06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters (64)

1. Black, Elliott M. "Colonel Sebastian Moran." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 12.

2. ———. "Irene Adler." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 20.

3. Bousquet, Robert J. "The Operatic Roles of Irene Adler." The Serpentine Muse 21, no. 4 (2005): 19-23.

4. Calamai, Peter. "The Missing Missives of Colonel Moriarty." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 4 (1996): 5-7.

5. Caplan, Richard M. "Dr. Watson, Mr. Sherlock Holmes" the adventures of young Stamford and other Sherlockiana. Shelburne, Ont: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1996.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 167); Scuttlebutt Feb 1997; "Offers a fine demonstration of how much fun a Sherlockian can have mixing the Canon with an area of expertise: Caplan's area of expertise is dermatology, and he has over the years discussed that aspect of the Sherlock Holmes stories in articles in medical journals and in The Baker Street Journal, all reprinted here. But there is much more in this book: a series of letters from written by Young Stamford to his wife, from 1882 to 1913, and tells some fine stories about his travels and the people he meets (including Holmes and Watson, more than once)."

6. Cirone, Nino. "What Really Happened to Mary Morstan?" Canadian Holmes 25, no. 4 (2002): 20-22.

7. ———. "What Really Happened to Mary Morstan?" The Ritual, no. 27 (2001): 6-11.

8. Crelling, Jack. "Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard -- A Friend of Sherlock Holmes." The Camden House Journal 24, no. 2 (2002): 2-7.

9. ———. "Inspectors Gregson, Bradstreet and Hopkins of Scotland Yard." The Camden House Journal 26, no. 4 (2004): 2-5.

10. ———. "The Remarkable Miss Hunter." The Camden House Journal 27, no. 9 (2005): 2-7.

11. Dandrew, Thomas. "Victor and Violet: Symbolic Siblings?" Canadian Holmes 19, no. 4 (1996): 17-18.

12. Dillstone, Don. "Arthur Conan Doyle and Irene Adler." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 2 (2000): 9-13.

13. Dirda, Michael. "A Case for Langdale Pike." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 4 (2007): 22-34.

14. Eustace, Grant. "Irene Adler Reconsidered." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 6-8.

15. Foreman, Amanda. Die Herzogin von Devonshire : das Leben einer leidenschaftlichen Frau. Ungekürzte Taschenbuchausg. ed, (Serie Piper). München, Zürich: Piper, 2003.

ill. ; 19 cm. Translated by Susanne Friederike Levin und Martina M. Oepping. / Uniform Title: Georgiana, Dutchess of Devonshire.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

16. ———. Georgiana : das lustvolle Leben der Herzogin von Devonshire. Stuttgart: München, 2001.

ill. ; 22 cm. Translated by Susanne Friederike Levin and Martina M. Oepping. / Uniform Title: Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

17. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Random House, 1998.

ill. (some col.), geneal. tables ; 25 cm. Débutante: 1757-1774 -- Fashion's favourite: 1774-1776 -- Vortex of dissipation: 1776-1778 -- Popular patriot: 1778-1781 -- Introduction to politics: 1780-1782 -- Newcomer: 1782-1783 -- Unstable coalition: 1783 -- Birth and a death: 1783-1784 -- Westminster election: 1784 -- Opposition: 1784-1786 -- Queen Bess: 1787 -- Ménage à trois: 1788 -- Regency crisis: 1788-1789 -- Approaching storm: 1789-1790 -- Exposure: 1790-1791 -- Exile: 1791-1793 -- Return: 1794-1796 -- Interlude: 1796 -- Isolation: 1796-1799 -- Georgiana redux: 1800-1801 -- Peace: 1801-1802 -- Power struggles: 1802-1803 -- Doyenne of the Whig party: 1803-1804 -- "The ministry of all the talents": 1804-1806. Genealogical chart on lining papers./ Includes bibliographical references (p. [423]-432) and index.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

18. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. New York, London: Random House; Hi Marketing, 2001.

20 cm.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

19. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. London: HarperCollins, 1999.

ill. (some col.), facsims., geneal. tables, ports. (some col.) ; 20 cm. Originally published: London: HarperCollins, 1998. Includes index. Bibliography.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

20. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. Large type ed. Bath: Windsor, 2000.

25 cm. Originally published: London: HarperCollins, 1998. Publisher's no. AC5653.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

21. ———. Georgiana, duquesa de Devonshire. Barcelona: Omega, 2001.

Il. col. ; 20 cm. Rústica./ Biogr.individ./ Premio Whitbread 1998 a la Biografía del Año./ Título original: Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. traducción del inglés de Rosa Pérez.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

22. ———. Georgiana's World. London: HarperCollinsIllustrated, 2001.

col. ill. ; 26 cm.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

23. ———. Georgiana's World : the illustrated Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. London: HarperCollins, 2001.

col. ill., geneal. tables ; 26 cm.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

24. ———. "The Political Life of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, 1757-1806." Thesis/dissertation (deg); Manuscript (mss), University of Oxford, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references (leaves 263-289).; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

25. Foreman, Amanda, and Margareta Eklöf. Georgiana : 1757-1806 : en ädel engelskas uppgång och fall. Stockholm: Norstedt, 2001.

ill. ; 24 cm. Translated by Margareta Eklöf.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

26. Foreman, Amanda Lucy. The Political Life of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, 1757-1806. Boston Spa, U.K.: British Library Document Supply Centre, 1998.

BLDSC reference no.: D205832.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

27. Hall, John. "Holmes and Lestrade." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 6-8.

28. Heifetz, Carl L. "Moriarty: An Encounter of the First Kind or Smoke Gets in Your Eyes." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 6 (2001): 16-21.

29. ———. "A Toast to Murray, Watson's Courageous and Faithful Orderly." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 3 (2001): 20-21.

30. Hyder, William. "Irene Adler: A Pronounced Disagreement." The Musgrave Papers, no. 10 (1997): 61-66.

31. ———. "Lestrade: A Fair Cop." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 55, no. 2 (2005): 39-46.

32. Izban, Donald B. "In Honor of Inspector Lestrade." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 70.

33. Keefauver, Brad. "The Irene Adler Hoax." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 3 (1999): 24-26.

34. ———. "The Mystery of Violet Hunter." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 13-15.

35. Kellog, Richard. "Whatever Happened to Edward Rucastle?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 55, no. 1 (2005): 54-56.

36. Kellogg, Richard L. "The Androgynous Ms. Adler." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 114-116.

Some thoughts on the person of Irene Adler.

37. Koch, Hugo. "...There are...some hundreds of Henry Bakers in this city of ours..." an identification of the Henry Baker. S.l: s.n., 1998.

Includes bibliographical references;

38. Letwenko, Bobbie, and Ed Letwenko. "A Tribute to Toby." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 149.

39. Linsenmeyer, John. "Why Charles Augustus Milverton Should Be Canonized and Not Cannon-Balled." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 50, no. 1 (2000): 36-40.

40. Lovisi, Gary. "The First Harboiled Detective: The Strange Case of Birdy Edwards." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 64-69.

41. ———. "The Molly Maguires: The Real Birdy Edwards in the Real Valley of Fear!" Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 57-62.

42. Macnee, Angela. "'Charles Augustus Milverton': The Body in the Study." The Musgrave Papers, no. 13 (2000): 69-71.

43. Mallory, Michael. "Notes Toward a Biography of Mrs. Amelia Watson." Baker Street West 1 9, no. 2 (2003): 19-22.

44. Meyers, Don. "Holmes, Watson & Stamford: Was there a Method to Young Stamford's Madness?" Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 87-88.

45. Newhaus, Christian. "The Woman: Reflections on Irene Adler and Christine Daae." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 2 (1997): 28-29.

46. Randall, Warren. "Who Killed Enoch Drebber? (The Death and Burial of Jefferson Hope)." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 19-20.

47. Ravin, James G. "Who Was the King of Bohemia?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 4 (2004): 25-26.

48. Richards, Dana. "Mycroft Has His Rails." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 51, no. 3 (2001): 41-44.

49. Richardson, David. "To Old Frankland, the Crank." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 5 (2001): 43.

50. Robinson, Robert E. "The So-Called Porlock Enigma." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 4 (1994): 223-224.

The author argues that the true identity of Porlock is none other than Professor Moriarty.

51. Roden, Barbara. "Canonical Misconceptions Number One: Mrs. Hudson." The Ritual, no. 16 (1995): 35-39.

52. ———. "Canonical Misconceptions Number Two: Inspector Lestrade." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 48-53.

53. Rose-Bond, Sherry. "Mary Morstan, Madonna: Virgin or Material Girl." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 46, no. 2 (1996): 44-49.

54. Rossakis, Constantine. "Thaddeus Sholto: (Mis)Diagnosed." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 1 (2004): 51-53.

55. Rouby, Jason. "Porlock Was a Woman: A Postulation Stoutly Defended." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 51-53.

56. Schaefer, Bradley E. "Simon Newcomb." Physics Today 60, no. 2 (2007): 66-67.

The article reviews the book "Simon Newcomb: America's Unofficial Astronomer Royal," by Bill Carter and Merri Sue Carter. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...The book is organized around a dozen events in Newcomb's life, leaving gaps that miss many fun anecdotes. For example, readers do not learn that Newcomb was the intentional prototype for Arthur Conan Doyle's archvillain Professor James Moriarty...."

57. Shackleford, Lee Eric. "Regarding Irene, Maud, and Tina." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 4 (1997): 28-29.

58. Shreffler, Philip A. "Last Moments of Enoch J. Drebber." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 51-57.

59. Southworth, Bruce E. "The Impact of James Winter on the Life of Sherlock Holmes." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 179-182.

Provides some additional information (or speculation) on the person of James Winter and the impact this person had on the relationship between Holmes and Watson.

60. Vogelsang, Jim. "Ramblings of an Old Shikari (of Man and Beast)." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 16-18.

Written as Colonel Sabastian Moran.

61. Walker, Lynn E. "Letters from Grosvenor Square." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 4 (2003): 7-9.

Written as Lady Clara St. Simon.

62. Wallace, David. "What Ever Became of Gallant Murray?" Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 40-42.

63. Wellendowd, Violet. "A Sonnet for Stapleton: 'I was a Baskerville'." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 5 (2001): 44.

64. White, Kathryn. "Review--The Dynamics of a Falling Star: Some notes on the late Professor Moriarty." The Ritual, no. 16 (1995): 58-59.

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Beryl Stapleton (1)

1. Black, Elliott M. "Beryl Stapleton." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 25.

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Charles Augustus Milverton (1)

1. Chapman, Paul M. "The Original Charles Augustus." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 27-30.

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Colonel Sebastian Moran (1)

1. Goldfarb, Clifford S. "The Hunt for Colonel Sebastian Moran." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 4-10.

"A distinguished Bootmaker seeks the model for one of Sherlock Holmes's most dastardly opponents in one of the most turbulent periods of English history."

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Irene Adler (16)

1. "Core Collection: Historical Mystery Timeline." Booklist 103, no. 17 (2007): 14-15.

This article presents reviews of books that are set between the year 80 BC and 1901. Includes a couple of Holmes references. "1881 Irene Adler series, by Carole Nelson Douglas (Forge). The beautiful opera singer who outwitted Sherlock Holmes takes center stage in a series of crime-solving capers....1915 Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes series, by Laurie R. King (Bantam). The famous detective's brilliant young apprentice becomes his partner in both mystery and marriage...."

2. "Miscellany." Writer 116, no. 7 (2003): 10.

Provides information on topics and issues related to literature as of July 2003. Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes under entry for Laurie R. King. "Had Laurie R. King known just how dedicated fans of Sherlock Holmes could be to the sanctity of Arthur Conan Doyle's stories, she wonders if she would have been so eager to invent Mary Russell, Holmes' investigative equal and eventual lovematch. 'No, come to think of it, I probably wouldn't have [hesitated],' she tells Mystery Readers International. Holmes, she says, 'needed a change, of the sort that opened up the aspects of his personality not previously explored during his Baker Street days.'...King's Mary Russell novels begin with The Beekeeper's Apprentice, when Holmes retires from his investigations to raise bees in the country. King points out that historically, 'Holmes responds to strong, capable women,' noting that the only female known to have 'tweaked his interest' was Irene Adler, the one person who was able to outwit him in a case. Holmes needed a challenge, says King--and in Mary Russell, 'he got one.'"

3. "Spider Dance: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Irene Adler and Sherlock Holmes (Book)." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 48 (2004): 27.

Reviews the book "Spider Dance: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Irene Adler and Sherlock Holmes," by Carole Nelson Douglas.

4. Black, Elliott M. "Irene Adler." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 20.

5. Bousquet, Robert J. "The Operatic Roles of Irene Adler." The Serpentine Muse 21, no. 4 (2005): 19-23.

6. Dillstone, Don. "Arthur Conan Doyle and Irene Adler." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 2 (2000): 9-13.

7. Dondis, Harold, and Patrick Wolff. "Chess Notes." The Boston Globe, May 20, 2002: C8.

"The matter of how to handle women's chess has been a dilemma for American chess for years. Women have traditionally been weaker players than men and there has been much debate over this subject. There has been the feeling that women shy from head-to-head competition and, perhaps, from defeating men. However, by winning at chess, they will earn respect. One role model must surely be Irene Adler, the only person in the works of Conan Doyle ever to outwit Sherlock Holmes. In the short story 'A Scandal of Bohemia,' Dr. Watson wrote of Adler, 'To Sherlock Holmes, she was always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex.'...Still, the only person to outwit Sherlock Holmes would not be able to join the Speckled Band, which is the Sherlock Holmes Club that meets annually on Boylston Street. The popular Speckled Band simply does not admit women."

8. Eustace, Grant. "Irene Adler Reconsidered." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 6-8.

9. Hughes, Linda K. "Novels of Everyday Life: The Series in English Fiction, 1850-1930 (review)." Victorian Studies 42, no. 3 (2000): 505-507.

Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...After examining the claims of Marxist analysis, cultural studies, and poststructuralism as approaches to the everyday, Langbauer performs a double reading of fiction and theory in each of four chapters and in her Afterword: of Oliphant's and Charlotte Yonge's series and the 'culture industry' ('Minor Fiction, Endless Progress'); of Trollope's series and hybridity ('The Everyday as Everything'); of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories and the city as site of dailiness and boredom ('The City, the Everyday, and Boredom')...Langbauer's chapter on Conan Doyle shrewdly notes that to counteract boredom Holmes focuses obsessively on the minutiae that constitute it before inevitably relapsing back into ennui. Moreover, his blind spot regarding women (he never thinks to look for Irene Adler dressed as a man on the street) exposes the desire of the series and of masculinist agents to transcend the mortality of the body associated with women's reproductive capacity while retaining its generativity, whereas Irene's ultimate decision not to blackmail the king suggests the uses of indifference (a variant of boredom) as a feminist intervention...."

10. Hyder, William. "Irene Adler: A Pronounced Disagreement." The Musgrave Papers, no. 10 (1997): 61-66.

11. Keefauver, Brad. "The Irene Adler Hoax." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 3 (1999): 24-26.

12. ———. "The Irene Myth and the Maudie Possibility." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 2 (1997): 35-40.

13. Kellogg, Richard L. "The Androgynous Ms. Adler." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 114-116.

Some thoughts on the person of Irene Adler.

14. Kreyche, Gerald F. "Second-Fiddle Females." USA Today Magazine 132, no. 2708 (2004): 82-82.

Focuses on the social bias against women. Belief about the secondary status of women; Biblical stories that emphasize women's secondary status; Implications of the Greek mythology on Pandora's Box; Information on how women are regarded in history. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...She is puzzling and contains contradictory elements. She is wise, but not formidably so. She is eternally young and like a phoenix rises out of her own ashes utterly renewed. The novel, She by H. Rider Haggard, exemplified this female archetype in the setting of ancient Egypt. Sherlock Holmes scholars recognize her in the opera star, Irene Adler, heroine of A Scandal in Bohemia. Holmes, however, also had this to say about the fair sex, 'The motives of women are so inscrutable.... How can you build on such a quicksand? Their most trivial action may mean volumes or their most extraordinary conduct may depend on a hairpin or a curling tong.' No wonder women still are trying to break through the glass ceiling, not only in business, but in world culture."

15. Murasawa, Hiroko. "Drawing -- 'Irene Adler'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 29.

16. Newhaus, Christian. "The Woman: Reflections on Irene Adler and Christine Daae." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 2 (1997): 28-29.

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Jonathan Small (1)

1. Marino, Joe. "A question of judgement: Jonathan Small, a re-appraisal." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 119-131.

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Mrs. Hudson (4)

1. Cardwell, James Moss. Mrs. Hudson?-- Mrs. Hudson!! a conceptual narrative treatment of an original musical. Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisconsin: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2000.

2. Cooke, Catherine. "Mrs. Hudson: A Legend in Her Own Lodging House." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 55, no. 2 (2005): 13-23.

3. Davies, Martin. Mrs. Hudson and the spirits' curse. New York: Berkley Prime Crime, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004054425; "Mrs. Hudson takes an interest in one of Holmes' cases, and with Flottie, the orphan girl in her care, is determined to solve the mystery."

4. Izban, Donald B. "A Toast to Mrs. Hudson, or Mrs. Turner, or Both." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 37.

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Mycroft Holmes (Including the Diogenes Club) (8)

1. Campbell, Mary. "Images of Mycroft." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 4 (2006): 16-30.

2. Coppola, Joseph A., Stu Shiffman, and Nancy Beiman. Occasionally the British government. Fayetteville, NY: Mycroft Holmes Society Press, 2000.

Scuttlebutt Aug 2000.; "Offers 156 pages of scholarship, poetry, pastiche, and artwork devoted (appropriately) to Mycroft Holmes."

3. Davies, Bernard. "Mycroft Country." The Musgrave Papers, no. 12 (1999): 78-88.

4. Fish, Ronald E. "Toast to Mycroft Holmes." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 4 (2001): 20.

5. Scheideman, J. W. "Mycroft Holmes/The Machine Metaphors: A Reflective Essay on Sherlock Holmes's Metaphoric Older Brother." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 7-12.

Some thoughts on Sherlock Holmes' older brother.

6. Shiffman, Stu. "The Secret Sons of Mycroft Holmes." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 2 (2003): 14-17.

7. ———. "The Secret Sons of Mycroft Holmes." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 21-24.

8. Wolder, Burt. "The Secret Identity of Mycroft Holmes." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 2 (2003): 18-23.

06E Writings About the Writings -- Other Characters -- Professor Moriarty (17)

1. "Into the falls." Economist 319, no. 7706 (1991): 88-88.

Reports on the re-enactment by the London Sherlock Holmes Society of the tragic struggle between the literary detective Holmes and his arch-rival, Professor Moriarty, at Reichenbach Falls on May 4, 1991, exactly 100 years after the event. Description of the centenary pilgrimage; Familiarity with the canon of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's work; Details.

2. "Vice rewarded." Economist, no. (1997): 2/3p.

Reviews two books pertaining to crime. 'The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief,' by Ben Macintyre; 'Allan Pinkerton: The First Private Eye,' by James Mackay. Includes reference to Holmes. "Worth was the prototype for Sherlock Holmes's arch-enemy, Professor Moriarty; another Sherlock Holmes story, 'The Valley of Fear', was inspired by the Pinkerton agency's infiltration and destruction of the Molly Maguires, a ruthless gang that operated in the coal fields. Pinkerton's son, William, did much to bring Worth to justice and later became a close friend of the rogue. Worth's son eventually worked for the Pinkerton agency."

3. Carter, Bill, and Merri Sue Carter. "Simon Newcomb, astronomer and personality." Physics Today 61, no. 2 (2008): 12-12.

A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Simon Newcomb: America's Unofficial Astronomer Royal," by Bradley Schaefer from the February 2007 issue. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...We did not mention in our book that some have suggested Newcomb as the 'intentional prototype for Arthur Conan Doyle's arch-villain Professor James Moriarty' or as the 'learn'd astronomer' in Walt Whitman's famous 'When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer,' because we found only speculations but no credible evidence that either claim is true. In fact, several scientists have been suggested as possible models for Professor Moriarty, among them Carl Friedrich Gauss. But the model that Doyle seems to imply in The Valley of Fear is the London arch criminal of the 18th century, Jonathan Wild. Why would Doyle choose as his prototype for Moriarty a relatively remote American astronomer rather than Wild, the locally well-known British villain and criminal?..."

4. Connell, David J. "Reviews: Book." British Heritage 19, no. 6 (1998): 61.

Reviews the book 'The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief,' by Ben MacIntyre. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...In addition to his lavish attire, Worth was an articulate and self-educated man who was often seen at the best London parties. He was so renowned as a master criminal, that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle fashioned the fictional master criminal, Moriarty, after him...."

5. Kinsley, Joseph. "Professor Moriarty: The French Connection." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 46, no. 3 (1996): 13-15.

6. Lehman, David. "The Napolean of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief." People 48, no. 17 (1997): 33.

Reviews the book The Napolean of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief, by Ben Macintyre. Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "The inspiration for Professor Moriarty, Sherlock Holmes's arch-nemesis, was a slight, dapper Civil War deserter who came to New York City and quickly rose from pickpocket to criminal mastermind. Adam Worth, the son of German Jewish immigrants, was a man of principle. He ruled out violence, refused to prey on the poor and treated the robbing of banks as if it were an intellectual problem. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Red Headed League is a replay of the memorable heist Worth engineered at Boston's Boylston National Bank in 1876...."

7. Meyer, Charles A. "Moriarty: The American Connection." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 73 (1993): 40-44.

8. Nathan, Paul. "Rights." Publishers Weekly 243, no. 51 (1996): 25.

Updates what is happening in contracts between publishers and authors, as of December 16, 1996. Negotiations proceeding on Arthur Golden's partial manuscript 'Memoirs of a Geisha,' a debut novel under contract in 10 countries; 'Napoleon of Crime,' by Ben Macintyre, scheduled to be published in May by Farrar, Straus & Giroux, touted as the first biography of Adam Worth, supposedly the model for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Professor Moriarty.

9. Olding, Alan C. "In Memoriam Moriarty (A Funeral Ode for May 4, 1891)." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 54.

10. Perry, Anne. "An international man of mystery." Civilization 4, no. 4 (1997): 83.

Reviews the book 'The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief,' by Ben Mcintyre. Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. "Adam Worth was almost certainly the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle's great criminal mastermind, Professor Moriarty, but anyone comparing the two does Worth a great disservice. In Ben Macintyre's portrayal, Worth is an infinitely more interesting character. Unlike those of Moriarty, Worth's passions and flaws, his weaknesses and his virtues, are essentially human, prompting empathy and at times admiration--or at least pity....Macintyre paints the times and the players with excellent detail. Notable among the supporting cast are the fabulously wealthy J. Pierpont Morgan and the dynamic and extremely complex William Pinkerton, who was Worth's Holmes. In the end, when Worth's health was broken by years spent in a Belgian prison, Pinkerton was the one man he could trust to help him return his beloved Duchess of Devonshire to her rightful owners and to ensure that his children received some benefit from what little estate was left after his death in 1902. In a denouement befitting a Conan Doyle tale, the master thief ultimately joined the master sleuth in the quest for justice."

11. Phillips, Mike. "Dark genius." New Statesman 126, no. 4345 (1997): 48.

Reviews the book 'The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, the Real Moriarty,' by Ben Macintyre.

12. Ricker, W. E. "The Absent Corpse Mystery Solved; or, Professor Moriarty in the Yukon." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 108-118.

13. Rompalske, Dorothy. "Biography reviews." Biography 1, no. 9 (1997): 91.

Reviews the book 'The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief,' by Ben Macintyre. "Behind a facade of upper-class respectability, the Victorian era's greatest criminal mastermind, Adam Worth, carried off robberies of such ingenuity that Arthur Conan Doyle used him as the model for his memorable villain, Professor Moriarty. Unlike the dastardly Moriarty, however, Worth rejected physical violence and displayed such loyalty to his partners in crime that he won the respect and affection of even his most ardent pursuer, the famous private detective William Pinkerton...."

14. Schaefer, Bradley E. "Simon Newcomb, astronomer and personality." Physics Today 61, no. 2 (2008): 12-13.

A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Simon Newcomb: America's Unofficial Astronomer Royal," by Bradley Schaefer from the February 2007 issue. Includes references to Moriarty and Doyle. "...Regarding Professor Moriarty, many frivolous claims have been made over the last century of Sherlockian literature, but only Newcomb has a long list of identical and unique matches with the biography of Moriarty. Newcomb also has three documented personal connections with Arthur Conan Doyle at the time the author was inventing the arch-villain. But Newcomb has no connection with Moriarty's criminal side. Doyle often used multiple sources for characters, and he explicitly told friends that the criminal side of Moriarty's career was modeled after Adam Worth, a London arch-villain famous at the time, and not after Jonathan Wild, a forgotten criminal from two centuries earlier. We all agree that Doyle did not model the criminal Side of Moriarty after Newcomb."

15. Smith, Phillip Thurmond. "Europe." History: Reviews of New Books 27, no. 1 (1998): 31.

Reviews the book 'The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief,' by Ben Macintyre. Includes a reference to Doyle. "They may not make criminals like that any more, but if we hold the nostalgia we are still left with the fascinating life of Adam Worth (1844-1902), an international thief whose career ended roughly a century ago, and who was the model for Arthur Conan Doyle's master criminal Professor Moriarty. Worth's audacity, multiple identities, and elusiveness kept both Scotland Yard and the American Pinkerton detectives on his trail for over thirty years...."

16. Trudel, Jean-Louis. "Simon Newcomb's Journey." Beaver 83, no. 6 (2003): 26-33.

Profiles Nova Scotian astronomer Simon Newcomb. Family background; Career highlights; Awards received; Accomplishments. Includes mutiple references to Doyle and Holmes, beginning with this one: "A yearning for knowledge would lead a Nova Scotia son far from home to become the most honoured astronomer of his day -- and, some think, the inspiration for Conan Doyle's villainous Moriarty...."

17. Wernick, Robert. "Book reviews." Smithsonian 28, no. 7 (1997): 152.

Reviews the book 'The Napolean of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief,' by Ben Macintyre.



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson

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