06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales (32)

1. "The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes Volume 2." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 21 (2008): 59-59.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes," Volume 2, by Arthur Conan Doyle. Read by David Timson. Naxos AudioBooks, unabridged, four CDs, 5.5 hrs., $28.98 ISBN 978-962-634-862-8. "After 10 years, 57 stories, four novels and 60 CDs, David Timson's monumental task of recording every word of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories for Naxos concludes. Timson even contributes a Holmes-Watson adventure of his own, 'The Wonderful Toy.' Timson reads energetically, throwing himself into the stories' spirit of elegant deduction and head-long adventure. The dulcet tones of Timson's Watson are frequently interrupted by a panoply of other voices: Cockney ladies of the night, harried businessmen and, of course, the clipped public school staccato of Holmes himself."

2. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 35 (2005): 37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Homes: The Novels," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

3. Arnold, Sue. "Review: Audio: Sue Arnold's Choice: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes." The Guardian (London), October 4, 2008: 9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the audiobook The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Six Unabridged Stories, Vol 1 , by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, read by Edward Hardwicke. (7hrs, CSA Word, GBP19.99)

4. Baker, Simon. "The Character Who Refused to Die." Spectator 299, no. 9254/9255 (2005): 64-64.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews books "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, Volume III: The Novels," by Arthur Conan Doyle and "Sherlock Holmes: The Unauthorized Biography," by Nick Rennison.

5. Baskin, Barbara. "Media: Audiobooks." Booklist 97, no. 2 (2000): 263.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews two audio books written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes II'; 'The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes.'

6. Beam, Thelma. "Bookshelf: The Return of Sherlock Holmes." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 32-33.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews "The Return of Sherlock Holmes" from The Oxford Sherlock Holmes.

7. Bollen, Rebecca. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes. 2 vols. (Book)." Library Journal 129, no. 19 (2004): 60-60.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

8. Burns, Ann, and Theresa Connors. "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes VI (Book)." Library Journal 129, no. 1 (2004): 183-183.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the audiobook "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes VI," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

9. Chapman, Paul M. "Review--'The Sherlock Holmes Reference Library: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' by Leslie S. Klinger." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 71-72.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. ———. "Review--'The Sherlock Holmes Reference Library: The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes' by Leslie S. Klinger." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 63-64.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

11. Coghill, Bob. "Bookshelf: His Last Bow." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 34-36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

12. Connors, Theresa. "Audio reviews." Library Journal 119, no. 17 (1994): 102.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the sound recording 'Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Volume 2: Four More Classic Stories,' by Arthur Conan Doyle, read by Clive Merrison, Michael Williamson, Peter Davison and others.

13. Connors, Theresa, and Mark Annichiarico. "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes." Library Journal 122, no. 3 (1997): 174-174.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the sound recording 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes,' volume 1, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

14. Cox, Michael, and Nicholas Utechin. "Review--The Oxford Sherlock Holmes, The Case-book of Sherlock Holmes, edited with an introduction by W. W. Robson." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 66-67.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

15. Darlington, Frank, George A. Vanderburgh, Thelma Beam, Doug Wrigglesworth, Bob Coghill, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf' Reviews of Oxford's The Sign of the Four, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, The Valley of Fear, His Last Bow and The Books of Michael Harrison." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 30-36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

16. Davies, David Stuart. "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes--Another stab at them!" The Ritual, no. 18 (1996): 3-10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

17. ———. "Review--'The Folio Society Sherlock Holmes Short Stories'." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 113-114.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

18. Feigelman, Jennifer. "Graphic Classics: Arthur Conan Doyle." School Library Journal 51, no. 11 (2005): 177-177.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "Graphic Classics: Arthur Conan Doyle," vol. 2, edited by Tom Pomplun, illustrated by Rick Geary.

19. ———. "Graphic Novels." School Library Journal 51, no. 11 (2005): 177.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes a review with a reference to Holmes and Doyle. Pomplun, Tom, ed. Graphic Classics: Arthur Conan Doyle. vol 2. 2nd ed. illus. by Rick Geary, et al. 144p. Eureka. 2005. pap. $11.95. ISBN 0-9746648-5-5. Gr 8 Up "Doyle's prose and poetry are brought to life in this exciting volume. It has some overlap from the first volume (Eureka, 2002), but also includes some truly outstanding new tales. In 'The Ghosts of Goresthorpe Grange,' a man believes that his house is occupied by spirits and seeks out the help of a medium. Ultimately, he is drugged and swindled, and the dreamlike style of the art reinforces this mood. In 'Two Great Brown-Pericord Motor,' two men create an invention and become fiercely jealous and protective of it, until disaster erupts. This volume also contains two Sherlock Holmes stories and thrilling tales of sea adventures. Though each one is illustrated by a different artist, the writing ties the collection together nicely. Unlike the earlier volume, this one utilizes a consistent comic format throughout. The artists have deftly captured the themes and moods of each piece in the black-and-white illustrations done in a wide range of styles and techniques. This assortment of tales may attract new readers to Doyle's work."

20. Goldsmith, Francisca, and Phyllis Levy Mandell. "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes IV." School Library Journal 47, no. 9 (2001): 76.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the audiobook 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes IV.'

21. Gray, Patrick. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes." Touchstone: A Journal of Mere Christianity 19, no. 1 (2006): 51-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," written by Arthur Conan Doyle and edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

22. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "'The Return of Sherlock Holmes' Introduction." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 9-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

23. Hall, John. "The Date of the Case." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 62-64.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

24. ———. "Letter to the editor ('The many meanings of 'Study'')." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 144-145.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

25. ———. "Review--'The Oxford Sherlock Holmes: His Last Bow' edited with an introduction by Owen Dudley Edwards." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 63-65.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

26. Kean, Michael H. "Hare, Hounds and Horses." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 168-169.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

27. Posner, Richard A. "CSI: Baker Street." New Republic 231, no. 15 (2004): 47-49.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories, by Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

28. Roden, Barbara. "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, Introduction." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 9-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

29. Rogers, Michael. "Audio reviews." Library Journal 123, no. 3 (1998): 183.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews books on audiotape, including The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. 6 cassettes. 9 hrs. BDD Audio. 1997. ISBN 0-553-47954-7. $29.95

30. Scott, Whitney. "Adult books: Mystery." Booklist 94, no. 6 (1997): 547.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'The Mammoth Book of New Sherlock Holmes Adventures,' by Mike Ashley.

31. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--Sherlock Holmes' Strangest Cases by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 1 (2002): 29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

32. Weller, Philip. "Barking Up the Wrong Yew Tree." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 175-192.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Abbey Grange (3)

1. "Murder Short & Sweet." Kirkus Reviews 76, no. 18 (2008): 980-980.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Murder Short & Sweet," edited by Paul D. Staudohar. "Arranged in no particular order, these 25, winnowed from an archive of thousands similarly gore-drenched, compose an anthology that had every chance to be better than it is....Stanley Ellin, Lawrence Block and Ellery Queen provide solid entries, but you've seen them all before. Also represented are those anthology warhorses Poe, Conan Doyle, Christie, Sayers and Dahl. No clinkers among them, of course, but their very inevitability gives the collection that unfortunate thrice-told feeling." The selected Doyle contribution is "The Adventure of Abbey Grange."

2. Booth, Matthew. "The Abbey Grange Vox populi, vox Dei." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 101-105.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Lellenberg, Jon L. "Striking Close to Home: 'The Adventure of the Abbey Grange'." The Musgrave Papers, no. 7 (1994): 61-71.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Beryl Coronet (3)

1. Hall, John. "Whatever Her Sins Are: A Study of Motive in 'the Beryl Coronet'." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 81-91.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Holly, Raymond L. "The Missing Beryl." The Camden House Journal 22, no. 10 (2000): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Singleton, Paul. "Gems from 'The Beryl Coronet'." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 6 (2004): 4-7.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Black Peter (2)

1. Campbell, Patrick. "Death in the Coop? A quiz on 'The Adventure of Black Peter'." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 3 (2007): 49.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Eustace, Grant. "'Black Peter': A Tale From the Dark Side." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 51-55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Blanched Soldier (2)

1. Dale, Richard. "Sherlock Holmes O.H.M.S., The Blanched Soldier, and the Second Anglo-Boer War: The Case of the Post-Hiatus Hiatus." The Camden House Journal 19, no. 6 (1997): 2-4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Heifetz, Carl L. "Regarding the True Aetiology of the Skin-Lightening Syndrome in 'The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier'." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 7 (1998): 42-48.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Blue Carbuncle (13)

1. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the 1948 publication of The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle by the Baker Street Irregulars.

2. "Arguments through the ages ; Conan Doyle: 'On the contrary, Watson, you can see everything'." Star Tribune (Minneapolis), Nov 4, 2002: 17.A.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Editor's note: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), himself an amateur detective, is best known as the creator of the fictional consulting detective Sherlock Holmes and his associate, Dr. John Watson. Conan Doyle was so successful in constructing the character of Holmes that he came to be resented by fans who saw him as proof that their hero was mere fiction. Holmes, like Conan Doyle, was adept at deducing facts from seemingly inconsequential clues, a talent he demonstrated in such stories as 'The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle,' excerpted here. In this passage, Holmes and Watson are discussing the identity of a man who, assaulted while carrying home a goose, fled the scene - leaving behind his hat and the goose."

3. Bensley, Janet (ed). A Blue Carbuncle. [Zeigler, IL]: The Occupants of the Empty House, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Jan 2005 // "An interesting collection of papers about the gem, and the story."

4. Briggs, Thomas H., Charles Madison Curry, and Leonidas Warren Payne, Jr. Literature For the Junior High School. Vol. 3. Chicago/New York/San Francisco: Rand McNally & Company, 1929.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" is on pp. 507-528.

5. Duke, Michael. "'Upon the Second Morning After Christmas'." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 102-109.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Hedberg, Lloyd R., Jr. "Musings Upon the Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle: Unmasking the Story Within the Story or Real Villains Revealed." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 84-92, 118.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Henderson, John N. A history of the Museum Tavern in Bloomsbury. London: Blemund's, 1989.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Scuttlebutt Mar 2001. // "Traces the history of the tavern from 1723 (when it was the Dog and Duck) to the present day, and it does not neglect the fact that Sherlockian scholars have identified it as the Alpha Inn (in 'The Blue Carbuncle')."

8. Holly, Raymond L. "A Comparison of 'Blue Carbuncle' and 'Speckled Band'." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 1 (1996): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

9. Hyder, William. "The Blue Carbuncle: Loose Ends and Moral Ambiguities." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 57-63.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. Koch, Hugo. "...There are...some hundreds of Henry Bakers in this city of ours..." an identification of the Henry Baker. S.l: s.n., 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references //

11. Scovil, Jeffrey A. "The mysterious garnet." Earth 3, no. 5 (1994): 64.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses various aspects of garnet. Coloration; Types; Mineral composition; Uses. Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. "Sherlock Holmes is at the top of his form in 'The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle.' In the morning, while Holmes is still in his purple dressing gown, an acquaintance bursts in to announce that he has found a brilliant blue gem lodged in the crop of a Christmas goose. This isn't just any gem, either. It is the famous blue carbuncle recently stolen from the Countess of Morcar. Does this mystery daunt the unflappable sleuth? On the contrary, dear reader. By suppertime, he has figured out who stole the gem and how the hapless goose came to swallow it and has even apprehended and pardoned the thief. Not bad for a few hours' work. Unfortunately, the keen Holmes and his creator Arthur Conan Doyle do overlook one important detail in the story. There is no such thing as a blue carbuncle. Carbuncle comes from a Latin word meaning "small glowing ember" and originally referred to any dark, fiery red stone. But by Victorian times, the word came to refer only to garnet. And while garnets do come in nearly every other color, they never occur in blue....It's unfortunate that nature has never made a purely blue carbuncle, but that's just the way the chemistry worked out. As Holmes himself might say, 'It's elemental, my dear Watson.'"

12. Walker, Lynn E. "Irresolution and the Quest in 'The Blue Carbuncle'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 4 (2003): 29-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

13. Waterhouse, William C. "What Was the Blue Carbuncle?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 4 (2004): 19-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Boscombe Valley Mystery (5)

1. Hall, John. "The Boscombe Valley Mystery." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 14-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Olding, Alan C. "Ballarat Revisited." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 27-29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. ———. "A Brief History of Ballarat." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 12-18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Solberg, Andrew L. "The Importance of Petrarch and Meredith in 'The Boscombe Valley Mystery'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 47, no. 4 (1997): 35-37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Utechin, Nicholas. "The Boscombe Valley Mystery." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 22-25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Bruce-Partington Plans (6)

1. Aiken, Bruce. "In Re Bruce-Partington Plans." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 3 (1995): 4-9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Fildes, Christopher. "Sherlock Holmes solves the intractable problem of the black hole in the Aldgate area." The Daily Telegraph (London), March 3, 2001: 32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It was Sherlock Holmes who first identified the black hole in the Aldgate area. By now it is engulfing ministers and mayors and money, but in his time it had already swallowed the Bruce-Partington plans for the Royal Navy's latest submarine....More recently the black hole in the Aldgate area has proved itself capable of reducing signals and services to anti-matter, much to the dread of passengers whose daily journeys take them, or are meant to take them, to the City. Desperately, London Underground has sought to blame this on the interaction of new equipment and old track...."

3. Kean, Michael H. "Who Was Bruce-Partington: A Work in Progress." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 44-49.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. ———. Who was Bruce-Partington?, (Pondicherry Press monograph series). Pebble Beach, CA: Pondicherry Press, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 27) //

5. ———. Who was Bruce-Partington? Shelburne, Ontario, Sauk City Wisconsin: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. <32>-33) //

6. Smith, Samuel. "The Bruce-Partington Submarine: A Question of Historicity." The Camden House Journal 23, no. 4 (2001): 2-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Cardboard Box (7)

1. Applegate, Debby. The most famous man in America: the biography of Henry Ward Beecher. 1st ed. New York: Doubleday, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2005054842. Includes bibliographical references (p. 495-503) and index //

2. Dumych, Daniel M. Niagara Falls, (Scenes of America). Charleston, SC: Arcadia Pub, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006929700; Scuttlebutt Sept 1996 // "Has fine period photographs of a place mentioned in two Sherlock Holmes stories ('A Study in Scarlet' and 'The Cardboard Box')."

3. ———. Niagara Falls, (Images of America). Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2004114129; Scuttlebutt Sept 1996 // "Has fine period photographs of a place mentioned in two Sherlock Holmes stories ('A Study in Scarlet' and 'The Cardboard Box')."

4. ———. Niagara Falls, (Images of America). Dover, N.H: Arcadia, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96201784; Scuttlebutt Sept 1996 // "Has fine period photographs of a place mentioned in two Sherlock Holmes stories ('A Study in Scarlet' and 'The Cardboard Box')."

5. Gibson, Brian Neil. "Friends, Sherlockians, countrymen, lend me your ears. . . or Holmes, the Ripper and 'The Cardboard Box'." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 2 (1995): 7-10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 41-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Metress, Christopher. "Thinking the Unthinkable: Reopening Conan Doyle's 'Cardboard Box.'." Midwest Quarterly 42, no. 2 (2001): 183.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Explores how the superficiality of reason is exposed in 'The Cardboard Box,' a Sherlock Holmes detective story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Justification made by Doyle about the suppression of 'The Cardboard Box' tale; Core purpose of Doyle's series of Holmes stories; Similarities between the tale's characters, Holmes and Jim Browner.

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Case of Identity (5)

1. Davies, David Stuart. "A Case of Infidelity: Exposing 'A Case of Identity'." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 18-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Dorn, William S. "When Was the Gasfitters' Ball?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 1 (2003): 41-43.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Kestner, Joseph A. "'Real' men: Construction of masculinity in the Sherlock Holmes narratives." Studies in the Literary Imagination 29, no. 1 (1996): 73.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents an analysis of several Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, and his attempt to construct masculinity. Discussion of several of the Holmes narratives about art; Excerpts from 'Copper Beeches,' 'The Empty House' and 'A Case of Identity'; Construction of masculinity; Views on realism.

4. Klinger, Leslie S. James Windibank: The Underestimated Villain. Beverly Hills: Daypark Press, 1994.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Monahan, Eric. "Thoughts on The Case of Identity." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 58-59.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Charles Augustus Milverton (5)

1. Chapman, Paul M. "The Original Charles Augustus." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 27-30.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Linsenmeyer, John. "Why Charles Augustus Milverton Should Be Canonized and Not Cannon-Balled." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 50, no. 1 (2000): 36-40.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Macnee, Angela. "'Charles Augustus Milverton': The Body in the Study." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 69-71.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Shaw, John Bennett. "A Quiz on the Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 3 (1995): 46-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. ———. "A Quiz on the Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 2 (1994): 31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Copper Beeches (5)

1. Chapman, Paul M. "The Woman in Electric Blue, 'The Adventure of the Copper Beeches,' the Sensation Tradition and Wilkie Collins." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 93-101.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Keefauver, Brad. "The Mystery of Violet Hunter." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 13-15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Kellog, Richard. "Whatever Happened to Edward Rucastle?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 55, no. 1 (2005): 54-56.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Kestner, Joseph A. "'Real' men: Construction of masculinity in the Sherlock Holmes narratives." Studies in the Literary Imagination 29, no. 1 (1996): 73.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents an analysis of several Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, and his attempt to construct masculinity. Discussion of several of the Holmes narratives about art; Excerpts from 'Copper Beeches,' 'The Empty House' and 'A Case of Identity'; Construction of masculinity; Views on realism.

5. Stinson, Regina. "Shades of Violet." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 14-15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Written as Violet Hunter

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Creeping Man (2)

1. Bogomoletz, Wladimir V. "The Creeping Man: Some Canonical and Medical Aspects." The Musgrave Papers, no. 12 (1999): 68-76.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Holmes, Bruce. "Sherlock Holmes Predicted AIDS." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 17-19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A discussion of The Adventure of the Creeping Man and Holmes observations on Professor Presbury's injections of monkey serum.

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Crooked Man (7)

1. Case, David, Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, and G. K. Chesterton. Great Detective Stories. Falls Church, VA: Sound Room Publishers, 2001. Sound Recording 2 sound discs (2 hr., 14 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Commuters library. Unabridged. Read by David Case. //

2. ———. Great Detective Stories. Falls Church, VA: Sound Room Publishers/In Audio, 2001. Sound Recording 2 sound discs (2 hr., 14 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Unabridged. Read by David Case. //

3. ———. Great Detective Stories. Falls Church, VA: Sound Room Publishers/In Audio, 2003. Sound Recording; Computer File Date of Entry: 20040514 1 sound disc (2 hrs., 14 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact disc; MP3 format.; System requirements: CD/MP3 player or PC with CD-ROM, sound card, and MP3-compatible playback software. Unabridged. Narrated by David Case. //

4. ———. Great Detective Stories. Falls Church, VA: In Audio/Sound Room Publishers, 2002. Sound Recording 2 sound discs (134 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- digital ; 4 3/4 in. Unabridged classics in audio. Read by David Case. //

5. Chapman, Paul M. "'The Crooked Man': The Depths of Deception." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 71-77.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Crelling, Jack. "Soldiers in The Crooked Man." The Camden House Journal 28, no. 4 (2006): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Healey, Tim. "The Crooked Man Re-visited." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 10-15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Dancing Men (4)

1. Kahn, David. The codebreakers the story of secret writing. Rev. ed. New York: Scribner, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96031318; Scuttlebutt Mar 1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. 985-987) and index // "Widely and wisely regarded as the best book ever written about codes and ciphers, and those who deal with them (including Sherlock Holmes and the dancing men cipher)."

2. Smith, Samuel. "The Source of the Dancing Men." The Camden House Journal 23, no. 11 (2001): 2-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Sugiyama, Shigeru. "Lo, Here Lie Calves! The First 'Dancing Men' Message." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 74-75.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Upton, Jean, and Roger Johnson. "'The Dancing Men': The Emigration of Elsie or What's a Nice Kid Like You Doing in a Place Like This?" The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 37-42.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Devil's Foot (6)

1. "Relations of Literature and Science, 1991-1992." Configurations 2, no. 2 (1994): 373-431.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. Roden, A. E., et al. "Humanism and Values in the Medical Short Stories of Arthur Conan Doyle." South Med J 85 (May 1992): 528-537; Westmoreland, B.F. "Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Bell, and Sherlock Holmes: A Neurologic Connection." Arch Neurol 48 (1991): 325-329.; Oderwald, A. K. "The Physician and Sherlock Holmes." J R Soc Med 84 (1991): 151-152; Roszell, Calvert. "The Devil's Foot and the Dweller at the Threshold." BSJ 41 (1991): 100-103.

2. King, Linda. "Letter to the Editor (The Location of DEVI)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 90-91.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Lithner, Klas. "The Devil's Foot and Hanoi Shan." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 50-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. ———. "Dr. Sterndale's Brothers." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 43-46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Monahan, Eric. "Redruth Revisited." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 133-137.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Tinning, Herbert P. "A Devilish Exegesis, Part V." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 73-75.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Dying Detective (4)

1. Harmidarow, Walter, Doug Wrigglesworth, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf': Reviews of The Scroll of the Dead, The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Dying Detective and Waterloo: a Case-Book on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Historical Play." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 2 (1998): 42-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Richards, Jeffrey. "Review--'The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Dying Detective' edited by Christopher and Barbara Roden." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 68-70.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Sodeman, William A., Jr. "Sherlock Holmes and tropical medicine: A centennial appraisal." American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene 50, no. 1 (1994): 99-101.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Sir Arthur Conan Doyle incorporated an unidentified tropical disease as a murder weapon in the Sherlock Holmes story, "The Dying Detective," written in 1913. Documentary and circumstantial evidence suggests that the disease mentioned was melioidosis. The description of the newly identified disease occurred shortly before Doyle's death. Doyle's other works at the time reflect a consistent interest in tropical disease.

4. Speck, Gordon R. "A Note on Domestic Staples in 'The Dying Detective'." The Camden House Journal 17, no. 2 (1995): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Empty House (8)

1. Felix, Faerthen. "The Hidden Accomplice in 'The Empty House'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 1 (2003): 22-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Fell, Christine. "Review--'I looked in at Mecca...' Musgrave Monograph Number Four' by Anne Jordan." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 40-41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Hall, John. "'The Empty House', All London was Interested." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 15-29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Kestner, Joseph A. "'Real' men: Construction of masculinity in the Sherlock Holmes narratives." Studies in the Literary Imagination 29, no. 1 (1996): 73.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents an analysis of several Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, and his attempt to construct masculinity. Discussion of several of the Holmes narratives about art; Excerpts from 'Copper Beeches,' 'The Empty House' and 'A Case of Identity'; Construction of masculinity; Views on realism.

5. Lithner, Klas. "A Garroter by Trade." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 119-123.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Merrell, David W. "An 'Unwonted Tidiness': Reichenbach Revealed." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 2 (2002): 14-22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Monahan, Eric. "Lhasa at the Turn of the Century." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 33-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Solberg, Andrew L. "What Were Catullus and the Origin of Tree Worship Doing in the Empty House?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 45, no. 1 (1995): 18-23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Engineer's Thumb (3)

1. Batail, Jacques. "The Engineer's Thumb or Sherlock Holmes on the trail of 'the uncanny.'." International Journal of Psycho-Analysis 78, no. 4 (1997): 801-812.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Freud identified 'primal phantasies' (life in the womb, 'primal scene,' seduction, castration). It is argued that 'The Engineer's Thumb,' a short story from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, draws its uncanniness from the fact that it is underpinned by all the primal phantasies described by Freud. 'The Engineer's Thumb' therefore illustrates what analytical interpretation can contribute to the understanding of certain literary works..... In addition, in this short story, Conan Doyle, by setting up a 'talking cure,' anticipates the creation of psychoanalysis and highlights in a striking way certain aspects of what was to become psychoanalytical treatment."

2. Eustace, Grant. "The Engineer's Thumb." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 69-73.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Olding, Alan C. "The Madness of Colonel Warburton (The Engineer's Thumb)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 38-42.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Final Problem (9)

1. "Travel: Grand Tour; Holmes falls for Moriarty (literally)." Independent on Sunday (London), May 5, 2002: 24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Great writers and their adventures in Literature. This week, Arthur Conan Doyle kills off his hero....Arthur Conan Doyle, below, later resurrected his most famous character after protests from fans. Includes a brief biographical sketch of Doyle, an excerpt from "The Final Problem" and tourist information on London and tours to Switzerland.

2. Campbell, Patty. "The young adult perplex: visiting the locale of The Final Problem." Wilson Library Bulletin 62, no. (1987): 66-67.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Davies, David Stuart. "'The Final Problem': Time With Watson." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 103-107.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Geisser, Markus. "The Death of Sherlock Holmes, or the final destination of the Final Problem Reconsidered." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 129-133.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Kehoe, John. "The Case of the Murderous Author." Biography 4, no. 5 (2000): 114.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Focuses on the reasons for the attempts of author Arthur Conan Doyle to kill his fictitious character [sic], Sherlock Holmes. Background of the character's creation and development; Public outcry over the publication of the book 'The Final Problem,' which related Holmes' death."

6. Marriott, Guy, Bob Ellis, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Sherlock Holmes in Switzerland. [London]: The Sherlock Holmes Society of London, (Printed by T & C Printers), 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., map ; 30 cm. Edited by Guy Marriott and Bob Ellis. Contents: My First Trip to Switzerland / Lars Ahlner; The Pass of the Gemmi, and the Baths of Leuk; The Railroad to Reichenbach / John Baesch; Taking the Waters / Catherine Cooke; Canonical Connections / Bernard Davies; Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes and Switzerland / Vincent Delay; Upon the Dating of The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax With Some Observations on the Location of the Hotel National in Lausanne / Vincent Delay; An Alpine Walk / Arthur Conan Doyle; Cutting the Gordian Knot / Alexian Gregory; Two Honey Recipes from Switzerland / Eileen Holman; Meiringen, Meringues and Sherlock Holmes / Peter Horrocks; Albert Einstein - Man of the 20th Century / Peter Jezler; My Name is Peter Steiler / Albert Kunz; Some Notes on the Railways at Zermatt and Meiringen / Guy Marriott; To Climb the Matterhorn / Guy Marriott; Who Was Silas Hocking? / Guy Marriott; The Norwegian Explorers at Meiringen / Julie McKuras; A Final Case of Identity / Michael Meer; A Questionable Picture / Ernst-Harald Mock; Englishmen at Montreux / Patrick Moser; Holmes - The Honeyed Hermit / Reggie Musgrave; So What Happened Next? / Auberon Redfearn; Ex Libris Apis Mellifera / Susan Rice; Who Knew and How Did They Know? / Nicholas Utechin // The Sherlock Holmes Society of London makes occasional "pilgrimages" to sites mentioned in the Holmesian Canon. The 2005 Pilgrimage was to Reichenbach Falls and resulted in this volume of reminiscences, opinions and studies. Map on the back cover traces the trip./ Includes bibliographical references.

7. Meckley, Philip S. "'No Possible Conclusion Could Be More Congenial Than This': Soteriology and Death in 'The Final Problem'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 49, no. 3 (1999): 30-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Meer, Michael A. "'In the Journal de Geneve upon May 6th, 1891': The very final problem?" Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 118-122.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

9. Woods, Carol P. "The Final Final Problem." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 188-190.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Five Orange Pips (7)

1. Edwards, Owen Dudley. "The Five Orange Pips." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 27-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Ewing, Geoff. "The Relationships Between 'Silver Blaze' and 'The Five Orange Pips'." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 1 (2005): 12-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Hall, John. "Pips, pearls and scandal (Notes on the dates of FIVE, SCAN and SIGN)." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 35-39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Hirayama, Yuichi. "The Idle Killers of the KKK." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 95-97.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Hirayama, Yuichi, and John Hall. "Questions on 'The Five Orange Pips'." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 71-74.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Klinger, Leslie S. "The Dating of The Five Orange Pips." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 45, no. 2 (1995): 70-79.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Winer, Lise. "The Five Orange Pips: A Case of Codes." The Camden House Journal 16, no. 12 (1994): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Gloria Scott (3)

1. Crelling, Jack. "The Nautical Holmes -- Some Notes of The Adventure of the Gloria Scott." The Camden House Journal 25, no. 6 (2003): 2-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Klinger, Leslie S. "The Mystery of the 'Gloria Scott'." Passengers' Log 1, no. 1 (1997): 9-10.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Monty, W. Scott, II. "'The Gloria Scott': What It Means to Me, or Don't Knox It 'Till You've Tried It." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 49-55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Golden Pince-Nez (5)

1. Bogomoletz, Wladimir V. "A Russian Golden Pince-Nez: Sergius, Anna, Alexis and the others." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 138-151.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Chapman, Paul M. "'The Golden Pince-Nez' Romantics and Revolutionists." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 89-95.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Christie, Agatha, G. K. Chesterton, Arthur Conan Doyle, Fabio Camero, and Hernando Iván Cano. Tres grandes detectives. Bogotá: Yoyo Libros ; N. Miami Beach, FL ; Yoyo USA [distributor], 2005. Sound Recording 3 sound discs (3 hr.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Digital ; 4 3/4 in. Compact discs. "Unabridged"--Container. "Audio libros : literatura para oir"--Container. Read by Fabio Camero (cd 1) and Hernando Iván Cano (cd 2-3). Uniform Title: Triangle at Rhodes. Spanish. //

4. Silverstein, Albert. "Eros and Death: The True Meaning of the Golden Pince-Nez." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 47, no. 2 (1997): 37-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Speck, Gordon R. "Through the Golden Pince-nez." The Camden House Journal 22, no. 11 (2000): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Greek Interpreter (4)

1. Meyer, Charles A. "An Investigation into the Greek Interpreter." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 55, no. 1 (2005): 43-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Raymond, Trevor S. "The Greek Interpreter: A sort of an introduction." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 1 (2006): 51-55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Rice, Susan. "'The Greek Interpreter': Wag the Dog in the Night-time." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 85-91.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Skinion, Cathrine, and John Skinion. "Sociological Implications of Male Groupings as Exemplified in 'The Greek Interpreter'." The Camden House Journal 15, no. 11 (1993): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- His Last Bow (10)

1. Bird, Margaret, and Sherlock Holmes Society of London. An East wind the east coast expedition of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 4-6 July 1997 : a practical handbook to the setting of His Last Bow. London: Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 131) //

2. Boot, William. "The shop that could not Foyle Holmes." Bookseller, no. 5086 (2003): 19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents the portion of story omitted from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's final volume of Sherlock Holmes stories, 'His Last Bow.'

3. Brady, Michael J. "The Irish Civil War of 1914 In reference to His Last Bow." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 39-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Bruxner, Pamela, and Bob Ellis. Colour it Prussian blue: a day excursion to Retired Colourman and His Last Bow territory, Sunday 4th September 2005. London: Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Burns, Ann, and Theresa Connors. "His Last Bow." Library Journal 125, no. 8 (2000): 168.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the audio tape 'His Last Bow,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

6. Cochran, William R. "Unveiling the Veiled Author of 'His Last Bow'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 4 (2004): 28-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. ———. "When the World Went All Awry: A Brief Discussion of LAST." The Camden House Journal 19, no. 11 (1997): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Gopnik, Adam. "The Big One." New Yorker 80, no. 23 (2004): 78-85.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews books about world wars. The Guns of August, by Barbara Tuchman; Europe's Last Summer, by David Fromkin; Cataclysm: The First World War as Political Tragedy, by David Stevenson. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...It was common in the past century to see the war as a blunder into which the masses were herded like sheep while the poets and philosophers grieved in vain. The new histories suggest that the war was welcomed in 1914, and particularly by the literate classes, as a necessary act of hygiene, a chance to restore seriousness of purpose after the two trivial decades of the Edwardian Belle Epoque. The bourgeois atomization of society--with its pursuit of private pleasures at the expense of common cause, its celebration of goods at the expense of honor--would be repaired by a unifying new national purpose. Chesterton and Sherlock Holmes, in different ways, recapture the mood of dissatisfaction with the bourgeois, the decadent, the trifling, and the petty. (In 'His Last Bow,' Holmes's last adventure, which is set in the summer of 1914, Holmes says to Watson, 'It will be cold and bitter, Watson, and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.') These were not words forced on a pliant population; they were words rising from a dynamic ideology. Even Thomas Mann used the vocabulary sympathetically: war was a moral necessity, 'both a purging and a liberation.' In England, particularly, any vestiges of the era of Wilde would be swept away at last, and the reign of Kipling secured...."

9. Narita, Kei-ichi. "Identifying the Author of 'His Last Bow': Toward a Computational Analysis of the Canon." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 80-96.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. Olding, Alan C. "'All That the Good Zeppelin Promises Us' Baron von Herling -- His Last Bow." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 118-121.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Hound of the Baskervilles (107)

1. "Campus Round-Up." Times Higher Education, 11/20, 2008: 12-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // This section offers news briefs on issues related to higher education in Great Britain as of November 2008....Third-year publishing students at Napier University in Edinburgh, England has republished a new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle's novel 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'...."

2. "Fall 2008 Hardcovers." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 26 (2008): 40-121.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews several books including one from Bloomsbury USA--Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong: Reopening the Case of the Hound of the Baskervilles (Nov., $20) by Pierre Bayard "playfully recreates the classic detective story." 50,000 first printing.

3. "Holmes at his very best in dark tale of a hound from hell." Daily Mail (London), February 20, 2004: 56.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...At the beginning of his investigative career, the denizens of Scotland Yard may have been sceptical. Not any more. 'I saw at once from the reverential way in which Lestrade gazed at my companion that he had learned a great deal since the days when they had first worked together.' In the real world there never has been an amateur detective whose brilliance leaves policemen in a state of perpetual bafflement. Conan Doyle invented the species. Holmes defined the character. A Study in Scarlet defined the genre and The Hound of the Baskervilles developed it to perfection."

4. "L'Affaire du chien des Baskerville." World Literature Today 82, no. 3 (2008): 73-74.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A revew by Warren Motte, University of Colorado, of Pierre Bayard. L’Affaire du chien des Baskerville. Paris. Minuit. 2008. 166 pages. 14.50. isbn 978-2-7073-2021-6. "Having already succored the falsely accused in Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Pierre Bayard now addresses himself to a miscarriage of justice in Conan Doyle. It is the third volume of his 'detective criticism' cycle -- a series of works that seeks to rock the foundations of the genre -- in which Bayard places some of the most renowned and cherished hermeneuts in our fictional culture dramatically on trial...."

5. "Librarians Choose A Century of Good Books." Library Journal 123, no. 19 (1998): 34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents a chart of the 150 best 20th century fiction books voted on by readers of 'Library Journal.' Includes The Hound of the Baskervilles.

6. "A Man of Many Mysteries." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 09/20/, 2000: A24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Focuses on the accusations of writer Rodger Garrick-Steele that novelist Sir Arthur Conan Doyle stole the idea for the 1901 Sherlock Holmes novel 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' from his friend Bertram Fletcher Robinson. Reaction from the Sherlock Holmes Society.

7. "Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong: Reopening the Case of the Hound of the Baskervilles." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 35 (2008): 45-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong: Reopening the Case of the Hound of the Baskervilles," by Pierre Bayard and translated by Charlotte Mandell. Bloomsbury, $20 (208p) ISBN 978-1-59691-605-0. "French literature professor and psychoanalyst Bayard (How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read) returns to the close reading and iconoclastic analysis of classic detective fiction he did in Who Killed Roger Ackroyd? with this audacious revisionist view of one of the best-known mysteries of all time. As always, Bayard playfully counters the ways literary academics read with the way real people read as he explains his theory of 'detective criticism.' Arguing that Sherlock Holmes often drew false conclusions, Bayard picks apart the apparently airtight case Holmes assembled in The Hound of the Baskervilles and offers an alternative solution. He goes a step further than with the Agatha Christie whodunit by suggesting that Holmes erred in his identification not only of the murderer but of the murder victim. Readers may be more impressed with Bayard's cleverness than his tongue-in-cheek arguments, but his logic will lead many to hope that his opinion on who really killed Hamlet's father (in Enquête sur Hamlet) will be translated into English as well."

8. "Sherlock Holmes, Paleographer." Biblical Archaeology Review 30, no. 5 (2004): 19-19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses the fictional [sic] character Sherlock Holmes' activities in paleography as contained in the book "The Hound of the Baskervilles" by Arthur Conan Doyle. Definition of paleography; Excerpt of "The Hound of the Baskervilles" which attests to Holmes as a paleographer.

9. "Was the creator of Sherlock Holmes a scheming poisoner?". Daily Mail (London), July 25, 2005: 72.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...Mr [Spiring] said: ' We're not saying she was necessarily a coconspirator, more of a patsy.' Holmes experts have dismissed the claims as 'bunkum'. Sarah Bromet, a distant relative of Sir [Arthur Conan Doyle], said: 'Even if Mr [Fletcher Robinson] did die in the most horrific way possible, how could you ever prove that Conan Doyle was behind it?' In his book, Mr [Rodger Garrick-Steele], who moved into Park Hill House in the 1980s, claims Sir Arthur colluded with his publishers to deny Mr Robinson recognition for devising the plot and supplying much of the local detail...."

10. "The World of Paperbacks." Contemporary Review 290, no. 1691 (2008): 521-524.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Lists a few titles related to Doyle and Holmes. "Also from Phoenix we have...Andrew Lycett's Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes (GBP10.99) whose hardback edition was hailed in this journal as 'the best and . . . certainly the fullest' biography of the writer...Vintage Classics have brought out Arthur Conan Doyle's famous novel. The Hound of the Baskervilles and have included with it not only the short story, The Adventure of the Speckled Band, which Doyle judged his best story, but an introduction by Ruth Rendell and all for GBP5.99....The life of Arthur Conan Doyle is arguably best seen in his correspondence and Harper Perennial has brought out Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters (GBP12.99), edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley. The review of the hardback edition praised this 'valuable collection', based on Doyle's letters to his mother, letters which were 'frank and revealing'and which showed his 'many and varied interests'...."

11. Arnold, Neala. "Murder & Mystery/Travel & Adventure." School Library Journal 53, no. 7 (2007): 126-126.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the books "Murder & Mystery," adapted by Shannon and Suzette Haden Elgin, illustrated by Mike Vosburg and Dan Spiegle and "Travel & Adventure," adapted by Seymour Reit, illustrated by Ernie Colon and Richard Rockwell. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "Each book includes adaptations of three classic stories that were first printed in Boys' Life. Much-abbreviated versions of The Hound of the Baskervilles, Macbeth, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow appear in Murder. Travel includes The Travels of Marco Polo, Moby-Dick, and Gulliver's Travels. Each one is only about 15 pages long and moves quickly, with little narrative to provide context beyond the dialogue and images. Because of this, some of the selections may be confusing to readers unfamiliar with the original works. The artwork is action-filled and attention-grabbing. Any bloodshed in Murder takes place 'offstage.' Images are well chosen. Lady Macbeth's bloodstained hands and Banquo's ghost are sufficient to create a sense of horror and suspense. The colors and type help to set the mood for each tale. Brief biographical information about the classic writers includes an account of how the work was received during its time. There is at least one inaccuracy: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle could hardly have died before he was born. Overall, these volumes are satisfying additions."

12. Arthur, Joanna. "The Seventeenth Century Hound." The Ritual, no. 18 (1996): 38-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

13. Aykroyd, Clarissa, and Bob Coghill. "The Hound on Stage." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 53-55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

14. Baker, Jody. "Baynes on - Mr. and Mrs. Stapleton." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 139-140.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

15. Bartelt, Kathryn R. "Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong: Reopening the Case of the Hound of the Baskervilles." Library Journal 133, no. 17 (2008): 69-69.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong: Reopening the Case of the Hound of the Baskervilles," by Pierre Bayard, translated by Charlotte Mandell.

16. Batten, Jack. "If Robert Service had written The Hound of the Baskervilles." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 26-29.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

17. Bayard, Pierre. L'affaire du chien des Baskerville, (Paradoxe). Paris: Minuit, 2007.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references. //

18. ———. L'affaire du chien des Baskerville, (Paradoxe). Paris: Minuit, 2008.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 22 cm. //

19. Beare, Geraldine. "'The Hound of the Baskervilles': Background, Inspiration and Connections." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 20-26.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

20. Berdan, Marshall S. "Costa a Little Less Rica - or - How Rodger Stapleton, Jr. Followed in His Father's Footsteps and Made Costa Rica Too Hot to Hold Him." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 36-42.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

21. Black, Elliott M. "Beryl Stapleton." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

22. Brady, James. "Derisive snickers from Europe." Advertising Age 76, no. 40 (2005): 50-50.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents news briefs on the advertising industry as of October 2005. Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...London's Times did a two-page expose suggesting Sherlock Holmes' creator, Conan Doyle, plagiarized 'Hound of the Baskervilles' from Daily Express Editor Fletcher Robinson and may have bumped Fletcher off, 'with a massive dose of laudanum,' in 1907. Fleet Street strikes again!..."

23. Brett, Simon. "Return to Baker Street." Daily Mail (London), October 31, 2003: 58.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "I hadn't touched a copy of The Hound Of The Baskervilles since my schooldays. I had enjoyed it then - which was surprising, since it was an O- level set text - but to reread the book recently was unalloyed pleasure. I was once again immediately immersed in the ghoulish, misty shadows of Dartmoor, and in Sherlock Holmes's race against time to save the new heir to Baskerville Hall from the ghastly fate which had destroyed his predecessors. But while I was reading, I was also deeply struck by how much Conan Doyle had got right by the time this Sherlock Holmes adventure was published in 1902, and by how much his creation has influenced all subsequent crime fiction...."

24. Burke, James. "Barryville or Baskermore? A Clarification of the Facts." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 51, no. 2 (2001): 33-40.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

25. Calamai, Peter. "Despatches from the Moor: Newspapers and The Hound of the Baskervilles." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 51, no. 4 (2001): 5-11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

26. Callan, Paul. "House of Horror on Welsh Border; Hotel of the Baskervilles." The Mirror, July 31, 2001: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Baskerville Hall suddenly looms, grey and gloomy, from the end of an avenue of towering trees. There is an eerie, even forbidding look about the big house - as though it has witnessed something terrible. It is not too surprising. Baskerville Hall - now the Baskerville Hall Hotel, near the Welsh border village of Clyro, and Hay-on-Wye - was the real life country house that featured in Sherlock Holmes's most famous adventure, The Hound of the Baskervilles. The story, which made its author, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, a rich man, is 100 years old...."

27. Cavendish, Richard. "Publication of The Hound of the Baskervilles." History Today 52, no. 3 (2002): 57.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Recalls the publication of the book 'The Hound of the Baskervilles: Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes,' by Arthur Conan Doyle, on March 25, 1902.

28. Chapman, Paul M. "'A Real Creeper': The Hound of the Baskervilles and the Gothic Tradition." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 13-19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

29. Clausson, Nils. "Degeneration, Fin-de-Siecle Gothic, and the Science of Detection: Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and the Emergence of the Modern Detective Story." Journal of Narrative Theory 35, no. 1 (2005): 60-87.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

30. Connor, Neil. "Baskerville Claim Rubbished." Birmingham Post, June 2, 2004: 4.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Claims that one of the most famous Sherlock Holmes' tales had its origins in the Midlands have provoked a furore among tourist officials in Devon. The Hound of of Baskervilles is traditionally known to have been set on the foggy landscapes of Dartmoor. But thriller writer Phil Rickman has caused anger by claiming that Herefordshire may have played an important part in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's story. Speculation about the Midland roots are 50-years-old, but Rickman's claims, which are due to be published in a magazine dedicated to the detective, have also received an angry response from fans of Sherlock Holmes...."

31. Connors, Theresa, and Mark Annichiarico. "Audio reviews." Library Journal 121, no. 6 (1996): 138.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the sound recording 'The Hound of the Baskervilles,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

32. Cook, William. "The dog that barked in the night." New Statesman 130, no. 4568 (2001): 118.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'The Hounds of the Baskervilles,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

33. Cooke, Catherine. "Illustrating the Hound." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 36-44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

34. Cooper, Sam W. "The Curs of the Baskerville." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

35. Dahlinger, Susan E., and Leslie S. Klinger. "Arthur Conan Doyle, Fletcher Robinson & The Hound." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 7-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

36. Darling, Donald. "Some Thoughts on The Hound of the Baskervilles." The Camden House Journal 27, no. 7 (2005): 2-7.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

37. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--'The Oxford Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of the Baskervilles,' edited with an introduction by W. W. Robson." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 55-56.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

38. ———. "Suspense in The Hound of the Baskervilles." The Ritual, no. 15 (1995): 3-7.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

39. Doyle, Arthur Conan. Le chien des Baskerville, (La bibliothèque Gallimard .; Texte & dossier). Paris: Gallimard, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Traduction et lecture accompagnée par Jean-Pierre Naugrette. //

40. Dunn, Dave. "From Reading The Hound of the Baskervilles -- A Bootmaker Reflects." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

41. ———. "If Edgar Allen Poe had written The Hound of the Baskervilles." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 46-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

42. Folsom, Henry T. "The Dating of The Hound of the Baskervilles." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 68-71.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

43. Frank, Lawrence. "The Hound of the Baskervilles, the Man on the Tor, and a metaphor for the mind." Nineteenth-Century Literature 54, no. 3 (1999): 336.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Examines a dramatization of a nineteenth-century debate between opposing naturalistic accounts of the human mind reflected in The Hound of Baskervilles, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Influence of Darwinian thought on the 'Man of the Tor' episode; Metaphor of mind offered by the episode; Association of enlightenment rationalism with Romantic consciousness.

44. Frayling, Christopher. "The Greatest Shaggy Dog." Independent on Sunday (London), July 1, 2001: 8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The Hound of the Baskervilles is 100 years old. Now recognised as a classic, this Sherlock Holmes crime caper has never lost its bite. What gives the novel its enduring appeal? Christopher Frayling investigates."

45. ———. Nightmare the birth of horror. London: BBC Books, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 216-221) and index; Scuttlebutt Feb 1997 // "Was published to accompany the BBC mini-series that was broadcast and it's far more than merely a repeat of the material in the television shows: Frayling explores Frankenstein, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and The Hound of the Baskervilles, and offers new information on the genesis of the Dartmoor tale, and some splendid illustrations, including (for the first time) the first page of Chapter XI of the manuscript, and B. Fletcher Robinson's inscription in the copy of the first edition of the book he presented to coachman Harry Baskerville 'with apologies for using the name!'"

46. Garrick-Steele, Rodger, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The House of the Baskervilles. Bloomington, Ind.: 1st books library, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 597-603) // An editor of the Express newspaper, Bertram Fletcher Robinson, wrote a story, 'An Adventure on Dartmoor,' which may be the original tale Doyle turned into The Hound of the Baskervilles. Garrick-Steele speculates on Doyle's career, postulating plagiarism, adultery, blackmail, and murder in the career of Holmes's creator

47. Gelly, Christophe. Le chien des Baskerville : Poètique du roman policier chez Conan Doyle, (Collection Champ anglophone). Lyon: PUL. Presses universitaires de Lyon, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [199]-205). //

48. Glowka, Arthur Wayne, Megan Melancon, Adrian Fairchild, Leona Gray, Zachary Haley, Niyatee Kher, Holly Leskovics, Leah Stanley, and Danielle C. Wyckoff. "Among the New Words." American Speech 78, no. 1 (2003): 93-102.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents new words or phrases in the English language. Among them is one that references Doyle. Baskerville effect; Hound of the Baskervilles effect n [from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles] Death caused by fear 2001 Dec 24 Washington Post A7 (Lexis-Nexis) In Mandarin, Cantonese and Japanese, the words 'death' and 'four' are pronounced nearly identically. As a result, the number four causes anxiety and stress among many Chinese and Japanese.... The researchers found there were 13 percent more deaths from heart attacks among Americans of Chinese and Japanese descent on the fourth day of the month than would have been expected....'We call this mortality peak the 'Baskerville effect,'' the researchers wrote in the Dec. 22-29 issue of British Medical Journal [sic]. 2002 Jan 7 Cheryl Clark San Diego Union-Tribune B1 (Lexis-Nexis) His paper, published last month in the British Medical Journal [sic], is titled 'The Hound of the Baskervilles Effect: Natural Experiment on the Influence of Psychological Stress on Timing of Death.' Mar 4 Bill Hendrick Atlanta Journal-Constitution 1C (Lexis-Nexis) Phillips and his colleagues dubbed their finding 'the Hound of the Baskervilles effect,' and it was published under that title in the respected British Medical Journal [sic].

49. Grant, Graham. "Could Sherlock Holmes' creator also be a killer?; Expert claims Conan Doyle stole classic plot then murdered real author." Daily Mail (London), July 26, 2008: 47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // It has all the ingredients you would expect of a classic Sherlock Holmes story. A national newspaper editor dies suddenly and a knight of the realm is suspected of his murder, triggered by infidelity, blackmail and fear of exposure. But according to one psychologist, author and Holmes enthusiast, this is no fictional plot - and the killer was none other than Holmes' Edinburgh-born creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Dr Rodger Garrick-Steele claims Sir Arthur stole the idea for his most famous Holmes novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles, from his friend Fletcher Robinson - then had him poisoned when he threatened to reveal the truth...."

50. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "The Hound of the Baskervilles, Part One." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 25, no. 3 (2001): 85-91.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

51. ———. "The Hound of the Baskervilles, Part Two." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 25, no. 4 (2002): 123-128.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

52. Hall, John. "The Curse of the Baskervilles." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 56-61.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

53. ———. "A Writer's Notes on the Hound." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 27-28.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

54. Hargan, Jim. "Dartmoor of the Baskervilles." British Heritage 19, no. 5 (1998): 52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Provides information on the hounds of Dartmoor, with reference to The Hound of the Baskervilles. When Conan Doyle first heard about the hounds; Folk tales surrounding the hounds of Dartmoor; How Conan Doyle set about writing a book about this folk tale; Places of interest in Dartmoor.

55. Harper, Jennifer, and the Washington Times. "Writer pegs author of Sherlock Holmes as plagiarist, killer; 'Baskervilles' claim irks Doyle devotes." The Washington Times, October 03, 2000: A2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "What's this? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle . . . a murderer? The plot has thickened considerably for those who cherish the clever civility of Sherlock Holmes, celebrated detective and pipe- puffing icon. His creator has been accused of murder - along with mischief, plagiarism, deception and some hanky-panky, too. Doyle would be mortified, most likely, to learn that a fellow Englishman believed he stole the plot for 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' from another writer, then poisoned that very writer and ran off with his wife back in 1907. But this is what researcher Rodger Garrick-Steele believes, and he has been accumulating circumstantial evidence for 11 years...."

56. Healy, Philip. "A busman and his holiday." Adults Learning 20, no. 3 (2008): 24-25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article describes how summer school from the perspective of both tutor and learner confirms adult learning and its role in civil society. Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. "...This year I've seen the summer school from both sides: as tutor and as student. In July, I taught a course on late Victorian and Edwardian detective stories in Oxford, and in August I attended the Greek and Latin summer workshop at University of Wales, Lampeter. This is the story of a busman and his holiday. 'The Oxford Experience' summer school, run by the University's Department for Continuing Education, is held at Christ Church. There were a dozen students from around the world in my class, including a German crime writer, who kept me on my toes as I led the week's discussion on the detective story. Most had done their preparatory reading -- The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Oxford Book of Victorian Detective Stories, an anthology of stories by Conan Doyle's contemporaries and precursors....No discussion of the late Victorian and Edwardian detective story is complete without recognising the material role played by magazine publishing and advertising. We looked at copies of The Strand from 1891, which first published the individual stories of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. There is a tremendous immediacy in handling these original magazines, not least in the illustrations and the amusing language of advertisements circa 1890. The Hound of the Baskervilles exists for most of us on screen as much as on the page. We looked at three film and TV adaptations -- the Basil Rathbone version of 1939, the 1965 Peter Cushing version, and the 2002 BBC version with Richard Roxburgh. Each adapted the story to the cinematic conventions of its day, the dramatic opening of the recent BBC adaptation being in the style of contemporary forensic crime series....In reading The Hound of the Baskervilles, we noted that the first third of the book is set in London, with the rest of the action taking place on Dartmoor, and how Conan Doyle uses this to mythic effect. The civilisation of the city is under constant threat from the elemental forces of evil. We are reminded of this in contemporary terms by the escaped convict on the moors, in historical terms by the account of Hugo Baskerville and the legend of the hound, and in prehistoric terms by the landscape itself, with its unforgiving rocky outcrops and the treacherous Grimpen Mire. The last even suggests the primordial soup from which life emerges just as it is also tile cause of death for so many creatures, including, of course, the villain, Stapleton. Evolution may have thrown up the intelligence of a Sherlock Holmes, but the battle for the survival of civilisation, so the myth intimates, never ends. We came to this view after one class member described the Dartmoor section as having a 'spiritual' quality. She was responding, it transpired, to the book's stark nature symbolism, which gives it an authority far beyond that achieved by its fast-paced derring-do narrative...."

57. Heptonstall, Geoffrey. "The English novel in the twentieth century: 5--John Fowles." Contemporary Review 268, no. 1564 (1996): 262.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Describes the life and works of literary author John Fowles. Education; Career history; Achievements; Comments on the essays 'The Tree' and 'Islands'; Debut novel 'The Collector'; Critique of Conan Doyle's 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'; 'The Magus'; 'Daniel Martin.'

58. Hirayama, Yuichi. "Book Review (The Hound of Baskerville)." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 150-161.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

59. ———. "The Hound Commentary in Japan." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 15-22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

60. Hobbs, Don. "Review--The Hound of the Baskervilles: Hunting the Dartmoor Legend by Philip Weller." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 4 (2001): 17, 24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

61. Hollyer, Cameron. "The Footnotes of a Gigantic Hound." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 14-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of The Hound of the Baskervilles from The Oxford Sherlock Holmes.

62. Hunt, A. Godfrey. "The Dartmoor Map: What can the Illustration tell us?" Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 48-49.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

63. ———. "The Influence of West Wickham Court on the Description of Baskerville Hall." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 118-120.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

64. ———. "Lighting Baskerville Hall." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 16-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

65. ———. "Twenty-three Hotels Cartwright Investigated." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 91-92.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

66. ———. "Walking Speeds in the Dartmoor Region." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 174-176.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

67. Hyder, William. "Scraps for the Hound." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 45-55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

68. Kean, Michael H. "The Hound of the Baskervilles: Wine, Women, and Song." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 51, no. 3 (2001): 34-40.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

69. Kinsella, Eileen. "The Case of the Scarce Dust Jacket." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 10/16/98, 1998: W14.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Provides information on the first edition of The Hound of the Baskervilles.

70. Klinger, Leslie S. The Search for Baskerville Hall. Beverly Hills: Daypark Press, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

71. Le Page, Sebastian. "The Hound is Cursed." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 74-75.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

72. McCaffery, Laura Hibbets. "Growing the literacy collection." Wilson Library Bulletin 69, no. (1995): 46-8+.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A list of recreational and informational materials from the past few years for adult new readers, ESL students, and family literacy programs. Includes The Hound of the Baskervilles, adapted by Murray Shaw. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda/Lerner, 1993. 104p. $13.13 lib.bdg., pa$4.95. 0-87614-717-1, 0-87614-556-X. (Match Wits with Sherlock Holmes, 8). Fry Reading Level 6. "All the flavor of the Arthur Conan Doyle original remains in this easy-to-read, fast-paced adaptation."

73. McLemee, Scott. "Losing Friends and Influencing People." Chronicle of Higher Education 48, no. 19 (2002): A12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Profiles intellectual historian Richard Wolin. Criticisms on his book 'Heidegger's Children: Hannah Arendt, Karl Lowith, Hans Jonas, and Herbert Marcuse'; Interest in cultural criticism; List of philosophical works. Includes references to Doyle. "...Inspired by Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, in which Sir Charles Baskerville's fear of the hound leads him to die of a heart attack, David P. Phillips, a professor of sociology, and colleagues investigated whether fear could create a spike in death rates. They analyzed computerized death certificates of more than 47 million Americans who died from 1973 to 1998. The researchers were particularly interested in whether more Americans of Chinese or Japanese descent died of heart attacks on the fourth day of the month, because of superstitions many have inherited about the number four. (The Mandarin, Cantonese, and Japanese words for "four" bear nearly the same pronunciation as the words for "death.") Sure enough, cardiac deaths were 7.3 percent higher on the fourth day than on the other days of the first week of any month among Chinese- and Japanese-Americans, but not among whites, the researchers wrote in the British Medical Journal last month. For Chinese- and Japanese-Americans with chronic heart problems (like Conan Doyle's Sir Charles) the increase was even greater: 13 percent higher on the fourth day than on other days. Mr. Phillips calls the increase the "Baskerville effect." Finding a suitable real-life trigger for the Baskerville effect was not easy, reports Mr. Phillips. The trigger had to cause psychological stress among one group of people but not another without creating physical danger or changes in medical service. A lab test was untenable, the researchers write: "Doyle's intuition is consistent with many laboratory studies, which show cardiovascular changes following psychological stress. However, for ethical reasons, only nonfatal stressors can be studied in the laboratory. ..."

74. McPherson, Lynn. "Sherlock Holmes Author 'Killed His Rival'." Sunday Mail, July 27, 2008: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It reads like the plot from one of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes novels. A top writer steals the idea for his most famous novel from a friend - then has him killed. But Holmes enthusiast Dr Rodger Garrick-Steele is convinced that's exactly what the legendary Scots writer did a century ago. He claims Conan Doyle stole the outline of The Hound Of The Baskervilles from his friend, former Daily Express editor Fletcher Robinson. And when Robinson threatened to expose the author, Conan Doyle had him poisoned...."

75. McVeigh, Tracy. "Sleuth calls for Conan Doyle's love rival to be dug from grave: Behind the fictions penned by the creator of Sherlock Holmes lies a bizarre literary tale of intrigue and mystery." The Observer, October 15, 2000: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Was Britain's greatest crime-writer and creator of the world's best-known detective novel also a killer and adulterer? The allegations have been dismissed as 'ludicrous' by the Sherlock Holmes Society, but now author Rodger Garrick-Steele is hoping to prove his case beyond doubt with the proceeds of a film planned on the subject. For 11 years he has gathered evidence to show that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle actually poisoned a man whose work he then plagiarised. The modern-day sleuth plans to have the alleged victim's body exhumed and tested to prove his theory...."

76. Mendick, Robert. "Was Conan Doyle a Killer and a Thief?; Scotland Yard Detectives to Investigate Allegation of Dark Secret Behind the Greatest of Sherlock Holmes' Mysteries." The Independent (London), September 10, 2000: 3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "'When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' Now the enduring maxim of that most cerebral of detectives Sherlock Holmes is being put to the test. It is a mystery as dark as any of those for which his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is so justly celebrated - or is he? For Scotland Yard detectives are to investigate the death, almost a century ago, of a close acquaintance of the writer - and the man accused of murder is Conan Doyle himself. And the motive? According to the research, he stole the work, The Hound of the Baskervilles - and then poisoned the true author to cover up the plagiarism...."

77. Miller, Andrew. "Books: I wish I'd written...; Andrew Miller on Conan Doyle's masterpiece." The Guardian (London), September 12, 1998: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Few novels create an atmosphere of desperate adventure as compellingly as Conan Doyle's little masterpiece The Hound of the Baskervilles. Not a moment is lost in propelling us into the mystery of Sir Charles Baskerville's sudden death amid the eerie grandeur of Dartmoor, and in the following 174 pages there is enough adventure and derring-do for a book twice its length...."

78. Monahan, Eric. "Baskerville Hall." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 29-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

79. Morrell, David, and Hank Wagner. Thrillers : 100 must-reads. 1st ed. Longboat Key, FL: Oceanview Pub., 2010.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 24 cm. Welcome to the world of thrillers / by David Hewson -- One hundred must-read thrillers / by David Morrell, Hank Wagner -- Theseus and the Minotaur (1500 B.C.) / Lee Child -- Homer's The Iliad and the Odyssey (7th century B.C.) / William Bernhardt -- Beowulf (between 700 and 1000 A.D.) / Andrew Klavan -- William Shakespeare's Macbeth (1605-1606) / A.J. Hartley -- Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719-1722) / David Liss -- Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or, The modern Prometheus (1818) / Gary Braver -- James Fenimore Cooper's The last of the Mohicans (1826) / Rick Wilber -- Edgar Allan Poe's The narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838) / Katherine Neville -- Alexandre Dumas' The count of Monte Cristo (1845) / Francine Mathews -- Wilkie Collins's The woman in white (1860) / Douglas Preston -- H. Rider Haggard's King Solomons mines (1885) / Norman L. Rubenstein -- Robert Louis Stevenson's The strange case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde (1886) / Sarah Langan -- Anthony Hope's The prisoner of Zenda (1894) / Michael Palmer -- Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) / Carole Nelson Douglas -- H.G. Wells's The war of the worlds (1898) / Steven M. Wilson -- Rudyard Kipling's Kim (1901) / Tom Grace -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The hound of the Baskervilles (1901) / Laura Benedict -- Joseph Conrad's Heart of darkness (1902) / H. Terrell Griffin -- Erskine Childers's The riddle of the sands (1903) / Christine Kling -- Jack London's The sea wolf (1904) / Jim Fusilli -- Baroness Emma Orczy's The scarlet pimpernel (1905) / Lisa Black -- Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan of the apes (1912) / W. Craig Reed -- Marie Belloc Lowndes's The lodger (1913) / James A. Moore -- John Buchan's The thirty-nine steps (1915) / Janet Berliner -- E. Phillips Oppenheim's The great impersonation (1920) / Justin Scott -- Richard Connell's "The most dangerous game" (1924) / Katherine Ramsland -- W. Somerset Maugham's Ashenden, or, the British agent (1928) / Melodie Johnson Howe -- P.G. Wodehouse's Summer lightning (1929) / R.L. Stine -- Edgar Wallace's King Kong (1933) / Kathleen Sharp -- Lester Dent's Doc Savage : the man of bronze (1933) / Mark T. Sullivan -- James M. Cain's The postman always rings twice (1934) / Joe R. Lansdale -- Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca (1938) / Allison Brennan -- Agatha Christie's And then there were none (1939) / David Morrell -- Eric Ambler's A coffin for Dimitrios (1939) / Ali Karim -- Geoffrey Household's Rogue male (1939) / David Morrell -- Helen Macinnes's Above suspicion (1941) / Gayle Lynds -- Cornell Woolrich's "Rear Window" (1942) / Thomas F. Monteleone -- Vera Caspary's Laura (1943) / M.J. Rose -- Kenneth Fearing's The big clock (1946) / Lincoln Child -- Graham Greene's The third man (1950) / Rob Palmer -- Patricia Highsmith's Strangers on a train (1950) / David Baldacci -- Mickey Spillane's One lonely night (1951) / Max Allan Collins -- Jim Thompson's The killer inside me (1953) / Scott Nicholson -- Ernest K. Gann's The high and the mighty (1953) / Ward Larsen -- Jack Finney's Invasion of the body snatchers (1955) / James Rollins -- Hammond Innes's The wreck of the Mary Deare (1956) / Matt Lynn -- Ian Fleming's From Russia, with love (1957) / Raymond Benson -- Alistair MacLean's The guns of Navarone (1957) / Larry Gandle -- Richard Condon's The Manchurian candidate (1959) / Robert S. Levinson -- Len Deighton's The IPCRESS file (1962) / Jeffery Deaver -- Fletcher Knebel & Charles W. Bailey's Seven days in May (1962) / James Grady -- Lionel Davidson's The rose of Tibet (1962) / Milton C. Toby -- Richard Stark's (Donald E. Westlake's) The hunter aka Point blank (1962) Duane Swierczynski -- John le Carré's The spy who came in from the cold (1963) / Denise Hamilton -- Wilbur Smith's When the lion feeds (1964) / W.D. Gagliani -- Evelyn Anthony's The rendezvous (1967) / Sandra Brown -- Michael Crichton's The Andromeda strain (1969) / Josh Conviser -- James Dickey's Deliverance (1970) / Terry Watkins -- Frederick Forsyth's The day of the jackal (1971) / F. Paul Wilson -- Brian Garfields's Death wish (1972) / John Lescroart -- David Morrell's First blood (1972) / Steve Berry -- Trevanian's The Eiger sanction (1972) / Lee Goldberg -- Charles McCarry's The tears of autumn (1974) / Hank Wagner -- Peter Benchley's Jaws (1974) / P.J. Parrish -- William Goldman's Marathon man (1974) /Hank Wagner -- James Grady's Six days of the condor (1974) / Mark Terry -- Jack Higgins's The eagle has landed (1975) / Zoë Sharp -- Joseph Wambaugh's The choirboys (1975) / James O. Born -- Clive Cussler's Raise the Titanic! (1976) / Grant Blackwood -- Ira Levin's The boys from Brazil (1976) / Daniel Kalla -- Robin Cook's Coma (1977) / CJ Lyons -- Ken Follett's Eye of the needle (1978) / Tess Gerritsen -- Ross Thomas's Chinaman's chance (1978) / John D. MacDonald's The green ripper (1079) / J.A. Konrath -- Justin Scott's The shipkiller (1079) / Lawrence Light -- Robert Ludlum's The Bourne identity (1980) / Linda L. Richards -- Eric Van Lustbader's The ninja (1980) / J.D. Rhoades -- Thomas Harris's Red dragon (1981) / Bev Vincent -- Jack Ketchum's Off season (1981) / Blake Crouch -- Thomas Perry's The butcher's boy (1982) / Robert Liparulo -- Tom Clancy's The hunt for red October (1984) / Chris Kuzneski -- F. Paul Wilson's The tomb (1984) / Heather Graham -- Andrew Vachss's Flood (1985) / Barry Eisler -- Stephen King's Misery (1987) / Chris Mooney -- Nelson DeMille's The charm school (1988) / J.T. Ellison -- Dean Koontz's Watchers (1988) / Lee Thomas -- Katherine Neville's The eight (1988) / Shirley Kennett -- Petrer Straub's Koko (1988) / Hank Wagner -- Johns Grisham's The firm (1991) / M. Diane Vogt -- R.L. Stine's Silent night (1991) / Jon Land -- James Patterson's Along came a spider (1992) / Mary SanGiovanni -- Stephen Hunter's Point of impact (1993) / Christopher Rice -- Johns Lescroart's The 13th juror (1994) / Karna Small Bodman -- Sandra Brown's The witness (1995) / Deborah LeBlanc -- David Baldacci's Absolute power (1996) / Rhodi Hawk -- Gayle Lynds's Masquerade (1996) / Hank Phillippi Ryan -- Lee Child's Killing floor (1997) / Marcus Sakey -- Jeffery Deaver's The bone collector (1997) / Jeffrey J. Mariotte -- Dan Brown's The Da Vinci code (2003) / Steve Berry. Includes index. [edited by] David Morrell and Hank Wagner. // Through essays contributed by modern thriller writers such as David Baldacci, Lee Child, Sandra Brown, and many others, this book explores 100 works of suspense from the ancient world to modern times.

80. Moss, Robert A. "Old Frankland: A Case of Identity." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 1 (2002): 27-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

81. Niver, Harold E. "The Hound and I." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 65-67.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

82. Paton, Jennie C. "The Hound: Theatre of the Imination." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 68-72.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

83. Pugh, Brian W. "The Weather and Atmosphere of Dartmoor in the Hound." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 132-135.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

84. Richardson, David. "The Crank on the Moor: The Legacy of Mr. Frankland." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 3 (2003): 22-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

85. ———. "The Crank on the Moor: The Legacy of Mr. Frankland." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 3 (2002): 13-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

86. ———. "How Watson Raised the Lantern." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 21-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Written as Mr. Frankland.

87. ———. "The Year of the Hound Continues." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 2 (2001): 7-9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

88. Rossakis, Constantine. "The First Colonial Hound: A Centenary Discovery." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 3 (2003): 17-21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

89. Salvatori, Gianlucca. "The Blessing of the Baskervilles." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 199-200.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

90. Saville, Guy. "The War of the Baskervilles; the World's Best-Known Detective Story is 100 Years Old this Summer, and so is a Dark Controversy about Who Actually Wrote It." The Independent (London), July 11, 2001: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...As the celebrations of the book's centenary gather pace (other highlights include expeditions and enactments on Dartmoor, numerous new books on Conan Doyle, even a spoof version by Spike Milligan), a dark suspicion overshadows them: that its creation involved literary foul play...."

91. Scott, James. "Happy anniversary: the Hound of the Baskervilles." The Sunday Herald, March 3, 2002: 9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It's one hundred years since Arthur Conan Doyle resurrected his hero Sherlock Holmes for the spine-chilling The Hound Of The Baskervilles. James Scott investigates the origins of a classic."

92. Seskus, Tony. "Did Sir Arthur turn his hand to real murder on Dartmoor?" Daily Mail (London), September 11, 2000: 32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Its demonic appearance and massive, slavering jaws struck terror into the hearts of the unfortunate Baskerville family, providing Sherlock Holmes with one of his most famous cases. But real-life detectives have now been drafted in to investigate claims that the man who provided the inspiration for The Hound of the Baskervilles was murdered by Holmes's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Author Rodger Garrick-Steele claims Edinburgh-born Doyle stole the story from Victorian journalist Bertram Fletcher Robinson, who was denied any recognition for his work. Mr Garrick-Steele 58, a psychologist who spent 11 years researching his latest book, claims Doyle then murdered his 36-year-old friend to prevent the truth coming to light....The Sherlock Holmes Society dismissed the poisoning theory as 'complete bunkum' but Doyle expert Christopher Frayling, rector of the Royal College of Art, said: 'If the evidence is properly sourced, I cannot wait to read it.'"

93. Spano, Susan. "At home on the moors." New York Times, June 8, 1997: 6.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Provides information on the experience of the author, who visited the wild uplands of Dartmoor National Park in the West Country of England, said to be frequented by pixies and ghosts. History of the park; How it was depicted in the book 'Hound of Baskervilles,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. INSET: The bottom line.

94. Stinson, Regina. "To Laura Lyons." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 6 (2002): 23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

95. Taylor-Ide, Jesse Oak. "Ritual and the Liminatily of Sherlock Holmes in The Sign of Four and The Hound of the Baskervilles." English Literature in Transition (1880-1920) 48, no. 1 (2005): 55-70.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

96. Thoms, Peter. Detection & its designs: narrative & power in 19th-century detective fiction. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97035273. Includes bibliographical references (p. 169-174) and index // "The author uses Conan Doyle as one of several early detective-fiction authors, and devotes a chapter to "The Hound of the Baskervilles".

97. Trump, Simon. "Conan Doyle Accused of Baskerville Betrayal." The Toronto Star, September 11, 2000: E 07.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Rodger Garrick-Steele, a writer from Dawlish, Devon, has spent 11 years researching a new book on [Arthur Conan Doyle]'s relationship with Bertram Fletcher Robinson, a journalist and the largely unsung co- author of The Hound Of The Baskervilles. He claims Conan Doyle colluded with his publishers to deny Fletcher Robinson recognition for devising the plot and supplying much of the local detail. Christopher Frayling, rector of the Royal College of Art and an authority on Conan Doyle, also believes Fletcher Robinson was unfairly treated...." Article also appeared in the Ottawa Citizen the previous day.

98. ———. "Murderer of the Baskervilles: British author claims Sherlock Holmes' creator committed murder to cover up fact that he was helped by another writer. Simon Trump reports." The Ottawa Citizen, September 10, 2000: A9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It is a mystery worthy of Sherlock Holmes himself. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the fictional detective, has been accused of betraying a fellow author to conceal the true authorship of one of his greatest works. Rodger Garrick-Steele, a writer from Dawlish, Devon, has spent 11 years researching a new book on Conan Doyle's relationship with Bertram Fletcher Robinson, a journalist and the largely unsung co- author of The Hound of the Baskervilles. He claims Mr. Conan Doyle colluded with his publishers to deny Mr. Fletcher Robinson recognition for devising the plot and supplying much of the local detail...."

99. Walch, Abigail, Christie Aschwanden, Ramin Ganeshram, Maureen Kennedy, Elizabeth Krieger, Sara Schmidt, and Martha Scribner. "Healthy News." Health 16, no. 4 (2002): 23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents updates on several studies related to health as of May 2001. Association of superstition with heart attacks; Measures that can be considered in preventing depression; Role of Lowering one's cholesterol in improving one's mood. Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "Breaking a mirror could result in more than bad luck. New research suggests that the stress associated with deeply held superstitious beliefs can trigger fatal heart attacks, especially in people with heart disease. Researchers from the University of California at San Diego studied more than 47 million death certificates from over 15 years and discovered that among Chinese and Japanese Americans, fatal heart attacks peaked significantly on the fourth day of the month, the equivalent of Friday the 13th in Chinese and Japanese cultures. No similar pattern in heart fatalities was found among Anglo subjects; the researchers suppose this could be because beliefs about unlucky numbers are taken more seriously in Chinese and Japanese cultures. The team has dubbed this scared-to-death phenomenon the 'Baskerville effect'--for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous Sherlock Holmes novel The Hound of the Baskervilles, in which the character Sir Charles dies of a heart attack induced by fright...."

100. Wallace, Arminta. "The hounding of Arthur Conan Doyle You have been warned. The 100th anniversary of the publication of The Hound of the Baskervilles is the excuse for a major Sherlock Holmes fest." The Irish Times, August 18, 2001: 63.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...Even now, the centenary of its publication is at the centre of a major Holmes fest. Penguin Books is bringing out a series of five Holmes stories, complete with new introductions by such literary luminaries as Peter Ackroyd and Iain Sinclair, along with a new biography of Arthur Conan Doyle. There will be - you have been warned - enactments on Dartmoor. But the shadow of the supernatural is not the only shadow which hangs over The Hound of the Baskervilles. Arguments have long raged over the book's authorship, and have surfaced again in the English papers this month. Did Conan Doyle write it himself, or was it a collaboration with another writer who was, following its enormous success, simply elbowed out of the way?..."

101. Wellendowd, Violet. "A Sonnet for Stapleton: 'I was a Baskerville'." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 5 (2001): 44.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

102. Weller, Philip. "The Greeks Had Several Words for it. A Knoxian Analysis of the Hound of the Baskervilles." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 85-90.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

103. Weller, Philip, Edward Hardwicke, and Bryan Harper. The hound of the Baskervilles hunting the Dartmoor legend : being the original text of the classic story. Devon England: Devon Books, 2001.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references (p. 237-243) // "The book includes the full text from The Strand Magazine, and a major new study by Philip Weller of the historical, geographical, and literary background to the story, illustrated with 100 historic and contemporary photographs, and a foreword by Edward Hardwicke."

104. White, Kathryn. "Gothic Elements in The Hound of the Baskervilles." The Ritual, no. 15 (1995): 13-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

105. Wiseman, Richard. "How We Discover the Big Truths in Small Things." Skeptic 13, no. 4 (2007): 24-31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article discusses various magical and superstitious beliefs in the U.S. Mention is made of the "Baskerville effect", a label for cardiac death. "Nevertheless, Phillips and his team are confident that something strange is happening, and named the alleged effect after Charles Baskerville, a character in the Arthur Conan Doyle story The Hound of the Baskervilles, who suffers a fatal heart attack from extreme psychological stress."

106. Woods, Paula L. "Book Review; He's hounding Sherlock Holmes." Los Angeles Times, November 30, 2008: F11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Expanding the scope of the 'detective criticism' he began in 2000's 'Who Killed Roger Ackroyd? The Mystery Behind the Agatha Christie Mystery,' French literature professor and psychoanalyst Pierre Bayard turns his attention to another canonical text of the genre, Arthur Conan Doyle's 'The Hound of the Baskervilles.' In 'Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong' (Bloomsbury: 196 pp., $20), Bayard analyzes 'the way the facts are presented, accepting no testimony without reservation and systematically calling into question everything' in and outside of the text...."

107. Yates, Donald A. "A Vindication of Stapleton." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 2 (2002): 40-46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Illustrious Client (13)

1. Aiken, Bruce. "Some Comments of Vitriol and Some Vitriolic Comments on ILLU." The Serpentine Muse 15, no. 3 (1999): 14-18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Bengtsson, Hans-Uno. "'It Needs Careful Handling'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 82-90.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some thoughts and observations on The Adventure of the Illustrious Client and Dr. Watson's 24-hour cramming on Chinese porcelain as a part of the tale.

3. Cirone, Nino. "The Importance of Being Illustrious or Would the Real Illustrious Client Please Stand Up." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 1 (2003): 5-11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Clifford, Carolyn M. "'A loyal friend and a chivalrous gentleman': The Illustrious Client -- Identified at Last." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 3 (2004): 14-25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Dahlinger, Susan E. "Of 'The Illustrious Client'." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 73 (1993): 12-15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Edwards, Owen Dudley. "Forensic Evidence from the Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes." Discover NLS--Collections, Research, News and Events at the National Library of Scotland, no. 3 (2006): 14-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Renowned Conan Doyle scholar Owen Dudley Edwards dissects a recently acquired treasure and reveals the deft editorial surgery at work behind one of the writer's last Sherlock Holmes stories, 'The Illustrious Client.'"

7. Elliott, Philip. "The Illustrious Client Revealed, or The Chivalrous Gentleman of Windsor." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 2 (2003): 20-22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Hirayama, Yuichi. "The Illustrious Client." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 63-65.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

9. ———. "Who was 'The Illustrious Client'?" Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 33-35.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. Mason, Bill. "A Tale From the Crypt: Unearthing The Illustrious Client in Dracula." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 2 (2003): 24-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

11. Solberg, Andrew L. "The Intertwining Chronologies of The Illustrious Client and The Red Circle." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 28-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some observations on the chronology of these two adventures and their overlapping nature.

12. Webb, Keith E. "Baron Gruner Receives an Answer." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 6-7.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

13. Winer, Lise. "'A Master and a Mister of Disguise' A Musing on 'The Adventure of the Illustrious Client." The Camden House Journal 19, no. 4 (1997): 2-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Lady Frances Carfax (4)

1. Brocklebank, Jonathan. "What price Conan Doyle? An elementary GBP250,000." Daily Mail (London), June 7, 2008: 41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "The slim volume contains only 28 pages and the story told on them is far from the author's most celebrated. But the 97-year-old manuscript in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's own meticulous hand went on sale yesterday for [pounds]250,000. The short story, The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax, is one of 56 Sherlock Holmes mysteries written by the Edinburgh-born author, but manuscripts in his handwriting are rare and highly prized. The tale comes a long way down the list of favourite Sherlock Holmes adventures but experts say the handwritten text with pencilled corrections gives a fascinating insight into the working methods of the prolific author. Conan Doyle had the volume bound for himself in 1911, although the story was not seen by the public until it was serialised in the pages of The Strand magazine. It was later published in a collection of Sherlock Holmes short stories entitled His Last Bow. The book went on sale at the Antiquarian Book Fair in London with a price tag of [pounds]250,000 - but vendor Alex Hime, from Beverly Hills, California, said he might be prepared to consider a small reduction to a good customer...."

2. Campbell, Mary. "The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax." Canadian Holmes 23, no. 1 (1999): 6-8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Hill, Gideon. "Seeking the Suite of the Cure: An Inquiry into the Canonical Baden." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 3 (2004): 25-27.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Sayers, Dorothy L., and Richard Lancelyn Green. Studies in Sherlock Holmes. 1st separate ed. [London]: Privately printed for The Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm. Foreword / by R. L. Green -- Holmes' college career -- Dr. Watson's christian name -- Dr. Watson, widower -- The dates in The Red-headed League. //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Lion's Mane (3)

1. Feldhamer, George. "Deep Waters Indeed: An Analysis of 'The Adventure of the Lion's Mane." The Camden House Journal 19, no. 10 (1997): 2-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Hirayama, Yuichi, and Masako Mizuochi. "Another Solution of The Lion's Mane." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 22-25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Lindvall, Robert. "Reflections on 'The Lion's Mane'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 50-52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Man with the Twisted Lip (7)

1. "The Watson Conundrum." Wilson Quarterly 28, no. 4 (2004): 11-11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Analyzes the short story "The Man With the Twisted Lip," in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes." Overview of the story; Conflict regarding the character John H. Watson in the story.

2. Accardo, Pasquale. "The Unclear Saint: Reflections on the Phenomenon of Mirroring in 'The Man with the Twisted Lip'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 50, no. 4 (2000): 14-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Ballew, William. "How Rascally Was That Lascar?" Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 75-77.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Dawson, Carrie. "'The Slaughterman of Wagga Wagga': Imposture, National Identity, and the Tichborne Affair." Australian Literary Studies 21, no. 4 (2004): 1-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Cited works include a reference to Doyle. Jaffe, Audrey. 'Detecting the Beggar: Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry Mayhew, and "The Man with the Twisted Lip".' Representations 31 (1990): 96-116.

5. Healey, Tim. "Pillow Talk: a gloss on a word in 'The Man With the Twisted Lip'." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 11-12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Jaffe, Audrey. "Detecting the Beggar: Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry Mayhew, and "The Man with the Twisted Lip"." Representations, no. 31, Special Issue: The Margins of Identity in Nineteenth-Century England (1990): 96-117.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Roden, Barbara, and Christopher Roden. "An Untypical Adventure: Reflections on 'The Man With the Twisted Lip'." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 46-55.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Mazarin Stone (2)

1. Berdan, Marshall S. "Adventure of the Mazarin Stone." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 125-133.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. ———. "Curtains in Baker Street. Yet Another Solution to the Authorship of 'The Mazarin Stone'." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 125-133.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Missing Three-Quarter (1)

1. Davies, David Stuart. "The Missing Three-Quarter: Mining the Incidentals." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 97-99.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Musgrave Ritual (11)

1. Aykroyd, Lucas. "The Musgrave Ritual: Who was Rachel Howells?" Canadian Holmes 19, no. 1 (1995): 12-16.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Brotton, Jerry. The sale of the late King's goods Charles I and his art collection. London: Macmillan, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006445054. Includes bibliographical references and index // Possibly of interest for those investigating aspects of 'The Musgrave Ritual.'

3. Chapman, Paul M. "'These Relics Have a History': Sir Philip Musgrave and the English Civil Wars." The Ritual, no. 28 (2001): 42-48.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Doyle, Michael. "Sherlock Holmes and the Legacy of Rachel Howells." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 1 (1995): 17-41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Doyle, Steven T. "Reflections on 'The Musgrave Ritual'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 2 (2003): 31-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Keefauver, Brad. "'The Musgrave Ritual': The Trapping of Richard Brunton." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 57-61.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. MacGregor, Arthur. The late king's goods collections, possessions, and patronage of Charles I in the light of the Commonwealth sale inventories. London, Oxford: A. McAlpine. Oxford University Press, 1989.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 91185144. Includes bibliographical references and index. Scuttlebutt Aug 1995 // "A catalog listing that might interest those who are investigating aspects of 'The Musgrave Ritual'"

8. Narayan, Sundar. "Some Observations on the Story of The Musgrave Ritual." The Camden House Journal 15, no. 5 (1993): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

9. Raymond, Trevor S. "Bookshelf." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 2 (1996): 42-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // A review of The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Musgrave Ritual.

10. Richardson, David. "Ritual Murder: Some Uncomfortable Thoughts on the Musgrave Ritual." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 6 (2001): 48-54.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

11. Roden, Christopher. "The Brunton Connection." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 49, no. 2 (1999): 45-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Naval Treaty (2)

1. Klinger, Leslie S. "From Prussia with Love: Contemplating The Naval Treaty." The Musgrave Papers 11, no. (1998): 93-101.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Skinion, John. "Are there more Red Herrings in the Naval Treaty Than Fish in the Sea?" The Camden House Journal 15, no. 11 (1993): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Noble Bachelor (5)

1. Classic Detective Stories. a collection. Vol. 2. Newport Beach, CA: Books on Tape, 1996. Sound Recording 9 sound cassettes (90 min. each).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog. Unabridged. Volume 2, of two volumes. Read by various readers. //

2. Buddle, Judith. "The Ballad of Hatty Doran." Varieties of Ash 2, no. 1 (1994): 32-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Hyder, Harry N. "Hatty Doran and the Noble Bachelor." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 45, no. 1 (1995): 39-41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Skinion, Signe. "The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor Who is the True Noble Bachelor?" The Camden House Journal 16, no. 7 (1994): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Whitlam, Carol M. "The Noble Bachelor." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 75-80.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Norwood Builder (1)

1. Fetherstone, Sonia. "'The Norwood Builder': A Case of False Advertising." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 31-35.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Priory School (6)

1. Cirone, Nino. "'The Priory School': A Three Pipe Story." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 57-67.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Dale, Richard. "Sherlock Holmes, the Old School Tie, and the Priory School: The Singular Case of the Nineteenth Century British Public School." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 12 (1996): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Bob Ellis. This dark square : a Priory School examination. [London]: The Sherlock Holmes Society of London, Printed by Parchments of Oxford, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill., maps ; 30 cm. "This dark square is the Priory School" / by Jonathan McCafferty -- "...it is time that we were leaving for Euston" / by Guy Marriott -- Ham Hall / by Guy Marriott -- The Priory School prospectus / compiled by Jonathan McCafferty -- Class in 'The Priory School' / by Nicholas Utechin -- Manners are not idle / by Jonathan McCafferty -- The Fighting Cock / by Jonathan McCafferty -- A tram-car coming down a country lane: The Tramway Museum at Crich / by Guy Marriott -- Horace's sidelights on Huxtable / by Horace -- The plover and curlew are the only inhabitants / by Bob Ellis -- The Ashbourne inheritance / by Jonathan McCafferty. Includes bibliographical references. Edited by Bob Ellis. //

4. Konhauser, Joseph D. E, Daniel J Velleman, and S Wagon. Which way did the bicycle go? and other intriguing mathematical mysteries, (Dolciani mathematical expositions). Washington, D.C.: Mathematical Association of America, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 95081495; Scuttlebutt Feb 1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-232) and index // "An imaginative collection of mathematical mysteries by Joseph D. E. Konhauser, Dan Velleman, and Stan Wagon. And the first problem in the book is a discussion of a real Canonical mystery (from 'The Priory School'): how do you tell from a set of bicycle tracks which way the bicycle was going? It turns out that there is a mathematical answer to the question, and it's explained neatly in the book (which also has some nice Sherlockian cover art by Max Carl Winkler)."

5. Lewis, Lou. "'The Adventure of the Priory School': Some Thoughts on Religion and Philosophy." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 1 (2002): 39-41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Starrs, James E. The Noiseless tenor the bicycle in literature. New York: Cornwall Books, 1982.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 81067758. Bibliography: p. 375-383. Scuttlebutt Apr 1996 // "James E. Starrs is well-known now for forensic investigation of questions such as whether Alferd Packer dined on the party he was supposed to be guiding over the mountains (Starrs dug up the victims, and concluded that they had indeed been murdered, and quite likely butchered). And he enjoys bicycling, and he has edited a delightful anthology that includes 'The Priory School' (and some discussion of bicycle tracks), and a splendid Foreword by William Saroyan, and two excerpts from Christopher Morley, and much more."

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Red Circle (3)

1. Gilliland, William. "The Adventure of the Red Circle Confuses Crime and Patriotism in Naples." The Camden House Journal 24, no. 10 (2002): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Kobayashi, Junko, and Megumi Kobayashi. "The Red Circle Re-Read." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 30-31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Solberg, Andrew L. "The Intertwining Chronologies of The Illustrious Client and The Red Circle." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 28-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some observations on the chronology of these two adventures and their overlapping nature.

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Red-Headed League (8)

1. Baker, Jody. "Mrs. Baynes on the Date of the Red Headed League." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 160-162.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Hirayama, Yuichi. "John Clay's Grandfather." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 159-161.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Jordan, Anne. "The Red-Headed League." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 13-17.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Kean, Michael H. "Dating The Red-Headed League: A Secondary Analysis." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 6-11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Klinger, Leslie S., and Timothy Bourke. "What Game was Afoot in The Red-Headed League?" The Sherlock Holmes Journal, no. (2000).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Michaud, Rosemary. "A Considerable Crime: The Red-Headed League Reconsidered." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 145-150.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Sayers, Dorothy L., and Richard Lancelyn Green. Studies in Sherlock Holmes. 1st separate ed. [London]: Privately printed for The Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm. Foreword / by R. L. Green -- Holmes' college career -- Dr. Watson's christian name -- Dr. Watson, widower -- The dates in The Red-headed League. //

8. Smith, Samuel. "The Mysteries of 'The Red-Headed League'." The Camden House Journal 26, no. 8 (2004): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Reigate Squires (1)

1. Booth, Matthew. "'The Reigate Squires': The Adventure of the Missing Opportunities." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 63-69.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Resident Patient (6)

1. Aiken, Bruce. "Does 'The Resident Patient' Prove That There are Fictional Elements in the Sherlockian Canon?" Canadian Holmes 28, no. 4 (2005): 25-27.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Curtis, Donald E. "An Examination of 'The Resident Patient'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 50, no. 2 (2000): 41-43.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Dalrymple, Theodore. "Sheer delight in doing evil." BMJ: British Medical Journal 334, no. 7607 (2007): 1325-1325.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article presents the author's reaction to having read the book "The Resident Patient," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, which centers on a doctor named Trevelyan who visits Sherlock Holmes and Watson to discuss a patient named Blessington. A discussion of the story's plot, which centers on the fact that Blessington is really a criminal named Sutton, is presented. The author's involvement in being a witness in a case where a man hanged another man and attempted to make the incident look like suicide is discussed.

4. Keefauver, Brad. "'The Resident Patient': the money trail." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 79-83.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Murdock, Karen. "Cheating the Noose: A Speculation on the Silence of the Resident Patient." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 4 (2002): 26-28.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. ———. "A Suspicious Photograph on the Mantelpiece, or How Did the Worthington Gang Track Down Blessington?" The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 6 (2004): 22-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Retired Colourman (3)

1. Bruxner, Pamela, and Bob Ellis. Colour it Prussian blue: a day excursion to Retired Colourman and His Last Bow territory, Sunday 4th September 2005. London: Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Crelling, Jack. "Indelible Holmes: Some Notes on the Adventure of the Retired Colourman." The Camden House Journal 23, no. 12 (2001): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Edwards, Ralph E. "Canon Queries: The Adventure of the Retired Colourman." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 1 (1996): 17-18.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Scandal in Bohemia (9)

1. Coules, Bert. "Damn the man anyway: thoughts on 'A Scandal in Bohemia'." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 9-11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Derbyshire, David. "Holmes was right, women will rescue the photos first." The Daily Telegraph (London), December 27, 2004: 11.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "A piece of folklore that helped Sherlock Holmes solve one of his earliest and most famous cases still holds true after a century: women will choose to save the photograph of a loved one above anything else from a burning house. A survey has shown that, given the choice of saving just one precious thing from their home, most women will rescue a family picture. The findings confirm the plot twist of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's A Scandal in Bohemia, the first of the Sherlock Holmes short stories which was published in The Strand magazine in 1891...."

3. Doyle, Michael. "Bohemia -- The Scandal and the Woman." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 2 (2002): 26-36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Griffith, James. "From a Certain Point of View in 'A Scandal in Bohemia': Outsmarting Mr. Sherlock Holmes." Victorian Newsletter 86, no. (1994): 7-9.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Hall, John. "Pips, pearls and scandal (Notes on the dates of FIVE, SCAN and SIGN)." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 35-39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Harmidarow, Walter. "Really, Dr. Watson? Disguise and the dating of 'A Scandal in Bohemia'." Canadian Holmes 23, no. 4 (2000): 6-8.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Hirayama, Yuichi. "The True Identity of King of Bohemia." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 177-181.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Kellogg, Richard L. "The Androgynous Ms. Adler." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 114-116.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some thoughts on the person of Irene Adler.

9. Rzepka, Charles J. Detective fiction, (Cultural history of literature). Cambridge: Polity, 2005.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- ill. ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. // See the author's "Casebook" essay on Sherlock Holmes, pp. 114-151. Entitled "The Scientific Detective's Bohemian Soul," the essay is supplemented by material on "A Scandal in Bohemia" appearing on pages 144-151, subtitled "Bohemian Souls of Steel."

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Second Stain (8)

1. Accardo, Pasquale. "Second Thoughts on the Second Stain." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 49, no. 1 (1999): 47-50.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Block, Ira. "Who Is the Real Trelawney Hope?" Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 30-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Gibbs, Joseph. "The Official Secrets Act and 'The Second Stain'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 4 (2002): 31-33.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Heifetz, Carl L. "A 'Second Stain' Saves the Day." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 6 (2000): 36-39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Hultgren, Joella D. "'The Second Stain' Explained: Did Holmes Suspect the Subterfuge?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 4 (2002): 41-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. McClure, Michael W. "The Adventure of the Second Stain 'There Can Be No Second Stain'." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 72 (1992): 19-23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Smith, Samuel. "The Mystery(s) of the Second Stain." The Camden House Journal 26, no. 1 (2004): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. White, Kathryn. "'The Second Stain': Sex, Lies and Red Tape." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 107-112.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Shoscombe Old Place (1)

1. Swift, Francine Morris. "Shoscombe Prince." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 45, no. 3 (1995): 147-156.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Sign of the Four (18)

1. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 2.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Highlights the 1898 publication of "The Sign of the Four" in Pitman's shorthand.

2. Cirone, Nino. "What Really Happened to Mary Morstan?" Canadian Holmes 25, no. 4 (2002): 20-22.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Connors, Theresa. "The Sign of Four (Book)." Library Journal 129, no. 16 (2004): 118-118.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the audiobook "The Sign of Four," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

4. Coules, Bert. "Review--The Oxford Sherlock Holmes, The Sign of Four edited with an introduction by Christopher Roden." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 46-48.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of the book.

5. Coules, Bert, Clive Merrison, Michael Williams, and Arthur Conan Doyle. BBC Radio presents Sherlock Holmes, sign of the four. New York: BBD Audio :; Distributed under exclusive license from BBC Worldwide Ltd., 1998. Sound Recording (cassette) 2 sound cassettes (110 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- analog, Dolby processed. "An audio dramatization"--Container. Participants: Clive Merrison (Sherlock Holmes), Michael Williams (Dr. John Watson) ; supporting cast ; Alexander Balanescu, violinist. [dramatized by Bert Coules]. //

6. Darlington, Frank. "Bookshelf: The Sign of The Four." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 30-31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Review of "The Sign of the Four" from The Oxford Sherlock Holmes.

7. Darlington, Frank, George A. Vanderburgh, Thelma Beam, Doug Wrigglesworth, Bob Coghill, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf' Reviews of Oxford's The Sign of the Four, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, The Valley of Fear, His Last Bow and The Books of Michael Harrison." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 30-36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Frank, Lawrence. "Dreaming the Medusa: Imperialism, primitivism, and sexuality in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four." Signs: Journal of Women in Culture & Society 22, no. 1 (1996): 52.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Discusses author Arthur Conan Doyle's treatment of the issues of imperialism, primitivism and sexuality in his book The Sign of Four. Characterization of detective Sherlock Holmes; Characterization of women in Doyle's published works; Projection of a Victorian anxiety about women; Description of India and the Indian culture.

9. Hall, John. "Pips, pearls and scandal (Notes on the dates of FIVE, SCAN and SIGN)." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 35-39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. Keep, Christopher, and Don Randall. "Addiction, Empire, and Narrative in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of the Four." Novel: A Forum on Fiction 32, no. 2 (1999): 207.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "Relates the book The Sign of the Four, by Conan Doyle, with the image of Great Britain as an empire and an exporter of addictive substances. What the fictitious character [sic] Sherlock Holmes represents; Impact of cocaine in medicine and Europe's colonial enterprise; Views of writer Jacques Derrida on the drug pharmakon."

11. Law, Gary. "Books: The six greatest crime novels ever; Some crime novels are so good they keep you guessing right up until the last page; some are so bad they're a crime in themselves. So which ones are the true greats? Gary Law picks six of the best from the golden era of detective fiction." Belfast Telegraph, April 12, 2003: 1.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The six picked by the author, along with his comments, are: The Sign of Four, by Doyle; Raffles, by E. W. Hornung; Murder on the Orient Express, by Agatha Christie; The Postman Always Rings Twice, by James M. Cain; The Big Sleep, by Raymond Chandler; and I, The Jury, by Mickey Spillane.

12. Liebman, Arthur, and David H. Galerstein. "The Sign of the Moonstone." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 71-74.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some observations on the influence of Wilkie Collins on Doyle and the parallels between Collins' The Moonstone and Doyle's The Sign of Four.

13. Lithner, Klas. "The Sign of Four Through Japanese Eyes." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 135-138.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

14. Marino, Joe. "A question of judgement: Jonathan Small, a re-appraisal." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 119-131.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

15. McCloskey, Susan. "The Sign of the Four as a Sign of the Times." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 3 (2003): 35-37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

16. Pogrebin, Robin. "When Sherlock Got His Quirks." The New York Times, December 3, 1996: C13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "It was a late summer evening in 1889 when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle sat down to dinner at the Langham Hotel in London with an American publishing agent who had come to commission new works of fiction for Lippincott's monthly magazine. Oscar Wilde was also at the table, and the young writers engaged in mutual flattery. They also discussed such topics as future wars and what Doyle later called 'the cynical maxim that the good fortune of our friends made us discontented.' By the end of the meal, the publishing agent, J. M. Stoddart, had tacked down what he had traveled all the way from Philadelphia for: commitments from Doyle and Wilde that each would write a short novel for Lippincott's. As a result, Wilde produced 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' and Doyle the second appearance of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson, in 'The Sign of Four.' Doyle's handwritten final draft of that story, the oldest surviving complete Sherlock Holmes manuscript, will be auctioned tomorrow at Sotheby's for an anonymous seller. It is expected to bring $250,000 to $350,000...."

17. Rossakis, Constantine. "Thaddeus Sholto: (Mis)Diagnosed." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 1 (2004): 51-53.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

18. Taylor-Ide, Jesse Oak. "Ritual and the Liminatily of Sherlock Holmes in The Sign of Four and The Hound of the Baskervilles." English Literature in Transition (1880-1920) 48, no. 1 (2005): 55-70.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Silver Blaze (8)

1. Ewing, Geoff. "The Relationships Between 'Silver Blaze' and 'The Five Orange Pips'." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 1 (2005): 12-13.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "'Silver Blaze': Sources and Solecisms." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 15-19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Gregory, Richard L. Nature 445, no. 7124 (2007): 152.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Heifetz, Carl L. "Sherlock Holmes, Scientific Detective, Solves the Silver Blaze Horse-Napping Case." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 3 (2004): 22-25.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Martin, Ged. "Speaking volumes." Times Higher Education Supplement, no. (1994): 21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews the book 'Silver Blaze,' by Arthur Conan Doyle.

6. Senter, R. Joel. "Silver Blaze or Mr. Sherlock Holmes' Greatest Joke." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 33.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Swift, Wayne B., and Francine Swift. Red Smith's view of Silver Blaze. s.l.: Wigmore-Sumatran, 2000.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Weller, Philip. "A Thoroughbred Case: The Strengths and Weakness of Silver Blaze." The Ritual, no. 19 (1997): 30-33.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Six Napoleons (4)

1. Blair, Victor. "'The Six Napoleons' and Parallels Between Napoleon, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 4 (1998): 17-19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Hyder, William. "Parsley and Butter: The Abernetty Business." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 152-160.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Presents some thoughts, theories, and speculation on Holmes, Watson, the Abernettys, and what exactly was meant by Holmes' statement of the parsley and butter.

3. Shiffman, Stu. "A League of Their Own." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 52-63.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Written as Horace Harker.

4. Singleton, Paul. "'The Six Napoleons': His First Last Bow." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 73-79.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Solitary Cyclist (2)

1. Jordan, Anne. "'The Solitary Cyclist': Thoughts on the Case." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 45-49.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Olding, Alan C. "The Solitary Cyclist Rings a Little Bell." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 121-123.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Speckled Band (8)

1. Beowulf Theater Company. [Skokie, IL]: Library Cable Network, 1994. Visual Material 1 videocassette (61 min.).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Skokie Public Library (Ill.) ; Library Cable Network. color. 1/2 in. VHS format. Theater company reads and acts script of Arthur Conan Doyle's Adventure of the speckled band. Producer, Dave Evans. //

2. Bloom, Clive. Creepers: British horror and fantasy in the twentieth century. London, Boulder, Colo: Pluto Press, 1993.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 92036706. Includes bibliographical references and index // "With Victor Sage's essay on 'The Speckled Band.'"

3. Brodie, Brian S., and Mark Alberstat. "'Bookshelf' Reviews of The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Speckled Band and Shades of Sherlock." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 3 (1998): 46-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Burr, Robert C. "Review--The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Speckled Band edited by Christopher Roden and Barbara Roden." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 3 (1997): 28.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Galerstein, David H. "The Monster of Stoke Moran." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 73 (1993): 31-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "The Shameful Secret of Stoke Moran: Speculations on 'The Speckled Band'." The Musgrave Papers, no. 9 (1996): 64-68.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Healey, Tim. "Review--'The Case Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Speckled Band' edited by Christopher Roden and Barbara Roden." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 67-68.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Holly, Raymond L. "A Comparison of 'Blue Carbuncle' and 'Speckled Band'." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 1 (1996): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Stockbroker's Clerk (2)

1. Crelling, Jack. "Diversified Speculations About The Stockbroker's Clerk." The Camden House Journal 27, no. 11 (2005): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Fetherstone, Sonia. "'The Stockbroker's Clerk': The Singular Duos." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 41-47.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Study in Scarlet (18)

1. Atkinson, Michael. "Type and text in "A Study in Scarlet": Repression and the textual unconscious; Jungian literary criticism." no. (1992): 328-342.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "...relies primarily on Jung but draws as well upon Freud and deconstructive criticism to discuss how a text might be governed by an unconscious element that acts like the unconscious does in a personality, providing hidden motivation to explain behavior at the conscious level / uses this concept to examine not only Watson, Holmes, and other characters in Arthur Conan Doyle's first archetypal Sherlock Holmes mystery ["A Study in Scarlet"], but also the subgenre itself..."

2. Dumych, Daniel M. Niagara Falls, (Scenes of America). Charleston, SC: Arcadia Pub, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006929700; Scuttlebutt Sept 1996 // "Has fine period photographs of a place mentioned in two Sherlock Holmes stories ('A Study in Scarlet' and 'The Cardboard Box')."

3. ———. Niagara Falls, (Images of America). Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2004114129; Scuttlebutt Sept 1996 // "Has fine period photographs of a place mentioned in two Sherlock Holmes stories ('A Study in Scarlet' and 'The Cardboard Box')."

4. ———. Niagara Falls, (Images of America). Dover, N.H: Arcadia, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96201784; Scuttlebutt Sept 1996 // "Has fine period photographs of a place mentioned in two Sherlock Holmes stories ('A Study in Scarlet' and 'The Cardboard Box')."

5. Freeman, Judith. "STUD Farm." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 1 (2004): 26-32.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Gibson, Brian Neil. "A Study In Scarlet." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 11-12.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews A Study in Scarlet from The Oxford Sherlock Holmes.

7. Hirayama, Yuichi. "Some Problems on the Translation of the Title of 'A Study in Scarlet'." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 58-60.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Hobbs, Don. "Review--A Study in Scarlet edited by Leslie Klinger." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 3 (2004): 21.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

9. Hodgson, John A. "An allusion to Arthur Conan Doyle's A Study in Scarlet in The Picture of Dorian Gray." English Language Notes 34, no. 2 (1996): 41.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Talks about Oscar Wilde's allusion to Arthur Conan Doyle's 'A Study in Scarlet,' in the book 'The Picture of Dorian Gray.' Holmes' sustained debt to Wilde and other aesthetes of his day; Holmes' off-handed reference to 'art jargon'; Wilde's sensitivity to the detective overtones of his labyrinth motif.

10. Huret, Gaston Corday, III. "The Ballad of Lucy Ferrier: for those who feel guilty about skipping Chapters 8-12 of Part II of A Study in Scarlet (translated by Don Hardenbrook)." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (2005): 66-68.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

11. Randall, Warren. "Who Killed Enoch Drebber? (The Death and Burial of Jefferson Hope)." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 19-20.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

12. Redmond, Christopher. "A Study in Sin: Religious Hypocrisy and Fanaticism in (and Out of) A Study in Scarlet." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 1 (2004): 31-37.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

13. Scheideman, Warren. "A Study in Scarlet: Canonical Theme and Structure." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 20-26.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // An examination of "the adventure that started it all."

14. Speck, Gordon R. "Three Men of Note and the Mormons in A Study in Scarlet." The Camden House Journal 16, no. 3 (1994): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

15. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--The Sherlock Holmes Reference Library: A Study in Scarlet edited by Leslie Klinger." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 4 (2001): 21, 30.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

16. Thomas, Katie-Louise. "Racial Alliance and Postal Networks in Conan Doyle's 'A Study in Scarlet.'." Journal of Colonialism & Colonial History 2, no. 1 (2001).

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Seeks to place Arthur Conan Doyle's A Study in Scarlet (1887) within the broader context of the notion that blood brotherhood transcended nation. According to this idea, in a process facilitated by the revolution in communications, Anglo-American racial "reunion" might lead to the foundation of an inter-imperial body politic. Doyle absorbed through fiction and other readings a deep interest in and knowledge of the United States. His writings also reflect his fear that the black races, the children of Britain's second empire, could strike back against and infect the mother country. His deep kinship with America was expressed in a "rhetorical imperative of racial unity"; this offered an antidote for the British, a means "to reclaim a white confederacy and re-stabilize their imperial position." These preoccupations are reflected in the text of A Study in Scarlet, in which the narrative is uncomfortably split between London and the American West. Though the cultural contexts are different, the character of Sherlock Holmes, the tracker of crime, has deep affinities with the pathfinders and pioneers of the American West.

17. Utechin, Nicholas. "Review--'The Oxford Sherlock Holmes: A Study in Scarlet' edited with an introduction by Owen Dudley Edwards." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 44-45.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

18. Vizoskie, Ben. "Who Wrote the American Chapters of A Study in Scarlet?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 50, no. 2 (2000): 29-36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Sussex Vampire (6)

1. "The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire." Scholastic Voice 64, no. 16 (1980): 14-17, 23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Illustrated.

2. Crelling, Jack. "Sussex Vampire Déjà Vu." The Camden House Journal 29, no. 3 (2007): 2-5.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Healey, Tim. "Carlo, Hacky and the poison that wasn't: thoughts on 'The Sussex Vampire'." The Ritual, no. 27 (2001): 17-26.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Kessel, Joseph T. "The Sussex Vampire Song." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 2 (2003): 14-15.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

5. Sayers, Dorothy L., and Richard Lancelyn Green. Studies in Sherlock Holmes. 1st separate ed. [London]: Privately printed for The Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1996.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- 19 cm. Foreword / by R. L. Green -- Holmes' college career -- Dr. Watson's christian name -- Dr. Watson, widower -- The dates in The Red-headed League. //

6. Vandenbroek, Robyn Ryan. "Grades 5 & up: Fiction." School Library Journal 43, no. 2 (1997): 100.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews a number of books including one with a reference to Doyle. Cresswell, Helen, comp. Mystery Stories: An Intriguing Collection. illus. by Adrian Reynolds. 224p. CIP. Kingfisher. 1996. pap. $6.95. ISBN 0-7534-5025-9. LC 96-1435. "Cresswell has compiled 19 mystery stories from a variety of well-known and critically acclaimed authors. For those who enjoy traditional detective stories, there is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's 'The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire.' Classic mystery buffs will appreciate Agatha Christie's 'The Adventures of Johnnie Waverly.' Those interested in a blend of realism and fantasy will enjoy the selections by Ray Bradbury and Dino Buzzati, and an excerpt from Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights will appeal to fans of gothic romance. All of the plots are compelling and should spark the interest of reluctant readers. This is a haunting anthology with an interesting blend of genres, however, many of these stories do appear in other collections such as Diana Wynne Jones's Hidden Turnings (Greenwillow, 1990), making it an additional purchase."

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Thor Bridge (4)

1. Gross, Adam, and Jerzy Kunz. "Suicidal shooting masked using a method described in Conan Doyle's Novel." American Journal of Forensic Medicine & Pathology 16, no. 2 (1995): 164-167.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The case of a suicide by gunshot is presented in which the person committing the suicide used a method described by Conan Doyle in one of his novels: conceal the weapon and make the suicide appear to be a homicide.

2. King, Shannon. "Behavior Viewed With Disapprobation (or a THOR Thubject)." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 11 (1996): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Prahlow, Joseph A., Scarlett Long, and Jeffrey J. Barnard. "A suicide disguised as a homicide: Return to Thor Bridge." American Journal of Forensic Medicine & Pathology 19, no. 2 (1998): 186-189.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Suicides staged as homicides are uncommon. We present a case of a self-inflicted gunshot wound of the chest disguised by the victim as a homicide, using a method described by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in his Sherlock Holmes story, "The Problem of Thor Bridge."

4. White, Kathryn. "The Problem of Thor Bridge." The Musgrave Papers, no. 10 (1997): 50-61.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Three Gables (2)

1. Dorn, William S. "Bill Dorn Continues His Fixation with Important Dates: Adventurous Appointments With The Three Gables." Baker Street West 1 6, no. 2 (2000): 22-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

2. Hedberg, Lloyd R., Jr. "Reconsidering Dakin on The Three Gables: A Response to D. Martin Dakin's Rejection of "The Adventure of the Three Gables" from the Canon; His Falsest Note of All." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 55-70.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Three Students (4)

1. "The Mammoth Book of Vintage Whodunnits." Kirkus Reviews 74, no. 1 (2006): 18-19.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The article reviews the book "The Mammoth Book of Vintage Whodunnits," edited by Maxim Jakubowski. The review comments that "Readers will look in vain for Agatha Christie, Ellery Queen and John Dickson Carr, though Jakubowski includes a negligible locked-room puzzle by E. Charles Vivian, superfluous stories from Poe and Conan Doyle and unclassifiable curios by M.P. Shiel and C. Daly King." The Doyle story is "The Adventure of the Three Students."

2. "Mystery Notes." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 50 (2005): 45-46.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Notes publication of The Mammoth Book of Vintage Who-dunnits, edited by Maxim Jakubowski. (Carroll & Graf, $13.95 paper 512p ISBN 1-59058-169-5) "The usual suspects are there of course, spinning their tales effortlessly and effectively, like Wilkie Collins with The Biter Bit, Baroness Orczy with The Dublin Mystery, Alexandre Dumas with Markheim, and the inevitable Edgar Allan Poe with The Purloined Letter and Arthur Conan Doyle with The Adventure of the Three Students -- not the best Sherlock Holmes mystery, but not a bad pick for this compilation...."

3. Lydon, Michael. "'The Three Students": An Awful Warning." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 81-87.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Speck, Gordon R. "Story and "The Three Students'." The Camden House Journal 17, no. 8 (1995): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Valley of Fear (21)

1. Burke, James. "Connections." Scientific American 278, no. 1 (1998): 113.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Look at the views of James Burke as he relate to the question on who came up first with the idea of evolution. Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...McParlan's work was not, however, to go totally unrecognized. In 1914 he became the internationally acclaimed hero of a novel entitled Valley of Fear. Well, he would have been such but for the fact that the author ended up naming the book's detective protagonist something else. McParlan's heroics were fictionally appropriated by (the already internationally famous) Sherlock Holmes. Given McParlan's fate, it's ironic that Valley of Fear was to be Sherlock's last case, too. After which his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, turned to expressing himself through a different medium. The kind that sat around tables and got up to what I was playing at the other night. Because in 1914 Doyle stopped writing and took over where Wallace and Lodge had left off: he became a leading light in the Society for Psychic Research...."

2. Crelling, Jack. "Some Points of Light in The Valley of Fear." The Camden House Journal 17, no. 4 (1995): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Darlington, Frank, George A. Vanderburgh, Thelma Beam, Doug Wrigglesworth, Bob Coghill, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf' Reviews of Oxford's The Sign of the Four, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, The Valley of Fear, His Last Bow and The Books of Michael Harrison." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 30-36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Doyle, Steven T., ed. Murderland: a companion volume to The Baker Street Irregulars' expedition to The Valley of Fear. New York: The Baker Street Irregulars, 2004.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- Includes bibliographical references. Contents: Introduction / Steven T. Doyle -- An expedition to the Vermissa Valley / Julia Carlson Rosenblatt -- The Mollies vs. the Scowrers: fact and fiction in The Valley of Fear / Steven T. Doyle -- Bad company / David Hammer -- The overthrow of the Molly Maguires: stories from the archives of the Pinkerton Detective Agency / Cleveland Moffett -- Vermissa, PA--Inferno, USA / Pasquale Accardo -- It is an old manuscript: the notes for The Valley of Fear / Peter Blau -- The strange case of Birdy Edwards: the first hardboiled detective? / Gary Lovisi -- The ancient manor house of Birlstone / Catherine Cooke -- A single triumph? The Valley of Fear on film / Pat Ward -- Miss Porlock, I presume? / Jon Lellenberg // A compilation of BSI papers related to The Valley of Fear, created in preparation for the October 2004 expedition of over 100 Sherlockians to the valley of Shenandoah and Mahanoy, the real site of action in the story. Includes photocopy reprints of notes outlining the plot of the story

5. Gilliland, William. "A Timely Report on The Valley of Fear." The Camden House Journal 26, no. 12 (2004): 2-3.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

6. Harris, Jay. "In The Valley of Fear." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 19-24.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

7. Johnson, Roger. "Review--'The Oxford Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear' edited with an introduction by Owen Dudley Edwards." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 60-63.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

8. Kenny, Kevin. Making sense of the Molly Maguires. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 96053599. Includes bibliographical references and index. Scuttlebutt Apr 1998 //

9. ———. "The Molly Maguires and The Valley of Fear." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 55, no. 2 (2005): 24-31.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

10. ———. "The Molly Maguires in popular culture." Journal of American Ethnic History 14, no. 4 (1995): 27.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Examines how the myth of the Molly Maguires was both elaborated and contested in popular fiction and in film. Semi-fiction approach; Albert Aiken's 'The Molly Maguires: or, The Black Diamond of Hazelton'; Daniel Doyle's 'Molly Maguire, the Terror of the Coal Fields'; 'Coal-Mine Tom or Fighting the Molly Maguires' by Sgt. O'Donnell; 'The Molly Detective'; Arthur Conan Doyle's 'The Valley of Fear'.

11. Lovisi, Gary. "The First Harboiled Detective: The Strange Case of Birdy Edwards." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 64-69.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

12. ———. "The Molly Maguires: The Real Birdy Edwards in the Real Valley of Fear!" Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 57-62.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

13. Lukas, J. Anthony. Big trouble a murder in a small western town sets off a struggle for the soul of America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 97021359; Scuttlebutt Nov 1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. [813]-829) and index // "What really happened to Birdy Edwards after he escaped from the Valley of Fear? Well, more precisely, what happened to the real Birdy Edwards? The real Birdy Edwards was the real Pinkerton agent James McParland, who helped bring an end to the Molly Maguires, and he continued his Pinkerton career, in the western United States, where he was once again involved in a battle with miners, and the International Workers of the World, after the assassination of a former governor of Idaho. That story is told in considerable detail in this book."

14. Poole, Henry W, and Mine Hill and Schuylkill Haven Railroad Company. Topographical map of the Mine Hill and Schuylkill-Haven Rail Road with its branches and extension to Ashland; surveyed and drawn by Henry W. Poole, Civl. Topl. Ming. Engr. Pottsville, Pa. Dec. 1854, to accompany the Report to the stockholders. n.p, 1854.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 98688718; Scuttlebutt July 1996. Citations: LC Railroad maps // Map of Pennsylvania between Schuylkill Haven and Ashland showing drainage, relief by hachures, cities, towns, individual buildings, mines, mills, and the mining branch rail lines. Chartered on the March 24, 1828. 13 miles opened in 1831. Completed to Ashland in 1857.

15. Robinson, Robert E. "The So-Called Porlock Enigma." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 4 (1994): 223-224.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // The author argues that the true identity of Porlock is none other than Professor Moriarty.

16. Rouby, Jason. "Porlock Was a Woman: A Postulation Stoutly Defended." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 51-53.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

17. Ward, Leo L. Pottsville. 1st ed, (Images of America). Charleston, SC: Arcadia Pub, 2006.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2006932170; Scuttlebutt July 1996 // "For those who would like to see just what the Vermissa Valley looked like in the days of the Scowrers: there are many 19th-century photographs, with informative captions. Pottsville, the county seat of Schuylkill County, is where the real Mollie Maguires were known and feared."

18. Ward, Leo L, and Mark T Major. Pottsville, (Images of America). Dover, N.H: Arcadia, 1995.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 95237528; Scuttlebutt July 1996 // "For those who would like to see just what the Vermissa Valley looked like in the days of the Scowrers: there are many 19th-century photographs, with informative captions. Pottsville, the county seat of Schuylkill County, is where the real Mollie Maguires were known and feared."

19. ———. Pottsville in the twentieth century, (Images of America). Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2003.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- LC Control Number: 2003105200; Scuttlebutt July 1996 // "For those who would like to see just what the Vermissa Valley looked like in the days of the Scowrers: there are many 19th-century photographs, with informative captions. Pottsville, the county seat of Schuylkill County, is where the real Mollie Maguires were known and feared."

20. Wood, Peter H. "Excellent Watson! ... An Almanac!" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 34-39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some thoughts on the dating of this tale, in reference to Whitaker's Almanack, the use codes and ciphers, and on the person known as Fred Porlock.

21. Wrigglesworth, Doug. "Bookshelf: The Valley of Fear." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 33-34.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Reviews "The Valley of Fear" from The Oxford Sherlock Holmes.

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Veiled Lodger (1)

1. Wills-Wood, Chris. "The Veiled Lodger: a physical examination." The Ritual, no. 13 (1994): 22-23.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Wisteria Lodge (1)

1. Bousquet, Robert J. "The Strange Tongue of the Mulatto of Wisteria Lodge: A Linguistic Investigation of the Mulatto's Speech." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 75-81.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // Some thoughts and observations on the unnamed mulatto who appears in this tale.

06B Writings About the Writings -- Tales -- Yellow Face (4)

1. Cuningham, Henry. "Sherlock Holmes and the Case of Race." Journal of Popular Culture 28, no. 2 (1994): 113-125.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- // "This article discusses the case of racism in the Sherlock Holmes story, The Yellow Face. The publication of a short story defending the marriage of a black man to a white woman would not be too unusual for the 1990s, but the widespread distribution of a similar story in the 1890s is a historical oddity. One hundred years ago, the Sherlock Holmes stories were some of the most popular and widely read in print. The Yellow Face brought before the reading public the volatile topic of just such an interracial couple, the prejudice they encountered, and the precarious fate of their mulatto child. Because of some improbable and illogical developments in the narrative, this case ranks among some of the poorer in the Sherlock Holmes cannon when viewed strictly as a detective story. But when examined as a vehicle for delivering a didactic message on racial attitudes that was half-a-century ahead of its time, The Yellow Face reveals itself to be shrewdly constructed. In the opinion of mystery writer John Dickson Carr, only an ardent Sherlockian can find high merit in The Yellow Face. The story certainly supports the view that a didactic intention may undermine artistry, at least when the tale is evaluated solely as a mystery."

2. Duke, Michael. "Lucy: 'A Little Coal-Black Negress' Emancipation and 'The Yellow Face'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 116-120.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

3. Hall, John. "'The Yellow Face' Through the Window." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 31-39.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //

4. Heifetz, Carl L. "A Scientific Lesson Learned From 'The Yellow Face'." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 1 (2004): 33-36.

NOTE // ABSTRACT --- //



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson

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