -- Death of a prize fighter / by Robert Switzer -- A matter of seconds / by Ellery Queen -- The debut of battling billson / by P.G. Wodehouse -- He swung and he missed / by Nelson Algren -- The legend of pig-eye / by Rick Bass -- Everything in the fifth / by Maxence Van Der Meersch -- One-thirty-three: Ringside / by Charles E. Van Loan -- A boxer: old / by Harry Sylvester -- The Chickasha bone crusher / by H.C. Witwer -- Champion / by Ring Lardner -- Stop the fight! / by Norman Katkov. edited by Paul D. Staudohar. // Twenty-two boxing stories written over the century. They include two on men who box to finance their education. In The Croxley Master, written in 1900 by A. Conan Doyle, he is a medical student, while in Mel Matison's 1943 Rose into Cauliflower he is a ballet dancer.

185. ———. Boxing's best short stories. London: Souvenir, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. edited by Paul D. Staudohar. //

186. Stephens, John Richard. Into the mummy's tomb. Berkley trade pbk. ed. New York: Berkley Books, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 23 cm. The malevolence of ancient Egyptian spirits / Arthur Weigall -- Lost in a pyramid, or, The mummy's curse / Louisa May Alcott -- Radiing mummies' tombs / various Egyptologists -- The vengeance of Nitocris / Tennessee Williams -- Under the pyramids / H.P. Lovecraft -- Opening King Tutenkhamen's tomb / Howard Carter with A.C. Mace -- The adventure of the Egyptian tomb / Agatha Christie -- The demon-possessed princess / an ancient Egyptian priest -- The majestic sphinx / Mark Twain -- Smith and the pharaohs / Sir H. Rider Haggard -- Some words with a mummy / Edgar Allan Poe -- Colonel Stonesteel's genuine homemade truly Egyptian mummy / Ray Bradbury -- Dead kings (excerpt) / Rudyard Kipling -- Lot no. 249 / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The locked tomb mystery / Elizabeth Peters -- The death-ring of Sneferu / Sax Rohmer -- The mummy, or, Ramses the damned (excerpt) / Anne Rice -- The jewel of seven stars (abridged) / Bram Stoker. edited by John Richard Stephens. //

187. ———. Into the mummy's tomb mysterious tales of mummies and ancient Egypt. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm. Introduction / John Richard Stephens -- Malevolence of ancient Egyptian spirits / Arthur Weigall -- Lost in a pyramid, or, The mummy's curse / Louisa May Alcott -- Raiding mummies' tombs / various Egyptologists -- Ring of Thoth / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Vengeance of Nitocris / Tennessee Williams -- Under the pyramids / H.P. Lovecraft -- Opening King Tutenkhamen's tomb / Howard Carter with A.C. Mace -- Adventure of the Egyptian tomb / Agatha Christie -- Demon-possessed princess / an ancient Egyptian priest -- Majestic sphinx / Mark Twain -- Smith and the pharaohs / Sir H. Rider Haggard -- Some words with a mummy / Edgar Allan Poe -- Colonel Stonesteel's genuine homemade truly Egyptian mummy / Ray Bradbury -- Dead kings (excerpt) / Rudyard Kipling -- Lot no. 249 / Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Locked tomb mystery / Elizabeth Peters -- The death-ring of Sneferu / Sax Rohmer -- The mummy, or, Ramses the damned (excerpt) / Anne Rice -- The jewel of seven stars (abridged) / Bram Stoker. "This 2006 edition published by Barnes & Noble, Inc., by arrangement with Fern Canyon Press." edited by John Richard Stephens. //

188. Thompson, T. Jack. "Light on the Dark Continent: The Photography of Alice Seely Harris and the Congo Atrocities of the Early Twentieth Century." International Bulletin of Missionary Research 26, no. 4 (2002): 146.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on the mission photography of Alice Seely Harris, an English missionary with the Congo Balolo Mission, concerning the Congo Atrocities of the early twentieth century. Her family background; Contributions of her photography to reforms in Congo; Description of her missionary photographs. Contains a couple of references to Doyle. "...A host of personalities, many of them well-known internationally, helped to bring the Congo atrocities to the attention of a wider public. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, famous as the creator of Sherlock Holmes, wrote a pamphlet, The Crime of the Congo....What was unusual was the international nature of the campaign against Leopold’s rule. The campaign was due to the work of many people, some of whom have been mentioned in passing. Several of them, such as Mark Twain and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, were already figures of international repute; others such as E. D. Morel and William H. Shepherd became famous as a result of the campaign...."

189. Wade, Robert. "Spadework." The San Diego Union, Mar 18, 1984: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is universally known as the creator of Sherlock Holmes. And of little else. Yet the Holmes stories are only the tip of the Doyle iceberg; there exists a whole body of other works, hitherto mostly submerged. But no longer, because [John Michael Gibson] and [Richard Lancelyn Green], who produced the first complete Doyle bibliography, have again teamed to revive 33 of his short stories never previously published in book form and 10 of them only recently identified as his work....They're not all winners, of course, but all show the hand of a born storyteller and trace the development of a major -- and often underrated -- author. It's a valuable piece of scholarship but don't let that scare you off. It's fun, too."

190. Wells, H. G., and Arthur Conan Doyle. Science fiction classics. Renton, WA: Topics Entertainment, 2001. Sound Recording 8 sound cassettes (ca. 11 hrs.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, 1 7/8 ips. Audio book collection. 4 classic stories. Unabridged. "All recordings c2001 by Worldtainment. com"--Container. //

05F Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- The Piltdown Man (5)

1. The boldest hoax. Boston: WGBH Video, 2005. Visual Material 1 videodisc (60 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in. DVD; Dolby digital.; System requirements to access DVD-ROM features: Computer capable of reading PDF documents; Internet connection. Originally produced by the BBC in 2003. Special DVD-ROM features: teaching materials, link to Nova web site. Participants: Narrator: Richard Donal. Original PBS Broadcast Date: January 11, 2005. Audience: MPAA rating: Not rated. produced and directed by Kate Bartlett ; produced for NOVA by Gary Glassman ; a BBC production ; additional production for NOVA by Providence Pictures, Inc. for WGBH/Boston. Editors, Peter Norrey, Rick Widmer. // "Who Created Piltdown Man-Science's Most Notorious Fraud? For 40 years, a fossil skull discovered in Piltdown, England, was hailed as the missing link between apes and humans. Then, in 1953, new scientific tests revealed the shocking truth-"Piltdown Man" was a fake! But who could have perpetrated the hoax? Was it the amateur archaeologist, Charles Dawson, who dug up most of the bones? Or the eminent museum curator, Sir Arthur Smith Woodward of Britain's Natural History Museum, who won fame by presenting the reconstructed skull to an eager public in 1912? Could it even have been Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, who lived near Piltdown? With more red herrings and false trails than an Agatha Christie whodunit, The Boldest Hoax digs into intriguing new clues from archives at the Natural History Museum, and delves into the skullduggery and national pride that led a handful of faked bones to hoodwink a generation of leading scientists. Go deep into the archives of Britain's Natural History Museum, where intriguing documents shed new light on this notorious case."--Container.

2. "The great deception." Discover 21, no. 1 (2000): 57.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Cites the scientific hoax involving a doctored human skull discovered at Piltdown Common in Sussex, England in 1912. Doyle mentioned.

3. Frullani, Anita. "The piltdown man forgery." British Heritage 19, no. 4 (1998): 16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reports on the discovery of the Piltdown Man at the Piltdown quarry in Sussex, England, by amateur geologist Charles Dawson. Indication that Piltdown Man established Britain's importance in the study of human evolution; What the findings consisted of; Belief that Piltdown Man was an ancestor of modern man; Identification of persons who took part in the findings; Information on other findings; Indepth look at the discoveries. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Nearly everyone ever associated with Piltdown Man, from Arthur Smith Woodward to the more obvious culprit, Charles Dawson, was accused of perpetrating the hoax. One surprising allegation claimed that the mastermind was author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who was known to have visited the site, located near his home. Accusers pointed to references found in his writings concerning fossil skulls, a diagram that resembled a golf course near Piltdown, and various other supposed connections to the Piltdown Hoax. In particular, some have suggested that he left a cryptic confession in the opening lines of his novel, The Lost World: I have wrought my simple plan If I give one hour of joy To the boy who's half a man Or the man who's half a boy. The theory is something of a stretch, since Conan Doyle published this book in 1912, prior to the discovery of Piltdown Man, and the lines' simple meaning is fairly clear: He hoped his book would appeal to young and old alike...."

4. Maxted, Lawrence R. "Video." Library Journal 130, no. 16 (2005): 117.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // An annotated bibliography of recently released video titles is provided, one with a reference to Doyle and Holmes. The Boldest Hoax: The Story of Piltdown Man. color & b/w. 60 min. Kate Bartlett, BBC Prod., NOVA, dist. by WGBH-Boston Video, 800-949-8670; shop.wgbh.org. 2005. VHS ISBN 1-59375-288-1. $19.95; DVD ISBN 1-59375-289-X. $19.95. "Determined to be a hoax in 1953, the fossils known collectively as Piltdown Man made a sensation when discovered in 1912 in southeastern England. This documentary, seen on the PBS series NOVA, concentrates on trying to establish who had the access, means, and motive to fake the fossils and then stay quiet while scientific careers were wasted studying them. The documentary includes as suspects Sherlock Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Smith Woodward and Martin Hinton of Britain's Natural History Museum, and the fossils' discoverer, Charles Dawson. Using dramatic re enactments, period footage, and interviews with experts, the documentary examines each suspect and makes an educated judgment as to who was the likely perpetrator. Piltdown Man is perhaps the most famous example of how science can be duped. This program does a fine job of placing the hoax in its historical context and providing insight into the scientific method, all while telling an intriguing story. Highly recommended."

5. Walsh, John Evangelist. Unravelling Piltdown: the Science Fraud of the Century and its Solution. s.l.: s.n., 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Sep 1999 // With discussion of Arthur Conan Doyle and many others.

05G Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Spiritualism and Fairies (88)

1. "Books Received." Folklore 118, no. 3 (2007): 356-363.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A list of books received by the journal is presented, including Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur. The Coming of the Fairies. Introduction by John M. Lynch. Lincoln, Nebr.: Bison Books, 2006. Extraordinary World series. xv, 189 pp. Illus. $9.95 (pbk). ISBN 0-8032-6655-3, ISBN-13: 978-0803266551.

2. "Great American Skeptics." Skeptic 14, no. 3 (2008): 81-91.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article provides information on the great American skeptics. Includes a section on Houdini and Arthur Conan Doyle (p. 84).

3. "Photography of the Paranormal." USA Today Magazine 134, no. 2726 (2005): 64-68.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article provides information on the exhibition "The Perfect Medium: Photography and the Occult." The exhibit brings together some 120 photographs culled from public and private archives throughout Europe and North America, focusing primarily on the period from the 1860s through World War II, when occult and paranormal phenomena were a hot topic of debate and supporters and skeptics summoned photographs as evidence. Approaching the material from a historical perspective, the exhibition presents the photographs on their own terms, without authoritative comment as to their veracity. Included in the exhibition will be Mumler's portrait of Fanny Conant, a well-known Boston medium, who appears in the photograph with her control spirit. The Perfect Medium is organized in three sections, emphasizing different roles photography has played in its encounters with the occult. The article notes that "As the Spiritualist movement gained momentum in the late 19th century, spirit photography became a hotly debated topic, attracting the attention of major intellectual figures, including psychologist William James, scientists Alfred Russell Wallace and Charles Richet, and author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the latter best known for his tales of Sherlock Holmes."

4. Alexander, David. "Early ghostbusters." Skeptic 4, no. 4 (1996): 42.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents information on the early works of spirit paintings and how the mystery behind such paintings were revealed. Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes. "Spiritualism was championed by many of the leading lights of the age, including the naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, the physicists William Crookes and Oliver Lodge, and even Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who demonstrated none of his literary alter-ego's legendary deductive reasoning skills when confronting the supernatural. (Doyle gave hundreds of thousands of pounds to the British Society for Psychical Research and thought it would be for his support and defense of spiritualism that he would be remembered, not his creation of Sherlock Holmes.)"

5. Alves, Abel. "Humanity's Place in Nature, 1863 - 1928: Horror, Curiosity and the Expeditions of Huxley, Wallace, Blavatsky and Lovecraft." Theology & Science 6, no. 1 (2008): 73-88.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Even as Sherlock Holmes’ creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in the 1920s was promoting through a series of lectures on spiritualism in the United States the notion that one can contact the dead, Lovecraft was writing letters recoiling at the metaphysical notions of spiritualism and Theosophy, as well as Christian fundamentalism. While some people might 'give tremendous weight to the cunningly doctored reports of ‘occult’ phenomena popularized by men like Lodge, Doyle, and Flammarion,' there were others who 'refuse to think about such things at all...'"

6. Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack. "Recent Work in Critical Theory." Style 33, no. 4 (1999): 508.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a bibliography annotates of published books based primarily on materials coming into the Northern Illinois University libraries between August 1998 and August 1999. Includes entries with reference to Doyle and Holmes. Silver, Carole G. Strange Secret Peoples: Fairies and Victorian Consciousness. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1999. "Silver examines the hidden web of connections between the Victorian fascination with fairies and the dominant preoccupations of Victorian culture. Using works by such writers and artists as Thomas Carlyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Charlotte Mew, and Aubrey Beardsley, among others, Silver assesses the anthropological, folkloric, legal, historical, and medical aspects of the place of fairies in the Victorian consciousness. Silver identifies a pervasive eroticism and a sense of sexual anxiety in the Victorian social, literary, and cultural approach to the world of fairies and folklore." Kendrick, Stephen. Holy Clues: The Gospel According to Sherlock Holmes. New York: Pantheon, 1999. "Kendrick argues that Sherlock Holmes functions as a spiritual guide and master, as a character whose Zen-like techniques of awareness and observation provide religious insight for modern, cynical readers. In addition to exploring the stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for religious and metaphysical lessons, Kendrick demonstrates the ways in which the methods of investigating crimes are the same methods that yield religious insight when applied to the world and to the human heart. Kendrick draws upon both Eastern and Western religious tradition while addressing issues of justice and mercy, good and evil, guilt and innocence."

7. Barsham, Diana. Arthur Conan Doyle and the meaning of masculinity, (Nineteenth century). Aldershot, England, Burlington, VT: Ashgate Pub, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 00042047. Includes bibliographical references and index // "A valued icon of British manhood, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has been the subject of numerous biographies since his death in 1930. All his biographies have drawn heavily on his own autobiography, Memories and Adventures, a collection of stories and anecdotes themed on the subject of masculinity and its representation." "Diana Barsham's new study offers a challenging reinterpretation of Doyle's literary career, covering the full range of his work as novelist, historian, war correspondent, legal campaigner, propagandist, and, after his conversion to Spiritualism, as religious leader. In particular, she investigates the fascinating relationship between the popular Sherlock Holmes stories, read here as secret autobiography, and Doyle's formal histories of the Boer War and of World War One.". "Situating Doyle's writing within the biographical traditions of the nineteenth century to which Dr. John H. Watson contributed his memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, this book charts the stages of Doyle's determination to become a great name in the culture of his day. His progress is charted through a series of dialogic contestations with rival figures such as Dr. George Budd, Thomas Hardy, Winston Churchill, Harry Houdini and St. Paul." "This original and thought-provoking work will be of interest to scholars and students of the nineteenth century and to Doyle's many readers and admirers throughout the world."--Book jacket

8. Beydt, Bruce. "The Adventure of the Cottingley Fairies." British Heritage 25, no. 2 (2004): 20-25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "This article describes an incident in which two girls in England who claimed to have seen fairies and also had photographic evidence to prove it. One of the most respected men in England -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes -- believed that the girls could literally see and photograph fairies that frolicked in their back yard.... The girls, Frances Griffiths and Elsie Wright struck to their story until as late as the 1980s, when they finally admitted that four of the five famous photographs, at least, were fakes."

9. Brandon, Ruth. The life and many deaths of Harry Houdini. 1st ed. New York: Random House, 1993.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 94004080. Includes bibliographical references and index //

10. ———. The life and many deaths of Harry Houdini. London: Secker & Warburg, 1993.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: gb 93052655. Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-330) and index //

11. Bray, Christopher. "Is there anybody there?" New Statesman 137, no. 4900 (2008): 58-59.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Servants of the Supernatural: the Night Side of the Victorian Mind," by Antonio Melechi. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Meanwhile, in the decidedly less pious London of the 1870s, the conjuror John Nevil Maskelyne had his work cut out for him convincing people the mediums were talking hooey. You might be able to replicate their miracles, he was told, but that doesn’t mean the spiritualists get their effects the same way. A few years later, no less a figure than Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- who in the shape of Sherlock Holmes was creating one of the enduring emblems of the rationalist enlightenment -- would be a sucker for the sorcerers. His friend Harry Houdini had an explanation for every huckster’s hocus-pocus, but Doyle was having none of it. His wife was dead and he needed to believe there were people who could help him commune with her...."

12. Brownstein, Gabriel. The man from beyond: a novel. 1st ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2005011982 // "Inspired by the complex relationship between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the celebrated author and champion of spiritualism, and Harry Houdini, the famed magician and escape artist, Brownstein's uneven first novel reimagines the consequences of the séance, held in 1922 after a chance meeting on the New Jersey shore, in which the spirit-writing Lady Doyle delivered a message from Houdini's late mother to her skeptical son. While the author does a good job of getting inside the heads of his two historical protagonists with their opposing philosophies, much of the story focuses on the admirable but less interesting 22-year-old Molly Goodman, an intrepid reporter who follows the two great men's activities. In a vivid scene, after Houdini barely escapes from a locked box under the Hudson far down river from where he was supposed to emerge, he realizes that, like Sherlock Holmes after surviving his struggle with Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls, everyone believes he's dead. After this delicious twist, however, the story rushes to a hasty climax involving an insufficiently developed villain. Brownstein's story collection, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Apt. 3W (2002), won the PEN/Hemingway Award. "

13. Carlson, Scott. "Do-It-Yourself Journalism." Chronicle of Higher Education 50, no. 27 (2004): A48-A48.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on the collection of zines by several librarians in Minneapolis Community and Technical College in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Other zines in the college's collection are just plain odd. Totally amateur and absolutely earnest, Voices From Spirit Magazine caters to those who talk with the dead. The March 1988 issue includes an interview from beyond with Arthur Conan Doyle, which reads like a celebrity feature you might find in Entertainment Weekly. Nearly the entire interview goes by before the mediums bother to ask how Doyle is passing his time in the spirit world. 'I am a representative in our local parliament,' he replies...."

14. Cary, Alice. "Harry Houdini: Best of a vanishing breed." Biography 2, no. 10 (1998): 94.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Profiles that late Hungarian magician, Harry Houdini. Includes Inset, "Houdini's duel with Doyle."

15. Chism, Stephen. The Afterlife of Leslie Stringfellow: A Nineteenth-Century Southern Family's Experience with Spiritualism. Fayetteville, AK: University of Arkansas Press, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

16. Chism, Stephen J. ""The very Happiest Tiding": Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Correspondence with Arkansas Spiritualists." Arkansas Historical Quarterly 59, no. 3 (2000): 299-310.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "In 1919, Fayetteville, Arkansas, spiritualist Lessie Stringfellow Read and her adoptive mother, Alice Stringfellow, contacted Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in hopes of receiving assistance in publishing Leslie's Letters to His Mother, eventually published by the Fayetteville Democrat in 1926. Said to be a product of automatic writing, the book consisted of messages allegedly received between 1886 and 1912 from Alice's son, Leslie, who had died in 1886, and described the afterlife from his point of view as a new arrival. While Doyle is famous for his Sherlock Holmes mysteries, he had a keen interest in spiritualism throughout his career and, by 1919, had become England's foremost public advocate for it. Surviving correspondence indicates that he believed the document to be authentic and was impressed not only because it reflected ideas and images from other spiritualist writings, but because it described the afterlife in very specific terms."

17. Cohen, Emily Jane. "The fairy machine." Art Issues, no. 51 (1998): 24-29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Discusses the late 19th and early 20th century quest to produce photographic evidence of the existence of fairies, with particular reference to the images faked by two girls, Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, in Cottingley, England, in 1917. The author notes the interest of Arthur Conan Doyle in the Cottingley fairy photographs, outlines his theories regarding them, and comments on the recent film Fairy Tale: a True Story by Charles Sturridge. She concludes by examining the place of electricity in the depiction of fairies and in art works by Marinetti, Picabia and Raoul Dufy."

18. Cox, Jim. "A Journey of Spiritualism." Baker Street West 1 4, no. 2 (1998): 14-19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

19. Crawley, Geoffrey. "Fairy tales, and true stories." British Journal of Photography, no. 7165 (1998): 12-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A discussion of the story of the Cottingley Fairies, the greatest photo hoax of all time. The photographs were taken in 1917 by two young girls, Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, and included an image of Frances behind an array of cut-out fairies in a glen. They came to public notice when published by the novelist Arthur Conan Doyle in the December 1920 issue of Strand magazine; Doyle had an abiding interest in the paranormal. The images were actually taken using a Midg box quarterplate magazine camera and a developing and contact printing kit."

20. ———. "Photographing fairies." British Journal of Photography, no. (2000): 71-74.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The writer describes his involvement in a project to expose the 20th century's longest-running photography hoax--the Cottingley fairy photographs. He details how the five pictures of fairies were staged in 1917 and 1921 by two girls, Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, using cardboard figures. Recalling how he later became friends with the elderly Elsie, he explains how the girls were reluctant to expose the fraud for fear of showing up the famous men who became interested in the case, particularly Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, then an accomplished photographer. Noting the longevity of the hoax and of media interest in it, he describes how the hoax came to an end with confessions from the two women in the 1980s."

21. ———. "Pixies, not pixels." British Journal of Photography, no. 7166 (1998): 12-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "By 1920, the hoax of Conan Doyle's pictures of the Cottingley Fairies divided Britain into believers and skeptics. The pictures were taken by two girls who claimed that they had seen the fairies. In the baffling final picture, the Fairy Sunbath, the girls conveniently placed six fairy cutouts along a grassy bank. The girls' story defied disproval until 1983."

22. Crowley, John R. "Seeking Psychic and Spiritual Truth." Journal of Religion & Psychical Research 18, no. 2 (1995): 71.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Part II. Discusses three attempts at proving paranormal experiences. Citation to Doyle in the notes.

23. Curry, Andrew, Holly J. Morris, Art Samuels, Maggie Shrout, Anne Bradley, Nora Keating, Amy Kost, Lee Neville, and Sheila Thalhimer. "Hoaxes of the Ages." U.S.News & World Report 129, no. 4 (2000): 74.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a list of archaeological discoveries which were later discovered to be hoaxes. Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...There were fairies in the garden in pictures taken in 1917 by two girls, 10 and 16, in Cottingley, England. Experts determined the photos had not been tampered with. Sherlock Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle saw the images as proof little people were returning to the world and defended them in his book The Coming of the Fairies...."

24. Doyle, Arthur Conan. The coming of the fairies. Bison Books ed. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006013101. Contents: How the matter arose -- The first published account, Strand, Christmas number 1920 -- Reception of the first photographs -- The second series -- Observations of a clairvoyant in the Cottingley Glen, August 1921 -- Independent evidence for fairies -- Some subsequent cases -- The theosophic view of fairies. Includes bibliographical references //

25. ———. The coming of the fairies. London: Pavilion, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Originally published: London : Hodder and Stoughton, 1922. //

26. ———. Il ritorno delle fate. [Carnagno, Italy]: SugarCo Edizioni, 1992.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Language: Italian. Translation of: The coming of the fairies. //

27. ———. The Maracot Deep and Other Stories. Newcastle: CSP Classic Texts, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

28. ———. The new revelation. 1st ed. Jackson Hole, WY: Archeion Press, LLC, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007942281 //

29. ———. The new revelation. Cambridge: Rupert Books, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm. // Facsimile reprint of the ed. published: Chicago : Progressive Thinker Press, 1917.

30. ———. The new revelation. Garden City Park, NY: SquareOne Classics, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. Includes index. With introduction and afterword by George J. Lankevich. // Originally published: New York : G.H. Doran, c1918. With new introd.

31. ———. Our African winter. London: Duckworth, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It's an interesting account of the family's tour of eastern and southern Africa in 1928-1929."

32. ———. Our reply to the cleric: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's lecture in Leicester, October 19th, 1919, following the church congress., (Rupert Books monograph series, no. 5). Cambridge [England]: Rupert Books, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Afterword by Michael W. Homer./ Facsimile reprint. First published: Halifax [England] : Spiritualists' National Union, 1920./ Limited ed. of 400 copies./ Includes bibliographical references //

33. ———. Spiritualism and rationalism: with a drastic examination of Mr. Joseph McCabe, Rupert books monograph series ;; no.7;. Cambridge [England]: Hodder and Stoughton, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Facsimile reprint of 1920 ed./ Limited to 400 copies./ At head of title on cover: The answer of spiritualism./ Includes bibliographical references. With an afterword by Michael W. Homer. //

34. ———. Spiritualist Pamphlets. Newcastle: CSP Classic Texts, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

35. ———. The vital message. 1st ed. Jackson Hole, WY: Archeion Press, LLC, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2007942282 //

36. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Valfrid Hedman. Haudantakainen elämä. 2. p. ed. Hämeenlinna: Karisto, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 21 cm. Uniform Title: New revelation. Seitsemännestä englanninkielisestä painoksesta suomentanut Valfrid Hedman. //

37. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Kazuo Kondo. Yosei monogatari jitsuzaisuru yosei sekai, (Ten bukkusu shirizu =: Ten books). Tokyo,: Kosumo Ten Paburikeshon. Hatsubaimoto Taiyo Shuppan., 1989.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

38. Ellwood, Robert S. Swedenborg and Sherlock Holmes. Urbana, OH: Urbana University, 2001. Visual Material 1 videocassette (ca. 90 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- sd., col. ; 1/2 in. Swedenborg lecture series ; 2001; VHS. Introduction by Dr. Steve Cooley. // Dr. Ellwood compares the relationship between Swedenborg and the detective writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who created the incomparable Sherlock Holmes. Doyle became an avid spiritualist. Dr. Ellwood also discusses the empirical or observational side of Swedenborgianism and its founder.

39. Farquhar, Michael. A treasury of deception liars, misleaders, hoodwinkers, and the extraordinary true stories of history's greatest hoaxes, fakes, and frauds. New York: Penguin, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2004063314. Includes bibliographical references (p. [284]-287) //

40. Ferguson, Christine. "Eugenics and the Afterlife: Lombroso, Doyle, and the Spiritualist Purification of the Race." Journal of Victorian Culture 12, no. 1 (2007): 64-85.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The article examines the fulfillment of eugenicist Francis Galton's desire for a merging of religion and eugenics within the occult movement that he himself had explored throughout his career, which is the modern spiritualism. In making this argument, the author intends to balance the celebratory tendency of some of the recent scholarship on Victorian spiritualism with a discussion of its ideological complicity with both positive and negative eugenics." Includes multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

41. Flores, Enrique, and Arthur Conan Doyle. "The photomedium and spirit photography." Luna Córnea, no. 10 (1996): 10-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reproduces a text on spiritualist photography by the British author Arthur Conan Doyle. The author introduces the extract from Conan Doyles' The History of Spiritualism, published in 1927, and comments on the two possible types of spirit photography. Conan Doyle discusses William Crookes's photographs of an apparition summoned by the medium Florence Cook, offers an explanation of how spirit photography might be possible, and describes his own experiments with the photomedium William Hope.

42. Galvan, Jill Nicole. The Sympathetic Medium : feminine channeling, the occult, and communication technologies, 1859-1919. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Introduction: Tuning in to the female medium -- Sympathy and the spiriting of information In the cage -- Securing the line : automatism and cross-cultural encounters in late Victorian Gothic fiction -- Du Maurier's media : the phonographic unconscious on the cusp of the future -- Telltale typing, hysterical channeling : the medium as detective device -- Literary transmission and male mediation. Includes bibliographical references and index. // "The nineteenth century saw not only the emergence of the telegraph, the telephone, and the typewriter but also a fascination with seances and occult practices like automatic writing as a means for contacting the dead. Like the new technologies, modern spiritualism promised to link people separated by space or circumstance; and like them as well, it depended on the presence of a human medium to convey these conversations. Whether electrical or otherworldly, these communications were remarkably often conducted - in offices, at telegraph stations and telephone switchboards, and in seance parlors - by women." "In The Sympathetic Medium, Jill Galvan offers an analysis of the rise of the female medium in Great Britain and the United States during the Victorian era and through the turn of the century. Examining a wide variety of fictional explorations of feminine channeling (in both the technological and supernatural realms) by such authors as Henry James, George Eliot, Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker, Marie Corelli, and George Du Maurier, Galvan argues that women were often chosen for that role, or assumed it themselves, because they made at-a-distance dialogues seem more intimate, less mediated." "Two allegedly feminine traits, sympathy and a susceptibility to automatism, enabled women to disappear into their roles as message-carriers. Anchoring her literary analysis in discussions of social, economic, and scientific culture, Galvan finds that nineteenth- and early twentieth-century feminization of mediated communication reveals the challenges that the new networked culture presented to prevailing ideas of gender, dialogue, privacy, and the relationship between body and self."--Book jacket.

43. Goldman, David. "A Real-life Fairy Tale." Biography 4, no. 4 (2000): 28.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Relates how trick photographs made by Elsie Griffiths and Frances Wright made the people of London, England, believed in the existence of fairies and gnomes during the 1920s. Writer Arthur Conan Doyle's role in convincing the public regarding the authenticity of the pictures.

44. Gomel, Elana. "Altered States: Sex, Nation, Drugs, and Self-Transformation in Victorian Spiritualism/Possessed Victorians: Extra Spheres in Nineteenth-Century Mystical Writings." Victorian Studies 49, no. 4 (2007): 751-753.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews two books including "Altered States: Sex, Nation, Drugs, and Self-Transformation in Victorian Spiritualism," by Marlene Tromp and "Possessed Victorians: Extra Spheres in Nineteenth-Century Mystical Writings," by Sarah W. Willburn. Opens with a reference to Doyle. "'The psychic cloud' (to use Arthur Conan Doyle’s expression) that rained revelations upon the enraptured sitters in Victorian Spiritualist séances, refuses to be dispelled by the light of skepticism...."

45. Harper, Margaret Mills. "Nemo: George Yeats and her Automatic Script." New Literary History 33, no. 2 (2002): 291-314.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Spiritualism was also changing as the Victorian period faded into the Edwardian and Europe slouched toward the transformations of the Great War, waning and then reasserting itself in the 1890s and through the War. The renewal featured a greater emphasis on voices, either spoken or written, and correspondingly somewhat less on physical phenomena, so that Arthur Conan Doyle could suggest in 1926 that 'materialisation may have been more common in the past than in the present,' and that 'in these days complete materialisation is very rare.'..." The note for this passage (12) continues the Doyle reference: Arthur Conan Doyle, The History of Spiritualism (New York, 1926), vol. 2, pp. 209-10. Doyle's wife Jean, it should be remembered, had conducted automatic writing a few years earlier. See Pheneas Speaks; direct spirit communications in the family circle, reported by Arthur Conan Doyle (London, 1927). See also Ruth Brandon, The Spiritualists: The Passion for the Occult in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (New York, 1983), p. 226.

46. Harvey, John. "The Photographic Medium: Representation, Reconstitution, Consciousness, and Collaboration in Early-Twentieth-Century Spiritualism." Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 2, no. 2 (2004): 109-123.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes multiples references to Doyle. "This paper discusses the image of the ghost as adapted by and to photography. It focuses on the evolution of the photographic ghost in relation to a distinctive manifestation of psychic photography (or spirit photography) prevalent during the early twentieth century. Psychic investigators observed that in some photographs the faces of spirits that developed on the glass-plate negatives appeared to have been handmade.... This paper examines the unique and overlooked interaction between science and spirit, apparatus and appearances, and matter and minds, involving and connecting attendant and (purportedly) remote psyches."

47. Herbst, Judith. Hoaxes, (The unexplained). Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2003022692. Includes index. Contents: Sherlock Holmes gets flim flammed -- Giants in the earth -- Rainforest shadiness -- The sun, the moon, and batman -- Graffiti in the grain // A look at some of history's most famous hoaxes and publicity stunts, including fairy photographs, moon-men, lost tribes, and crop circles

48. Heydt, Bruce. "Genius Gone Awry." British Heritage 25, no. 2 (2004): 4-4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "This article introduces a series of articles published in the May 2004 edition of the journal "British Heritage." This issue features two stories appealing to those who enjoy looking into the past and second-guessing their intellectual superiors. Both are tales of men of genius whose wits momentarily let them down. One, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, was a brilliant engineer whose vision of how to build a better mousetrap--or railway in this case--proved an embarrassing failure. The other, Arthur Conan Doyle, was a literary genius whose powers of reasoning often matched those of his fictional creation, Sherlock Holmes--but who on one occasion was duped by two mischievous little girls."

49. Homer, Michael W. Lo spiritismo, (Collana religioni e movimenti). Torino: Elledici, 1999.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Language: Italian. Includes bibliographical references. //

50. Houdini, Harry. A Magician Among the Spirits. Princeton, NJ: Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2006. Sound Recording Sound disc.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital, mono, ; 3/4 in. Originally published: Amsterdam : Fredonia Books, c2002. "Reprinted from the 1972 ed."--T.p. verso. Distribution is restricted to RFB&D members who have a documented print disability such as a visual impairment, learning disability or other physical disability. // The whole country got excited by Houdini's campaign against faking spiritualists. He careened through the country, offering money for spirit contacts he couldn't duplicate by admitted magical chicanery. It was a heyday not only for Houdini but for the spirit-callers and there was an equally famous protagonist who thought the spirits could indeed be contacted, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A photo at the front records a meeting between Houdini and Doyle and Houdini gives Doyle his own chapter. There's an earlier chapter on Daniel Dunglas Home, the English engineer of spectacular paranormal effects. Houdini raises hell with spiritualists who were giving their (usually paying) clients a vision of heavens to come, and shares the methods used to practice "fake" and sensational spiritualism. Houdini was nothing if not unrelenting. As a taste of things to come, he ends his introduction with the words: "Up to the present time everything that I have investigated has been the result of deluded brains." -Back cover.

51. Huntington, Tom. "The man who believed in fairies." Smithsonian 28, no. 6 (1997): 104.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses author Sir Author Conan Doyle's belief in Spiritualism. How his reputation suffered due to his belief in fairies; The birth of Modern Spiritualism in 1848 in Hydesville, New York; Biographical data for Doyle; Doyle's tour of America to promote Spiritualism; Doyle's correspondence with Harry Houdini; The powerful force that is faith.

52. Jolly, Martyn. Faces of the living dead the belief in spirit photography. 1st American ed. West New York, NJ: Mark Batty Publisher, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006921050 //

53. ———. Faces of the living dead the belief in spirit photography. 1st British ed. London: British Library Publishing Division, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006921050 //

54. Jones, Terry, and Brian Froud. Lady Cottington's pressed fairy book. Atlanta, Kansas City, Mo: Turner Pub. Distributed by Andrews and McMeel, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 95149518; Scuttlebutt Dec 1997 // "After the controversy surrounding the publication in 1907 of her famous fairy photograph in The Regular magazine, Angelica Cottington retired into a life of seclusion. Never having married, she became Lady Cottington upon the death of her father and lived as a recluse on the family estate until her death in 1991. Her pressed fairy journal was brought to light when the estate was sold to developers and the house was scheduled to be demolished....Highly esteemed by those who enjoyed the inventive text by Terry Jones (of Monty Python's Flying Circus) and the splendid art-work by Brian Froud."

55. ———. Lady Cottington's pressed fairy book. 10 3/4 anniversary ed. New York: H. N. Abrams, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2005008950; Scuttlebutt Dec 1997 // "After the controversy surrounding the publication in 1907 of her famous fairy photograph in The Regular magazine, Angelica Cottington retired into a life of seclusion. Never having married, she became Lady Cottington upon the death of her father and lived as a recluse on the family estate until her death in 1991. Her pressed fairy journal was brought to light when the estate was sold to developers and the house was scheduled to be demolished....Highly esteemed by those who enjoyed the inventive text by Terry Jones (of Monty Python's Flying Circus) and the splendid art-work by Brian Froud."

56. Krauss, Rolf H. "Sherlock Holmes, die Fotografie und die Elfen." Jahrbuch für Moderne Kunst, no. 40 (1993).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses the 'Cottingley fairies' case of 1917 and the interest of Arthur Conan Doyle in the photographs taken by two young Yorkshire girls of each other with apparently supernatural beings. The author describes the conjectures of theosophists and photographers until 1990 when Joe Cooper, in his book The Case of the Cottingley Fairies (London: Robert Hale), revealed how the photographs had been faked.

57. MacIntyre, F. Gwynplaine. "The Land of Mist, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1926)." Fantasy & Science Fiction 110, no. 2 (2006): 162-162.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Provides an overview of the book "The Land of Mist," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Theme of the book; Concept of spiritualism addressed in the book.

58. Magnusson, Magnus. Fakers, Forgers & Phoneys: Famous Scams and Scamps. Edinburgh: Mainstream, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

59. Milmo, Bycahal. "Unpublished Images of the Fairies that Fooled the World Go on Sale." The Independent (London), February 16, 2001: 5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "They fooled the author of the Sherlock Holmes novels and created a myth which persisted for 60 years that a colony of 12-inch fairies was to be found dancing at the end of a garden in West Yorkshire. Part of the series of blurry photographs of what became known as the Cottingley Fairies resurfaced yesterday, with unpublished images of the two schoolgirls whose innocent prank duped the world. An archive of prints and negatives taken in 1917 by Elsie Wright, 15, and her cousin, Frances Griffiths, 10, showing them playing with 'fairies', goes up for sale next month at a London auction house...."

60. Milner, Richard. "Charles Darwin and associates, ghostbusters." Scientific American 275, no. 4 (1996): 96.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on the controversy over the trial of 19th century spiritualist Henry Slade which involved noted naturalists Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace. Zoologist Edwin Ray Lankester's suit against Slade for criminal fraud; Darwin's support for the prosecution; Wallace's defense of Slade; Courtroom trial of Slade. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...The Slade trial was to become one of the strangest courtroom cases in Victorian England. Some saw it as a public arena where science could score a devastating triumph over superstition. For others, it was the declaration of war between professional purveyors of the 'paranormal' and the fraternity of honest stage magicians. Arthur Conan Doyle, the zealous spiritualist whose fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, was logic personified, characterized it as 'the persecution [rather than prosecution] of Slade.'..."

61. Monroe, John Warne. "Cartes de visite from the Other World: Spiritism and the Discourse of Laicisme in the Early Third Republic." French Historical Studies 26, no. 1 (2003): 119-153.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Doyle mentioned in note 29: For a skeptical discussion of Hudson's photographs, see John Beattie's articles in Photographic News 17 (1873): 334, 371, 383, 406-7, 443-44. For rather less skeptical but considerably more comprehensive histories of British and American spirit photography in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, see James Coates, Photographing the Invisible: Practical Studies in Spirit Photography, Spirit Portraiture, and Other Rare but Allied Phenomena (London, 1911); Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Case for Spirit Photography (London, 1922); and J. Traill Taylor, The Veil Lifted: Modern Developments in Spirit Photography (London, 1894).

62. Nickels, James B. "Psychic Research in a Winnipeg Family: Reminiscences of Dr. Glen F. Hamilton." Manitoba History, no. (2007): 51-60.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents an overview of Thomas Glendenning Hamilton and his psychic research. Hamilton is known for his studies in the field of parapsychology covering topics related to the Ouija board, mental telepathy, table rapping, table tipping, bell-box ringing, supernormal lights, dictatorial spirit guides, and trance personalities. Information about the studies conducted by Hamilton are offered. Includes references to Doyle along with a color photograph. "Occasionally, famous people arrived in Winnipeg and came to Hamilton House, some attending sittings and some even taking their own photographs of the proceedings. Three of the most noted visitors were Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1-3 July 1923), who wrote the Sherlock Holmes stories, Dr. and Mrs. L. R. G. Crandon (21-24 December 1926), who were associated with the Houdini versus Margery controversy, and the Right Honourable William Lyon Mackenzie King (20 August 1933), who was former Prime Minister of Canada, then Leader of the Opposition, and soon to return once more as Prime Minister. In May, June, and July of 1932, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle returned once more to Hamilton House--through séances--because he died on 7 July 1930...." Photograph caption reads: "The late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle appeared in a teleplasmic protrusion from Mary Marshall's nose during a séance at Hamilton House on 27 June 1932."

63. Owen, Alex. "'Borderland forms': Arthur Conan Doyle, Albion's daughters, and the politics of the Cottingley fairies." History workshop, no. 38 (1994): 48-85.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Owen looks at incidents surrounding photographs taken in 1917 by two English girls from the Yorkshire village of Cottingley. In photos taken of each other, the girls are shown playing with fairies. These photos were championed as genuine by Conan Doyle who published them in the Strand magazine in Dec 1920. Owen argues that Cottingley was one of the last manifestations of a glorious Victorian and Edwardian fairy tradition, and a highly-publicized incident in a broader interwar engagement with mysticism and the occult. He explores these themes, paying particular attention to the historical context that gave the Cottingley fairies their validity, and the blurring of the boundaries between rationalism, fantasy and spirituality that facilitated belief in a 20th c. fairyland. He contends that the issues are intimately bound up with social questions. Cottingley affords a fleeting glimpse of the interior worlds of two early-20th-c. working-class girlhoods, and the way in which the fanciful realizations of childhood were appropriated and recast by a small group of middle-class men. Power relations are a crucial part of the untold story, and social and gender anxieties constitute one of its major underlying tensions."

64. Polidoro, Massimo. Final séance: the strange friendship between Houdini and Conan Doyle. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 00051830. Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-252) and index // "This is the story of the unusual friendship between the renowned illusionist and escape artist Harry Houdini and the celebrated mystery writer and creator of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Both men were fascinated by the occult practice of Spiritualism, Houdini as an ardent skeptic and Conan Doyle as a true believer who was convinced that the dead could and did communicate with the living. While there are many biographies of both men, this is the first book to detail the years of their friendship and their battles over the veracity of Spiritualism." "During their five-year friendship, Houdini and Conan Doyle exchanged views about Spiritualism; conducted investigations of notable mediums of their day, such as Mina "Margery" Crandon; and even enjoyed vacationing together at Atlantic City.". "Based on original correspondence, photographs, and his own research, Polidoro reconstructs the relationship between the believer and the skeptic, which weathered mediums, seances, public debunkings, and hurt feelings. He also discusses in detail the final seance that ended the friendship between the two strong-willed men."--Book jacket

65. ———. "Houdini v. the blond witch of Lime Street." Skeptic 5, no. 3 (1997): 90.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Features Mina Stinson and her demonstrations on the power of mind over matter in 1923. Discovery of Mina's powers by her husband Le Roy Godard Crandon; Renaming of Mina as Margery; Seances with magician Harry Houdini. Includes multiple references to Doyle.

66. Princenthal, Nancy. "Willing Spirits: Art of the Paranormal." Art in America 94, no. 2 (2006): 104-115.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article focuses on "The Perfect Medium: Photography and the Occult," an exhibition of spirit photography at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Some of the works featured in the exhibit include pocket-sized gilted framed formal portraits and bigger and bolder images from the early decades of the 20th century. The event showed that photography can indeed serve as an ideal form for cathing ghosts and spirits. Includes references to Doyle. "...Among the exhibition's photographs of this period were two from the famous Cottingley Fairies series, produced in 1925 by the 16-year-old Elsie Wright and her 10-year-old cousin Prances Griffiths, and vigorously supported by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (who maintained a substantial collection of spirit photographs and once conducted a demonstration of a spirit-photo session at Carnegie Hall in which audience members were reported to have shouted out and swooned; these decorous, achingly sweet concoctions continued to compel belief (and pilgrimages to the wooded site of the fairies' supposed visit) until 1981, when Elsie died and Frances confessed to copying the winged sprites from an illustrated book. Such was Conan Doyle's power in the spirit photography movement that his death was almost immediately followed by his appearance in a host of occult photographs. Most bittersweet (though perhaps less touching than funny) is a 1931 portrait by William Hope of Conan Doyle's stolid-looking son Denis, literally haunted by his inescapable father....Also on view at Burgin, along with an assortment of purported spirit photographs and various publications pro and con, were playbills of 'Anti-Spiritualist Entertainments' from 1879, a booklet called 'Spirit Rapping Made Easy,' a catalogue for magician's props including 'materialized hands...fine for spiritualist seances' and a poster for an entertainment that reads 'Is Arthur Conan Doyle Right? Can the Dead Talk to the Living?' illustrated by an enormous ghostly arm reaching down to write on a magic slate while a pert Gibson girl looks on, agog...."

67. Purkiss, Diane. At the bottom of the garden : a dark history of fairies, hobgoblins, and other troublesome things. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Ancient worlds -- Medieval dreams -- Birth and death : fairies in Scottish witch-trials -- Desire of gold and the good neighbours : the uses of fairies -- The fairy goes literary : Puck and others -- Into the Enlightenment -- Victorian fairies -- Tinker Bell's magic and the fairies' call to war -- Photographing fairies, and a Celtic revival -- Fairy bubbles and alien abductions. Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0807/00051534-d.html Includes bibliographical references (p. 323-348) and index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Includes discussion of the Cottingley fairies."

68. ———. At the bottom of the garden : a dark history of fairies, hobgoblins, and other troublesome things. New York: New York University Press, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 24 cm. Ancient worlds -- Medieval dreams -- Birth and death : fairies in Scottish witch-trials -- Desire of gold and the good neighbours : the uses of fairies -- The fairy goes literary : Puck and others -- Into the Enlightenment -- Victorian fairies -- Tinker Bell's magic and the fairies' call to war -- Photographing fairies, and a Celtic revival -- Fairy bubbles and alien abductions. Includes bibliographical references (p. 323-348) and index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Includes discussion of the Cottingley fairies."

69. ———. At the bottom of the garden : a dark history of fairies, hobgoblins, and other troublesome things. 1st U.S.A. pbk. ed. New York: New York University Press, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 20 cm. Ancient worlds -- Medieval dreams -- Birth and death : fairies in Scottish witch-trials -- Desire of gold and the good neighbours : the uses of fairies -- The fairy goes literary : Puck and others -- Into the Enlightenment -- Victorian fairies -- Tinker Bell's magic and the fairies' call to war -- Photographing fairies, and a Celtic revival -- Fairy bubbles and alien abductions. Includes bibliographical references (p. 323-348) and index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Includes discussion of the Cottingley fairies."

70. ———. Troublesome things : a history of fairies and fairy stories. London, New York: Allen Lane, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Includes discussion of the Cottingley fairies."

71. ———. Troublesome things : a history of fairies and fairy stories. London: Penguin, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., facsims., ports. ; 20 cm. Originally published: London: Allen Lane, 2000. Includes bibliographical references and index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001. // "Includes discussion of the Cottingley fairies."

72. Randi, James. "Fairies, frauds, & fuss." Skeptic 5, no. 3 (1997): 10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the motion picture 'Fairy Tale: A True Story,' from Paramount Studios. Includes multiple references to Doyle and a photograph of Doyle and Houdini.

73. Rivkin, Stevin E. "A Reconstruction of Houdini's Famous Show Exposing Séance Fraud." Skeptic 14, no. 1 (2008): 14-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article focuses on Harry Houdini's seance exposure show and lecture on November 14, 1924 in Charleston, West Virginia. Includes references to Doyle. "...When the famous author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle attacked Houdini in the newspapers for his criticism of spiritualism, Houdini responded by issuing a challenge in newspapers and from the stage for Margery to appear with him and prove her powers in her own hometown. (She did not accept.)...Many thought Houdini himself had the powers of a medium, and that he could actually vanish and re-materialize when he made his famous escapes. Included among the believers were leading spiritualist and author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and professor of physics and psychic researcher Sir Oliver Lodge--even though Houdini had personally told them his illusions and tricks were done by natural means....'Let me tell you one of the most interesting stories showing the fraud of spirit letters. Mrs. Conan Doyle gave a séance several years ago in Atlantic City and sat down and wrote in beautiful English a 32 page letter professing to come from my mother. My mother never spoke a word of English in her life. ' he said....'

74. Ryan, Paul. "Ghosts in the machine: Conan Doyle and spirit photography." Luna Córnea, no. 10 (1996): 18-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Traces the history of spiritualist photography, with reference to the work of William Hope. The author states that spirit photography originated in the U.S.A., notes the popularity of spirit photographers including William H. Mumler in the 1860s following the Civil War and Mrs. Deane in Britain in the aftermath of the First World War, and describes the usual format of such photographs. He observes that spirit photography was supported by a number of celebrities including Arthur Conan Doyle, who undertook experiments with Hope and published articles in defence of spirit photography. The author describes attempts to discredit Hope's work, which was finally exposed as a trick in 1933, and notes that, despite this, advocates of spirit photography still defend its validity."

75. Silverman, Kenneth. Houdini! the career of Ehrich Weiss : American self-liberator, Europe's eclipsing sensation, world's handcuff king & prison breaker. 1st ed. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96007163; Scuttlebutt Mar 1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. 435-443) and index // "A new biography with some discussion of the relationship between Houdini and Conan Doyle."

76. Sorel, Nancy Caldwell. "Harry Houdini and Arthur Conan Doyle." Atlantic Monthly 273, no. 1 (1994): 103.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Features the first encounter between Harry Houdini and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Doyle's obsession with the supernatural; Celebrity status of Doyle and Houdini; Contact between the two; Seance conducted to contact Houdini's mother.

77. Stanford, Peter. "Knock, knock. Who's there? A dead man's spirit." New Statesman 131, no. 4582 (2002): 32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Relates the experience of attending a seance at the British Spiritualist Association in London, England. Discussion of mortality and the concept of Heaven; Topic of spiritualism; Way that the spiritual medium targets people in the audience to give messages to. Includes references to Doyle

78. Stashower, Daniel. "The Medium & the Magician." American History 34, no. 3 (1999): 38.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses the controversy between Harry Houdini and spiritualist Mina Crandon. Information on Mina Crandon; Views of Houdini on Crandon's psychic ability; Description of Crandon's seance attended by Houdini. Includes multiple references to Doyle.

79. Stuttaford, Andrew. "Feywatch." National Review 50, no. 25 (1998): 52-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the exhibition "Victorian Fairy Painting" at the Frick Collection in New York City in 1998. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...It is no coincidence that a number of the most striking works on display at the Frick are by painters who were outsiders. The greatest of them all, Richard Dadd, murdered his father. His obsessively detailed masterpiece, The Fairy Feller's Master Stroke, was the product of nine years' work in a lunatic asylum. That's also where Charles Doyle (father of the creator of Sherlock Holmes) ended up. His Self-Portrait, A Meditation, shows a man all too aware that the spirits surrounding him are the product of a troubled mind...."

80. Swiss, Jamy Ian. "Bigger than life even in death." Skeptic 6, no. 1 (1998): 99.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the two books about magician Harry Houdini written by Ken Silverman. 'Houdini!!!: The Career of Erich Weiss'; 'Notes to Houdini!!!.' Includes references to Doyle.

81. Trout, Steven. "Christ in Flanders?: Another Look at Rudyard Kipling's 'The Gardener'." Studies in Short Fiction 35, no. 2 (1998): 169.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents criticisms on the short story, 'The Gardener,' by Rudyard Kipling. Connections between Kipling's character and Christ; Expression of powerful Christian myth; Reflection of Kipling's anguish over the death of his son, John Kipling. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...As custodians of the fallen, dedicated to redeeming the waste of war through commemoration and responsible for transferring tracts of shell-torn wasteland into English gardens, such men invited absorption into myths of regeneration and resurrection, especially during a decade when, as Jay Winter has demonstrated, faith in spiritualism and the miraculous swept across Britain. At the same time that Kipling described Christ in Flanders, Conan Doyle's campaign to convince skeptics of the credibility of séances and mediums (a crusade born of his own wartime loss) had inspired thousands of mourners to attempt communication with the Beyond...."

82. Tymn, Michael E. "Mediumship: Direct Connection to a Level of the Afterlife, Telepathy, or Fraud?" Journal of Religion & Psychical Research 25, no. 3 (2002): 123.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // For some 65 years -- from about 1870 until around 1935 -- mediumship was thoroughly and meticulously investigated by a number of highly-regarded scientists and scholars. All concluded that genuine mediums exist -- the "white crows" that prove all crows are not black, as William James put it. Nearly all those who recognized the reality of mediumship came to see it as offering proof of the survival of conscioushess at death. Based on the conclusions of the overwhelming majority of these learned men, the question asked in this Ashby competition teas answered long ago. As they say in the legal profession, res judicata -- it has been decided. And yet, we still doubt. This article summarizes the approach, methods, and conclusions of the famous researchers of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries and attempts to explain why their conclusions are still questioned to this day. [Abstract from author] Includes references to Doyle.

83. Weisberg, Barbara M. "They spoke with the dead." American Heritage 50, no. 5 (1999): 84.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Features Kate and Maggie Fox, hoax spiritualists based in Hydesville, New York. Family life; Beginnings of spiritual awareness; Impact on the public consciousness; Investigation of their authenticity. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...By the time Maggie died, spiritualism had already waned in the United States, but its influence had grown internationally. Britain in particular was a center; the movement reached a peak there after World War I, as it had in the United States after the Civil War. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, a fervent spiritualist, fiercely defended mediums against the attacks of Harry Houdini, the renowned magician who delighted in exposing their tricks...."

84. Wheen, Francis. "Francis Wheen: If you believe in fairies, clap your hands!" The Guardian (Manchester), Dec 18, 1994: No page citation.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "'At one time such beings were frequently seen and perhaps would be still,' [Patrick Harpur] writes sadly, 'were it not that belief in them is now considered risible.' This is borne out by Paul Sieveking, editor of that wonderful magazine Fortean Times ('The Journal Of Strange Phenomena'). He told me last week that fairies 'don't turn up as sightings very much, though we did have one woman who claimed to have seen one in Ireland in the 1950s. But they're few and far between.' It was not ever thus. As recently as the 1930s, the correspondence columns of John O'London's Weekly carried many letters from 'sane and sensible grown-ups' relating their encounters with gnomes, elves, goblins and sprites. Even the great and the good weren't ashamed to answer [Peter Pan]'s question in the affirmative: W B Yeats was an inveterate leprechaun-lover, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 'the self-styled personification of robust British common sense' wrote an article for the Christmas issue of the Strand magazine in 1920 under the startling headline: 'Fairies Photographed: An Epoch-Making Event.' The photographs, which had been taken by two girls in the Yorkshire village of Cottingley, were indeed remarkable evidence, not of the existence of fairies, but of Conan Doyle's gullibility. One showed young Elsie Wright reaching out to shake the hand of a small gnome; in the other, her cousin Frances Griffiths gazed into the camera while a group of winged fairies, playing on their panpipes, danced cheerfully in the foreground. Anyone with two brain cells to rub together could have guessed that the pictures were faked, not least because of the uncanny resemblance of the girls' supernatural playmates to the popular Victorian and Edwardian images created by illustrators such as Arthur Rackham, Richard Dadd and 'Dicky' Doyle, Sir Arthur's own father. Many years later, in 1983, Elsie belatedly confessed that the 'fairies' were in fact cardboard cut-outs of watercolours that she had painted herself. By then, however, poor old Conan Doyle was long dead, having gone to his grave still insisting that there really were fairies at the bottom of the garden." [Abstract of longer article.]

85. Wokler, Robert. "The subtextual reincarnation of Voltaire and Rousseau." American Scholar 67, no. 2 (1998): 55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on the work of Theodore Besterman and Ralph Leigh in annotating and assembling the letters of philosophers Voltaire and Rousseau. Information on Besterman; Account on 'Correspondence of Voltaire,' by Besterman; Information on Leigh; Review given by Leigh to the work of Besterman; Work relationship of Besterman and Leigh. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...A student of parapsychology, Theodore Besterman was appointed, while still a young man, first the editor and then the chief investigating officer of the Society for Psychical Research in London. By the mid-1930s, his works on crystal gazing, divining rods, and mediums had established his reputation as one of the world's foremost authorities on mental telepathy and clairvoyance. In true Voltairean fashion, however, he was convinced that nearly all of the paranormal phenomena reported in his own journal were quackery, and his determination to expose most fortune-tellers as charlatans so enraged Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Society's other unshakeable believers in the existence of fairies that, before he resigned himself, Besterman managed to drive out most of the Society's members, leaving only the skeptics and scientists inside...."

86. Wood, Peter H. "Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle and H. P. Lovecraft: Three Attitudes to the Spiritual World." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 1 (2005): 14-23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

87. Wright, Sarah. "Gregorio Marañón and 'the cult of sex': effeminacy and intersexuality in 'The Psychopathology of Don Juan' (1924)." Bulletin of Spanish Studies 81, no. 6 (2004): 717-738.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses the contemporary paradigms of masculinity in the play "La plasmatoria," written by Pedro Muñoz Seca. Interrogation of Spanish masculinity, anxiety about the hyper-erotics of the age; Misconceptions in the popular imagination regarding the reading of Don Juan's sexuality; Accounts on the science of psychoanalysis. Includes references to Doyle (p. 719). "...The critic Jorge de la Cueva, reviewing the opening performance in El Debate, cites the psychic inventions of Thomas Alva Edison and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as possible prototypes for Muñoz Seca's machine. In his memoir, The Diary and Sundry Observations of Thomas Alva Edison, Edison revealed that he had been assembling a machine (a valve) that could make contact with the spirit-world by recording paranormal sonic events. In 1932, two years after Conan Doyle’s death, the photograph, 'Conan Doyle's Return' fashioned the writer’s psychic reappearance in the form of 'ectoplasm' exuding from the nose of the medium Mrs Mary Marshall during a séance...."

88. Wynne, Catherine. "Arthur Conan Doyle and Psychic Photographs." History of Photography 22, no. 4 (1998): 385.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on spirit photography advocated by Arthur Conan Doyle. Ideas depicted in the cartoon published in the journal 'Punch'; Involvement in an inquiry regarding photos of fairies; Discussion on Holmesian philosophy.

05H Sir Arthur Conan Doyle -- Grant Allen (4)

1. Campbell, Patrick. "Grant Allen: The Bootmaker Connection." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 3 (2003): 21-23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Falk, Lilian. "Letter to the Editor, 'Grant Allen'." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Greenwood, Therese. "Arthur Conan Doyle, Grant Allen and Wolfe Island." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 3 (2003): 19-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Sveum, Richard J. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the publication of the final installment of Grant Allen's "Hilda Wade" and makes some additional observations on Allen and Doyle's friendship with Allen.



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson