06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects (93)

1. Sherlock Holmes exhibit at the Shaw Festival Theatre, June 1994. 1994. Visual Material 1 portfolio (4 items).

ill., map, photo. ; 41 x 33 cm. + 1 descriptive list ([3] leaves ; 28 x 22 cm.) Copies of a map and photograph from the Buffalo & Erie County Public Library (Buffalo, N.Y.) and a clipping and a photocopy of newspaper articles from a private collection, all originally part of an exhibit at the Shaw Festival Theatre, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, celebrating the premiere at Buffalo's Star Theatre on Oct. 23, 1899 of the play, "Sherlock Holmes," written by and starring William Gillette.;

2. "Totally Weird and Wonderful Words/Gallimaufry: a Hodgepodge of our Vanishing Vocabulary." Touchstone: A Journal of Mere Christianity 20, no. 7 (2007): 40-40.

Reviews Totally Weird and Wonderful Words edited by Erin McKean Oxford University Press, 2006 (270 pages, $14.95, paperback) and Gallimaufry: A Hodgepodge of Our Vanishing Vocabulary by Michael Quinion Oxford University Press, 2006 (272 pages, $25.00, hardcover). Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "Have you ever wondered why the friends of Shakespeare's Bottom call him 'bully Bottom' or puzzled over exactly what Sherlock Holmes is calling for when he calls for a 'hackney carriage'? Erin McKean, editor in chief of the New Oxford American Dictionary, and the popular language enthusiast Michael Quinion are here to help...."

3. Addy, John. "Arsene Lupin Versus Sherlock Holmes." The Musgrave Papers, no. 10 (1997): 35-43.

4. Aiken, Bruce. "Some Comments on Class, Race and Ethnic Prejudice in the Sherlockian Canon." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 1 (1998): 18-24.

5. Aldrich, Fred. "On the Birthday of Sherlock Holmes: Some Thoughts About Oysters." Canadian Holmes 28, no. 2 (2004): 15-17.

6. Blankenship, Marshall L. "Sherlock Holmes in marine biology literature." International Journal of Dermatology 39, no. 11 (2000): 879.

"Discusses the interest of clinical dermatologists in the dermatological diagnoses featured in Sherlock Holmes novels created by Arthur Conan Doyle."

7. Blau, Peter E. "About Golf, and Rudyard Kipling, and Vermont, and Other Things." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 8-13.

8. Bogomoletz, Wladimir V. "Who Was François le Villard? Sherlock Holmes and the Paris Detective Service." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 51, no. 3 (2001): 14-23.

9. Duke, Michael. "Sherlock Holmes' Other Doctors." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 37-43.

10. Foreman, Amanda. Die Herzogin von Devonshire : das Leben einer leidenschaftlichen Frau. Ungekürzte Taschenbuchausg. ed, (Serie Piper). München, Zürich: Piper, 2003.

ill. ; 19 cm. Translated by Susanne Friederike Levin und Martina M. Oepping. / Uniform Title: Georgiana, Dutchess of Devonshire.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

11. ———. Georgiana : das lustvolle Leben der Herzogin von Devonshire. Stuttgart: München, 2001.

ill. ; 22 cm. Translated by Susanne Friederike Levin and Martina M. Oepping. / Uniform Title: Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

12. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Random House, 1999.

ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm. 1. Debutante: 1757-1774 -- 2. Fashion's Favourite: 1774-1776 -- 3. The Vortex of Dissipation: 1776-1778 -- 4. A Popular Patriot: 1778-1781 -- 5. Introduction to Politics: 1780-1782 -- 6. The Newcomer: 1782-1783 -- 7. An Unstable Coalition: 1783 -- 8. A Birth and a Death: 1783-1784 -- 9. The Westminster Election: 1784 -- 10. Opposition: 1784-1786 -- 11. Queen Bess: 1787 -- 12. Menage a Trois: 1788 -- 13. The Regency Crisis: 1788-1789 -- 14. The Approaching Storm: 1789-1790 -- 15. Exposure: 1790-1791 -- 16. Exile: 1791-1793 -- 17. Return: 1794-1796 -- 18. Interlude: 1796 -- 19. Isolation: 1796-1799 -- 20. Georgiana Redux: 1800-1801 -- 21. Peace: 1801-1802 -- 22. Power Struggles: 1802-1803 -- 23. The Doyenne of the Whig Party: 1803-1804 -- 24. "The Ministry of All the Talents": 1804-1806. Includes bibliographical references (p. [423]-432) and index.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

13. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. Pbk. ed. London: HarperCollins, 1999.

ill. (some col.), ports. (some col.) ; 20 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 439-449) and index.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

14. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. London: HarperCollins, 1998.

ill. (some col.), ports. ; 24 cm. Geneal. tables on lining papers. Includes bibliographical references (p. 439-449) and index.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

15. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. New York: Modern Library, 2001.

ill. ; 21 cm. Originally published: London : HarperCollins, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (p. [423]-432) and index.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

16. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. Large type ed. Thorndike, Me. ; Bath, England: Thorndike Press; Chivers Press, 2000.

ill. ; 23 cm. "Originally published in Great Britain by HarperCollinsPublishers, London, in 1998"--T.p. verso. Includes bibliographical references (p. 909-935).; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

17. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire: Random House, 2000.

1st U.S. ed. ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm. Publication date from CIP data. Genealogical chart on endpapers. Includes bibliographical references (p. [423]-432) and index. Internet Resource Date of Entry: 19990421; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

18. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Random House, 1998.

ill. (some col.), geneal. tables ; 25 cm. Débutante: 1757-1774 -- Fashion's favourite: 1774-1776 -- Vortex of dissipation: 1776-1778 -- Popular patriot: 1778-1781 -- Introduction to politics: 1780-1782 -- Newcomer: 1782-1783 -- Unstable coalition: 1783 -- Birth and a death: 1783-1784 -- Westminster election: 1784 -- Opposition: 1784-1786 -- Queen Bess: 1787 -- Ménage à trois: 1788 -- Regency crisis: 1788-1789 -- Approaching storm: 1789-1790 -- Exposure: 1790-1791 -- Exile: 1791-1793 -- Return: 1794-1796 -- Interlude: 1796 -- Isolation: 1796-1799 -- Georgiana redux: 1800-1801 -- Peace: 1801-1802 -- Power struggles: 1802-1803 -- Doyenne of the Whig party: 1803-1804 -- "The ministry of all the talents": 1804-1806. Genealogical chart on lining papers./ Includes bibliographical references (p. [423]-432) and index.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

19. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. New York, London: Random House; Hi Marketing, 2001.

20 cm.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

20. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. London: HarperCollins, 1999.

ill. (some col.), facsims., geneal. tables, ports. (some col.) ; 20 cm. Originally published: London: HarperCollins, 1998. Includes index. Bibliography.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

21. ———. Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. Large type ed. Bath: Windsor, 2000.

25 cm. Originally published: London: HarperCollins, 1998. Publisher's no. AC5653.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

22. ———. Georgiana, duquesa de Devonshire. Barcelona: Omega, 2001.

Il. col. ; 20 cm. Rústica./ Biogr.individ./ Premio Whitbread 1998 a la Biografía del Año./ Título original: Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. traducción del inglés de Rosa Pérez.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

23. ———. Georgiana's World. London: HarperCollinsIllustrated, 2001.

col. ill. ; 26 cm.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

24. ———. Georgiana's World : the illustrated Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. London: HarperCollins, 2001.

col. ill., geneal. tables ; 26 cm.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

25. ———. "The Political Life of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, 1757-1806." Thesis/dissertation (deg); Manuscript (mss), University of Oxford, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references (leaves 263-289).; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

26. Foreman, Amanda, and Margareta Eklöf. Georgiana : 1757-1806 : en ädel engelskas uppgång och fall. Stockholm: Norstedt, 2001.

ill. ; 24 cm. Translated by Margareta Eklöf.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

27. Foreman, Amanda Lucy. The Political Life of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, 1757-1806: University of Oxford, 1998.

PhD thesis. ; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

28. ———. The Political Life of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, 1757-1806. Boston Spa, U.K.: British Library Document Supply Centre, 1998.

BLDSC reference no.: D205832.; It was Gainsborough's portrait of Georgiana that was stolen by Adam Worth, and she's the duchess mentioned in the Canon (in 'A Case of Identity'), where Miss Mary Sutherland's broad-brimmed hat was 'tilted in a coquettish Duchess of Devonshire fashion over her ear.'"

29. Greene, Douglas G. "The Only Women: The Female Sleuth in Fiction." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 2 (2003): 6-13.

30. Hahn, Robert W. "Horse Racing in the Victorian era." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 34-36.

31. Hirayama, Yuichi. "The Japanese Rivals of Sherlock Holmes." The Nezire Zanmai International 1, no. (1991): 21-31.

32. Hobbs, Don. "Review--The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 6 (2003): 12.

33. Horn, Pamela. The Victorian Town Child. Stroud: Sutton, 1997.

ill., facsims. ; 25cm. Scuttlebutt Sep 1999; "Details on just what sort of life the original Baker Street Irregulars led."

34. Hurd, Cheryl A. The Victorian yellow pages: resources for your Victorian lifestyle. 1st ed. Scotia, N.Y: Teapot Press, 1995.

LC Control Number: 96102036;

35. Jeffers, H. Paul. Bloody business : an anecdotal history of Scotland Yard. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1999.

ill. ; 22 cm. Previously published: [S.l.]: H. Paul Jeffers, 1992. Includes index. Scuttlebutt Jan 2001.; "The book is an interesting history of the Yard, with due attention to Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (who has his own chapter)."

36. Jewell, Donald Girard. The Meteorological Holmes: a monograph on weather and forecasting in the time of Sherlock Holmes, (The Sherlock Holmes natural history series). Westminster, MD: Pinchin Lane Press, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Jul 1997; "Illustrated with artwork of the period, is the ninth volume in his interesting Sherlock Holmes Natural History Series."

37. Kean, Michael H. Sherlock Holmes-- vintage and spirited, (The Pondicherry Press monograph series). Pebble Beach, California: The Pondicherry Press, 1997.

38. Kinsella, Eileen. "The Case of the Scarce Dust Jacket." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 10/16/98, 1998: W14.

Provides information on the first edition of The Hound of the Baskervilles.

39. Klinger, Leslie S. "Domestic Violence in the Canon." Passengers' Log 6, no. 2 (2003): 13-15.

40. ———. Re: Vampires. Malibu: Daypark Press, 2002.

41. ———. "Vampires in Transylvania". Malibu: Daypark Press, 2006.

42. Kovacic, Chuck. "Up in Smoke: A Presentation of Sherlockian Cigar Box Labels." Baker Street West 1 1, no. 2 (1995): 14-19.

43. Lahey, John. Damn you, John Christie! the public life of Australia's Sherlock Holmes. Melbourne: State Library of Victoria, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93176627. Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-276) and index;

44. Livingston, Bud. "Birth Control in the Canon." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 50, no. 3 (2000): 44-45.

45. Macintyre, Ben. The Napoleon of crime: the life and times of Adam Worth, master thief. 1st American., 1st Farrar, Straus and Giroux ed. New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1997.

LC Control Number: 97000520; Scuttlebutt Apr 1997. Includes bibliographical references (p. [299]-328) and index; "An expanded version of his stories in The Times and the N.Y. Times when the famous Gainsborough portrait of the Duchess of Devonshire, once stolen by Worth, went to auction."

46. ———. The Napoleon of crime: the life and times of Adam Worth, master thief. New York: Dell Pub., 1998.

"Delta Trade Paperbacks."/ Originally published: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1997./ Includes bibliographical references (p. [301]-335) and index.;

47. ———. The Napoleon of crime: the life and times of Adam Worth, master thief. London: HarperCollins, 1997.

Includes index.;

48. ———. The Napoleon of crime: the life and times of Adam Worth, master thief. London: Flamingo, 1998.

Originally published: London : HarperCollins, 1997./ Includes index.;

49. ———. The Napoleon of crime: the life and times of Adam Worth, master thief. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books, 1998 8 sound cassettes (11 hours, 15 min.) :; analog.

Narrated by Simon Prebble.;

50. McKuras, Julie. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 3.

Highlights the 1949 publication of John Dickson Carr's biography, The Life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

51. ———. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 3.

Some observations on two anthologies published in 1949 and found in the John Bennett Shaw Collection that feature Silver Blaze: The Horse-Lovers Anthology and The Great Horse Omnibus.

52. ———. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 3.

Observations on the 1949 publication, the Baker Street Rubaiyat by Nathan L. Bengis.

53. ———. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 2.

Highlights an article by Gertrude Bacon in the June 1899 Strand Magazine entitled "Pigs of Celebrities" that features artwork by Arthur Conan Doyle.

54. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 5.

Comments on articles and contributions in this issue of the newsletter from Peter Blau, Doug Wrigglesworth, Tim Johnson, Catherine Cooke, and Dick Sveum. Also noted are Susan Dahlinger's continued work on William Gillette, one of the items displayed in the New York exhibit, and the passing of cartoonist Charles Schulz.

55. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 7.

Comments on the writings in this issue; the newest contributor/writer for the newsletter, John Bergquist; and the passing of E. W. McDiarmid. Includes a photograph of "the Man behind Mrs. Hudson."

56. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 5-6.

Some reflections from the new editor of the newsletter on the work of individuals in support of the Collections, current writings in this issue, additional information on the Morleys (from the last issue), and the curator's appointment to a national committee.

57. ———. "Supporting the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 7.

Discusses ways in which donors can contribute to the Collections, with examples of matching giving from Ecolab and planned giving, in the example of David Hammer.

58. ———. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 6.

Reports on some of the recent research visits to the Collections, including Masamichi (Mitch) Higurashi from Japan and Doug Elliott from Canada. Includes a picture of Mitch Higurashi.

59. Michaud, Rosemary. "Victor Victorian: Some Thoughts on Cross-Dressing in the Canon." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 1 (1997): 25-30.

60. Morstein, Mona. "Sherlock Holmes and Homeopathy." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 4 (2002): 46-54.

61. Motion, Andrew. Wainewright the Poisoner. London: Faber, 2001.

ill., facsims., ports. ; 20 cm. Originally published: 2000. Includes bibliographical references and index.; "The biography's subject is Thomas Griffiths Wainewright (1794-1847), who was (according to Sherlock Holmes, in 'The Illustrious Client') both a great criminal and no mean artist."

62. ———. "Wainewright the Poisoner." Alfred A. Knopf, 2000.

1st American ed. ill. ; 26 cm. Machine generated contents note: I I Introduce Myself and Disappear 3 -- Notes 9 -- 2 Are We? io -- Notes 18 -- 3 Habits of Regularity 23 -- Notes 30 -- 4 Simplicity and Finish 34 -- Notes 40 -- 5 I Become a Renegade 42 -- Notes 47 -- 6 The Bold Lover 50 -- Notes 56 -- 7 Gods of My Worship 59 -- Notes 67 -- 8 The Fairest Relics of the Purest Times 74 -- Notes 83 -- 9 Gentle-Hearted Janus 89 -- Notes ioo -- Io What Is Mine I07 -- Notes I13 -- I All Bull's-Eye ii6 -- Notes 123 -- 12 True Nature 15 -- Notes 132i -- 13 Bills of Sale 134 -- Notest 141 -- 14 Knock, Knock, Knock 144 -- Notes 152 -- I5 IStarve '59 -- Notes 167 -- I6 IAmNobody 172 -- Notes 18I -- 7 A Desperado 184 -- Notes 19 -- I8 A-a-a-ah! Quee! 193 -- Notes 204 -- 19 Number 2325 206 -- Notes 218 -- 20 Low Cunning and Revenge 223 -- Notes 234 -- 21 Miserable Petitioner 238 -- Notes 247 -- Afterword 25z -- Select Bibliography 265 -- Index 27z. Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-269) and index. Internet Resource Date of Entry: 19991210; "The biography's subject is Thomas Griffiths Wainewright (1794-1847), who was (according to Sherlock Holmes, in 'The Illustrious Client') both a great criminal and no mean artist."

63. ———. Wainewright the Poisoner. London: Faber and Faber, 2000.

ill., ports., facsims. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references.; "The biography's subject is Thomas Griffiths Wainewright (1794-1847), who was (according to Sherlock Holmes, in 'The Illustrious Client') both a great criminal and no mean artist."

64. ———. Wainewright the Poisoner : the confession of Thomas Griffiths Wainewright: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

University of Chicago Press pbk. ed. ill. ; 23 cm. Contributor biographical information http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bios/uchi051/2001048009.html Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/uchi051/2001048009.html Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-269) and index. National bibliography no: GBA1-V3580; "The biography's subject is Thomas Griffiths Wainewright (1794-1847), who was (according to Sherlock Holmes, in 'The Illustrious Client') both a great criminal and no mean artist."

65. Richards, Dana. "To Hell with Sherlock Holmes." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 13-16.

Some observations on the relationship and perceptions between Holmes and the police.

66. Roden, Christopher. "Concerning Men With Watches and Lost Specials." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 82-91.

67. Ross, Thomas Wynne. Good old index the Sherlock Holmes handbook : a guide to the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, persons, places, themes, summaries of all the tales, with commentary on the style of the author. 1st ed. Columbia, SC: Camden House, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96000749;

68. Rusch, Barbara. "A Singular Set of People: Collectors, Collections, and Private Museums of the Canon." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 2 (2003): 39-45.

69. Scott, Alison M. "Organizing the Brain Attic: Indexing the Commonplace Books of Sherlock Holmes." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 4 (1994): 199-203.

Presents some observations and thoughts on Holmes memory and his memory aids--his commonplace books and indexes--and how these might have been arranged or structured.

70. Scullion, Hugh S. The Sherlock Holmes Reference Manual. London: Cadds Printing, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Jun 1997; "Offers indexes to Canonical murderers, smoking and tobacco, ships, wrongful arrests, characters and places mentioned, and other topics."

71. Silverstein, Albert. "Sherlock Holmes, Jews and Rhode Island." Rhode Island Jewish Historical Notes 14, no. 2 (2004): 336-352.

The author, a psychologist and professor at the University of Rhode Island, describes his own and others' 20th-century studies of Sherlock Holmes, the detective character created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The article considers Rhode Island's Sherlock Holmes societies and examines both specific references to Jews in the Holmes canon and evidence of Doyle's attitudes toward victims of persecution.

72. Skoyles, Lesley. "The Arthur Conan Doyle Pub, Edinburgh." The Ritual, no. 13 (1994): 24-25.

73. Smith, Edward S., Jr. "Canonical Canines." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 2 (1999): 41-44.

74. Société Sherlock Holmes de France, and France) Louvre des antiquaires (Paris. L'univers de Sherlock Holmes au Louvre des Antiquaires une étude. Paris: Louvre des Antiquaires, 1997.

Includes bibliographical references; Scuttlebutt Jul 1997; "An attractive booklet published to accompany the exhibition at the Louvre des Antiquaires in Paris; it's an excellent anthology of scholarship by members of the Societe Sherlock Holmes de France (all in French), with caricatures by Jean-Pierre Cagnat, and an intriguing Sherlockian discovery in one of Camille Pissarro's paintings."

75. Solito, Enrico. "Sherlock Holmes and Italy." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 179-182.

76. Southworth, Bruce E. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 5-Highlights the contents of this issue of the newsletter.

77. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 4.

Highlights articles in the present issue and also notes Peter Blau's discovery that Tsar Nicholas II, while in captivity with his family in Tsarkoe Selo, read The Valley of Fear.

78. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 4.

Comments on the various articles appearing in this issue of the newsletter, with additional commentary on the 1894 photograph of Doyle noted in previous issues, additional information on the identity of Frances Crane, and a note on the election of Julie McKuras as the new president of the Norwegian Explorers.

79. Stampe, Mia. "Holmes in Scandinavia 2000." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 212-214.

80. Stampe, Mia, and Mattias Bostrom. "Sherlock Holmes in Scandinavia 2002." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 153-155.

81. Stampe, Mia, Nils Nordberg, and Mattias Bostrom. "Sherlock Holmes in Scandinavia 2001." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 186-190.

82. Sveum, Richard J. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 4.

Provides an update on the Friends activities, including the annual membership meeting to be held in August, thanks for contributions, and the University's Friends of the Libraries.

83. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 4.

Words of thanks to Jamie Hubbs, Collections Specialist, who leaves to go back to school and Bruce Southworth, who concludes his work as editor of the newsletter. Also a word on the upcoming Friends membership meeting and on the donation of collections.

84. ———. "A Word from our President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 5.

Comments on the various activities of the Friends of the Holmes Collections and the University of Minnesota Libraries, including materials and gifts received for the Collections, securing a new curator, construction of the new Library Access Center, and the upcoming membership meeting.

85. Tanaka, Kiyoshi. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes in Kamakura City'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 72.

86. ———. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes in Kamakura City'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 72.

87. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 222, 228, 231.

88. Trapp, David James. "Observations on Freehold Estates and the Fee Tail." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 165-168.

Provides some understanding of English property law which, in turn, aids in understanding such legal references as found in some of the tales.

89. Upton, Jean. "Brides in the Canon." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 31-40.

90. Valley, Richard. "Crossed-Dressed to Kill: Transvestism and the World of Sherlock Holmes." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 22-30.

91. Vaught, Richard L. "Polytheism, Monotheism and Sherlock Holmes." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 37-39.

92. Vaulbert de Chantilly, Marc. Wainewright the Poisoner : an example of Andrew Motion's "high scholarship". London: Vanity Press of Bethnal Green, 2000.

21 cm. Limited ed. of 100 copies. Includes bibliographical references.; "The biography's subject is Thomas Griffiths Wainewright (1794-1847), who was (according to Sherlock Holmes, in 'The Illustrious Client') both a great criminal and no mean artist."

93. White, Kathryn. "Behind the Veil: Facial Disfigurement in the Conan Doyle Stories." The Ritual, no. 13 (1994): 13-21.

06F Writings about the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Animals (1)

1. Dorn, William S., and Ian Malcolm Earlson. The dogs of Sherlock Holmes. Denver: Pencil Productions Ltd, 2005.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 99-100); Offers the dog's side of the story for 20 of the 60 dogs which appear in the Canon. Quite often, as the dogs reveal, Holmes' deductions were based on faulty logic and less than the full story. Was the Hound of the Baskervilles a vicious monster or a children's playmate?

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Architecture (2)

1. Groves, Derham. Better Holmes and gardens : Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle and architectural design "down under" an exhibit of architectural design & practice based on stories and characters from the Doyle/Holmes canon. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Libraries, 2000.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 20-25);

2. ———. "Better Homes and Gardens: Sense of Place in the Sherlock Homes Stories." Journal of Popular Culture 36, no. 3 (2003): 466.

In Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's autobiography, "Memories and Adventures," the creator of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson chose to sum up his life's work as a writer in architectural terms. Doyle's choice of metaphor in this description is not surprising given that his father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was an architect with the Scottish Office of Works. Little is known about Charles' architectural career, although he is credited with designing the fountain at Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh and one of the windows in Glasgow Cathedral. Some of Doyle's literary houses were undoubtedly inspired by real places, such as the "wooden outhouse" in "Black Peter" which Peter Carey, the disreputable retired captain of the steam-sealer, Sea Unicorn, "built himself. . . a few hundred yards from his house. The idea that a house can tell a story about its occupants was behind a design project called "Better Holmes and gardens" which have run both at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), and at the University of Melbourne. It involved architecture students early in the course each designing a house for the characters in a Sherlock Holmes story of his or her choice. For example, in 2001, the students could have chosen to design a house for the disfigured circus performer Euginia Ronder in "The Veiled Lodgers."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Art (77)

1. Bergem, Phillip G. "David Henry Friston: First Artist of the Canon." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 4 (2003): 23-25.

2. Boetschi, Marianne. "Drawing -- 'A Scandal in Bohemia'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 205.

3. ———. "Drawing -- 'Abbey Grange'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 62.

4. ———. "Drawing -- 'Baker Street 221B, London; Holmes and Moriarty'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 10.

5. ———. "Drawing -- 'Devil's Foot'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 120.

6. ———. "Drawing -- 'East Wind (His Last Bow); von Bork and Altamont'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 133.

7. ———. "Drawing -- 'East Wind (His Last Bow); von Bork, tied'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 163.

8. ———. "Drawing -- 'Eastwind (sic); Harwich Harbor'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 218.

9. ———. "Drawing -- 'Lady Carfax'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 75.

10. ———. "Drawing -- 'The (sic) Silver Blaze'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 108.

11. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Blue Carbuncle'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 126.

12. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Dying Detective; Culverton Smith'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 24.

13. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Red Headed League'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 226.

14. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Second Stain'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 111.

15. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Second Stain'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 117.

16. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Speckled Band'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 222.

17. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Tree Barridebs' (sic)." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 98.

18. Cagnat, Jean-Pierre. "Drawing -- 'How are you? You have been in New Mexico, I Perceive'." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 7.

19. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Editor'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 98.

20. ———. "Drawings -- 'A Visit at my Great-Uncle, Horace Vernet'." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 47-54.

21. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1993'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 23-28.

22. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1994'." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 47-50.

23. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1996'." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 93-96.

24. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1999'." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 93.

25. ———. "Drawings -- 'Barbizon'." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 121-124.

26. ———. "Drawings -- 'Montpelier 1993'." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 15-18.

27. ———. "Drawings -- 'Some Graves in the Churchyard of Pere Lachaise'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 24-25.

28. ———. "Drawings -- 'The Unauthorized Pictures What I Discovered'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 127-130.

29. ———. "Drawings -- 'Thirty Minutes at the Monument'." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 140-141.

30. Camargo, Graciliano. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 182.

31. ———. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 190.

32. Carlile, David. "Pensive Holmes (illustration)." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 123.

33. Hasler, Martin. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 102.

34. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 103.

35. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 157.

36. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 159.

37. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 160.

38. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 162.

39. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 163.

40. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 164.

41. Hirayama, Hiroko. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 61.

42. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 75.

43. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 36.

44. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 36.

45. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 42.

46. ———. "Drawings -- Sherlockian Gallery III." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 78-79.

47. Kasahara, Seiji. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 15.

48. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 20.

49. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 37.

50. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 54.

51. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 65.

52. ———. "Drawings--'Sherlockian Gallery'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 40-45.

53. Langeveld, Colin. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 178.

54. ———. "An Illustration (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 178.

55. McGee, Tom. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 14.

56. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 63.

57. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 34.

58. ———. "Drawings -- 'Sherlockian Gallery II'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 64-67.

59. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 14, 17, 49, 77, 121, 123, 133.

60. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 37, 39, 42, 72, 80, 86, 88, 100, 105, 108, 112, 146.

61. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 85, 86, 92, 98, 107.

62. Murasawa, Hiroko. "Drawing -- 'Holmes and Watson'." The Nezire Zanmai International 1, no. (1991): 31.

63. ———. "Drawing -- 'Irene Adler'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 29.

64. ———. "Drawing -- 'John H. Watson MD'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 19.

65. ———. "Drawing -- 'Mary Morstan Watson'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 89.

66. ———. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 14.

67. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 16, 20.

68. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 37, 54, 65.

69. Nakano, Kayoho. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 5, 11, 47, 49, 52, 57, 58.

70. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 5, 21, 28, 71, 75, 79.

71. Shiffman, Stu. "Drawing -- Featuring 'Holmes of Two Worlds'." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 150.

72. ———. "Drawing -- Prod. #107 'The Riding Hood Case'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 173.

73. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 173.

74. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 19, 88, 106, 187.

75. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 12, 19, 27, 151.

76. Stampe, Mia. "Vernet and Thorvaldsen: A Discussion of the Vernet Relation and an Artistic Connection with Danish Roots." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 52, no. 3 (2002): 42-49.

77. Whelan, Michael, and David A Cherry. The art of Michael Whelan: scenes, visions. New York: Bantam Books, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93012706; Scuttlebutt Nov 1997; "Michael Whelan is one of the very best artists in the world of fantasy and science fiction, and this book offers a fine display of his work, including the full-color and previously-unpublished portraits of 'Sherlock Hoka' and 'Moriarty Hoka' that were painted in 1983 for a 'Hoka' movie project based on the stories by Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson. Alas, the movie was never produced, but their delightful short story 'The Adventure of the Misplaced Hound' was published in Universe Science Fiction (Dec. 1953) and in Earthman's Burden (New York: Gnome Press, 1957). Note: the artist is not the "Wiggins" of The Baker Street Irregulars."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Baker Street, 221b (28)

1. "Abbey National Unveil Bronze of Sherlock Holmes." Birmingham Post, October 9, 1999: 32.

"In the detective's shadow: Abbey National has tried to dilute the image of banks as soulless organisations, whose only driving force is the creation of profit, by unveiling a three-metre high bronze of Sherlock Holmes as part of its 150th anniversary celebrations. The move commemorates the bank's 'association' with the detective, dating back to 1932, when Abbey's head offices moved to Baker Street and incorporated Holmes' fictional address of 211b. Abbey still receives letters addressed to the crime-buster, which are answered by his 'secretary' who works for the bank."

2. "The best of Brickish; Japanese flock to admire our building blocks of history." Daily Mail (London), May 5, 1998: 25.

"Squat and solid, they are regarded with hushed awe by the visitors who file past every day. Treasured for their shape and texture and marvelled at for their lasting quality, these are the precious prize exhibits in a Japanese museum. British bricks, it seems, are building up a reputation for themselves. Back home, they can be found cluttering up back gardens, littering building sites or even propping open doors. But the Japanese believe our bricks deserve more respect. At the World Brick Museum in Maizuru, north-west of Kyoto, specimens are kept lovingly in glass cases and treated as works of art. More than 10,000 visitors a month go to look at them. The Japanese fascination with British bricks probably has something to do with the rarity of brick buildings in Japan. The high risk of earthquakes has made building with bricks a risky business. So when the museum hosted an exhibition of just 16 bricks, titled 'Sherlock Holmes and English Bricks', record numbers of visitors flocked through the doors. They feasted their eyes on a collection of clay from Covent Garden, Scotland Yard, the Royal Albert Hall, St Pancras Station and 221B Baker Street - the detective's home address. The museum curators enlisted the help of the city of Portsmouth to compile the exhibition after discovering that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created the character of Sherlock Holmes while living there in 1887...."

3. "Even Sherlock Holmes." The Daily Telegraph (London), January 23, 2001: 29.

"Even Sherlock Holmes, the former occupant of Abbey National's Baker Street headquarters, would need a few more clues to assess whether the former building society's bid for Bank of Scotland is better than Lloyds TSB's approach for Abbey...."

4. "Holmes' place." The Evening Standard (London), August 4, 1999: 12.

"Lord Tugendhat is hoping the cash registers of the Abbey National will be going ching! ching! over the Abbey's links with Sherlock Holmes. The bank, of which he is chairman, is sponsoring a statue of Conan Doyle's great detective as part of its 150th anniversary celebrations. 221b Baker Street, where Holmes and Watson were so capably looked after by Mrs Hudson, has been occupied by Abbey National since 1932, and the Sherlock Holmes Society has long pleaded for a statue there...."

5. "Holmes' Statue is on the Case!". Birmingham Evening Mail, September 24, 1999: 37.

"A bronze statue of the world's best-known fictional detective was unveiled in London. The statue of Sherlock Holmes stands outside Baker Street underground station, near to where the detective lived at the fictional number 221b. Abbey National, whose head office is located on the site of what would be 221b Baker Street, has sponsored the work to mark its 150th anniversary...."

6. "Sherlock homes in on London address." The Evening Standard (London), September 21, 1999: 19.

"The final touches are being put to a 9ft statue of the great sleuth Sherlock Holmes which will stand outside Baker Street Tube station - close to the fictional detective's London address. The bronze, by Essex sculptor John Doubleday, has been commissioned by the Sherlock Holmes Society whose chairman Lord Tugendhat will unveil it on Thursday...."

7. "Superb Take Holmes Pay; Job Vacancy for Sherlock Holmes Lookalike at Museum." The Mirror, January 29, 1998: 34.

"Looking for a job with a difference? It's elementary, dear Watson. The Baker Street Museum has a vacancy for a Sherlock Holmes lookalike at its famous address in London. It is just one of a range of opportunities you'll find in Summer Jobs Britain '98 and Summer Jobs Abroad '98 (both GBP 8.99)...."

8. "Tellers' Tales." New Statesman 128, no. 4453 (1999): vi.

Presents several trivia related to the banking industry. Includes reference to Holmes and 221B Baker Street. "Abbey House, the Baker Street headquarters of Abbey National, receives about 100 letters a week addressed to Sherlock Holmes, 221b Baker Street. They are fielded by a special secretary to Sherlock Holmes."

9. Barlay, Nick. "Statues of the London." The Times (London), May 15, 2004: 31.

Unveiled by Harold Wilson in 1966, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi's serene sculptural presence in Tavistock Square Gardens has become a focal point for peace memorials and events, just as his strategy of non-violent non-cooperation (satyagraha) has become a byword for peaceful resistance. Pandit Nehru, the former Prime Minister of India, planted a copper beech tree near by to commemorate his visit to London in 1953, and a cherry tree was planted in 1967 for the victims of Hiroshima. Each year on October 2, Gandhi's birth is celebrated with a huge display of flowers. To find Gandhi's statue, the great man's own instructions will help: "There is no way to peace. Peace is the way." The recent murder of Lancelyn Green, the renowned Sherlock Holmes expert, only fuels the transatlantic excitement of American and British fans: is there a Conan Doyle curse? What is true, of course, is that Holmes lived at 221b Baker Street, which is now a museum complete with very real souvenirs. Around the corner in front of Baker Street station is a statue of the famous detective by the sculptor John Doubleday, who is responsible for a number of London's more populist enterprises. The statue was unveiled in 1999 by Lord Tugendhat, the chairman of Abbey National Bank. The association with Holmes goes back to 1932, when the company built its headquarters at 200 Baker Street. Soon, a "secretary to Sherlock Holmes" had to be appointed to deal with the constant letters addressed to 221b. A permanent memorial to the world's most translated and performed playwright after Shakespeare was first proposed by the film director Derek Jarman, but it wasn't until 1998 that Oscar Wilde secured a place in Central London. Maggi Hambling's bronze in Adelaide Street near Trafalgar Square was unveiled by Stephen Fry and is less formal than the blue plaque at Wilde's residence in Tite Street in Chelsea. Entitled A Conversation with Oscar Wilde 1854-1900, the memorial consists of a sarcophagus, out of which pokes the writer's head. According to Hambling, the sculpture is "completed" when a member of the public sits down on the sarcophagus to have a chat with the author. In addition, the rebellious Wilde is depicted smoking, once a symbol of moral decay. Inscribed on the memorial is that wonderful quote by Wilde: "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."

10. Bennett, Suzy. "Scenes of the crime." The Daily Telegraph (London), May 12, 2007: 13.

"...For fans of Britain's original detective, the Sherlock Holmes Museum at 221b Baker Street, London, is an obvious place to visit...along with the Sherlock Holmes pub on nearby Northumberland Avenue, which exhibits props used in the films. Further afield, in Devon, mist-wreathed Dartmoor was the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, although most of the 2002 film version of the story took place in Glen Maye, Jurby and Druidale on the Isle of Man...."

11. Boetschi, Marianne. "Drawing -- 'Baker Street 221B, London; Holmes and Moriarty'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 10.

12. Campbell, Mark. "Hot on Sherlock Holmes's Trail; Mark Campbell Sniffs Out the London Haunts of Conan Doyle's Legendary Sleuth." The Independent (London), October 27, 2001: 7.

"One of the most famous literary addresses in London is 221b Baker Street. There's only one problem - the cosy rooms of amateur detective Sherlock Holmes and his friend, John H Watson, don't actually exist. The 'real' 221b, subsumed by the head office of the Abbey National, is not a worthy place of veneration. However, down the street in the Sherlock Holmes Museum..., you'll find a mock 221b frontage and a frighteningly accurate rendition of the dark and cluttered Victorian interior of Conan Doyle's stories. But for every fictitious address in the Canon (the official term for the four novels and 56 short stories featuring Holmes and Watson), you'll find plenty of bona fide locations in the capital. To begin with, turn the corner into Wigmore Street and you pass the post office that Holmes magically deduced Watson had visited in The Sign of Four (1890)...."

13. Carlton, Michael. "Inside Yankee." Yankee 68, no. 3 (2004): 6-6.

Recounts the bird watching experience of a journalist in Highlands, Scotland. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "I was on assignment for the Los Angeles Times/Washington Post News Service, writing various stories from the U.K., ranging from Princess Diana's first trip to Balmoral, the magnificent country house of the Windsors, to interviewing the man who actually lived at 221b Baker Street, the fictional home of Sherlock Holmes...."

14. Dalby, Stewart. "Play dough: Hot on the trail of the man who never was: Sherlock Holmes was a fictional character but that doesn't stop people collecting anything to do with him." The Guardian (London), July 15, 2000: 24.

"Sherlock Holmes never existed, of course. Nor did his much-loved dwellings at 221b Baker Street in London. But try telling Kazie Kamaza, one of the thousands of visitors who flock to the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Company in Baker Street each year....Almost exactly opposite is the Sherlock Holmes Museum, housed in a former Victorian lodging house. A blue plaque on the wall claims that this is the original 221b Baker Street. Not so, says the Abbey National Bank. Its modern, 60s built former headquarters a few doors along is where numbers 205 to 229 Baker Street used to be. And Abbey National still gets mail, as does the museum, addressed to Sherlock Holmes and asking him to help with a problem. They are reluctant to tell you at the museum just how many visitors they receive. In fact, they are disinclined to tell you anything if they suspect you have been across the road talking to the Memorabilia Company. The two see themselves as strong competitors...."

15. Dorn, Jennifer. "Streetlights of London." British Heritage 27, no. 5 (2006): 11-12.

The article presents information on the Marylebone neighborhood in London, England. The address 221B was not there in Baker Street, Marylebone during the years of the Sherlock Holmes stories. But Baker Street was extended and renumbering of the buildings was done in 1930. 221B became a real address and the popular Sherlock Holmes Museum was made there. The beautiful Regent's Park is the famous residential area of Marylebone. Medical services are offered in Wimpole and Harley streets.

16. Ellis, Stephen. "Abbey ending for Sherlock Holmes." The Sunday Times (London), June 5, 1994.

"...Ever since 1932 when its head office opened on the site where 221b Baker Street would be, Abbey National has been answering letters addressed to Sherlock Holmes. As many as 200 a week arrive from admirers the world over expressing their admiration for the fictional hero or simply asking after his health. Some go so far as to request his help to find stolen jewels or missing pets. All are answered by an Abbey employee referred to as 'Secretary to Sherlock Holmes.' However, like a real-life Moriarty, a Sherlock Holmes Museum has opened nearby and is putting the pressure on to have all the letters redirected so it can take advantage and sell its memorabilia of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great detective...."

17. Fernz, Helena. "Probing the residence at 221b Baker Street, London." Business Times, December 7, 2001: 13.

"Let's play the sleuth on this occasion and investigate the famed residence at 221b Baker Street, London, by stopping at http:// www.sherlock- holmes.co.uk/ The notable occupants of this well-known abode at Baker Street are none other than Sherlock Holmes and his colleague John H. Watson, MD. Well, actually, this will probably be the easiest 'case' ever to be investigated, for 'The Sherlock Holmes Museum' that is online provides a colourful and in-depth tour to anyone who actually takes the time to visit and explore...."

18. Friedman, Kinky. "Mad Cowboy Disease." Texas Monthly 31, no. 5 (2003): 244.

Relates the experience of a cowboy when he visited London, England. Reaction of the city workers to the cowboy's outfit; Details of the cowboy's meeting with Mike Levy, former record producer and tennis partner of Great Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...On my last night in London, I walked through the fog until I came to the most famous address in the world, 221B Baker Street. On the door was a small bronze plaque that read 'Visitors for Mr. Sherlock Holmes or Doctor Watson please ring the bell.' I rang the bell, walked up one flight of seventeen steps, and suddenly I was standing in Sherlock Holmes's living room. There was a cheery fire in the fireplace. Holmes's violin stood poignantly nearby, along with the old Persian slipper where he kept his Turkish tobacco. And in the room were Japanese, Russians, Africans, people from seemingly every nation on earth, all bound together by a common, passionate belief that Sherlock Holmes was real. It was, I thought, a perfect United Nations...."

19. Galerstein, David H. "Book review--'They Came to Baker Street' by Reginald L. Johnson." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 70 (1992): 39-40.

"Johnson was born at the turn of the century and discovered the Canon as a teen-ager, and his book is a collection of more than 50 well-written vignettes of those who visited the famous sitting-room, edited and foot-noted by Alan Truscott (who as the bridge editor of the N.Y. Times has shown in his bridge column that he too is an admirer of Sherlock Holmes)."

20. Hughes, Mel. "221B -- An Early Visit (or Parker's Vigil)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (2004): 93.

21. Jenkins, Rebecca. "Detective work at Baker Street." The Times (London), September 25, 1999: 30.

"Looking for clues on a tour of Sherlock Holmes's fictional patch. We were on the trail of Sherlock Holmes. Nine of us, mostly American tourists and fellow sleuths, were scouring Marylebone for the haunts of a fictional character. It was a strange way to spend a Tuesday afternoon...."

22. Klinger, Leslie S. "Layout of a 'Most Desirable Residence'." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 78-81.

23. Laidlaw, Joanna. "The fun of museum shopping." Victoria 12, no. 3 (1998): 16.

Focuses on museum shops in London, England that sell souvenirs and other gift items. Henry VIII's Tudor palace; Tower of London; Victoria & Albert Museum; Pollock's Toy Museum; Museum of Garden History; Twinings Tea Museum. Includes passing references to Holmes. "...Come along with Londoner Joanna Laidlaw on an enlightening stroll that leads directly to artful and unusual souvenirs -- from a silk scarf to a Beefeater teddy bear and a Sherlock Holmes hat....Snoop around the real 221b Baker Street (011 44 171 935 8866), and see where Sherlock Holmes lived. The fictitious English sleuth still receives thousands of letters, birthday cards, and invitations to speak. The museum shop sells everything from Baker Street street signs and meerschaum pipes to capes, and handsome tweed deerstalker hats. You can even buy a real London Times from the last century and a chess set featuring characters from the tales (the pawns are London bobbies)...."

24. Malion, Brian. "Deconstructing Baker Street or 221b Faker Street." Baker Street West 1 7, no. 2 (2001): 33-35.

25. McAteer, Michael. "Holmes' legend lives." Toronto Star, January 3, 2002: L14.

"The small room with the two windows overlooking Baker Street is on the first floor of the Sherlock Holmes Museum. Here, shrouded in blue tobacco smoke, the great consulting detective pondered the criminal mind as gas lamps flickered in the fog outside and hansom cabs rattled over cobbles. A museum visitor- an American by his accent- glances over the room crammed with Holmes memorabilia before addressing a young woman decked out as a Victorian maid. 'Did Sherlock Holmes die in this house?' he asks...."

26. Muller, Lynne. "The case of the fictional flat: A quirky London museum pays tribute to Sherlock Holmes and Watson." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), May 16, 1998: F3.

"...I'll never know if she believed Sherlock Holmes had really lived, because I didn't pursue the conversation. But the obsession she and other Sherlockians share must be the ultimate tribute to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Holmes' creator. Fascination with the Holmes persona is so strong almost 70 years after Doyle's death that there are more than 300 Sherlockian organizations worldwide, 17 in Japan alone. And the fiction is complete in Baker Street's Sherlock Holmes Museum, which allows fans to visit the small flat, reproduced with style and good humour, that Holmes shared with Dr. Watson from 1881 to 1904. The museum contains no mention of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, no background on how he came to create his famous sleuth. A project of the Sherlock Holmes International Society, the museum simply reproduces Holmes' flat (and sells a few souvenirs along the way). Thankfully, there's not too much schlock amidst the Sherlockiana...."

27. Nurton, James. "The King and I." Managing Intellectual Property, no. (2000): 5p.

Focuses on the story Elvisly Yours owner Sid Shaw to illustrate the limits of trademark protection for the memorabilia and collectibles about Elvis Presley. Lawsuit filed by Elvis Presley Enterprises against the company; Details of how Shaw won various lawsuits against his business; Forecasts of how Shaw's legal troubles will end. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...If you're looking for celebrities, London's Baker Street would be a good place to start. On one side of the road is the famous Madame Tussauds waxworks, the country's biggest tourist attraction, and home to models of thousands of politicians, monarchs, sports stars, artists, entertainers and criminals. On the other side is number 221 B, the residence of Sherlock Holmes, probably the world's most famous detective. Now there is a new face in the neighbourhood. The King is in town. Next to the Sherlock Holmes museum, the greatest rock and roll star of all time has just moved in to number 233. Elvis the Pelvis, the Memphis Flash, is here...."

28. Rowan, David. "Strange Case of the Building Society Which was Found at the Wrong Address." The Guardian (London), November 10, 1994: 26.

"It is the Case of the Missing Door Number, or perhaps the Hound of Westminster Council. For the quest to occupy Sherlock Holmes's famous lodgings has brought financiers, councillors, and now Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's daughter into a conflict more bitter even than Mrs Ronder's prussic acid. Only the intervention of the nation's law makers, it seems, can decide finally who owns 221b Baker Street. The problem is that there never was, or is, a Number 221b. An Abbey National edifice has long been numbered 215-229, and the Sherlock Holmes Museum stands, as the Post Office sees it, at 239. But both have been claiming the rights to the legendary address which Watson found 'cheerfully furnished, so desirable in every way'. And now Westminster council has come down on the building society's side...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Banks and Banking (7)

1. "Abbey National Unveil Bronze of Sherlock Holmes." Birmingham Post, October 9, 1999: 32.

"In the detective's shadow: Abbey National has tried to dilute the image of banks as soulless organisations, whose only driving force is the creation of profit, by unveiling a three-metre high bronze of Sherlock Holmes as part of its 150th anniversary celebrations. The move commemorates the bank's 'association' with the detective, dating back to 1932, when Abbey's head offices moved to Baker Street and incorporated Holmes' fictional address of 211b. Abbey still receives letters addressed to the crime-buster, which are answered by his 'secretary' who works for the bank."

2. "Holmes' place." The Evening Standard (London), August 4, 1999: 12.

"Lord Tugendhat is hoping the cash registers of the Abbey National will be going ching! ching! over the Abbey's links with Sherlock Holmes. The bank, of which he is chairman, is sponsoring a statue of Conan Doyle's great detective as part of its 150th anniversary celebrations. 221b Baker Street, where Holmes and Watson were so capably looked after by Mrs Hudson, has been occupied by Abbey National since 1932, and the Sherlock Holmes Society has long pleaded for a statue there...."

3. "Holmes' Statue is on the Case!". Birmingham Evening Mail, September 24, 1999: 37.

"A bronze statue of the world's best-known fictional detective was unveiled in London. The statue of Sherlock Holmes stands outside Baker Street underground station, near to where the detective lived at the fictional number 221b. Abbey National, whose head office is located on the site of what would be 221b Baker Street, has sponsored the work to mark its 150th anniversary...."

4. "Tellers' Tales." New Statesman 128, no. 4453 (1999): vi.

Presents several trivia related to the banking industry. Includes reference to Holmes and 221B Baker Street. "Abbey House, the Baker Street headquarters of Abbey National, receives about 100 letters a week addressed to Sherlock Holmes, 221b Baker Street. They are fielded by a special secretary to Sherlock Holmes."

5. Dalby, Stewart. "Play dough: Hot on the trail of the man who never was: Sherlock Holmes was a fictional character but that doesn't stop people collecting anything to do with him." The Guardian (London), July 15, 2000: 24.

"Sherlock Holmes never existed, of course. Nor did his much-loved dwellings at 221b Baker Street in London. But try telling Kazie Kamaza, one of the thousands of visitors who flock to the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Company in Baker Street each year....Almost exactly opposite is the Sherlock Holmes Museum, housed in a former Victorian lodging house. A blue plaque on the wall claims that this is the original 221b Baker Street. Not so, says the Abbey National Bank. Its modern, 60s built former headquarters a few doors along is where numbers 205 to 229 Baker Street used to be. And Abbey National still gets mail, as does the museum, addressed to Sherlock Holmes and asking him to help with a problem. They are reluctant to tell you at the museum just how many visitors they receive. In fact, they are disinclined to tell you anything if they suspect you have been across the road talking to the Memorabilia Company. The two see themselves as strong competitors...."

6. Ellis, Stephen. "Abbey ending for Sherlock Holmes." The Sunday Times (London), June 5, 1994.

"...Ever since 1932 when its head office opened on the site where 221b Baker Street would be, Abbey National has been answering letters addressed to Sherlock Holmes. As many as 200 a week arrive from admirers the world over expressing their admiration for the fictional hero or simply asking after his health. Some go so far as to request his help to find stolen jewels or missing pets. All are answered by an Abbey employee referred to as 'Secretary to Sherlock Holmes.' However, like a real-life Moriarty, a Sherlock Holmes Museum has opened nearby and is putting the pressure on to have all the letters redirected so it can take advantage and sell its memorabilia of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great detective...."

7. Wells, David H. "Further gloom in the building societies' challenging new world." Management Accounting: Magazine for Chartered Management Accountants 72, no. 1: 28.

Discusses the plight of Abbey National and other building societies in Great Britain in the aftermath of the Building Societies Act of 1986. Continuation of mutuality and legal framework debate; Financial results and balance sheet changes; Contribution of the main activities; Development of newer activities. Includes passing references to Doyle and Holmes. "...In every year since the passing of the Building Societies Act 1986, Abbey National has been involved in some kinds of controversy. These included the fierce debate over its conversion to a public limited company, the fairness of allocation of free shares to members, the mystery of its 400,000 lost share certificates, the purchase of Scottish Mutual Assurance and its continuing links with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictitious Sherlock Holmes....Visitors to the fictitious home of Sherlock Holmes at 221b Baker Street, London--and the postmen delivering mail to the sleuth--would have been further mystified. Abbey National's Head Office is at 215-229 Baker Street and it has had many secretaries dealing with his correspondence for over 50 years. However, a new museum for the detective has opened at 239 Baker Street. It is called 221b Baker Street and is claimed to fit the description of Holmes's house...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Baritsu (Bartitsu) (5)

1. Bowen, Richard. "Further Lessons in Baritsu." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 22-26.

2. Hirayama, Yuichi. "The Master and 'Baritsu'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 61-62.

3. Masters, Rosalind. "Review--'Some Knowledge of Baritsu' by Hirayama Yuichi and John Hall." The Ritual, no. 19 (1997): 64-65.

4. Waterhouse, D. B. "More Thoughts on Baritsu." The Ritual, no. 21 (1998): 40-42.

5. Webb, James R. "Some Observations on Baritsu." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 229-231.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Bee culture (1)

1. Moss, Robert A. "Some Observations Upon the Segregation of the Queen." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 4 (1994): 226-232.

The author explores the "numerous intersections of organic chemistry and apian husbandry" in the work of Holmes during his time on the Sussex Downs, that "a significant portion of Holmes's Practical Handbook was devoted to apian chemistry," and speculation "upon the possible content and import of Holmes's observations upon the segregation of the queen."

06F Writings about the writings -- Other Subjects -- Bibliography (24)

1. Abbreviated Bibliographic Check List of A. Conan Doyle. Canterbury, Kent: Tiger Books, 1993.

"The information is restricted to first appearances of his articles and stories in magazines and newspapers and to the first editions of his books, and relies to a great extent on the Green/Gibson bibliography. The checklist is certainly much handier for the collector to carry along to bookshops than the more detailed bibliography, but has one serious defect: there is no index, and magazines are reported chronologically according to the first appearances of Conan Doyle item, so anyone finding a run of Pearson's, for example, will locate the check list of ACD's contributions to the magazine only by searching a three-page table of contents."

2. "Book Review--Ron de Waal's TUSH." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 76 (1994): 51.

Review of The Universal Sherlock Holmes bibliography.

3. "Relations of Literature and Science, 1991-1992." Configurations 2, no. 2 (1994): 373-431.

Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. Roden, A. E., et al. "Humanism and Values in the Medical Short Stories of Arthur Conan Doyle." South Med J 85 (May 1992): 528-537; Westmoreland, B.F. "Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Bell, and Sherlock Holmes: A Neurologic Connection." Arch Neurol 48 (1991): 325-329.; Oderwald, A. K. "The Physician and Sherlock Holmes." J R Soc Med 84 (1991): 151-152; Roszell, Calvert. "The Devil's Foot and the Dweller at the Threshold." BSJ 41 (1991): 100-103.

4. Buard, Jean-Luc, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Bibliographie des Traductions d'Arthur Conan Doyle dans les periodiques 1894-1914. S.l.: Visage Vert, 1995.

5. De Waal, Ronald B. "Days and Thoughts in the Life of Mr. Ron. A Bibliography of Published and Unpublished Writings." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 35-43.

6. De Waal, Ronald Burt, and George A. Vanderburgh. The universal Sherlock Holmes. Toronto, Ont., Shelburne, Ont., Canada: Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library. G.A. Vanderburgh, 1994.

LC Control Number: 95118755;

7. De Waal, Ronald Burt, George A. Vanderburgh, and Timothy J. Johnson. "The universal Sherlock Holmes." Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Libraries, 1999.

The Universal Sherlock Holmes web version is based on the Universal Sherlock Holmes (1994), the third in a series of bibliographies documenting the world of Sherlock Holmes by Ronald Burt De Waal, and is intended as a reference tool for those interested in the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota

8. Dutch, William. August W. Derleth, 1909-1971 a bibliographical checklist of his books. Sauk City, WI: August Derleth Society, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96086124; Scuttlebutt Dec 1996;

9. Garland, Lawrence, and John DePol. The affair of the unprincipled publisher. New Castle (Del.): Oak Knoll Books, 1983.

LC Control Number: 84161252. Citations: De Waal C22185; "A pastiche by Lawrence Garland that reports on an encounter between Thomas J. Wise and Sherlock Holmes."

10. Green, Richard Lancelyn, John Michael Gibson, and Graham Greene. A bibliography of A. Conan Doyle. New rev. & expanded with addenda and corrigenda ed. Boston: Hudson House, 2000.

LC Control Number: 82003541. Includes index;

11. Hobbs, Donald J., and Leslie S. Klinger. The crowded box-room: a checklist of Sherlockian publications and their publishers. Flower Mound, Tex.: A Fairdale Press Publication, 1999.

"A Fairdale Press publication"--back cover./ Limited ed. of 50 copies./ Introduction by Leslie S. Klinger. Scuttlebutt Apr 1999; "With the names and dates of more than 420 publications, and the names of associated societies and editors, plus notes, appendices, and an index."

12. Johnson, Roger. "Review--'The Universal Sherlock Holmes' by Ronald B. De Waal, edited by George Vanderburgh." The Ritual, no. 14 (1994): 58-59.

13. Johnson, Timothy J. "Collections Update -- More Accessibility Soon." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 3.

Notes work on mounting a digital version of The Universal Sherlock Holmes bibliography on the Holmes Collections web site.

14. Keating, H. R. F., ed. Crime & mystery the 100 best books. 2nd Carroll & Graf pbk. ed. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96034892; Scuttlebutt Jan 1997. Includes bibliographical references and index; "Keating comments on his selections, from Edgar Allan Poe to P. D. James, and Conan Doyle is noted for The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and The Hound of the Baskervilles. "

15. Lindenstruth, Gerhard. Arthur Conan Doyle: eine illustrierte bibliographie der veroffentlichungen im Deutschen sprachraum. Giessen, Germany: Verlag Munniksma, Lindengasse, 1993.

16. ———. Arthur Conan Doyle: eine illustrierte Bibliographie der Veröffentlichungen in deutschen Sprachraum, (Das Phantasmaskop). Amsterdam: Verlag Munniksma, 1994.

17. Lovisi, Gary. "Tauchnitz Books Sherlock Holmes and the Non-Sherlockian Titles." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 26-30.

18. McDiarmid, E. W., Peter E. Blau, and John Bennett Shaw. A basic Holmesian library. [Minneapolis]: Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota, 1995.

19. Ross, Michael, Peter E. Blau, and Von Herder Airguns Ltd, eds. Sherlockiana, 1894-1994 eine Bibliographie deutschsprachiger Sherlock-Holmes-Veröffentlichungen. Zweite, bearb. u. erw. Aufl ed, (Baskerville Bücher). Kempen: M. Ross, 1995.

LC Control Number: 95109967;

20. Ross, Michael, Von Herder Airguns Ltd, Oliver Bruhns, and Peter Neugebauer, eds. Jubiläumsbibliographie deutscher Sherlockiana = a centenary bibliography of German Sherlockiana : 1894-1994. Germany: Von Herder Airguns, 1994.

21. Speckled Band Collection (Houghton Library), John Pull, H. W. Bell, and Roger E. Stoddard. A catalogue of Sherlockian books and manuscripts. Boston: Speckled Band, 1994.

LC Control Number: 95103791;

22. Thiel, Carl William. The Basic 100: the 100 most important critical studies and association items to the Sherlock Holmes canon as suggested by John Bennett Shaw. A Collector's Guide. Shelburne, ON: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Dec 1996; Foreword by Ray Betzner;

23. Townsend, Guy M., John J. McAleer, and Boden Clarke. The work of Rex Stout : an annotated bibliography & guide. 2nd , rev. and expand ed, (Bibliographies of modern authors, no. 30). San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press, 1995.

Rev. ed. of: Rex Stout, an annotated primary and secondary bibliography. 1980. Includes index. by Guy M. Townsend and John McAleer ; edited by Boden Clarke.;

24. Wrigglesworth, Doug. Arthur Conan Doyle in Canada : travels in Canada by the creator of Sherlock Holmes, including an annotated bibliography of related holdings in the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection of the Toronto Public Library, Occasional paper (Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection of the Toronto Public Library). Toronto, Ont.: Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, 2005.

ill., ports. ; 22 cm. Scuttlebutt Jul 2005.;

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Chemistry (1)

1. Richards, Antony J., Bryson Gore, Royal Institution of Great Britain, and Sherlock Holmes Society of London. Holmes, chemistry and the Royal Institution. Linton, Cambridgeshire: E. & E. Plumridge, Ltd, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references. Contents: Foreword / Antony J. Richards -- Acknowledgements / Bryson Gore, Antony J. Richards -- The Royal Institution of Great Britain : place of tradition and chemical genius / Antony J. Richards -- Sherlock Holmes : a study in chemistry / Antony J. Richards -- Chemistry is ... elementary / Bryson Gore -- Faraday and Holmes : two chemists, one character / Antony J. Richards -- Where did Holmes learn his chemistry? / Antony J. Richards -- Appendix A, Selected Royal Institution of Great Britain discourses of a Holmesian nature / Antony J. Richards -- Appendix B, South Foreland : more than just a lighthouse / Antony J. Richards;

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Christmas (1)

1. "Mysteries Reveal Message of Christmas; [Fourth Edition]." The Oregonian (Portland, OR), December 15, 1994: 06.

Something mysterious is going on in Bethlehem, and Sirlock and Watstein get to the bottom of it in "The Inn Kaper," a Christmas musical by St. Stephen Lutheran Church in Gladstone.; The musical will follow the indefatigable detective, Sirlock, and his trusty assistant, Watstein, as they uncover the meaning of Christmas, said Troy Lutz, youth director of the play. The characters are based on the Sherlock Holmes stories and placed in biblical times, he said.

06F Writings about the writings -- Other Subjects -- Chronologies (4)

1. Dorn, William S., Nancy Beiman, Philip Cornell, J. F. Christ, and Ernest Bloomfield Zeisler. A day-by-day chronology of Mr. Sherlock Holmes according to Zeisler and Christ. Denver, CO: Pencil Productions, Ltd, 2002.

LC Control Number: 2002094349. Includes bibliographical references (p. 49) and indexes;

2. Keefauver, Brad. "Review--'The Date Being---? A Compendium of Chronological Data Expanded and Revised' by Andrew Jay Peck and Leslie S. Klinger." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 1 (1997): 20.

3. Klinger, Leslie S., ed. Life and Times of Mr. Sherlock Holmes, John H. Watson, M.D., Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Other Notable Personages: A Table of Significant Events. Beverly Hills: Daypark Press, 1996.

4. Petersen, Svend, Arthur Conan Doyle, Carl William Thiel, Karen Murdock, Frank Darlington, Edwin Christenson, and George A. Vanderburgh. Sherlock Holmes almanac. Shelburne, Ont: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2002.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 371-374) and index;

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Clothing (2)

1. Waugh, Norah. The cut of men's clothes, 1600-1900. New York: Theatre Arts Books, 1964.

LC Control Number: 64021658; Scuttlebutt Apr 1997. Bibliography: p. 157; "For those who would like to make their own Sherlockian costumes, The Cut of Men's Clothes, 1600-1900, is reported to be a fine source, and includes a pattern for a Sherlock Holmes coat."

2. ———. The cut of men's clothes, 1600-1900. London: Faber, 1964.

LC Control Number: 65003299; Scuttlebutt Apr 1997. Bibliography: p. 157; "For those who would like to make their own Sherlockian costumes, The Cut of Men's Clothes, 1600-1900, is reported to be a fine source, and includes a pattern for a Sherlock Holmes coat."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Collecting Sherlockiana (55)

1. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 7.

Highlights recent acquisitions from David Hammer, Ted Friedman, J. Randolph Cox, John and Inez Bergquist, and Hugo Koch. Includes photographs of Richard Sveum with Ted Friedman, John Bergquist with Tim Johnson and Michael Meer, and Ted Friedman's stamp moulage.

2. "Book fetches pounds 15,000 at auction." Daily Post (Liverpool), May 21, 2008: 8.

"A first edition of a Sherlock Holmes story discovered in an Oxfam shop has sold for more than pounds 15,000 after a bidding war between buyers in the US and the UK yesterday. The rare first edition of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study In Scarlet, broke its upper reserve price of pounds 9,000 to fetch pounds 15,500 at the Bonhams Auction in Oxford. The story was discovered inside a book called Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 by two volunteers at an Oxfam shop in Harrogate, North Yorkshire...."

3. "Global Reach." American Libraries 38, no. 6 (2007): 42-42.

The article offers news briefs about libraries. Includes a reference to Doyle. "Scottish celebrities, including actor Sir Seen Connery and author Ian Rankin, have joined the National Library of Scotland's campaign to purchase the archive of Edinburgh-born publisher John Murray, which includes manuscripts and letters from Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, Lord Byron, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The Heritage Lottery Fund and the Scottish Executive provided the bulk of the funding, but the library must raise GBP6.5 million to close the deal. The National Library plans to make the archive widely accessible through exhibitions that will travel the country...."

4. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 8.

Notes donors who have made contributions in honor or memory of special persons.

5. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 12.

List of donors who made contributions in memory or honor of a special individual. Includes a photograph of Peter Blau, E. W. McDiarmid and Mike Whelan and another of three of the founders of the Norwegian Explorers: E. W. Ziebarth, Mac McDiarmid, and Bryce Crawford.

6. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 8.

List of recent donors to the Collections.

7. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 8.

List of donors with gifts given in memory or honor of certain individuals.

8. Blau, Peter E. "From One Collector to Another." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 1, 6.

Discusses the acquisition and gift of a rusty paperclip, now set in a paperweight, that once belonged with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's papers.

9. Breese, James. "Your Money: Focus On; a Study in Scarlet Treasure Hunters." Sunday Mirror, June 1, 2008: 46.

"A book handed in to a branch of Oxfam in Harrogate has just gone under the hammer for a small fortune. What made it so desirable was the special connection to Sherlock Holmes. However, it is not a mystery why the book made so much....The book in which the story first appeared - Samuel Beeton's Christmas Annual 1887 - is thought to be one of the most desirable titles for collectors of fine fiction. There are rarer editions that have commanded over pounds 50,000 in the past. Only a handful of these are thought to exist."

10. Cowan, James. "Conan Doyle saw greatness in Canada: Toronto library acquires collection of author's notes during visits here." National Post (Canada), November 18, 2004: A9.

"Sir Arthur Conan Doyle loved Canada -- its landscape, its government, its literature. The creator of Sherlock Holmes came to North America three times between 1894 and 1922, travelling for different reasons but almost exclusively by private rail car. In 1914, he was headed to the National Reserve in Jasper, Alta., as an invited guest of the Canadian government. He stopped at Canadian Clubs along the way -- in Winnipeg, Fort William, Ont., and Hamilton, among other cities -- delivering speeches on literature....Doyle's speaking notes were among the items acquired last spring by the Toronto Public Library at an auction at Christie's in London and directly from the Doyle estate. Toronto has the only public library collection in the world dedicated to Arthur Conan Doyle, contained in a wood-panelled room on the fifth floor of the Toronto Reference Library...."

11. De Waal, Ronald B. "Pages From the Journal of Ron De Waal. Collecting and Writing About Sherlock Holmes." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 19-20.

12. Gordon, Douglas. "Canine Curiosa in William and Mary's Special Collections." American Libraries 30, no. 9 (1999): 60.

Focuses on the collection of information and materials on the history of dogs at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...The fiction section includes many of the great names in dog literature Richard Harding Davis, Albert Payson Terhune, Jim Kjelgaard, James Thurber, Rudyard Kipling, James Oliver Curwood, MacKinlay Kantor, Alfred Ollivant, Dion Henderson, Sidonie Gabrielle Colette, Ouida Sebestyen, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jack London, and Eric Knight. Any number of titles, Richard Harding Davis's The Bar Sinister (1903), Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902), and Mark Twain's A Dog's Tale (1904) among them, are first editions...."

13. Groves, Derham. An Album of ephemera mostly from the Black Jack Press. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1997.

14. ———. Even more Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1998.

15. ———. More Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1997.

16. ———. Sherlock Homes just what you're looking for. Brunswick West, Vic: Black Jack Press, 1997.

17. ———. Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1997.

18. ———. Too many Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1998.

19. ———. You bastard Moriarty being a consideration of the collectability of ephemera related to the greatest detective that never lived, Sherlock Holmes. Standard version ed. Melbourne, Australia: Littlewood Press, 1996.

20. Hacker, Richard Carleton. Rare Smoke : the ultimate guide to pipe collecting. 1st ed. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Autumngold Pub., 1999.

ill. ; 22 cm. "Volume 1, a limited edition of which this is one of 2500 copies." Scuttlebutt Sep 1999; "Rick reports that he includes information on commemorative Sherlock Holmes pipes, and some previously untold stories about his adventures with the late Jeremy Brett."

21. Hall, John. "British Sherlockiana 2002." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 145-146.

22. ———. "British Sherlockiana in 1999." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 176-178.

23. ———. "British Sherlockiana in 2000." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 215-216.

24. ———. "British Sherlockiana in 2001." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 204-205.

25. Halperin, Jim, and Hector Cantú. Collectible Movie Posters : illustrated guide with auction prices. Atlanta, GA: Whitman Pub., 2010.

ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Introduction -- The top 100 collectible movie posters (1. The bride of Frankenstein -- 2. Dracula : one sheet -- 3. The black cat : one sheet -- 4. Flying down to Rio : one sheet -- 5. Frankenstein : one sheet -- 6. The phantom of the Opera -- 7. The mad doctor -- 8. Freaks -- 9. Son of Frankenstein -- 10. The black cat : half sheet -- 11. Hollywood -- 12. Wings : one sheet -- 13. King Kong : one sheet -- 14. Stagecoach -- 15. Baby face -- 16. Son of Kong -- 17. The bride of Frankenstein : half sheet -- 18. Dracula : title lobby card -- 19. Snow White and the seven dwarfs -- 20. Wings : one sheet -- 21. Ye olden days -- 22. Werewolf of London -- 23. The Klondike Kid -- 24. The thief of Bagdad -- 25. The pride of the clan -- 26. The raven : half sheet -- 27. Mad love -- 28. The hunchback of Notre Dame -- 29. The whoopee party -- 30. Grand Hotel -- 31. Citizen Kane : one sheet -- 32. Babe comes home -- 33. Love before breakfast -- 34. Moon over Miami : three sheet -- 35. The bride of Frankenstein : title lobby card -- 36. Dracula : lobby card -- 37. Mickey's nightmare -- 38. The black cat : half sheet -- 39. Londres despues de media noche (London after midnight) : poster -- 40. La signora de Shanghai (The lady from Shanghai) -- 41. The war of the worlds -- 42. Citizen Kane : half sheet -- 43. The meller dreamer -- 44. Metropolis -- 45. The wolf man : insert -- 46. Casablanca : half sheet -- 47. The eagle -- 48. Frankenstein : three sheet -- 49. King Kong : one sheet -- 50. The grapes of wrath -- 51. It happened one night -- 52. Another fine mess -- 53. The rescue -- 54. Moon over Miami : one sheet -- 55. Londres apres minuet (London after midnight) : poster -- 56. The Benson murder -- 57. Hawaiian holiday -- 58. Gilda -- 59. Dracula : one sheet -- 60. Frankenstein : title lobby card -- 61. Scarface -- 62. Magician Mickey -- 63. Modern times -- 64. The champion -- 65. Things to come -- 66. The outlaw -- 67. The adventures of Sherlock Holmes -- 68. The adventures of Robin Hood : six sheet -- 69. The Broadway melody -- 70. The raven : one sheet -- 71. Son of Frankenstein : title lobby card -- 72. The Cocoanuts : insert -- 73. Mickey's pal -- 74. Violent is the word for Curly -- 75. Duck soup -- 76. The black pirate -- 77. M -- 78. The Benson murder case -- 79. Flying down to Rio : midget window card -- 80. Casablanca : two-folio -- 81. Flying down to Rio : two sheet -- 82. The wayward canary -- 83. Casablanca : one sheet -- 84. Creature from the Black Lagoon -- 85. The wolf man : one sheet -- 86. The wolf man : half sheet -- 87. Gold diggers of 1933 -- 88. Faust -- 89. The Cocoanuts : lobby card -- 90. The raven : title lobby card -- 91. Mickey Mouse stock poster one sheet -- 92. Casablanca half sheet -- 93. The phantom of the Opera : insert -- 94. The adventures of Robin Hood : three sheet -- 95. This gun for hire -- 96. The adventures of Robin Hood : one sheet -- 97. Godzilla -- 98. Attack of the 50 foot woman -- 99. The Oregon Trail -- 100. Lonesome ghost) -- Appendix A. Most popular stars ; Appendix B. Releases by year ; Appendix C. Number of posters by studio ; Appendix D. The studios ; Appendix E. the Laemmle legacy. "The top 100 rarities"--Cover./ Includes bibliographical references (p. 207) and indexes. Jim Halperin and Hector Cantu, editors ; foreword by Sara Karloff.;

26. Harris, Christopher. "Arts Ink: Memorabilia Holmesiana for sale." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), July 13, 1995: C1.

"What Sotheby's is calling one of the finest collections of Sherlock Holmes memorabilia ever offered for sale is expected to fetch about L70,000 (roughly $145,000) when it goes on the block in London on July 24. The collection, amassed by a former custodian of the Sherlock Holmes Society, includes papers, first editions and other materials relating to the legendary fictional detective and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle...."

27. Harris, David, and Derham Groves. In the privacy of their own Holmes. Melbourne: Blackbird Books, 2004.

Includes bibliographical references and a press bibliography, "Publications of the Sumac Press" (p. 44-45); Scuttlebutt May 2004; "'In the Privacy of Their Own Holmes: An Exhibition of Private Press and Limited Edition Sherlockiana' was arranged by Derham Groves for the Baillieu Library at the University of Melbourne from Apr. 5 to May 28, and there was an interesting assortment of Sherlockiana on view. Derham also edited and published this booklet to coincide with the exhibition; the 46-page booklet offers nicely-illustrated essays by Peter E. Blau, Vincent Brosnan, Derham Groves, David G. Harris, Michael Jorgensen, Robert C. Littlewood, Jerry Margolin, and C. Paul Martin about private presses and other matters."

28. Hirayama, Yuichi. "Sherlockiana in Japan." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 100-103.

29. ———. "Sherlockiana in Japan 2001-2002." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 197-198.

30. ———. "Sherlockiana in Japan 2002-2003." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 151-152.

31. Hobbs, Don. "Review--2001: A Sherlockian Odyssey: A Journey Among the Shaw 100." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 4 (2001): 14.

32. Hollyer, Cameron. "Seventeen Steps to a Collection." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 1 (2006): 14-37.

33. Johnson, Timothy J. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 5.

A report from the curator on a non-Sherlockian matter: his appointment to the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress (which will also provide opportunities to meet with Sherlockians in the Washington, DC area).

34. Kennedy, Maev. "Flipside of Conan Doyle: Auction of romantic manuscripts from Sherlock Holmes creator." The Guardian (London), October 17, 2003: 12.

"...A collection of Conan Doyle manuscripts, which have remained in his family for the past century, is to be auctioned at Christie's in London in aid of a number of charities. It includes the original manuscript of the book he insisted should have a print run of 15,000 copies, against the judgment of his publishers. A Duet with an Occasional Chorus, which appeared in 1889, was not what fans of A Study in Scarlet or The Sign of the Four expected...."

35. Klinger, Leslie S. "'Maybe you collect yourself, sir. . .': 'The Collection Mania in its Most Acute Form': A Checklist of Sherlockian Pornography." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 56, no. 4 (2006): 41-47.

36. McKuras, Julie. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 3.

Provides some observations on the London Mystery Magazine and one of its contributors ("Sagittarius"; identified as Olga Katzin).

37. ———. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 4.

Provides an update on new acquisitions to the Collections from Steve Clarkson, Jennie Paton, Syd Goldberg, the Herbert Hoover Museum, Bob Katz, and the family of the late Will Crakes.

38. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 4.

Notes the arrival of the Eve Titus manuscript archive, her current illness, and her contributions to the article about this acquisition. Also noted are other articles in the newsletter relating to Theodore Blegen, the Reichenbach Falls, and the passing of Sherlockian Wayne Swift.

39. Meer, Michael A. "'Maybe You Collect Yourself, Sir ...' Morbus Colligendi Sherlockianus (Incurable): Being Some Scattered Notes on Hunters, Collectors, and Books." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 51, no. 3 (2001): 48-52.

40. Proubasta, Joan. "Spanish Sherlockiana in 1999." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 183-184.

41. Rossakis, Constantine. "The First Colonial Hound: A Centenary Discovery." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 53, no. 3 (2003): 17-21.

42. Rutter, Richard R. "Sherlockiana Germania, Part I." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 70 (1992): 1-8.

43. ———. "Sherlockiana Germania, Part II." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 71 (1992): 1-7.

44. Shaw, John. "Last chapter in strange case of the literary detective." The Times (London), July 11, 1995: 1.

"A fascination with Sherlock Holmes, which turned a schoolboy into a literary detective, will lead to a Pounds 70,000 book sale in London this month. Stanley MacKenzie became a world authority on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional detective and his collection of first editions, reference books and papers is regarded as the finest in Europe. As an honorary member of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, Mr MacKenzie, who lived in west London and died aged 82 earlier this year, had been consulted frequently by playwrights and film-makers. The material he collected will now be sold at Sotheby's on July 24...."

45. Shaw, John Bennett. Collecting Sherlockiana : an essay. Bradenton: Opuscula Press, 1992.

port. ; 57 x 73 mm. "Two hundred copies of this important work have been published ... This is copy number 16. Robert F. Hanson Editor and Publisher"--Colophon.;

46. Shaw, John Bennett, and Catherine Cooke. Collecting Sherlockiana: John Bennett Shaw's basic Holmesian library, (Rupert Books monograph series). Cambridge: Rupert Books, 1998.

47. Shaw, John Bennett, and Karen Murdock. "The First 'Shaw 100'." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 2 (2005): 18-37.

48. Sherlock Holmes Around the World (Organization). Sherlock Holmes Around the World S.H.A.W. : [newsletter]. S.l.: Sherlock Holmes Around the World, 1996.

49. Solito, Enrico. "Sherlockiana in Italy 2000." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 206-208.

50. Southworth, Bruce E. "Stix-Shaw Bolo Tie Comes to Minnesota." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 1.

Highlights gift from Dorothy Stix of a bolo tie that had belonged to her husband, Tom, and John Bennett Shaw, given to the Collections during the Holmes birthday weekend in New York.

51. Speckled Band Collection (Houghton Library), John Pull, H. W. Bell, and Roger E. Stoddard. A catalogue of Sherlockian books and manuscripts. Boston: Speckled Band, 1994.

LC Control Number: 95103791;

52. Starrett, Vincent, and George A. Vanderburgh. The literary classics number 2. Hypertext ed, (Vincent Starrett's electronic library). Shelburne, Ontario, Canada: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1996.

Contents: The private life of Sherlock Holmes -- Books alive -- Bookman's holiday; This disk contains read-only text files of stories, commentary, criticism and interpretation written by Vincent Starrett about Sherlock Holmes, detective fiction and literature in general and book collecting

53. Thiel, Carl William. The Basic 100: the 100 most important critical studies and association items to the Sherlock Holmes canon as suggested by John Bennett Shaw. A Collector's Guide. Shelburne, ON: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Dec 1996; Foreword by Ray Betzner;

54. Williams, Sally. "Elementary, my dear Watson... silver cutlery of the family that inspired Sherlock Holmes classic is tracked down in Wales." The Western Mail, June 3, 2008: 12.

"A set of silver cutlery featuring Sherlock Holmes' legendary Hound of the Baskervilles is to be sold at auction later this month. The 42-piece set, which is expected to fetch up to pounds 6,000, was hidden in a wardrobe at Baskerville Hall, Clyro Court, in Mid Wales - the setting that inspired author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to write his spine-chilling thriller. The crest showing a hound with a broken spear through its jaw with five drips of blood falling from its tip is on every piece of the dinner service. The hound, Black Vaughan, howled and roamed the nearby foggy moors of Hergest Ridge and was the inspiration of Conan Doyle's book. And the silver is believed to have been used at the fine banquets Conan Doyle would have attended during his numerous visits to the house in the late 19th and early 20th century. It lay hidden for 63 years until being discovered by antiques expert Martin Heath...."

55. Wood, Benton. Philatelic and numismatic Holmes a handy reference guide to Sherlockian stamps & coins. Rev. & updated ed. Holmes Beach, Fla: Pleasant Places of Florida, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 36);

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Collecting Sherlockiana -- Marylebone Library (London) (2)

1. "'A Singular Set of People...'." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 2.

Notes the decisions by two scion societies of the Baker Street Irregulars to make contributions to the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota, The Arthur Conan Doyle Collection at The Metropolitan Toronto Library, and The Sherlock Holmes Collection at the Marylebone Library in London.

2. Cooke, Catherine. "Vintage 1951 - a Festival, a Society and a Collection." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 186-198.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Collecting Sherlockiana -- Newberry Library (2)

1. "Datebook." American Libraries 34, no. 3 (2003): 95.

Presents the calendar for events related to the American Library Association for March-April 2003. Reference and photo from Newberry Library exhibit, "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Sherlock Holmes."

2. Terras, Donald J., and C. Frederick Kittle. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes : Essays and Art on the Doctor and the Detective. [Chicago]: Northeastern Illinois University Press, 2003.

C. Frederick Kittle Collection of Doyleana (Newberry Library) ; ill., ports. ; 26 cm. Dr. Kittle and Dr. Doyle : kinsmen through medicine and belle letters / by Robert Cotner -- Have you a 'reminiscences' in your attic / by Raymond L. Betzner -- A doctor's unjaundiced look at the Victorian medical scene (or, Eschewing the syringe for the pen) / by Ely M. Liebow -- Down the slopes with Conan Doyle at Davos (the birth of skiing) / by C. Frederick Kittle -- The magic doors / by Julie McKuras -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle on stamps / by Marshall Blankenship -- Military intelligence? Jumbo shrimp? What about amateur mendicant? / by Susan Rice -- The romance of medicine for doctors Doyle and Kittle / by Richard J. Sveum -- Arthur Conan Doyle visits Chicago, 1894 / by C. Frederick Kittle -- Kittle collection of Doyleana, Newberry Library Chicago. Core collection -- Appendix. A chronology of books by Arthur Conan Doyle: 1859-1930. "Commemorating the Kittle Collection of Doyleana, Newberry Library, April 11, 2003."/ Laid in: Program for Doyle exhibit dinner, April 11, 2003./ Includes bibliographical references. Compiled and edited by Donald J. Terras.;

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Collecting Sherlockiana -- Portsmouth (14)

1. "The best of Brickish; Japanese flock to admire our building blocks of history." Daily Mail (London), May 5, 1998: 25.

"Squat and solid, they are regarded with hushed awe by the visitors who file past every day. Treasured for their shape and texture and marvelled at for their lasting quality, these are the precious prize exhibits in a Japanese museum. British bricks, it seems, are building up a reputation for themselves. Back home, they can be found cluttering up back gardens, littering building sites or even propping open doors. But the Japanese believe our bricks deserve more respect. At the World Brick Museum in Maizuru, north-west of Kyoto, specimens are kept lovingly in glass cases and treated as works of art. More than 10,000 visitors a month go to look at them. The Japanese fascination with British bricks probably has something to do with the rarity of brick buildings in Japan. The high risk of earthquakes has made building with bricks a risky business. So when the museum hosted an exhibition of just 16 bricks, titled 'Sherlock Holmes and English Bricks', record numbers of visitors flocked through the doors. They feasted their eyes on a collection of clay from Covent Garden, Scotland Yard, the Royal Albert Hall, St Pancras Station and 221B Baker Street - the detective's home address. The museum curators enlisted the help of the city of Portsmouth to compile the exhibition after discovering that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created the character of Sherlock Holmes while living there in 1887...."

2. "City Gets Conan Doyle Collection; Portsmouth, England, receives Sherlock Holmes memorabilia worth $3.6 million." Los Angeles Times, Aug 8, 2004: A.9.

"'[Richard Lancelyn Green] was the foremost [Arthur Conan Doyle] scholar and a leading Sherlock Holmes specialist. His collection was acknowledged to be the finest in private hands,' said Nicholas Utechin, Lancelyn Green's friend and editor of the 'Sherlock Holmes Journal.' Lancelyn Green, a prominent figure in the Sherlock Holmes Society, spent more than 40 years collecting material related to Conan Doyle and Holmes. His will stipulated that the collection should be housed together and that he wanted it offered first to Portsmouth's library service."

3. "Global Reach." American Libraries 35, no. 8 (2004): 23-23.

Presents world news briefs on libraries as of September 2004. "What may be the world's largest collection of Arthur Conan Doyle memorabilia was donated August 6 to the Portsmouth Library' by the estate of writer Richard Lancelyn Green. The collection includes a full-size recreation of Sherlock Holmes's Baker Street study, and first editions of all Conan Doyle's works."

4. "Holmes collection left to library in southern England." Xinhua News Agency - CEIS, Aug 6, 2004: 1.

"[Arthur Conan Doyle] was born in Edinburgh. He moved later to Portsmouth and then London. While in Portsmouth, he wrote 'A Study in Scarlet' ( 1887), which introduced [Holmes] and his sidekick, Dr. Watson. '[Richard Lancelyn Green] was the foremost Arthur Conan Doyle scholar and a leading Sherlock Holmes specialist. His collection was acknowledged to be the finest in private hands,' said Nicholas Utechin, editor of the 'Sherlock Holmes Journal.'"

5. "Library gets Sherlock trove ; Conan Doyle collection includes first editions, full-size replica of detective's study." San Antonio Express-News, Aug 7, 2004: 16A.

"One of the world's greatest collections of memorabilia from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was handed over Friday to a library in the port city where the author once had a medical practice and wrote the first two Sherlock Holmes adventures. When he died in March, writer and collector Richard Lancelyn Green, left the 20,000-item collection worth more than $3.6 million to the Portsmouth library service. The collection includes a full size recreation by Lancelyn Green of the study at 221B Baker Street, Holmes' fictional London address...."

6. "A new home for Sherlock Holmes." Daily Mail (London), August 6, 2004: 19.

"A collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle memorabilia, including a hint of how Sherlock Holmes got his name, is moving. Writer Richard Lancelyn Green, who died in March, has left the 20,000 items, worth more than Pounds 2million, to Portsmouth library...."

7. "The World." The Augusta Chronicle, Aug 7, 2004: A.02.

"One of the greatest collections of memorabilia from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was given Friday to a library in Portsmouth, England, where he wrote the first Sherlock Holmes adventures. The 20,000- item collection of Richard Lancelyn Green includes a full-size model of the study at 221B Baker St., Holmes' fictional address."

8. "Writer leaves pounds 2m Conan Doyle collection to library." Daily Post, Aug 7, 2004: 7.

"[Richard Lancelyn Green], who died in March this year, was a prominent figure in the Sherlock Holmes Society and spent more than 40 years collecting everything he could find that related to [Arthur Conan Doyle] and Sherlock Holmes."

9. Alberge, Dalya. "Holmes archive row ends in GBP2m bequest." The Times (London), August 6, 2004: 11.

"The world's leading authority on Sherlock Holmes, who was found garotted on his bed three months ago, has bequeathed his Pounds 2 million collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's papers to the nation. Richard Lancelyn Green was found dead at 50 after trying in vain to stop the sale of another Pounds 2 million collection of Doyle papers, some of which he felt should have been left to the British Library. An open verdict on his death was recorded. Mr Lancelyn Green left more than 20,000 Doyle manuscripts and memorabilia, amassed over more than 40 years, to Portsmouth, where Dr Conan Doyle had his medical practice and where he created his legendary detective...."

10. ———. "Holmes archive row ends in Pounds 2m bequest." The Times (London), Aug 6, 2004: 11.

"Mr [Richard Lancelyn Green] left more than 20,000 [Arthur Conan Doyle] manuscripts and memorabilia, amassed over more than 40 years, to Portsmouth, where Dr Conan Doyle had his medical practice and where he created his legendary detective. Doyle's daughter, Dame Jean, died in 1997 at the age of 84. She stipulated in her will that Sherlock Holmes manuscripts were to go to the British Library and museums in Edinburgh, Doyle's birthplace, and Southsea or Portsmouth, where he worked as a doctor and where he created [Holmes]. Mr Lancelyn Green's brother, Scirard, said yesterday: 'It's truly fitting that Richard's life work should go to Portsmouth. Conan Doyle wrote the first two Sherlock Holmes stories there, so in some way his work is going home.'"

11. Cook, William. "Close to home: A bit more than naval-gazing: When you think of Portsmouth, what comes to mind? Its redoubtable historic warships, perhaps. Chances are, it's not designer shopping, contemporary art - or Portsmouth FC's first goalkeeper, Arthur Conan Doyle." The Guardian (London), Apr 12, 2008: 2.

"From the crow's nest of Portsmouth's new Spinnaker Tower, you get a great view of the Isle of Wight, but the most spectacular sight is right beneath your feet, more than 100 metres below. Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard is a slice of living history, featuring several fasci nating museums, housed in the original dockside buildings that were the powerhouse of the royal navy for several centuries. Most riveting is Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory, moored beside the Victorian battleship HMS Warrior, and Henry VIII's favourite warship, the Mary Rose. [Richard Lancelyn Green]'s bequest has provided a cultural catalyst for a city with a far more varied cultural life than its robust public image as a military harbour would suggest. Portsmouth was also the birthplace of Britain's greatest novelist, Charles Dickens. The handsome house where he was born is now a museum. And if you prefer fine art to literature, the local artist WL Wyllie was one of the finest maritime painters of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. There are some splendid examples of his work Portsmouth's City and Royal Naval Museums, most notably his epic panorama of the Battle of Trafalgar. There's first class stand-up comedy at Jongleurs and the Wedgwood Rooms, and the cathedral is a gem. 'It was a place in which a man might very well spend a happy life,' wrote [Arthur Conan Doyle], of Portsmouth. Or, he might have added, a very enjoyable weekend."

12. Forsyth, Alex. "'Super museum' proposed in shake up." The News (Portsmouth, England), 27 January, 2009.

"The City Museum and Central Library would be sold off and their contents re-housed in a brand new GBP37m landmark building if plans go ahead...." Mentions the Lancelyn Green Collection at Portsmouth.

13. Gilchrist, Jim. "Not so elementary." The Scotsman, no. (2007): 22.

"'I think when I started out, inevitably, I had a fairly naive view of him,' says [Andrew Lycett], 'based on the available evidence, which tended to present this rather upright English gentleman, forever taking up causes and, of course, his life dominated by writing Sherlock Homes.' We're talking in London, at the Primrose Hill flat of his partner, the literary photographer Sue Greenhill, and he has just obliged our own photographer by donning a T-shirt emblazoned with the single word 'Elementary'. Doyle (whose immortal detective never actually use the phrase 'elementary my dear [John H Watson]', until an 1899 stage dramatisation by the American actor William Gillette) would turn out to be rather more complicated than Lycett expected. 'Now, after looking into his life in some detail, I suppose I'm more aware of the warts-and-all aspect of his character, and that there were these contradictions. I'm much more aware of his sheer complexity and, in a way, I look to Edinburgh as a metaphor for that. It was Robert Louis Stevenson who alighted on the 'divided city' aspect of Edinburgh and you get that in Conan Doyle's character - the fascination with the supernatural alongside that strong belief in reason and science.' But even the field of Conan Doyle scholarship turned out not to be without its dark side: during Lycett's period of research, a leading Doyle scholar and archivist, Richard Lancelyn Green, was found dead amid strange circumstances. Amid the conspiracy theories, Lancelyn Green's own massive collection, as he had bequeathed, went to the City of Portsmouth, where Doyle practised as a doctor and where Lycett was eventually able to access it - though not without some help from the actor and broadcaster Stephen Fry, who is patron of the collection. Among so much fresh documentary material the biographer was able to 'flesh out the details' of the author's close relationship with his second wife while his first, Louise, was dying of tuberculosis. The established picture was one of Doyle, although fond of [Jean Leckie], doing the honourable thing of the day. Lycett refers to Leckie as Doyle's 'mistress', but how certain is he that, prior to Louise's death and his marriage to Leckie in 1907, theirs was a physical affair? 'I think he was in this awful dilemma. He had this wife who was ill, who I don't think he was very passionate about but who he respected and liked. He did his best for her in many ways, taking her abroad to try and ensure she'd live longer. However, during this period he met and fell in love with this younger, attractive and in many ways more suitable woman.'"

14. Sapsted, David. "Conan Doyle fan leaves pounds 2m hoard to library." The Daily Telegraph (London), Aug 6, 2004: 11.

Mr [Richard Lancelyn Green] had collected 20,000 items, including a recreation of 221b Baker Street....His will, published today, leaves them to the library service in Portsmouth, where Conan Doyle lived and worked between 1882-1890 and where he helped to found Portsmouth Football Club, becoming its first goalkeeper. The collection will be catalogued before going on display in 2006."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Collecting Sherlockiana -- Toronto Public Library (8)

1. "ALA/CLA Annual Conference." American Libraries 34, no. 3 (2003): 97.

Presents the schedule and highlights for the 2003 American Library Association/Canadian Library Association Annual Conference, held in Toronto, Canada. Notes "Sherlock Holmes in Toronto" and The Sub-Librarian Scion of the Baker Street Irregulars in the ALA meeting with an invitation to "come and tour the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection at the Toronto Reference Library. This is one of the world's finest collections of materials by and about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Victoria Gill, Curator, will give an introduction to the Collection, emphasizing Sherlock Holmes. Afterwards, there will be a complimentary 'Coffee and Sticky Buns' light reception, hosted by the Bootmakers of Toronto, the local Sherlock Holmes scion society. Meet the Bootmakers and the Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection. Speaker: Victoria Gill, Curator of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection"

2. "'A Singular Set of People...'." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 2.

Notes the decisions by two scion societies of the Baker Street Irregulars to make contributions to the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota, The Arthur Conan Doyle Collection at The Metropolitan Toronto Library, and The Sherlock Holmes Collection at the Marylebone Library in London.

3. Coren, Michael. "Lest civility entirely perish in our times, it behooves us to cherish eccentricity." Alberta Report / Newsmagazine 22, no. 43 (1995): 42.

Opinion. Relates the author's experiences at a one-day conference on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes at a Toronto library. View that eccentrics, such as Holmes aficionados, help defend the right to be different; Their fight against political correctness; Analysis of the psychology of eccentrics; Problems that the modern age has with eccentrics and with Conan Doyle's books.

4. Gill, Victoria. "Thus, month after month his papers accumulated." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 3 (1995): 19-20.

5. ———. "Thus, month after month his papers accumulated." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 2 (1994): 4-5.

6. ———. ""Thus, month after month his papers accumulated."." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 18-19.

Curator of the ACD Collection in Toronto provides an update on library activites.

7. ———. ""Thus, month after month his papers accumulated."." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 23-24.

The curator of the ACD Collection provides regular updates from Toronto.

8. Wrigglesworth, Doug. "The Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collections at the Toronto Reference Library." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 6.

Provides some background on the Doyle Collections at the Toronto Reference Library and the activities of its Friends organization, including their newsletter, The Magic Door, and celebrations surrounding the centennial of the publication of the Hound of the Baskervilles.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Collecting Sherlockiana -- University of Minnesota (115)

1. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 3.

Highlights the 1948 publication of The Client's Case-Book by The Illustrious Clients of Indianapolis.

2. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 3.

Highlights the founding of the Norwegian Explorers scion society in 1948.

3. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 4.

Highlights the 1948 publication of The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle by the Baker Street Irregulars.

4. "50 Years Ago: "We may need an interpreter."." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 5.

Notes French, German, and Spanish titles from the Holmes Collections, especially La casa vacia (The Empty House) purchased by Dr. Philip Hench in 1961.

5. "50 Years Ago: "you will send for a hansom"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 5.

Discusses The Second Cab and other "Cab" publications of the Speckled Band of Boston. Also discusses Vincent Starrett's short story, "A Picture for Ronald Colman."

6. "50 Years Ago: 'Cadaver in the Roman Toga' by Edith Meiser airs on November 9, 1947." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 3.

A brief biographical sketch of actress and writer Edith Meiser. Includes a photograph of Meiser and a reproduction of page one of the script for "Cadaver in the Roman Toga."

7. "50 Years Ago: From the archives of the Norwegian Explorers." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 5.

Reports on material in the Norwegian Explorers archive related to its inaugural meeting in 1947 and first general meeting in 1948.

8. "50 Years Ago: Howard Haycraft and Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 5.

Highlights Howard Haycraft's contributions to Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and reprints part of a 1947 column by Haycraft in EQMM. Includes a reproduction of a cover of EQMM from the John Bennett Shaw Collection and the first page of an article by Haycraft in the November 1947 EQMM (from the Haycraft Collection).

9. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 2.

Highlights the 1898 edition of William Gillette's play "Held By The Enemy."

10. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 2.

Highlights the 1898 publication of "The Sign of the Four" in Pitman's shorthand.

11. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 2.

Highlights Sherlockian James Montgomery (b. 1898) and his writings.

12. "100 Years Ago: "The Press....is a most valuable institution"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 2.

Reprint of a letter written by Doyle to The Times, October 20, 1897 from Morley's Hotel, Trafalgar Square, London, WC

13. "100 Years Ago: "To Ada, from her old friend Arthur Conan Doyle, Jan. 18, '97"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 2.

Discusses a photograph taken of Doyle in New York, during his 1894 tour of the United States and Canada and the mysteries associated with the inscription on the back of the photograph. Includes a reproduction of the photograph and inscription.

14. "100 Years Ago: Ada and the Napoleon of Photography." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 2.

A follow-up article on the mysteries presented in an inscription on the back side of a photograph taken of Doyle in New York. The photographer is identified as Napoleon Sarony, known for his photographs of celebrities in the late 19th century. The identity of the "Ada" of the inscription is still unknown, Ada Waller and Ada Pasby being the most likely candidates.

15. "100 Years Ago: For a Song?". Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 2.

Highlights publication of Songs of Action, a collection of poetry and "The Song of the Bow," sheet music based on the same ballad of the outland bowmen found in Doyle's The White Company.

16. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 8.

Notes gifts to the Collections from Christopher and Barbara Roden (a copy of their latest publication, The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe); Dale Ahlquist, President of the American Chesterton Society, and his donation of a copy of Sherlock Holmes Meets Father Brown and His Creator; Dr. William A. S. Sarjeant, M. Bt, and his gift of several items during his visit; and Daniel Morrow's gift of several journal clippings and articles regarding Sherlock Holmes and radio.

17. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 10.

Notes recent additions to the Collections including donations from Caroline Bryan, Steve Clarkson, Don Hobbs, Charles Press, Allen J. Heiss, Doug Wrigglesworth, Les Klinger, and Ed Christenson.

18. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 4.

Notes the acquisition of cigars from C Us 4 Cigars in Aurora, Illinois; Brad Keefauver's gift of materials related to the "Sherlock Holmes for President" campaign, and other materials from Philip Sherman, Geoff Jeffrey, Ted Bergman, and John Bergquist. Includes photos of Keefauver and the cigars.

19. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 7.

Notes the donation of Arthur M. Axelrad's Hot on the Scent, A Visitor's Guide to the London of Sherlock Holmes and the purchase of a new archive of Eve Titus, to be featured in a later issue of the newsletter.

20. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 4.

Highlights the acquisition of "On Grimpen Mire," a bronze sculpture donated by the sculptor Lynette Yencho and her husband Michael.

21. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 5.

Highlights some recent acquisitions by the Sherlock Holmes Collections.

22. "Bill Rabe material comes to Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 1-3, 5.

Discusses acquisition and contents of the Bill Rabe Collection acquired by the University of Minnesota Libraries.

23. "Calling all Scion Societies." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 3.

Call for materials from scion societies for the University of Minnesota Libraries' Sherlock Holmes Collections.

24. "The Charm of Variety." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 5.

Call for letters written by John Bennett Shaw for addition to the Holmes Collections.

25. "Contents of the Crowded Box-Room." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 1-2.

Describes the origins and nature of the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota.

26. "It was in a city in Russia..." (Golden Pince-Nez)." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 1-2, 4.

Discusses John Bennett Shaw's acquisition of the Czarina's Tauschnitz editions of The Hound of the Baskervilles, A Study in Scarlet, and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Includes photographs of the Tauschnitz editions and the Czarina.

27. "Libraries around the country." Civilization 2, no. 5 (1995): 92.

Presents a calendar of events for libraries in the United States. Includes "University of Minnesota--Sherlock Holmes and John Bennett Shaw: The Detective and the Collector. Celebrates the university's establishment of Shaw's personal library as a source for Holmes research. October 13 through November 30 at the Wilson Library..."

28. "Mark Your Calendars." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 4.

Announcement of the 1998 membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections in conjunction with the 50th anniversary celebration of the Norwegian Explorers, August 7-9.

29. "Mark Your Calendars." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 6.

Announcement of the 1998 membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections in conjunction with the 50th anniversary celebration of the Norwegian Explorers, August 7-9.

30. "Mark Your Calendars." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 6.

Announcement of the 1998 membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections in conjunction with the 50th anniversary celebration of the Norwegian Explorers, August 7-9.

31. "Mark Your Calendars." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 6.

Announcement of the 1998 membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections in conjunction with the 50th anniversary celebration of the Norwegian Explorers, August 7-9.

32. "Meet the Editorial Board." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 6.

Presents short biographical profiles of the editorial board of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections newsletter: Julie McKuras, Bruce E. Southworth, and Richard J. Sveum.

33. Minnesota's resource treasures, special library collections. University of Minnesota Special Collections, Sherlock Holmes Collection [sic]. [Saint Paul, MN]: Metronet, 1999. Visual Material 1 videocassette (27:20).

sd., col. ; 1/2 in. VHS format. Title from container. Participants: Narrators: Tim Johnson and Jamie Hubbs.;

34. "One Hundred Years Ago: "...a considerable mansion" (ACD)." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 2.

Discusses Doyle's home, Undershaw. Includes two photographs, one of Undershaw during construction and the other of Doyle's other home, Windlesham (miscaptioned as Undershaw in the article).

35. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 8.

Notes the contributions made by donors in supporting the Sherlock Holmes Collections, either in honor or in memory of special persons.

36. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 8.

Notes the contributions made by donors in supporting the Sherlock Holmes Collections, either in honor or in memory of special persons.

37. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 12.

Listing of those who have given gifts to support the Collections in honor or memory of special persons.

38. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 8.

Lists donors who have made contributions in memory or honor of a special individual.

39. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 8.

A list of recent donors to the collections, in memory or honor of certain individuals.

40. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 8.

List of donors who made contributions in honor of or memory of certain individuals.

41. Sherlock Holmes. [Minneapolis]: [WCCO Television], 1996. Visual Material 1 videocassettes (15 min.).

WCCO-TV (Television station : Minneapolis, Minn.) sd., col. ; 1/2 in. Beta and VHS formats. Broadcast Jan. 21, 1996 on KTCA-TV, St. Paul, Minn. [program narrated by Dave Moore].; In an episode of Moore on Sunday, James Hubbs reveals the extent of the Holmes materials, donated in part by John Bennett Shaw, in the Special Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries.

42. "Sherlock Holmes in many languages." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 1-3, 5.

Profile of Fred Levin's interest in Yiddish language versions of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Includes photograph of Bruce Southworth, Fred Levin, and Dr. Richard Sveum.

43. "'A Singular Set of People...'." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 2.

Notes the decisions by two scion societies of the Baker Street Irregulars to make contributions to the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota, The Arthur Conan Doyle Collection at The Metropolitan Toronto Library, and The Sherlock Holmes Collection at the Marylebone Library in London.

44. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 8.

Notes work by Courtney Andersen and tours of the Collections during the opening festivities. Includes a photograph of Tim Johnson, Phil Bergem, John Bergquist, and Pj Doyle.

45. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 8.

Notes research and visits by Steve Robinson (Gilbert, Arizona), Larry and Ann Koppers of Leawood, Kansas, and Angelo Barratta and Laura Leigh Mason, of Phoenix, Arizona. Includes a photograph of the Koppers.

46. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 8.

Notes the visits of Randall Stock and Adam Sveum, with photographs of both.

47. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 5.

Notes recent visits to the Collections by Catherine Cooke, Susan Dahlinger, and Randall Stock

48. "You may have read of the remarkable explorations of a Norwegian named Sigerson..."." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 1-3.

Biographical profile of E.W. "Mac" McDiarmid. Includes photograph of McDiarmid and Dorothy Rowe Shaw, reproduction of McDiarmid bookplate for the University of Minnesota Libraries Sherlock Holmes Collections

49. Bergquist, John. "The Paton Collection Comes to Minnesota." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 1, 6.

Highlights the arrival of Jennie Paton's audio-visual collection to Minnesota.

50. Blau, Peter E. "About Bill Rabe." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 3.

Biographical information and personal reflections and insights about Bill Rabe.

51. Brusic, Lucy McTeer, ed. Sherlock Holmes the detective & the collector : essays on the John Bennett Shaw Library. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Library, Special Collections and Rare Books, 1995.

Contents: Preface / Austin J. McLean -- Editor's note / Lucy M. Brusic -- John Bennett Shaw : A remembrance / Thomas L. Stix Jr. -- Labryinths : the worlds of Sherlock Holmes / Lawrence Frank -- Holmes by any other name : translating the Sherlock Holmes stories / Nils Nordberg -- Holmes and Watson among the scholars : when the game is really afoot / J. Randolph Cox --The writings about the writings : being a requiem for the great game / David L. Hammer -- Turn the dial to Sherlock Holmes on radio / William Nadel -- I see Sherlock everwhere : Holmes on film / Jennie C. Paton -- If it sticks to the ceiling it must be done : the Holmes pastiche / Robert Brusic -- Elementary Holmes : Sherlockian children's literature / Ruth Berman -- Sherlock Holmes meets Batman : the great detective in American comic books / Charlotte A. L. Erickson (cont.) Contents: The Art and craft of Sherlock Holmes, and I don't mean detection / Derham Groves -- I never believed there was a society such as yours : Sherlockian Societies / Peter E. Blau -- Contributors. Includes bibliographical references. ;

52. Brusic, Lucy McTeer, James Hubbs, William Nadel, and Cy Harrice. Edith Meiser and her adventures with Sherlock Holmes a guide to the Edith Meiser Collection at the University of Minnesota. Minneapolis: Sherlock Holmes Collections, Special Collections and Rare Books, University of Minnesota, 1999.

Includes bibliographical references;

53. Dahlinger, Susan E. "Sherlock Holmes, a centenary essay." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 1, 6, 8.

An essay on the life and work of the actor, William Gillette, on the centennial of his first performance of the play "Sherlock Holmes," the art of Frederic Dorr Steele (who fixed Gillette's image of Holmes in the minds of many), Vincent Starrett's work with Gillette on the publication of the script, and the materials related to all three of these men in the Holmes Collections.

54. Johnson, Timothy J. "The Adventure of the Unopened Box: Building the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries." Collection Management 29, no. 3/4 (2004): 121-141.

The article traces the historical development and description of significant acquisitions that comprise major portions of the Sherlock Holmes Collections of the University of Minnesota Libraries Special Collections. Beginning with the formation of the Norwegian Explorers, a local scion society of the Baker Street Irregulars of New York, in 1948, the article presents the intertwined nature in the development of this local interest group and the growth of the Holmes Collections. Various strategic acquisitions methodologies, such as donor relations, exhibitions, scholarly publications, and conference development are presented as part of the narrative. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

55. ———. "Collections Update -- More Accessibility Soon." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 3.

Notes work on mounting a digital version of The Universal Sherlock Holmes bibliography on the Holmes Collections web site.

56. ———. "The Cover." Libraries & Culture 36, no. 2 (2001): 366.

Describes the bookplate for the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries in Minneapolis. Illustration of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; Background on the titles included in the collections; Significance of the collections.

57. ———. "Meet the new Curator of Special Collections: Timothy Johnson." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 1-2-4.

Introductory essay by the new curator of the Sherlock Holmes Collections. Includes a photograph of Tim Johnson and Mike Whelan, head of the Baker Street Irregulars.

58. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 5.

Notes recent activities including recent class visits, preparations for the summer conference and exhibit, work with the Weisman Museum on their "Cabinet of Curiosities" exhibit, and an article on the Collections in the St. Paul Pioneer Press. Also noted is progress on fund-raising for McDiarmid curatorship, work with the Law Library on a conference tie-in with the exhibit, and the passing of Wayne Swift.

59. ———. "An Update From the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 9.

Reflections on the attention given the exhibit "The Basic Holmesian Library" by the media, conference attendees, and other visitors. An update on current book cataloging and other activities is also given.

60. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 4, 8.

Provides some observations on this year's trip to New York and the BSI weekend and on preparations for the opening of the Elmer L. Andersen Library.

61. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 5, 8.

Comments on the final move into and grand opening of the Elmer L. Andersen Library. work on the Hubbs cataloging project, the latest exhibit, "Better Holmes and Gardens: Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Architectural Design 'Down Under' and the passing of E. W. McDiarmid.

62. ———. "An Update From the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 6-7.

An abbreviated version of the 'State of the Collections' address given at the annual membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections. Includes a photograph of Richard Sveum and Anne McDiarmid and another photograph of Jim Deleo, Mary McDiarmid, and the author.

63. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 4.

Reports on the status of the cataloging project funded by the Hubbs family and on a gift by Mary McDiarmid towards the endowed curator position.

64. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 4.

Provides information on recent activities including gifts to the collections, the important contributions of volunteers, planning for the move into the new library, and the availability of a web version of The Universal Sherlock Holmes bibliography.

65. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 5, 6.

Provides a word of thanks for the work of Jamie Hubbs, Collection Specialist, as he moves on to graduate coursework in library science, and an update on planning the move of the Collections into the new library building and possible disruptions to service during that time.

66. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 5.

Provides an update on the move into the new Elmer L. Andersen Library, beginning organization of the cataloging work as a result of the Hubbs family gift, the mounting of a new exhibit featuring the work of Derham Grove's architectural students, and the passing of Dorothy Rowe Shaw.

67. Lellenberg, Jon L. "Norman Schatell." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 1-2-5.

Portrait of Norman Schatell.

68. Malec, Andrew. "Frederic Dorr Steele." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 6.

Portrait of the illustrator Frederic Dorr Steele and holdings by the Holmes Collections.

69. ———. "Some Personal Recollections of the Early Days of the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 1, 10-11.

A reminiscence from an Irregular who played a role in the early days of the collections. Includes a picture of the author with E. W. McDiarmid and another photograph from the July 1983 "Adventures on the Air" with John Bennett Shaw, Austin McLean, Edith Meiser, and McDiarmid.

70. McKuras, Julie. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 2.

Sherlock Holmes Baffled was made in 1900, and marked the premier of the Master Detective in the new entertainment medium of the motion picture. Although the film lasts less than one minute, the impact of Holmes on the screen is still felt 100 years later. Jennie Paton has donated a copy of this film to the Sherlock Holmes Collections.

71. ———. "About the Haycraft Collection." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 7.

Provides background on the Haycraft Collection acquisition.

72. ———. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 5.

Notes recent acquisitions for the Collections including Keith Webb's first book, Sherlock Holmes in Japan, computer image files from Bill Vande Water, and items from Al Gregory and Karen Ellery.

73. ———. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 4.

Hightlights recent acquisitions and donations to the collections from Jennie Paton, Laura Kuhn, and Taylor Publishing.

74. ———. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 5.

Highlights recent acquisitions to the Collections.

75. ———. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 4.

Highlights recent acquisitions to the Holmes Collections including donations from Bert Coules, Larry Millett, George Hubbs, and Fred Anderson.

76. ———. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 4.

Highlights a number of recent acquisitions including material from Larry Millett, Pasquale Accardo, Margrith Geisser, materials from the "Holmes Under the Arch" conference, and a tape from Jill Fritz.

77. ———. "The Basic Holmesian Library." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 1, 5.

Some observations on John Bennett Shaw's "List of 100" and the exhibit based on Shaw's list that was displayed during the conference "2001: A Sherlockian Odyssey". Includes seven photographs from the exhibit and visitors during the conference including Les Klinger, Jon Lellenberg, Richard Lancelyn Green, and Dan Posnansky.

78. ———. "Community Support for the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 5.

Highlights the support of Mike McKuras and his volunteer work on the Friends board and the additional support of Ecolab, Inc. Also reports on a visit from a member of Ecolab’s Community Relations Department, Cheryl Budewitz, to the Collections. Includes a photograph of Cheryl and Tim Johnson during her visit.

79. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 11.

Reflections on the contents and writers in this issue of the newsletter.

80. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 4.

Some observations on the arrival of the Paton Collection, other articles in the newsletter, the identity of "A.M." as Arthur Mee, and a correction to include Jon Lellenberg on the editorial board.

81. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 2.

Observations on some of the changes that have affected the Collections: the move into the new library, the contributions of new writers for the newsletter, and the addition of Jon Lellenberg to the editorial board.

82. ———. "The Old Globe Theatre, KPBS-FM of San Diego, and "The Mask of Moriarty"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 4.

Reports on the production and playbill for "The Mask of Moriarty" at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego and the associated radio program, "These Days," on KPBS-FM with the resulting donations to the Sherlock Holmes Collections. Includes photograph of Paxton Whitehead in the role of Holmes and Tom Lacy in the role of Watson

83. ———. "The Paton Collection." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 7.

Provides additional information on the newly acquired Paton collection of audio-visual materials.

84. ———. "Treasures From the John Bennett Shaw Library." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 7.

Provides some additional information on the selection of items for the New York BSI exhibit, those who assisted in developing the exhibit, and a list of the items that were displayed. Includes a photograph of the curator near one of the cases at the National Arts Club.

85. ———. "Treasures, Tales and Tea." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 7.

Reports on a Friends of the Libraries event the highlighted a number of treasures from the various collections that will be moving into the new library and Tim Johnson's presentation that included items from the Holmes Collections and some background on the history and development of rare and special collections.

86. ———. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 7.

Notes visitors to the Collections, including students in the Summer Enrichment Program of the Minneapolis Public Schools ("The Doolittle Detective Agency"). One member of the class, Joseph Anderson, is the great-great-grand nephew of Dr. Joseph Bell. Includes four photographs of visitors.

87. ———. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 8.

Observations on the research use of the Collections by Andrew Malec, Lucy Brusic, Jamie Hubbs, and William Nadel.

88. Shaughnessy, Tom. "On the Elementary Importance of the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 4.

An article by the University Librarian on the importance of the Holmes Collections within the context of the larger mission of a research library.

89. Southworth, Bruce E. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 5.

Thoughts on recent activities in the Collections and the contents of this issue of the newsletter, including the web version of The Universal Sherlock Holmes, the tribute to Will Crakes, the Morley donation, the new library, and a new editor for the newsletter.

90. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 4.

Highlights articles in the present issue and also notes Peter Blau's discovery that Tsar Nicholas II, while in captivity with his family in Tsarkoe Selo, read The Valley of Fear.

91. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 7.

Highlights the articles in this issue of the newsletter that deal with the theme of Holmes in art.

92. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 5.

Reflects on the recently held "Founders' Footprints" conference, the advisory committee meeting, the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections membership meeting, and the arrival of Tim Johnson as the new curator.

93. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 3.

Highlights the articles that have appeared in the second year of the newsletter's publication.

94. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 4.

Comments on the various articles appearing in this issue of the newsletter, with additional commentary on the 1894 photograph of Doyle noted in previous issues, additional information on the identity of Frances Crane, and a note on the election of Julie McKuras as the new president of the Norwegian Explorers.

95. ———. "Musings from the Writing Table." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 3.

Comments on reactions to the inaugural edition of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections newsletter.

96. ———. "Musings from the Writing Table." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 4.

Discusses the two mysteries posed by articles in this issue of the newsletter, highlights other items from the newsletter, and thanks those who have sent materials or financial contributions to the Collections.

97. Sveum, Richard J. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 3.

Focuses on Charles Honce and his work. "In 1950, the latest of Charles Honce’s fine press Christmas books was published by the Golden Eagle Press in Mount Vernon. The 58-page To Talk of Many Things was limited to 88 copies. It was designed and printed by S. A. Jacobs, who attended the 1950 BSI Dinner with Honce. The Sherlock Holmes Collections has John Bennett Shaw’s copy of this book, whose cover page indicates it is "A Book Lovers Opinion on a Lot of Other Subjects Including Eating, Drinking, Traveling, Decorating, Entertaining, and Dressing and Undressing...."

98. ———. "Advisory Committee Meeting." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 4.

Reports on the Sherlock Holmes Collections advisory committee meeting held on August 7th.

99. ———. "Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections: a word from Dr. Richard Sveum, President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 1 (1997): 4.

Discusses the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections and the inaugural newsletter for the collections.

100. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 4.

Invites readers to the open house for the new Elmer L. Andersen Library, comments on the exhibit at the BSI reception in New York, and urges readers to continue their support of the Collections.

101. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 4.

Notes the upcoming August Friends annual meeting, the opening of the Elmer L. Andersen Library, and the passing of E. W. McDiarmid.

102. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 4.

Highlights events at the annual membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections including meeting in the new Andersen Library, awarding Lucy Brusic the volunteer of the year, the establishment of an endowment named in honor and memory of E. W. McDiarmid for the curator's position, and tributes to McDiarmid. Includes a photograph of Lucy Brusic and Tim Johnson.

103. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 4.

Notice of the next Friends annual meeting in conjunction with the 2001 conference co-sponsored with the Norwegian Explorers. Also information on the University's capital campaign and the desire to raise funds for the McDiarmid endowed curator position.

104. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 4.

Presents a report on the annual meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections.

105. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 4.

Extends gratitude to the Hubbs family for their gift to the Collections, alerts readers to a display of items at the Baker Street Irregulars weekend in January 2000, and the opening gala for the new library.

106. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 4.

Notes appointment of Timothy J. Johnson as the new curator of Special Collections, the construction of the new Minnesota Library Archives and Access Center, and a reminder of the membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections on August 7th.

107. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 7.

Notes the upcoming annual meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections, the acquisition of the Norman Schatell archives, and the ongoing desire to collection scion society materials and John Bennett Shaw correspondence.

108. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 7.

Recaps the activities of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections during the "Founders' Footprints" conference.

109. ———. "The Hubbs Family Gift." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 1, 5.

Reports on the gift of the Hubbs family for the cataloging of the book and serial portions of the Collections. The project gift, which will take three years, was matched by the University Libraries. Additional information is provided on members of the Hubbs family who have played such an important role with the collections. Includes a photograph.

110. ———. "Library Receives Maiwand Jezails Artifacts." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 1, 4.

Notes the donation by Richard D. Lesh, BSI, of souvenirs of the June 2, 2001 Maiwand Jezail dinner in Omaha, Nebraska to the Holmes Collections. Also provides additional information on Professor Lesh and the Maiwand Jezail scion society. Includes a photograph of Lesh and the author at the dinner.

111. ———. "The View from Laurel Cottage." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 1-4.

Profile of lawyer, scholar, writer, publisher, philanthropist, and Sherlockian David L. Hammer.

112. ———. "A Word from our President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 3.

Notes his visit with David and Audrey Hammer and the many donations of correspondence with John Bennett Shaw and back issues of periodicals that have been received by the Collections.

113. ———. "A Word from our President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 5.

Comments on the various activities of the Friends of the Holmes Collections and the University of Minnesota Libraries, including materials and gifts received for the Collections, securing a new curator, construction of the new Library Access Center, and the upcoming membership meeting.

114. ———. "A Word from our President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 6.

Observations on the first year of the Friends' newsletter, a request to consider membership, and a note on the upcoming membership meeting.

115. Vande Water, Bill. "'the picture has supplied us with one of the most obvious missing links.' (Hound)." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 3-4.

Discusses the photographic holdings of the University of Minnesota's Sherlock Holmes Collections.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Collecting Sherlockiana -- University of Texas (4)

1. Becker, Jill, and Sheri Fowler. "Around the state." Texas Monthly 23, no. 2 (1995): 16.

Presents a guide to various entertainment and cultural events to be organized in Texas during 1995, with a reference to Doyle. "When the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center in Austin receives a writer's archive, items such as letter openers, ash-trays, and checkbooks often accompany the manuscripts and letters. These personal effects make up the center's new permanent display, 'Worldly Possessions.' Among the articles exhibited are Isaac Singer's typewriter (complete with Yiddish characters), Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's metal-rimmed glasses (below, bottom left), a pair of moccasins worn by D. H. Lawrence, and a plate bearing Charles Dickens' initials and seal."

2. Max, D. T. "Final Destination." New Yorker 83, no. 16 (2007): 54-71.

The article discusses the literary manuscripts held at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. The center's director Thomas Staley is profiled. On hand are works such as a Gutenberg Bible, a first edition of "Alice in Wonderland," and the corrected proofs of James Joyce's "Ulysees." The article reports on Staley's method for acquiring new material and his passion for the field. Former University of Texas dean Harry Huntt Ransom's development of the archive center is covered. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Ransom acquired books and manuscripts so rapidly that they piled up in the halls and stairwells. 'G.T.T.' -- Gone to Texas -- became a recognized abbreviation in the rare-book business. He was also innovative. He bought the collections of the living or only recently dead writers whom Harvard and Yale considered too green. Ransom, who earned the nickname the Great Acquisitor, not only bought these writers' manuscripts and letters; he tried to gather everything from baby book to death mask. As a result, the center has Arthur Conan Doyle's undershirts, Evelyn Waugh's writing desk, a pair of beaded moccasins worn by D. H. Lawrence, Anne Sexton's glasses, and Isaac Bashevis Singer's Yiddish typewriter...."

3. Petkus, Donald A. "Lone Star Treasures: ACD Manuscripts and Materials at the University of Texas-Austin." Baker Street West 1 10, no. 1 (2004): 13-14.

4. Spong, John. "King's Ransom." Texas Monthly 31, no. 10 (2003): 98-107.

Focuses on the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC) at the University of Texas (UT) in Austin. Information on several collections found at the HRC: Vision of former UT vice president Harry Ransom when he founded the HRC in 1957; Reasons behind Ransom's success in creating the HRC; Efforts of HRC director Tom Staley to promote the research center. Includes a reference to Doyle with a photograph of his reading glasses. "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's reading glasses. The HRC has many personal effects belonging to the Scotland-born creator of Sherlock Holmes, including his desk, the clothes he was wearing when he escaped his burning house in 1929, his Ouija board, and the dirty socks his wife took off of him after he died so she could make him more presentable for the afterlife."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Conferences and Workshops (23)

1. "ALA conference preview. (Cover story)." American Libraries 29, no. 4 (1998): 106.

Presents information on the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference in Washington, D.C. from June 25 to July 1, 1998. Includes "Sherlock Holmes In Washington." Peter E. Blau of The Red Circle of Washington and the infamous "Black Peter" of the Baker Street Irregulars, will be our host for Sherlockian presentation toasts, and canonical discussion at the National Press Club on the 13th floor of the National Press Building. Speakers: Gayle T. Harris, past-pres., libn., Lib. of Congress, "Skeletons in the Stacks"; Peter E. Blau, "Insights and Revelations on the World of Sherlockian Scholarship and Conviviality"; Francine Morris Swift, sr. surviving member of Sublibns., member, Baker Street Irregulars, Sherlock Holmes Society of London, "The Good Old Days of the Sublibrarians Scion."

2. "Foth revisited (2) Who Was Who at Footprints of the Hound." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 4 (2002): 28-30.

3. "From the Editor's Commonplace Book." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 127.

Peter Blau's report on Doyle manuscripts offered at Sotheby's, The Scowrers and Molly Maguires Third International Seminar, the passing of Patsy Dalton, and The Watsonian Weekend III.

4. "Photomontage I. Birthday 2001." The Serpentine Muse 17, no. 2 (2001): 6-7.

5. "Photomontage II. Bash 2001." The Serpentine Muse 17, no. 2 (2001): 10.

6. "Sherlock Holmes: Victorian Sleuth to Modern Hero [advertisement]." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 48.

Announcement of a conference held at Bennington College in Vermont, June 23-26, 1994. Featured speakers include Nicholas Meyer and Edward Hanna.

7. "Who Was Who at ACD@35." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 3 (2007): 50-51.

8. Bruxner, Pamela. "Review -- Aspects of Holmes II: Scrutinizing Holmes, York 11-13 June 1993." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 98-103.

9. Campbell, Mary, and Bob Coghill. "Footprints of FOTH, A Reminiscence." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 2 (2001): 4-12.

10. Capolupo, Maria. "Review--Sherlock in Summer, The Mini Tonga Cruise--Part II." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 58-59.

11. Cochran, William R. "From the Editor's Commonplace Book." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 62-63.

On the demise of the periodical Baker Street Miscellanea, Julie and Al Rosenblatt's 4-day mini-course on Holmes at Vassar College, an article in MHQ by Thaddeus Holt, the Folio Society's version of the Canon, the 25th anniversary of the Noble Bachelors of St. Louis, the Sherlock Holmes Society of London's "Back to Baker Street" festival, and the Books of Michael Harrison.

12. Elliott, Philip et al. "ACD at Thirty-Five." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 2 (2006): 24-39.

13. France, F. Dennis. "Founder's Footprints: The Fiftieth Anniversary Conference of the Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota." The Serpentine Muse 15, no. 1 (1998): 16-20.

14. Johnson, Timothy J. "An Update From the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 5.

Notes attendance at various conferences between March and the beginning of the Holmes conference in June.

15. Keefauver, G. Hunter. "Fear and Fake Rowing on the Campaign Trail: The Dayton Sherlockian Convention of '00." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 19-24.

16. McCafferty, Jonathan, and Elaine Hamill. "Review--Aspects of Holmes V." The Ritual, no. 26 (2000): 62-65.

17. Moore, Richard. "Review--Aspects of Holmes III: A Study in Scotland, Scandic Crown Hotel, Edinburgh, 4-5 May 1995." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 95-103.

18. Penner, Marilyn. "FOTH Revisited: When Toronto was the Centre of the Universe." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 4 (2002): 24-27.

19. Putney, Charles R, Joseph A. Cutshall King, and Sally Sugarman. Sherlock Holmes: Victorian sleuth to modern hero. Lanham, Md: Scarecrow Press, 1996.

LC Control Number: 96007265. Includes bibliographical references (p.) and index; "Perhaps the only real problem for those who attend Sherlockian symposiums and workshops and weekends is that all too often one goes home without the papers presented at the gatherings, because the sessions generally aren't recorded and the papers generally aren't published, and it's even worse if there are multiple sessions, and one can't attend all of them. A pleasant exception is the conference organized by The Baker Street Breakfast Club at Bennington College in June 1994. This is a thoroughly welcome collection, and the editors have done an excellent job of offering 24 of the papers from the conference, including Nicholas Meyer's fine keynote address on 'Sherlock Holmes on Film: A Personal View' (he has never seen a Sherlock Holmes film he didn't dislike, and explains why, with considerable insight and humor)."

20. Randall, Warren. "FOTH Revisited (3) At the Sound of the Hound." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 4 (2002): 31-35.

21. Southworth, Bruce, Marshall S Berdan, John Pforr, Marina Stajic, Alvin E Rodin, R. Dixon Smith, Jack D. Key, Carole Nelson Douglas, Robert Brusic, Joseph W Moran, and Harold Orel. Sherlock Holmes' rogues, rascals and ruffians Minneapolis, Minnesota, June 11-13, 1993, conference proceedings. S.l: s.n, 1995.

Includes bibliographical references. Contents: Introduction / Bruce Southworth -- A Study in scarlet journalism: the curious non-correlation between late Victorian criminals and those depicted by John H. Watson, popular author / Marshall S. Berdan -- Those bars of gold: proprietors and inhabitants of the opium dens of London, tales from London's East End / John Pforr -- The Most winning woman... / Marina Stajic -- A Murderous medical trio: Drs. Roylott, Palmer and Pritchard / Alvin E. Rodin and Jack E. [i.e. D.] Key -- Bohemian scandals, Irene Adler: rogue or rival? / Carole Nelson Douglas -- Prayer for Norwegian Explorers banquet, June 12, 1993 / Robert Brusic -- A Tribute to the Norwegian explorer / Joseph W. Moran -- Conan Doyle's sense of justice / Harold Orel -- His old friend Charlie Peace reconsidered / R. Dixon Smith;

22. Sveum, Richard J. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 4.

Notice of the triennial conference, "2001: A Sherlockian Odyssey - A Journey Among the Shaw 100", to be held June 29 to July 1, 2001.

23. Weller, Philip, and Jane Weller. "Franco-Midland Hardware Company Contributions to The Kamakura Seminar and the Kawasaki Convention." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 206-222.

06F Writings about the writings -- Other Subjects -- Dictionaries and Encyclopedias (21)

1. Merriam-Webster's encyclopedia of literature. Springfield, Mass: Merriam-Webster, 1995.

LC Control Number: 94042741; Scuttlebutt Jan 1996; "Has entries for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, and The Hound of the Baskervilles; the anonymous author of the entry on Conan Doyle didn't confirm the titles of all the Sherlock Holmes book, but it's nice to see continuing attention paid to the Canon and its author."

2. Brooks, Robert. The Solar Pons encyclopedia. Toronto: Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Feb 1997;

3. Bunson, Matthew. Encyclopedia Sherlockiana an A-to-Z guide to the world of the great detective. 1st ed. New York: Macmillan, 1994.

LC Control Number: 94010714. Includes bibliographical references (p. 325-326);

4. ———. The Sherlock Holmes encyclopedia. London: Pavilion, 1995.

5. Bunson, Matthew, and Masamichi Higurashi. Sharokku Homuzu hyakka jiten = Encyclopedia Sherlockiana. Tokyo: Hara Shobo, 1997.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 460-470);

6. Haigh, Gideon. Uncyclopedia. New York: MJF Books/Fine Communications, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2005938864; Scuttlebutt 1994; "Is subtitled 'Everything you never knew you wanted to know,' and there's an entry for '221B Baker Street' with a description of the famous house and its contents."

7. ———. The uncyclopedia. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Hyperion, 2004.

LC Control Number: 2004042502; "Is subtitled 'Everything you never knew you wanted to know,' and there's an entry for '221B Baker Street' with a description of the famous house and its contents."

8. Herbert, Rosemary. Whodunit : a who's who in crime & mystery writing. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

25 cm. Includes index.;

9. Horn, Maurice. 100 years of American newspaper comics an illustrated encyclopedia. New York: Gramercy Books, 1996.

LC Control Number: 95045979. Includes bibliographical references (p. 405-406) and index; Scuttlebutt Jun 1996; "With sections on Sherlock Holmes, Hawkshaw the Detective, and Sherlocko the Monk."

10. Klinger, Leslie S. The Adventure of the Legion of Imposters: A Reference Work. Seattle: Wigmore Street Post Office, 1994.

11. Mortimer, John Clifford. The Oxford book of villains. Oxford England, New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Paper; Scuttlebutt 1994; Prof. Moriarty is present, in a reprint of T. S. Eliot's poem "Macavity: The Mystery Cat".

12. Nevins, Jess, and Michael Moorcock. The Encyclopedia of Fantastic Victoriana. Austin, TX: MonkeyBrain, Inc., 2005.

port. ; 26 cm. "This book is about genres and media which have traditionally been excluded from the canon: science fiction, fantasy, horror, mysteries, historical novels, dime novels, penny dreadfuls, and story papers."--Author's foreword, p. ix. Includes an introduction by Michael Moorcock. Appendix: Bulwer-Lytton: a brief appreciation: p. 1003-1005. Includes bibliographical references (p. 1007-1009). Scuttlebutt Dec 2005.; "An interesting exploration of the fantastic literature of the 19th century, and Conan Doyle is of course included, with entries for Irene Adler, Edward Bellingham, Jack Brocket, Micah Clarke, Brigadier Gerard, Sherlock Holmes, Sir Nigel Loring, Professor Moriarty, and Duncan Warner."

13. Park, Orlando. The Sherlock Holmes encyclopedia. Carol Pub. Group ed. Secaucus, N.J: Carol Pub. Group, 1994.

LC Control Number: 93042779;

14. Roden, Christopher. "On the Shoulders of Giants: Jack Tracy and The Encyclopaedia Sherlockiana." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana, no. (2001): 3-63.

15. Ross, Thomas Wynne. Good old index the Sherlock Holmes handbook : a guide to the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, persons, places, themes, summaries of all the tales, with commentary on the style of the author. 1st ed. Columbia, SC: Camden House, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96000749;

16. Sherwood, John C., and Mystery Visits (firm). The pocket Sherlock a portable guide to the Canon. West Grove, PA: Mystery Visits, 2005.

Includes bibliographical references and index; Synopses of the 60 commonly accepted chronicles, with primary plots and participants...plus case numbers and order, crimes both actual and suspected, publication dates and order, first anthology reference, popular chronology and notation systems, some unrecorded cases and bibliogrpahic materials. With personal data for Sherlock Holmes and John H. Watson.--T.p

17. Thurman, Susan. The Sherlock Holmes Study Guide. Henderson, KY: Class Act, 1995.

Scuttlebutt Sept 1995;

18. Tibballs, Geoff. The Boxtree encyclopedia of TV detectives. London: Boxtree, 1992.

LC Control Number: 93136514; Scuttlebutt July 1996. Added Title: TV detectives; "With brief entries for many of the Sherlockian series from 1951 (with Alan Wheatley) through the Granada series."

19. Weller, Philip. Alphabetically, My Dear Watson. Fareham, Hampshire: Sherlock Publications, 1994.

A pocket reference book listing all the Canonical characters, with brief details and citations.

20. ———. Elementary Holmes: a pocket reference guide to the world of Sherlock Holmes. Fareham, Hampshire: Sherlock Publications, 1993.

21. Wood, Benton. Who's where a handy reference guide to persons in the Holmesian Canon, listed by adventure. S.l: s.n., 1994.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Drugs and poisons (4)

1. Couchman, Jason. "Sherlock Holmes and Opium Use: Detecting Holmes's Mystery Narcotic." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 149-51.

A discussion of Holmes use of the drug as related in some of the tales.

2. Fouassier, E. "Sherlock Holmes, Watson and cocaine. A literary contribution to the history of drug addiction." Rev Hist Pharm (Paris) 41, no. 300 (1994): 65-70.

From 1887 to 1927, Conan Doyle devoted fifty-six short stories and four novels to the extraordinary investigations of Sherlock Holmes. Special passages from these works, gathered here in the form of long extracts, evoke the passion of the celebrated detective for cocaine and constitute rather generally an original sort of evidence on the emergence of drug addicts in Europe at the end of the 19th century.

3. Keep, Christopher, and Don Randall. "Addiction, Empire, and Narrative in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of the Four." Novel: A Forum on Fiction 32, no. 2 (1999): 207.

"Relates the book The Sign of the Four, by Conan Doyle, with the image of Great Britain as an empire and an exporter of addictive substances. What the fictitious character [sic] Sherlock Holmes represents; Impact of cocaine in medicine and Europe's colonial enterprise; Views of writer Jacques Derrida on the drug pharmakon."

4. Pearce, D. N. "Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle and cocaine." J Hist Neurosci 3, no. 4 (1994): 227-32.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- England (1)

1. The Sherlock Holmes video Tour the England of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. Somerset, England : Countryside TV Productions, 1995. Visual Material 1 videocassette (ca. 60 min.).

sd., col.; 1/2 in.; "The Sherlock Holmes Video finds the detective and his companion Dr. Watson existing as literary ghosts in their old rooms at 221b Baker Street. They set out to rediscover their past and through the eyes of the camera are able to view many of the sights, scenes, and locations relevant to their celebrated career."... [container]

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- England -- Birmingham (1)

1. Plant, Sadie. "The great toyshop of Europe." New Statesman 132, no. 4640 (2003): 30.

Discusses the city of Birmingham, England. Network of extensive canals that the city built in the 18th century; City that produced metal goods; Economic life that continues to be varied and inventive; City that is full of cultures. Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Birmingham makes all the usual claims to fame - great achievements, great people, great events. It can show off its magnificent pre-Raphaelite paintings, offer some outstanding architectural sights, music and food, not to mention countless shiny bars and waterside cafes. It was home to famous writers, too: JR R Tolkien, Hilaire Belloc and Benjamin Zephaniah; Samuel Johnson, whose first essays appeared in the Birmingham Journal; Washington Irving, who was living in the Jewellery Quarter when he wrote Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow; and Arthur Conan Doyle, who, as a young city doctor, bought his first violin from a shop on Sherlock Street...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- England -- Devon (6)

1. Brimacombe, Peter. "A walk on the wildside." In Britain 4, no. 2: 10.

Features the Dartmoor National Park in England, with a passing reference to Doyle. "...This menacing legend was the inspiration for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Hound of the Baskervilles, partially written in the Duchy Hotel at Princetown, now the High Moorland Visitor Centre...."

2. Hargan, Jim. "Dartmoor of the Baskervilles." British Heritage 19, no. 5 (1998): 52.

Provides information on the hounds of Dartmoor, with reference to The Hound of the Baskervilles. When Conan Doyle first heard about the hounds; Folk tales surrounding the hounds of Dartmoor; How Conan Doyle set about writing a book about this folk tale; Places of interest in Dartmoor.

3. ———. "England's un-natural landscape." British Heritage 27, no. 1 (2006): 34-40.

The article presents information on the historical natural landscapes in England. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...Rural folk reacted in ways ambiguous and contradictory, at once liking the short cuts and disliking the trespassers. Conan Doyle made fun of those attitudes in The Hound of the Baskervilles, as when Dr. Watson describes Mr. Frankland of Lafter Hall: 'Sometimes he will shut up a right of way and defy the parish to make him open it. At others he will with his own hands tear down some other man's gate and declare that a path has existed there from time immemorial, defying the owner to prosecute him for trespass.'"

4. Pugh, Brian W. "The Weather and Atmosphere of Dartmoor in the Hound." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 132-135.

5. Spano, Susan. "At home on the moors." New York Times, June 8, 1997: 6.

Provides information on the experience of the author, who visited the wild uplands of Dartmoor National Park in the West Country of England, said to be frequented by pixies and ghosts. History of the park; How it was depicted in the book 'Hound of Baskervilles,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. INSET: The bottom line.

6. Tuttle, Brad R. "Death at Dartmoor." American History 37, no. 4 (2002): 30.

Provides information on the massacre of U.S. prisoners of war at the Dartmoor Prison in England by British soldiers headed by Royal Navy Captain Thomas G. Shortland in 1812. Description of the massacre; Abuse of prisoners by British prison guards; Description of the conditions of prisoners; Acts of defiance demonstrated by the prisoners. Inset: Dartmoor Prison. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Not much has changed in this isolated part of Devon, the setting for the classic Sherlock Holmes story The Hound of the Baskervilles. Only two roads cross this great moor, and civilization seems far away. Travelers may come across an occasional farm and some sheep and semi-wild ponies, and perhaps think that time stopped here two centuries ago--when Dartmoor Prison was new...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- England -- London (94)

1. "Abbey National Unveil Bronze of Sherlock Holmes." Birmingham Post, October 9, 1999: 32.

"In the detective's shadow: Abbey National has tried to dilute the image of banks as soulless organisations, whose only driving force is the creation of profit, by unveiling a three-metre high bronze of Sherlock Holmes as part of its 150th anniversary celebrations. The move commemorates the bank's 'association' with the detective, dating back to 1932, when Abbey's head offices moved to Baker Street and incorporated Holmes' fictional address of 211b. Abbey still receives letters addressed to the crime-buster, which are answered by his 'secretary' who works for the bank."

2. "About London." New Statesman 129, no. 4481 (2000): 4.

Presents information related to London, England, including a quote from Doyle. "London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers of the Empire are irresistibly drained." in A Study in Scarlet (1887).

3. Cheap eats in London. 3rd ed. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96642563. Availability: Chronicle Books, 275 5th St., 3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94103; A picture of the Sherlock Holmes Pub on the cover.

4. "Excess Baggage." The Dominion Post (Wellington), December 24, 2002: A9.

"Sherlock Holmes fans can immerse themselves in the fictional detective's world, spending a weekend at the Sherlock Holmes Hotel in Baker St, London. The two-night break includes entry to Madame Tussaud's waxworks and a guided walk in the footsteps of Holmes with Historical Walks of London...."

5. "The Game's Afoot! Hot on the Trail of a Deerstalker." The Toronto Star, July 10, 1999: 1.

In response to a reader query, some suggested places in London from which to buy (or order) a deerstalker hat.

6. "Great Britain, Europe." Reference & Research Book News 19, no. 4 (2004): 35-43.

Presents abstracts of books on Great Britain and Europe selected from the 2004 issues of "Reference and Research Book News" and "SciTech Book News". Lists A Traveller's Companion to London, ed. by Thomas Wright. (Interlink Publishing Group, 2004) 410p. From the review: "Diary entries, letters, newspaper stories, and eyewitness accounts from authors such as Tacitus, Conan Doyle, and Crisp are among these nearly two hundred short readings about the places, people, and events that shaped London."

7. "History's dirty secret." Geographical 76, no. 4 (2004): 44-45.

Deals with the lack of political will to clean up urban air pollution in London, England. Passing reference to Holmes. "The smog -- caused by a temperature inversion that trapped thousands of tonnes of exhaust from domestic coal fires -- wasn't a new phenomenon. Since the 19th century, these 'London's particulars' had furnished the city with an air of mystery. Central to the tales of Sherlock Holmes and captured by artists such as Turner and Monet, the dense fog was accepted as a fact of life -- so much so that bronchitis became known as the 'British disease'."

8. "Holmes loan fraud; [3 Edition]." The Independent (London), December 7, 1994: No page citation.

"John A---------, 37, a businessman, of Belgravia, central London, who was behind the Sherlock Holmes museum in Baker Street, was convicted at Southwark Crown Court of founding it with the proceeds from a pounds 1.2m mortgage fraud. He will be sentenced next month."

9. "Holmes' Statue is on the Case!". Birmingham Evening Mail, September 24, 1999: 37.

"A bronze statue of the world's best-known fictional detective was unveiled in London. The statue of Sherlock Holmes stands outside Baker Street underground station, near to where the detective lived at the fictional number 221b. Abbey National, whose head office is located on the site of what would be 221b Baker Street, has sponsored the work to mark its 150th anniversary...."

10. In the footsteps of Sherlock Holmes. Derry, NH: Chip Taylor Communications, 1998. Visual Material 1 videodisc (45 min.).

sd., b&w & col. ; 4 3/4 in. European studies series (Chip Taylor Communications); England ; 3; DVD. produced by Associated Television International.; Actor Patrick Macnee guides us to all the places Holmes was written to have visited throughout London and unravels some intriguing mysteries about the fictional detective's life and times.

11. In the Footsteps of Sherlock Holmes. Derry, NH: Chip Taylor Communications, 2000. Visual Material 1 videocassette (45 min.).

sd., col. ; 1/2 in. Celebrity journal series; VHS. Narrated by Patrick Macnee. produced by Associated Television International.; Actor Patrick Macnee guides us to all the places Holmes was written to have visited throughout London and unravels some intriguing mysteries about the fictional detective's life and times.

12. In the footsteps of Sherlock Holmes. [s.l.]: Front Row Entertainment, 2002. Visual Material 1 videodisc (45 min.).

sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. DVD; Dolby surround stereo. Narrated by Patrick Macnee. Associated Television International. Director, David McKenzie; producer/writer, Monica M. Cushman.; Actor Patrick Macnee guides us to all the places Holmes was written to have visited throughout London and unravels some intriguing mysteries about the fictional detective's life and times.

13. "M2: Travel: It's Elementary!". Birmingham Evening Mail, August 20, 2002: 44.

"Finding a decent hotel in London is, to pinch a phrase from Sherlock Holmes, a three-pipe problem. Either you need to negotiate a second mortgage just to pay the bill or you arrive in an airless identi-kit concrete block with all the charm of a multistorey carpark. And you still get charged a small fortune. It was, then, with some trepidation that I headed for the Sherlock Holmes Hotel in Baker Street. The name alone conjured up visions of gullible American tourists being fleeced...."

14. "News in Brief." Nature 419, no. 6909 (2002): 770.

Presents international news briefs as of October 24, 2002. Presentation of a silver medal to the statue of Sherlock Holmes in London, England.

15. "Newsbrief: Sherlock's home." The Independent (London), May 19, 1994: no page citation.

"A plaque commemorating the creator of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is to be unveiled this month by his daughter, Lady Bromet, at 2 Upper Wimpole Street, where her father wrote several books, including `A Scandal in Bohemia' and `The Red Headed League'."

16. Nicholson London Pub Guide. 5th ed. London: Nicholson, 1994.

Scuttlebutt Jan 1996; "Visitors to London can choose from a variety of guides to London pubs (and they still are wonderful places to see London and Londoners at their best). John Baesch notes that the Guide (1995) has cover art showing the Peter Cushing side of the sign for The Sherlock Holmes."

17. "On the Trail of Sherlock Holmes." British Heritage 24, no. 3 (2003): 10.

Focuses on a package tour 'Sherlock Discovery,' organized by the Sherlock Holmes Hotel in London. Places to be visited in the tour; Duration of the package; Contact information for the package tour.

18. "Sherlock homes in on London address." The Evening Standard (London), September 21, 1999: 19.

"The final touches are being put to a 9ft statue of the great sleuth Sherlock Holmes which will stand outside Baker Street Tube station - close to the fictional detective's London address. The bronze, by Essex sculptor John Doubleday, has been commissioned by the Sherlock Holmes Society whose chairman Lord Tugendhat will unveil it on Thursday...."

19. "Sherlockian London." British Heritage 21, no. 1 (1999): 19.

Focuses on the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Co. shop in London, England. Showcase of the set from the Sherlock Holmes television series starring Jeremy Brett; Exhibition prices.

20. "Superb Take Holmes Pay; Job Vacancy for Sherlock Holmes Lookalike at Museum." The Mirror, January 29, 1998: 34.

"Looking for a job with a difference? It's elementary, dear Watson. The Baker Street Museum has a vacancy for a Sherlock Holmes lookalike at its famous address in London. It is just one of a range of opportunities you'll find in Summer Jobs Britain '98 and Summer Jobs Abroad '98 (both GBP 8.99)...."

21. "That great cesspool." Economist 354, no. 8162 (2000): 8-8.

Reviews the book 'London 1900: The Imperial Metropolis,' by Jonathan Schneer. References to both Holmes and Doyle.

22. "Tried and Terrific Explore London up close with guided walking tours." Providence Journal (Providence, RI), November 30, 1994: H-25.

Includes a reference to Holmes. "...We had been intrigued by brochures in our hotel lobby advertising two-hour guided walking tours with various themes, ranging from the sedate (London's gardens) to the literary (the London of Dickens and Sherlock Holmes) to the macabre (an evening tour of the spots where Jack the Ripper's victims were found)...."

23. Ackroyd, Peter. "London : the biography." Nan A. Talese, 2000.

1st ed. ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm. Originally published: London : Chatto & Windus, 2000. Includes bibliographical references (p. [761]-773) and index.; "'The image of London as a human body is striking and singular,' Ackroyd notes, and his book is full of anecdotes and insight and fine writing (and there are occasional mentions of Conan Doyle and Holmes, of course)."

24. ———. "London : the biography." Chatto & Windus, 2000.

ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 781-793) and index.;

25. ———. London : the biography. New York: Anchor Books, 2001.

ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm. Originally published: London : Chatto & Windus, 2000. Includes bibliographical references (p. [761-773) and index.;

26. ———. London : the biography. 1st Anchor Books ed. New York: Anchor Books, 2003.

ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index.;

27. ———. London : the biography. London: Vintage, 2001.

ill. (some col.), facsims. (some col.), maps (some col.), ports. (some col.) ; 24 cm. Originally published: London : Chatto & Windus, 2000. Includes bibliographical references and index.;

28. Alexander, Arthur M. Hot on the scent: a visitor's guide to the London of Sherlock Holmes. Rev. and expanded ed. Ashcroft, B.C: Calabash Press, 1999.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-272) and index;

29. Alexander, Marlene. "While in London, Lunch with the Great Detective." The Toronto Star, November 4, 2000: 16.

"...The Sherlock Holmes Public House and Restaurant proves an irresistible lure for a long-time fan of the Great Detective. My husband and teenage daughter agree, in view of its being the noon hour, that the situation bears further investigation. Ha, the game is afoot! Inside, we find that the lower floor is devoted to the bar. It seems the typical English pub except for the memorabilia that adorns the walls, among them Dr. Watson's service revolver and the stuffed and mounted head of the Hound of the Baskervilles...."

30. Barlay, Nick. "Statues of the London." The Times (London), May 15, 2004: 31.

Unveiled by Harold Wilson in 1966, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi's serene sculptural presence in Tavistock Square Gardens has become a focal point for peace memorials and events, just as his strategy of non-violent non-cooperation (satyagraha) has become a byword for peaceful resistance. Pandit Nehru, the former Prime Minister of India, planted a copper beech tree near by to commemorate his visit to London in 1953, and a cherry tree was planted in 1967 for the victims of Hiroshima. Each year on October 2, Gandhi's birth is celebrated with a huge display of flowers. To find Gandhi's statue, the great man's own instructions will help: "There is no way to peace. Peace is the way." The recent murder of Lancelyn Green, the renowned Sherlock Holmes expert, only fuels the transatlantic excitement of American and British fans: is there a Conan Doyle curse? What is true, of course, is that Holmes lived at 221b Baker Street, which is now a museum complete with very real souvenirs. Around the corner in front of Baker Street station is a statue of the famous detective by the sculptor John Doubleday, who is responsible for a number of London's more populist enterprises. The statue was unveiled in 1999 by Lord Tugendhat, the chairman of Abbey National Bank. The association with Holmes goes back to 1932, when the company built its headquarters at 200 Baker Street. Soon, a "secretary to Sherlock Holmes" had to be appointed to deal with the constant letters addressed to 221b. A permanent memorial to the world's most translated and performed playwright after Shakespeare was first proposed by the film director Derek Jarman, but it wasn't until 1998 that Oscar Wilde secured a place in Central London. Maggi Hambling's bronze in Adelaide Street near Trafalgar Square was unveiled by Stephen Fry and is less formal than the blue plaque at Wilde's residence in Tite Street in Chelsea. Entitled A Conversation with Oscar Wilde 1854-1900, the memorial consists of a sarcophagus, out of which pokes the writer's head. According to Hambling, the sculpture is "completed" when a member of the public sits down on the sarcophagus to have a chat with the author. In addition, the rebellious Wilde is depicted smoking, once a symbol of moral decay. Inscribed on the memorial is that wonderful quote by Wilde: "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."

31. Battista, Kathy, Brandon LaBelle, Barbara Penner, Steve Pile, and Jane Rendell. "Exploring 'an area of outstanding unnatural beauty': a treasure hunt around King's Cross, London." Cultural Geographies 12, no. 4 (2005): 429-462.

Includes references to Doyle and Holmes.

32. Baylen, Joseph O. "London 1900: The Imperial Metropolis (review)." Victorian Studies 43, no. 4 (2001): 680-682.

Includes reference to Doyle. "...Schneer cites the fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle, whose propagation of racist ideas and sentiments justified the imperialist sentiment prevalent in London in 1900. Here his acerbic view of Conan Doyle differs somewhat from the verdict of Daniel Strashower's recent biography of the writer...."

33. Bennett, Suzy. "Scenes of the crime." The Daily Telegraph (London), May 12, 2007: 13.

"...For fans of Britain's original detective, the Sherlock Holmes Museum at 221b Baker Street, London, is an obvious place to visit...along with the Sherlock Holmes pub on nearby Northumberland Avenue, which exhibits props used in the films. Further afield, in Devon, mist-wreathed Dartmoor was the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, although most of the 2002 film version of the story took place in Glen Maye, Jurby and Druidale on the Isle of Man...."

34. Berdan, Marshall S. "Elementary, My Dear Tourist: 100 years after his official retirement, Sherlock Holmes still draws supporters and supplicants to London's Baker Street." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 31-36, 43.

35. ———. "Sherlock Holmes 101." The Washington Post, January 11, 2004: 2.

"WHAT: Tracing the Victorian London of Sherlock Holmes; his colleague and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson; and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. WHY NOW: Because as devotees of Holmes -- 'the world's first and still most famous consulting detective' -- have collectively deduced, he was born Jan. 6, 1854, thus making 2004 his sesquicentennial celebration. SHERLOCKIAN SITES: The exact site of Holmes's 221B Baker St. residence remains a matter of debate. Because the entire Portman Square neighborhood in which it was located was reduced to rubble in World War II, the 'modern' world of Sherlock Holmes has been relocated to the northern end of the extended -- and renumbered -- Baker Street. Highlights include: "The Great Detective." Standing vigil outside the Marylebone Road exit of the Baker Street tube station is this statue, erected in 1999 by the Abbey National Bank (the residents of 221 Baker since 1932)....Sherlock Holmes Museum....Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Co...."

36. Campbell, Mark. "Hot on Sherlock Holmes's Trail; Mark Campbell Sniffs Out the London Haunts of Conan Doyle's Legendary Sleuth." The Independent (London), October 27, 2001: 7.

"One of the most famous literary addresses in London is 221b Baker Street. There's only one problem - the cosy rooms of amateur detective Sherlock Holmes and his friend, John H Watson, don't actually exist. The 'real' 221b, subsumed by the head office of the Abbey National, is not a worthy place of veneration. However, down the street in the Sherlock Holmes Museum..., you'll find a mock 221b frontage and a frighteningly accurate rendition of the dark and cluttered Victorian interior of Conan Doyle's stories. But for every fictitious address in the Canon (the official term for the four novels and 56 short stories featuring Holmes and Watson), you'll find plenty of bona fide locations in the capital. To begin with, turn the corner into Wigmore Street and you pass the post office that Holmes magically deduced Watson had visited in The Sign of Four (1890)...."

37. Churchill, Winsoar, and Alan Klehr. "London's Gentlemen's Clubs." British Heritage 21, no. 3 (2000): 50.

Focuses on clubs in London, England with a quote from the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes: "We had reached Pall Mall as we talked, and were walking down it from St. James's end. Sherlock Holmes stopped at a door some little distance from the Carlton, and cautioning me not to speak, he led the way into the hall. Through the glass panelling I caught a glimpse of a large and luxurious room, in which a considerable number of men were sitting about and reading papers, each in his own little nook. Holmes showed me into a small chamber which looked out into Pall Mall, and then, leaving me for a minute, he came back with a companion whom I knew could only be his brother...."

38. Cirone, Nino. "An Interview with a Baker Street Cabby." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 125-127.

39. Cooke, Catherine, and Alvin E. Rodin. "Arthur Conan Doyle in London, Part I, In Baker Street and Beyond." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 73 (1993): 16-27.

40. Cooper, Barbara Roisman. "Stage by Stage: London's Historic Theaters." British Heritage 26, no. 6 (2006): 34-40.

This article focuses on various historic theaters in London, England. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...'When I was in Kiss Me, Kate,' remembers Patricia Morison, who starred in the musical in 1951, 'the back door of the Coliseum opened onto a street that looked like a set of a Sherlock Holmes movie, gas lamps and fog swirling.'"

41. Dalby, Stewart. "Play dough: Hot on the trail of the man who never was: Sherlock Holmes was a fictional character but that doesn't stop people collecting anything to do with him." The Guardian (London), July 15, 2000: 24.

"Sherlock Holmes never existed, of course. Nor did his much-loved dwellings at 221b Baker Street in London. But try telling Kazie Kamaza, one of the thousands of visitors who flock to the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Company in Baker Street each year....Almost exactly opposite is the Sherlock Holmes Museum, housed in a former Victorian lodging house. A blue plaque on the wall claims that this is the original 221b Baker Street. Not so, says the Abbey National Bank. Its modern, 60s built former headquarters a few doors along is where numbers 205 to 229 Baker Street used to be. And Abbey National still gets mail, as does the museum, addressed to Sherlock Holmes and asking him to help with a problem. They are reluctant to tell you at the museum just how many visitors they receive. In fact, they are disinclined to tell you anything if they suspect you have been across the road talking to the Memorabilia Company. The two see themselves as strong competitors...."

42. Dorn, Jennifer. "Simpson's-in-the-Strand." British Heritage 26, no. 4 (2005): 16-166.

The article presents the author's view that for two decades now, London, England has enjoyed one of the most vital and diverse restaurant scenes in the world. Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...Simpson's has frequently been mentioned in literary works as well. Arthur Conan Doyle was particularly partial to the restaurant, using it as a meeting place in many of his books. In The Adventure of the Dying Detective, Doyle has his famous detective Sherlock Holmes fast so as to appear ill. After the criminal is caught, Holmes proposes dinner at Simpson's-in-the-Strand: 'When we have finished at the police station, I think that something nutritious at Simpson's would not be out of place.' Obviously, year after year many diners have followed this suggestion...."

43. ———. "Streetlights of London." British Heritage 27, no. 5 (2006): 11-12.

The article presents information on the Marylebone neighborhood in London, England. The address 221B was not there in Baker Street, Marylebone during the years of the Sherlock Holmes stories. But Baker Street was extended and renumbering of the buildings was done in 1930. 221B became a real address and the popular Sherlock Holmes Museum was made there. The beautiful Regent's Park is the famous residential area of Marylebone. Medical services are offered in Wimpole and Harley streets.

44. Duncan, Alistair. Close to Holmes : a look at the connections between historical London, Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. London: MX Publishing, 2009.

ill. ; 22 cm.; A look at some of the sites in central and outer London that were either mentioned in Arthur Conan Doyle's books or were important in his life. Photographs show the sites as they appeared to Doyle and as they appear today. Additionally, the author comments on theories that have been developed about Holmes and these locations.

45. Fell, Christine. "Review--'Back to Baker Street: An Appreciation of Sherlock Holmes and London' edited by Roger Johnson and Jean Upton." The Musgrave Papers, no. 7 (1994): 116.

46. Fernz, Helena. "Probing the residence at 221b Baker Street, London." Business Times, December 7, 2001: 13.

"Let's play the sleuth on this occasion and investigate the famed residence at 221b Baker Street, London, by stopping at http:// www.sherlock- holmes.co.uk/ The notable occupants of this well-known abode at Baker Street are none other than Sherlock Holmes and his colleague John H. Watson, MD. Well, actually, this will probably be the easiest 'case' ever to be investigated, for 'The Sherlock Holmes Museum' that is online provides a colourful and in-depth tour to anyone who actually takes the time to visit and explore...."

47. Fildes, Christopher. "Sherlock Holmes solves the intractable problem of the black hole in the Aldgate area." The Daily Telegraph (London), March 3, 2001: 32.

"It was Sherlock Holmes who first identified the black hole in the Aldgate area. By now it is engulfing ministers and mayors and money, but in his time it had already swallowed the Bruce-Partington plans for the Royal Navy's latest submarine....More recently the black hole in the Aldgate area has proved itself capable of reducing signals and services to anti-matter, much to the dread of passengers whose daily journeys take them, or are meant to take them, to the City. Desperately, London Underground has sought to blame this on the interaction of new equipment and old track...."

48. Friedman, Kinky. "Mad Cowboy Disease." Texas Monthly 31, no. 5 (2003): 244.

Relates the experience of a cowboy when he visited London, England. Reaction of the city workers to the cowboy's outfit; Details of the cowboy's meeting with Mike Levy, former record producer and tennis partner of Great Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...On my last night in London, I walked through the fog until I came to the most famous address in the world, 221B Baker Street. On the door was a small bronze plaque that read 'Visitors for Mr. Sherlock Holmes or Doctor Watson please ring the bell.' I rang the bell, walked up one flight of seventeen steps, and suddenly I was standing in Sherlock Holmes's living room. There was a cheery fire in the fireplace. Holmes's violin stood poignantly nearby, along with the old Persian slipper where he kept his Turkish tobacco. And in the room were Japanese, Russians, Africans, people from seemingly every nation on earth, all bound together by a common, passionate belief that Sherlock Holmes was real. It was, I thought, a perfect United Nations...."

49. Galerstein, David H. "Book review--'They Came to Baker Street' by Reginald L. Johnson." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 70 (1992): 39-40.

"Johnson was born at the turn of the century and discovered the Canon as a teen-ager, and his book is a collection of more than 50 well-written vignettes of those who visited the famous sitting-room, edited and foot-noted by Alan Truscott (who as the bridge editor of the N.Y. Times has shown in his bridge column that he too is an admirer of Sherlock Holmes)."

50. Garner, Paul. The Sherlock Holmes walk / by Paul Garner. London: Louis' London Walks, 2000.

51. Glinert, Ed. A literary guide to London. London, New York: Penguin, 2000.

ill., maps ; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references and indexes.; "An excellent guide, with a chapter "From Bart's to Baker Street: A Walk Through Sherlock Holmes's London" and many other references, Sherlockian and non-Sherlockian, to Arthur Conan Doyle."

52. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "Editorial: A Sherlock Holmes Statue for Baker Street." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 23, no. 2 (1997): 41-42.

53. Green, Richard Lancelyn, Anthony D Howlett, Catherine Cooke, Christopher Roden, and Barbara Roden. Conan Doyle of Wimpole Street the story behind the commemorative plaque at 2 Upper Wimpole Street, London. Penyffordd, Chester, England: Arthur Conan Doyle Society, 1994.

54. Hall, John. "Review--'Pie and Mash: A guide to Londoners' Traditional Eating Houses' by The Pie 'n' Mash Club of Great Britain." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 69-70.

55. Hammer, David L. A Deep Game: The travelers' companion to the London of Sherlock Holmes. 1st ed. Indianapolis: Gasogene Books, 2002.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-172) and index. Scuttlebutt Feb 2002.; "A delight: he has collected and rewritten material from his earlier guidebooks, and he has added new sites and sights and stories. If you're not able to arrange for David to be your personal tour guide, you'll do almost as well with his books."

56. Henderson, John N. A history of the Museum Tavern in Bloomsbury. London: Blemund's, 1989.

Scuttlebutt Mar 2001.; "Traces the history of the tavern from 1723 (when it was the Dog and Duck) to the present day, and it does not neglect the fact that Sherlockian scholars have identified it as the Alpha Inn (in 'The Blue Carbuncle')."

57. Horrocks, Peter, and Richard Lancelyn Green. The return of Sherlock Holmes : the handbook of The Sherlock Holmes Statue Festival, 21-26 September 1999. [Tonbridge]: Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1999.

Sherlock Holmes Statue Festival (1999 : London, England). ill., map, ports. ; 30 cm. Edited by Peter Horrocks and Richard Lancelyn Green ; with forewords by The Prince of Wales and The Prime Minister.;

58. Huntington, Tom. "Franklin's Last Home." American Heritage 57, no. 2 (2006): 49-52.

The article presents information about Benjamin Franklin, the inventor of electricity and the archaeological research on his residence home. Of the many houses Franklin lived in over his eight decades, only one survives, which has been restored just in time for his 300th birthday in London, England. The Benjamin Franklin House is ideally located in central London, close to Trafalgar Square, Charing Cross, and the Strand. The two nearest tube stops are Charing Cross and Embankment, at opposite ends of Craven Street. Information on the life of Franklin has also been offered in the article. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...There are a few good pubs nearby. Franklin probably frequented the Ship and Shovel, just down Craven Street and around the corner. If you turn onto Craven Passage, you'll find the Sherlock Holmes Pub. Franklin lived in a world without Sherlock Holmes, but that shouldn't keep you from stopping in, enjoying a pint, and surveying the pub's collection of Sherlockiana, including the re-creation of Holmes's famous sitting room that was originally built for the Festival of Britain in 1951."

59. Jenkins, Lin. "Elementary Fraud at the Sherlock Holmes museum." The Times (London) 1994: 3.

"[John A---------], 38, of Belgravia, central London, used false details to obtain mortgages. Each time he applied for money he claimed falsely that he had no outstanding debts on other properties. He netted Pounds 890,000 on the Sherlock Holmes museum building and Pounds 228,000 from a house in Battersea, south London. A further Pounds 100,000 was obtained on a flat in Stockwell, south London, under the name Peter Neville. A--------- wrote references claiming that Neville worked for him at his free newspaper distribution firm, Rollerteam Ltd."[excerpt]

60. Jenkins, Rebecca. "Detective work at Baker Street." The Times (London), September 25, 1999: 30.

"Looking for clues on a tour of Sherlock Holmes's fictional patch. We were on the trail of Sherlock Holmes. Nine of us, mostly American tourists and fellow sleuths, were scouring Marylebone for the haunts of a fictional character. It was a strange way to spend a Tuesday afternoon...."

61. Johnson, Roger, John Bennett Shaw, Sherlock Holmes Society of London, and Jean Upton. Back to Baker Street: an appreciation of Sherlock Holmes and London. London: The Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1994.

Contents: The Cabs of London; The Criterion; The Italian Quarter; St. Bartholomew's Hospital; The Turkish Bath; Sherlock Holmes...The Lost Years / Val Andrews; If in Doubt Try a Library / Catherine Cooke; Wanted: Bijou Villa in St. John's Wood / Catherine Cooke; The Banking Connection: 1894-1994 / James Cuthbertson; The Back Yards of Baker Street / Bernard Davies; The Mews of Marylebone / Bernard Davies; London: A City of Change / David Stuart Davies; Sherlock Holmes and the Senior Service / Grant Eustace; On the Technicalities of the Moranic Reversal / Stephen Farrell; Upon the Club as a Diversion (Instead of a Weapon) / Stephen Farrell and Roger Johnson; Taxi! / Stephen Fry; Conan Doyle in London / Richard Lancelyn Green; Mr. Lestrade / Derek Hinrich; On Coming the Old Soldier / Derek Hinrich; Genesis or How It All Began / Anthony Howlett; And Now Today... / Freda Howlett; Sherlock Holmes and the Music Hall / Roger Johnson; The Early Holmes: Alone in Bloomsbury / Jon L. Lellenberg; London, April 1894 / Roger Matthews; The Most Cunning and Dangerous Criminal in London: 'Jack the Ripper' and Mr. Sherlock Holmes / Tony Medawar; Holmes, the Law and the Inns of Court / John Warwick Montgomery;

62. Kendall, Robert, and Gloria Davis. "The Throb of Life in London." Hispanic Times Magazine 25, no. 2 (2002): 30.

Features the tourist spots in London, England. Destination for travelers; Description of the city; Citation of several tourist spots. Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. "...Located farther down Park Lane is the Grosvenor House, combining a hotel with residential flats. The Grosvenor provides a perfect view of Hyde Park across the street. At the far end of Park Lane, located across from the Marble Arch, is the historic landmark Cumberland Hotel, mentioned in Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories....Fringe theatre is London's equivalent to New York's Off Broadway productions. One of London's best is the Pentameters at The Three Horseshoes Pub, located one block from the Tube (or Underground) Station in Hampstead. I saw The Hound of the Basketvilles, which was adapted to the stage by Harry Meacher, who also starred as Sherlock Holmes and directed. Sharing honors was international film star Judi Bowker, who rose to prominence in Black Beauty and in Franco Zeffirelli's Brother Sun, Sister Moon....Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum contains 400 life size figures. It is situated in the Baker Street section of North London made famous by Arthur Conan Doyle as the residence of his detective creation Sherlock Holmes. The Sherlock Holmes Pub, meeting place for the club memorializing the legendary sleuth, is located in the shadows of Trafalgar Square...."

63. Koenig, Helmut. "In search of Sherlock Holmes." The Toronto Star, March 17, 1995: G25.

"...Even today, more than a century later, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's creation - hero of 56 stories and four novels - seems almost a living presence. Sherlock Holmes embodies the spirit of that London of long ago. And with a little imagination and some research, today's visitor can follow the sleuth on his rounds through labyrinthian ways of the capital....Be advised when tracking down sites from the adventures, however. Names have been changed. Others may never have existed. The Alpha Inn? The White Eagle Tavern? Oft-mentioned Saxe-Coburg Square? Directions can be misleading. Distances and timing are not always accurate...."

64. Laidlaw, Joanna. "The fun of museum shopping." Victoria 12, no. 3 (1998): 16.

Focuses on museum shops in London, England that sell souvenirs and other gift items. Henry VIII's Tudor palace; Tower of London; Victoria & Albert Museum; Pollock's Toy Museum; Museum of Garden History; Twinings Tea Museum. Includes passing references to Holmes. "...Come along with Londoner Joanna Laidlaw on an enlightening stroll that leads directly to artful and unusual souvenirs -- from a silk scarf to a Beefeater teddy bear and a Sherlock Holmes hat....Snoop around the real 221b Baker Street (011 44 171 935 8866), and see where Sherlock Holmes lived. The fictitious English sleuth still receives thousands of letters, birthday cards, and invitations to speak. The museum shop sells everything from Baker Street street signs and meerschaum pipes to capes, and handsome tweed deerstalker hats. You can even buy a real London Times from the last century and a chess set featuring characters from the tales (the pawns are London bobbies)...."

65. Lezard, Nicholas. "Sherlock Holmes was on the wrong side of town, finds Nicholas Lezard." The Guardian (London), September 18, 1999: 11.

Review of Atlas of the European Novel, 1800-1900, by Franco Moretti (Verso, pounds 12). "How many times do you think Sherlock Holmes goes to the East End? Ten times? A dozen? Fifteen? No: once, exactly. I find this hard to believe, but Moretti asserts it so pugnaciously - and it's not the kind of claim you make lightly, as anyone who has tangled with Sherlockians knows - that I have to defer to his research. This is a book which makes maps out of where books are set, or, rather, overlays geography with the loci of fiction, and sees what kind of patterns can be made. In the case of Sherlock Holmes's London, the fascinating thing is what happens when the detective's movements are superimposed on Charles Booth's real map of London, published in 1889. It's hugely detailed: each block of dwellings is colour-coded according to social class (there are seven: the richest are coloured gold, the poorest and most dangerous black, a scheme which is 'either quite naive or very very ironic', as Moretti drily puts it.) A map of Holmes's investigations is the exact inverse of Booth's. Murders are more likely to happen, in Conan Doyle's London, where in reality they are least likely to happen...."

66. Lyall, Sarah. "36 Hours in London." New York Times, April 20, 2008: 12.

"There are many different Londons, and they appeal to people with many different passions: museum lovers, theatergoers, opera buffs, devotees of royalty, students of history, people who like to walk in the rain. But richest of all, perhaps, is the London for book lovers. Because the city is the star and the backdrop of so much great literature, it is possible to believe you know it intimately -- how it looks, how it feels -- without ever leaving your home country, or indeed your home. But it is better to visit, if only for the joy of seeing the landscape of your imagination come to life. How thrilling to happen upon Pudding Lane, where a bakery mishap led to the Great Fire of 1666, after reading Pepys's account in his diaries. Or to wander along Baker Street, where Sherlock Holmes once fictionally solved the unsolvable. Walk across London Bridge and gaze down, toward Southwark Bridge: this is the stretch of the Thames where Dickens's sinister characters dredged up corpses in 'Our Mutual Friend.'"[Abstract from publisher]

67. MacGregor, Arthur. Sir Hans Sloane collector, scientist, antiquary, founding father of the British Museum. London: Published for the Trustees of the British Museum by British Museum Press in Association with Alistair McAlpine, 1994.

Includes bibliographical references and index;

68. McLaughlin, Joseph. Writing the urban jungle: reading empire in London from Doyle to Eliot. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000.

LC Control Number: 99043698. Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-228) and index; "Two of the book's seven chapters are 'Holmes on the Range: Frontiers Old and New in 'A Study in Scarlet'' and 'The Romance of Invasion: Cocaine and Cannibalism in 'The Sign of Four''.

69. Moretti, Franco. Atlas of the European Novel, 1800-1900. London, New York: Verso, 1998.

ill., maps (1 col.) ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Scuttlebutt Nov 1999. / Uniform Title: Atlante del romanzo europeo 1800-1900. English; "'This is a book which makes maps out of where books are set' and a map of Holmes' investigations shows that murders in Sherlock Holmes' London were far more likely in the best, rather than the worst, neighborhoods."

70. Morgan, Judith. "If You Go: London." The San Diego Union - Tribune, July 17, 1994: F6.

71. Muller, Lynne. "The case of the fictional flat: A quirky London museum pays tribute to Sherlock Holmes and Watson." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), May 16, 1998: F3.

"...I'll never know if she believed Sherlock Holmes had really lived, because I didn't pursue the conversation. But the obsession she and other Sherlockians share must be the ultimate tribute to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Holmes' creator. Fascination with the Holmes persona is so strong almost 70 years after Doyle's death that there are more than 300 Sherlockian organizations worldwide, 17 in Japan alone. And the fiction is complete in Baker Street's Sherlock Holmes Museum, which allows fans to visit the small flat, reproduced with style and good humour, that Holmes shared with Dr. Watson from 1881 to 1904. The museum contains no mention of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, no background on how he came to create his famous sleuth. A project of the Sherlock Holmes International Society, the museum simply reproduces Holmes' flat (and sells a few souvenirs along the way). Thankfully, there's not too much schlock amidst the Sherlockiana...."

72. Pearce, Fred. "The big smoke." Geographical 74, no. 9 (2002): 20.

Discusses the smog and environmental condition of London, England in nineteenth century. Increase in mortality rate in December 1873; Reasons for the decline in fog levels in 1900; Information on the London Fog Inquiry from 1901-1902; Overview of arts and literature inspired by the London fog. INSET: London cleans up its act, by Fred Pearce. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...The smog had become an integral character of Victorian fiction; in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's the Sherlock Holmes stories, for example. It became a metaphor that embodied confusion, foreboding and uncertainty about the future...."

73. Pizzichini, Lilian, and Frances Stonor Saunders. "The big smoke." New Statesman 131, no. 4617 (2002): 36.

Presents an article on the killer fogs which invaded London, England in December 1952. Number of people who died due to the fog; Influence of the fog on art and literature; Action taken by the city of London to address the disaster. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...But what really got the writers going was 'smog' (a portmanteau word meaning 'fog intensified by smoke'), coined at roughly the same time as 'London particular' or 'pea-souper'. These early 19th-century terms describe the meteorological phenomenon unique to the capital at the time. The industrial revolution saw it spread to other urban sprawls, heralding the unhealthy plight of the city-dweller. Novelists quickly picked up on the symbolism inherent in the smog that infected the atmosphere. Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr Jekyll gave birth to Mr Hyde in its muddy whorls; Sherlock Holmes chased villains through the thick of it. Fog had become the perfect emblem for a sinful city; implacable and insidious, even its acrid smell contained sickness...."

74. Pugh, Brian W., Philip Weller, and Gary Lovisi. "Book Review (Doylean Links With London and Naples)." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 156-157.

75. Quindlen, Anna. Imagined London : a Tour of the World's Greatest Fictional City, (National Geographic directions). Washington, DC: National Geographic, 2004.

ill., map ; 21 cm. Scuttlebutt Dec 2005.; "'I have been to London too many times to count in the pages of books,' she explains, 'to Dickensian London rich with narrow alley-ways and jocular street scoundrels, to the London of Conan Doyle and Margery Allingham with its salt-of-the-earth police officers and troubled aristocrats.' Baker Street is only one of many places she visits, and anyone who has enjoyed London will enjoy this book."

76. Reed, Adam. "City of Details: Interpreting the Personality of London." Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 8, no. 1 (2002): 127.

This article investigates the ways in which a group of enthusiasts for London constitute their city. The 'personality' attributed to London is described, as well as the interpretive acts that reveal it. These people, who also lead walking tours across the city, privilege 'detail' as their term of analysis. The article examines the identified qualities of that category, in particular its perceived capacity to animate the plural time-spaces of the city. This sensitivity to detail is presented as part of a sensing of place, which allows people to regard themselves as uniquely able to see the city. The article is intended as a contribution to the ethnography of London. [Abstract from author] Includes references to Holmes.

77. Reitz, Caroline. "Capital Offenses: Geographies of Class and Crime in Victorian London (review)." Victorian Studies 47, no. 1 (2005): 100-102.

Review of Capital Offenses: Geographies of Class and Crime in Victorian London, by Simon Joyce; pp. viii + 267. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2003, $39.50. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "..Later readings of Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde carry Joyce's argument through the end of the century. Joyce's emphasis on the 'privileged offender' (Dr. Jekyll or Dorian Gray, for example) in the context of late- century debates on the relationship between charity and crime illustrates that the cultural discourse on crime and class is more complicated than a neat distinction between cops and robbers or a close association between criminality and poverty...."

78. Rodin, Alvin E., Catherine Cooke, and Kevin Brown. "Arthur Conan Doyle in London, Part II, St. Mary's Hospital: Medicine, Spiritualism and Sion." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 74 (1994): 37-48.

79. Ronson, Jon. "The Human Zoo: Magical History Tour." The Guardian (London), September 2, 1995: T62.

"...There are, as it stands, three competing Beatles Walks of London. This would be confusing in itself, but it is compounded by the four Sherlock Holmes tours that are taking place concurrently - on the same pavement. 221b Baker Street is perilously close to the house that Paul McCartney shared with Jane Asher between 1963 and 1966, and walkers have been known to switch allegiance mid-tour. Today, in fact, two old ladies from America do just that...."

80. Rubinstein, William D. "The Hunt For Jack the Ripper." History Today 50, no. 5 (2000): 10.

Reviews the research and theories on the identity of the serial killer called Jack the Ripper who murdered five prostitutes in Whitechapel, London, England in 1888. Social and economic conditions in Whitechapel in 1888; Candidates for the true identity of the killer; Arguments about the 1992 discovery of the killer's alleged diaries. Includes passing references to Doyle and Holmes. "...The association of the Ripper with the London of Sherlock Holmes, with fogs, riverside opium dens, the haunts of prostitutes and criminals, virtually adjacent to great wealth and the aristocracy, is enticing to many....The notion that 'Jack' was actually 'Jill' surfaced early during the spate of killings themselves, and had an advocate of sorts in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who argued that the male killer was able to pass through Whitechapel disguised as a bloodstained midwife...."

81. Schneer, Jonathan. London 1900 : the imperial metropolis, (Yale Nota bene). New Haven, London: Yale University Press, 2001.

ill. ; 20 cm. Originally published : New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999. Includes bibliographical references (p. [307]-321) and index.; "In half a dozen entertaining pages, Mr. Schneer combs the Sherlock Holmes stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for a rich store of imperial themes."

82. ———. London 1900 : the imperial metropolis. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999.

ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 307-321) and index.; "In half a dozen entertaining pages, Mr. Schneer combs the Sherlock Holmes stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for a rich store of imperial themes."

83. Shiffman, Stu. "The Singing Fire by Liian Nattel: A view into the London not seen in the annals of Sherlock Holmes." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 4 (2004): 26-32.

84. Stasio, Marilyn. "Murder most fogbound." New York Times, 0ctober 19, 1997: 31.

Focuses on the links between London, England and its fictional detectives. Reference to the fictional [sic] detectives, Sherlock Holmes and Sir John Felding; Citing the book 'The Trial of Elizabeth Cree,' by Peter Ackroyd; Authors' perceived fascination with the use of London in the plots of their books; Descriptive language used to illustrate the murder scenes.

85. Stein, Richard L. "Recent Work in Victorian Urban Studies." Victorian Studies 45, no. 2 (2003): 319-331.

Reviews Victorian Babylon: People, Streets, and Images in Nineteenth-Century London, by Lynda Nead; pp. ix + 252. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2000, $35.00, GBP19.95.; Imperial Cities: Landscape, Display, and Identity, edited by Felix Driver and David Gilbert; pp. xvii + 283. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 1999, GBP45.00, $74.95.; Streetwalking the Metropolis: Women, the City, and Modernity, by Deborah L. Parsons; pp. x + 246. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, GBP15.95, $22.00.; Shopping for Pleasure: Women in the Making of London's West End, by Erika Diane Rappaport; pp. xi + 323. Princeton, NJ and London: Princeton University Press, 2000, $35.00, GBP21.95.; Writing the Urban Jungle: Reading Empire in London from Doyle to Eliot, by Joseph McLaughlin; pp. xii + 240. Charlottesville and London: University Press of Virginia, 2000, $55.00, $18.50 paper, GBP2.95, GBP14.50 paper. Includes multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

86. Swartz, Mim. "Trailing the path of London's infamous murderer | Steady nerves needed for Jack the Ripper tour." The San Diego Union - Tribune 1994.

87. Viney, Charles. The Authentic World of Sherlock Holmes : an evocative tour of Conan Doyle's Victorian London. Godalming, Surrey, Endland: Quadrillion Pub., 1999.

ill., maps ; 28 cm. Originally published: 1995.; Retraces the footsteps of Holmes and Watson through late-nineteenth-century London, each photograph illustrating a setting in one of the Holmes stories

88. ———. The Authentic World of Sherlock Holmes : an evocative tour of Conan Doyle's Victorian London. Godalming, Surrey, England: CLB, 1999.

ill., maps ; 28 cm.;

89. ———. The Authentic World of Sherlock Holmes : an evocative tour of Conan Doyle's Victorian London. Godalming: Bramley, 1999.

ill., maps ; 28 cm.;

90. ———. Sherlock Holmes in London : a photographic record of Conan Doyle's stories. Godalming, Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995.

ill., maps ; 28 cm. Includes: An atlas of Victorian London. [London] : G.W. Bacon, 1888. 1 atlas (7 maps).; "Over 200 original photographs of London taken between 1879 and 1914, each linked to events in the Sherlock Holmes stories"--Dust jacket

91. ———. Sherlock Holmes in London : a photographic record of Conan Doyle's stories. New York: Smithmark, 1995.

ill., maps ; 28 cm.;

92. ———. Sherlock Holmes in London : a photographic record of Conan Doyle's stories. Toronto: Viking, 1989.

ill., maps, ports. ; 28 cm.;

93. Watts, Janet. "At a glance." Sunday Times (London), February 27, 2000: 42.

Very short review of London 1900: The Imperial Metropolis, by Jonathan Schneer. "...Imperialism shapes every aspect of the city's culture -- the construction of Kingsway, music-hall black minstrels, Sherlock Holmes stories, the treatment of animals in London Zoo...."

94. Wheeler, Thomas B. Finding Sherlock's London over 200 Sherlockian sites in London listed by Underground station = Finding Sherlock's London : over 200 Sherlockian sites in London listed by advenure [sic]. Memphis, TN: London Secrets (R), 2003.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Food and Drink (5)

1. "Pluck a flamingo." Economist 389, no. 8611 (2008): 140-142.

In this article the author discusses cookbooks, noting that a significant number are published every year. A variety of issues are discussed including the history of cookbooks the domestic management taught by Isabella Beeton in 19th century Great Britain and the impact of Fannie Farmer on American cookery. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Although the recipes in one book are often similar to those in another, their presentation varies wildly. There are Lutheran cookbooks, Wiccan cookbooks, feminist vegetarian cookbooks ('The Political Palate') and satirical cookbooks. There are instructions on cooking the food that Jane Austen, Sherlock Holmes and Thomas Jefferson might have eaten...."

2. Bonnell, William. The Sherlock Holmes Victorian cookbook: favourite recipes of the great detective & Dr. Watson. Toronto: Macmillan Canada, 1997.

Scuttlebutt Nov 1997;

3. Dahlin, Robert. "Soup's On: A Selection of Forthcoming Cookbooks." Publishers Weekly 246, no. 30 (1999): 44.

Enumerates several cookbooks, one with a reference to Holmes. "Jo Grossman has not personally sampled every morsel served up in A Taste of Murder: Diabolically Delicious Recipes from Contemporary Mystery Writers (DTP), which she compiled with Robert Weibezahl....In total, more than 140 mystery authors supplied recipes and brief introductions to their fare. 'There are more recipes than that, because we wanted to include a sidebar with recipes from two Sherlock Holmes pubs, one in London, the other in Carmel,' says Grossman."

4. Diamond, Susan Z., and Paul Churchill. Seventeen steps to slimness: a Sherlock Holmes diet manual. Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisc: The Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2000.

5. Dorn, William S. Cooking for Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson : British recipes for two persons. Denver: Pencil Productions, 2004.

ill. ; 23 cm. Each recipe is preceeded by a quotation from the 1960 Doubleday edition of The complete Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle with page no. in brackets./ Includes index. British recipes for two persons; Recipes for two persons.; "Is sufficiently up-to-date to have nutritional values for each of the 60 recipes, many of them (including ships biscuits, toad in the hole, and Sussex fritters) not found in more traditional cookbooks; it is spiral-bound to open flat, with coated pages to allow spills to be wiped off easily."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Forensics (17)

1. "Books." Science news 171, no. 23 (2007): 367-367.

This article reviews the books "Mind In Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of the Mind," by Evan Thompson, "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases," by E. J. Wagner and "The Happiness Trip: A Scientific Journey," by Eduardo Punset.

2. "Miscellaneous Book Awards." World Almanac & Book of Facts, no. (2008): 256-256.

The article announces the recipients of book awards in 2007 including and Edgar awards for Best Critical/Biographical: The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, E. J. Wagner; Best Play: Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Steven Dietz.

3. "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases." Physics Teacher 45, no. 3 (2007): 190-190.

The article reviews the book "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases," by E.J. Wagner.

4. "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases." Publishers Weekly 253, no. 3 (2006): 49-49.

Review of The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases, by E. J. Wagner (published by Wiley).

5. "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases." Science news 169, no. 17 (2006): 271-271.

The article reviews the book "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases," E. J. Wagner.

6. Begley, Sharon. "Critical Thinking: Part Skill, Part Mindset And Totally Up to You." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 10/20, 2006: B1-B1.

This article discusses the difference between having critical thinking skills and applying them. The writer offers an example from the book "The Science of Sherlock Holmes" by E.J Wagner. Cognitive psychologist D. Alan Bensley at Frostberg State College in Maryland argues that application of critical thinking is determined by character traits not intelligence.

7. Benfey, Theodor. "Wish List." Chemical Heritage 25, no. 4 (2008): 43.

The article reviews several books including "Ghostwalk," by Rebecca Stott, "The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry," by Larry Gonick and Craig Criddle, and "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases," by E. J. Wagner.

8. Capuzzo, Mike. The Murder Room : the heirs of Sherlock Holmes gather to solve the world's most perplexing cold cases. New York: Gotham Books, 2010.

ill. ; 24 cm. Contents: The connoisseurs of murder -- The man who got away with murder -- The knights of the Café Table -- A little child shall lead them -- Cops and robbers -- The man who saw dead people -- Shades of the dark knight -- Guardians of the city -- Cold eyes from the past -- On the trail of the assassin -- Death of a B-girl -- The visual detective -- The man with the bad stomach -- On the trail of the warlock -- The reluctant knight errant -- The perfect mass murder -- The mask of the invisible man -- The return of Vidocq -- The gathering of detectives -- Busted -- The detective of souls -- The death artist -- Dreams of Morpheus -- A case they can't let go -- The butcher of Cleveland -- Imploring God -- The end of the affair -- Catch me if you can -- The case of the shoeless corpse -- The case of the prodigal son -- The sage of Scotland Yard -- Think therefore on revenge -- Murder in the cathedral -- What I want to hear are handcuffs -- The consulting detectives -- Take me to the psychopath -- The stranger in Biddle House -- City of brotherly mayhem -- Wrath sweeter by far than the honeycomb -- The worst mother in history -- The boy who never died -- The eight babies called "it" -- Murder in triplicate -- From heaven to hell -- The descent -- In the world which will be renewed -- "Congratulations, you've found your killer" -- Interrogation -- The haunting of Mary -- The case of the missing face -- The killer angels -- The ghost -- The ninth circle of hell -- Death in the time of bananas -- The miracle on South Street -- Knights of the round tables. Includes bibliographical references.; Documents the efforts of the Vidocq Society, an elite trio of gifted investigators, to solve such notorious cold cases as those of JonBenet Ramsey, the Butcher of Cleveland, and Jack the Ripper, and details their work with the world's top forensic specialists.

9. ———. The Murder Room : the heirs of Sherlock Holmes gather to solve the world's most perplexing cold cases. Waterville, ME: Thorndike Press, 2010.

The connoisseurs of murder -- The man who got away with murder -- The knights of the Café Table -- A little child shall lead them -- Cops and robbers -- The man who saw dead people -- Shades of the dark knight -- Guardians of the city -- Cold eyes from the past -- On the trail of the assassin -- Death of a B-girl -- The visual detective -- The man with the bad stomach -- On the trail of the warlock -- The reluctant knight errant -- The perfect mass murder -- The mask of the invisible man -- The return of Vidocq -- The gathering of detectives -- Busted -- The detective of souls -- The death artist -- Dreams of Morpheus -- A case they can't let go -- The butcher of Cleveland -- Imploring God -- The end of the affair -- Catch me if you can -- The case of the shoeless corpse -- The case of the prodigal son -- The sage of Scotland Yard -- Think therefore on revenge -- Murder in the cathedral -- What I want to hear are handcuffs -- The consulting detectives -- Take me to the psychopath -- The stranger in Biddle House -- City of brotherly mayhem -- Wrath sweeter by far than the honeycomb -- The worst mother in history -- The boy who never died -- The eight babies called "it" -- Murder in triplicate -- From heaven to hell -- The descent -- In the world which will be renewed -- "Congratulations, you've found your killer" -- Interrogation -- The haunting of Mary -- The case of the missing face -- The killer angels -- The ghost -- The ninth circle of hell -- Death in the time of bananas -- The miracle on South Street -- Knights of the round tables. Includes bibliographical references.; Documents the efforts of the Vidocq Society, an elite trio of gifted investigators, to solve such notorious cold cases as those of JonBenet Ramsey, the Butcher of Cleveland, and Jack the Ripper, and details their work with the world's top forensic specialists.

10. Champkin, Julian. "Print of True Genius." Daily Mail (London), November 6, 2004: 40.

"Since the arrival of Sherlock Holmes, created by the celebrated Edinburgh author Arthur Conan Doyle, the world has been aware that something as slight as a fingerprint can be used to catch countless criminals. In The Case of the Norwood Builder, Doyle showed his detective hero taking a keen interest in one particular piece of evidence....But few are aware of the convoluted case of the man who invented fingerprints or rather was first to suggest their use as forensic evidence. The story involves a heap of ancient musselshells, a Japanese ceramic tea-service, slightly flawed, and eventually a worldwide database, infallible, unbeatable, of use to detectives everywhere. All three lead, in a trail Sherlock Holmes would have been pleased to follow, to the unveiling next weekend in Beith, Ayrshire, of a statue of Dr Henry Faulds. Faulds is a name that should make wrongdoers quake in their shoes, or perhaps tremble in their gloves, since he was the first to suggest catching them by their fingerprints...."

11. Dhènaut, Alain, and Patrick Pesnot. The scene of the crime. Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2003. Visual Material 1 videodisc (ca. 54 min.).

sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in. On the trail of crime; DVD. [presented by] lÍNA ; a film by Alain Dhènaut ; written by Patrick Pesnot and Alain Dhénaut ; co-producers, INA ... [et al.]. "Co-producers, INA, France 3, To Do Today Productions, RTBF (Belgium Television), with support from the Center for Cinema and Television of Belgium's French community, in association with La Cinquième." Original music, May Simona.; Profiles crime scene investigation history from the time of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Discusses the contributions of Reiss and Locard to crime scene analysis, along with Godart's role in the 1927 Sacco and Vanzetti investigation. Describes how technological advances in forensic sciences have affected crime investigation. Includes scenario of a murder investigation.

12. Freeman, Judith. "Review -- The Science of Sherlock Holmes From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear: the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases by E. J. Wagner." The Serpentine Muse 22, no. 3 (2006): 20.

13. Knight, Bernard. "The modern Sherlock Holmes (book review)." New Scientist 133, no. (1992): 46-7.

Based on the BBC World Service series of the same name, this book is an introduction to modern crime-detection. Williams shows how the extraordinary advances made in modern forensic science have been built on the techniques made famous by Conan Doyle's immortal Holmes.

14. Saferstein, Richard. Criminalistics an introduction to forensic science. 2nd ed. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice-Hall, 1981.

LC Control Number: 80026146. Includes bibliographies and index; The introductory section on the history and development of forensic science features a tribute to Conan Doyle and Holmes.

15. Taube, Michael. "CSI: Sherlock Holmes?" Christian Science Monitor, Apr 11, 2006: 14.

Review of The Science of Sherlock Holmes by E.J. Wagner. John Wiley & Sons, 244 pp., $24.95.

16. Wagner, E. J. The science of Sherlock Holmes from Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the real forensics behind the great detective's greatest cases. Hoboken, N.J: Wiley, 2006.

LC Control Number: 2005022236. Includes bibliographical references and index. Contents: Dialogue with the dead -- Beastly tales and black dogs -- A fly in the ointment -- Proving poison -- Disguise and the detective -- The crime scene by gaslight -- A picture of guilt -- Shots in the dark -- Bad impressions -- The real dirt -- Notes from the devil -- A voice in the blood -- Myth, medicine, and murder;

17. Williams, Judy. The modern Sherlock Holmes: an introduction to forensic science today. London: Broadside Brooks, 1991.

Scuttlebutt Feb 1999; "With Sherlockian artwork on the cover, and a Canonical quote and a Paget illustration with each chapter, the book is based on a BBC World Service radio series that brought up to date "the meticulous detection methods set down by Sherlock Holmes 100 years ago."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Gems (1)

1. Dale, Doris. "The Gems of the Canon: Precious Toys, or the Devil's Bait." Baker Street West 1 3, no. 1 (1997): 13-15.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Illustrators and Illustrations (85)

1. Beare, Geraldine. "The Strand Magazine - 1891-1950." Imaginative Book Illustration Society Newsletter, no.9, suppl, no. 9 (1998): 31-33.

A history of 'The Strand Magazine', a literary and general interest magazine published by George Newnes which made its first appearance in January 1891 and ran for nearly sixty years, being absorbed into 'Men Only' in 1950. The author discusses the writers and illustrators whose work was published in the magazine. Authors who wrote for 'The Strand' included Conan Doyle, E.W. Raffles, P.G. Wodehouse, H.G. Wells, John Buchan and Agatha Christie. Among the many illustrators whose work featured in the pages of the magazine were Charles Pears, Frank Reynolds, W.H., Charles and T.H. Robinson, E.H. Shepard, Gordon Browne, Dudley Hardy, Edward Ardizzone, Mervyn Peake, Robin Jacques, Ronald Searle and John Farleigh.

2. Boetschi, Marianne. "Drawing -- 'A Scandal in Bohemia'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 205.

3. ———. "Drawing -- 'Abbey Grange'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 62.

4. ———. "Drawing -- 'Baker Street 221B, London; Holmes and Moriarty'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 10.

5. ———. "Drawing -- 'Devil's Foot'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 120.

6. ———. "Drawing -- 'East Wind (His Last Bow); von Bork and Altamont'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 133.

7. ———. "Drawing -- 'East Wind (His Last Bow); von Bork, tied'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 163.

8. ———. "Drawing -- 'Eastwind (sic); Harwich Harbor'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 218.

9. ———. "Drawing -- 'Lady Carfax'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 75.

10. ———. "Drawing -- 'The (sic) Silver Blaze'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 108.

11. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Blue Carbuncle'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 126.

12. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Dying Detective; Culverton Smith'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 24.

13. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Red Headed League'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 226.

14. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Second Stain'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 111.

15. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Second Stain'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 117.

16. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Speckled Band'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 222.

17. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Tree Barridebs' (sic)." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 98.

18. Cagnat, Jean-Pierre. "Drawing -- 'How are you? You have been in New Mexico, I Perceive'." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 7.

19. ———. "Drawing -- 'The Editor'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 98.

20. ———. "Drawings -- 'A Visit at my Great-Uncle, Horace Vernet'." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 47-54.

21. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1993'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 23-28.

22. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1994'." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 47-50.

23. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1996'." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 93-96.

24. ———. "Drawings -- 'Baker Street Irregulars Dinner 1999'." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 93.

25. ———. "Drawings -- 'Barbizon'." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 121-124.

26. ———. "Drawings -- 'Montpelier 1993'." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 15-18.

27. ———. "Drawings -- 'Some Graves in the Churchyard of Pere Lachaise'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 24-25.

28. ———. "Drawings -- 'The Unauthorized Pictures What I Discovered'." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 127-130.

29. ———. "Drawings -- 'Thirty Minutes at the Monument'." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 140-141.

30. Camargo, Graciliano. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 182.

31. ———. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 190.

32. Carlile, David. "Pensive Holmes (illustration)." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 123.

33. Cooke, Catherine. "Illustrating the Hound." The Musgrave Papers, no. 14 (2001): 36-44.

34. Dahlinger, Susan E. "Sherlock Holmes, a centenary essay." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 1, 6, 8.

An essay on the life and work of the actor, William Gillette, on the centennial of his first performance of the play "Sherlock Holmes," the art of Frederic Dorr Steele (who fixed Gillette's image of Holmes in the minds of many), Vincent Starrett's work with Gillette on the publication of the script, and the materials related to all three of these men in the Holmes Collections.

35. de Freitas, Leo. "The art of the illustrated book: the illustration of contemporary adult fiction." Journal, The, no. 12 (2002): 15-19.

The author charts the decline in the illustration of adult fiction from the 1830s to the present day. The heyday for adult fiction illustration is generally acknowledged to be the middle of the nineteeth century - the author cites as examples the illustration of books written by Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anthony Trollope and George Du Maurier - however, with the exception of the illustration of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories by Sydney Paget in the 1890s, the inclusion of illustrations in adult fiction is the exception rather than the rule. The exceptions he cites include William Kermode's cut illustrations to 'The Patriot's Progress' (1930), John Farleigh's illustrations to George Bernard Shaw's 'Black Girl in Search of God' (1932), McKnight Kauffer's interpretation of W.H. Hudson's 'Green Mansions' (1944), Edward Bawden's 'Death and the Dreamer' (1944), Anthony Gross's illustrations for 'The Forsyte Saga' (1950), Peter Blake's illustrations for 'The Sun on the Water' (1969), Ralph Steadman's accompaniments to J. Hunter Thompson's book 'Fear and Loathing' (1972), Brad Holland's illustrations for 'The Geek' (1976), Ian Pollock's 'Brothers of the Head' (1977), Marshall Arisman's illustrations for 'Dr Marr' (1990), Andrew Davidson's illustrations for Ted Hughes' 'The Iron Woman' (1993). The reasons for the shift away from illustration in the twentieth century are explored at length in the article. He notes that, while recently there have been interesting examples of the marriage of illustration and adult fiction, not all attempts to have been successful. [An edited version of a paper read at the Victoria & Albert study day, 10 February 2001]

36. Genova, John. "Sidney Paget's Successor: The Life of Arthur Twidle." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 55, no. 3 (2005): 12-19.

37. Hasler, Martin. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 102.

38. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 103.

39. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 157.

40. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 159.

41. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 160.

42. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 162.

43. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 163.

44. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 164.

45. Hirayama, Hiroko. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 61.

46. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 75.

47. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 36.

48. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 36.

49. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 42.

50. ———. "Drawings -- Sherlockian Gallery III." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 78-79.

51. Hyde, Jay. "Art in the Brood." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 162-64.

Some observations on William Henry Hyde, the first American illustrator of Holmes, and his inability to capture the Master.

52. Kasahara, Seiji. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 15.

53. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 20.

54. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 37.

55. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 54.

56. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 65.

57. ———. "Drawings--'Sherlockian Gallery'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 40-45.

58. Langeveld, Colin. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 178.

59. ———. "An Illustration (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 178.

60. Malec, Andrew. "Frederic Dorr Steele." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 6.

Portrait of the illustrator Frederic Dorr Steele and holdings by the Holmes Collections.

61. McGee, Tom. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 14.

62. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 63.

63. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 34.

64. ———. "Drawings -- 'Sherlockian Gallery II'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 64-67.

65. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 14, 17, 49, 77, 121, 123, 133.

66. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 37, 39, 42, 72, 80, 86, 88, 100, 105, 108, 112, 146.

67. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 85, 86, 92, 98, 107.

68. Murasawa, Hiroko. "Drawing -- 'Holmes and Watson'." The Nezire Zanmai International 1, no. (1991): 31.

69. ———. "Drawing -- 'Irene Adler'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 29.

70. ———. "Drawing -- 'John H. Watson MD'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 19.

71. ———. "Drawing -- 'Mary Morstan Watson'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 89.

72. ———. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 14.

73. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 16, 20.

74. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 37, 54, 65.

75. Nakano, Kayoho. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 5, 11, 47, 49, 52, 57, 58.

76. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 5, 21, 28, 71, 75, 79.

77. Scheideman, J. W. "'Blade Straight/Frederick Dorr Steele, True! An essay reflecting on the comparative contributions of Sherlockian illustrations." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. (1994): 1-16.

78. Shiffman, Stu. "Drawing -- Featuring 'Holmes of Two Worlds'." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 150.

79. ———. "Drawing -- Prod. #107 'The Riding Hood Case'." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 173.

80. ———. "Drawing (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 173.

81. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 19, 88, 106, 187.

82. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 12, 19, 27, 151.

83. Tanaka, Kiyoshi. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes in Kamakura City'." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 72.

84. ———. "Drawing -- 'Sherlock Holmes in Kamakura City'." The Nezire Zanmai International 2, no. (1992): 72.

85. ———. "Drawings (Untitled)." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 222, 228, 231.

06f Writings about the writings -- Other Subjects -- Indexes (3)

1. Clarkson, Stephen. The canonical compendium. Ashcroft, British Columbia: Calabash Press, 1999.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 429). Scuttlebutt Jan 2001.; "The product of more than 30 years of research (it started as a joint project with the late Bill Fleischauer), and the results of the research are both interesting and useful: there's a topical index of the Canon, with 80 categories and 144 subcategories, and story indexes for each of the 60 tales, with page numbers noted for five different editions (Baring-Gould's Annotated Sherlock Holmes and the Doubleday, Heritage Press, John Murray, and Oxford Press editions), plus intriguing introductory notes and 'miscellaneous' citations for each story."

2. Gellerstedt, Bob. The Sherlockian anthologies index with a listing of Conan Doyle's fiction. s.l.: the compiler, 1997.

Contents: Introduction, a 1986 letter from John Bennett Shaw -- The Sherlockian anthologies index -- Conan Doyle's fiction -- The recorded Sherlock Holmes cases -- "Stand with me here upon the terrace ... " : an index of the obituaries in The Baker Street Journal. Citations: De Waal C11597;

3. Goodrich, William D. The new good old index. Dubuque, Iowa: Gasogene Press, 1994.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- India (1)

1. Pai, Shraddha. "Holmes and India: More Than a Casual Connection." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 84-92.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons (1)

1. "Which the Justice which the Thief? the Life and Influence of Eugène-François Vidocq." Legal Studies Forum 29, no. 2 (2005): 825-837.

Explores the life of Eugène-François Vidocq, one of the founders of the French detective police service. His influence on detective fiction and nineteenth-century French literature; Family background; Accomplishments as a detective.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Agatha Christie (2)

1. Leitch, Thomas. "The Long & the Short." Kirkus Reviews 73, no. 17 (2005): 928-928.

Offers observation on the disparity between achievement in short mystery fiction and long. Praise for Leslie S. Klinger's editing of the book "New Annotated Sherlock Holmes"; Critique of the novels included in the book; Strength of Agatha Christie's anthology "Masterpieces in Miniature."

2. Oakley, Helen. "Disturbing Design: Nabokov's Manipulation of the Detective Fiction Genre in Pale Fire and Despair." Journal of Popular Culture 36, no. 3 (2003): 480.

Vladimir Nabokov's role as a self-conscious and even postmodernist innovator has long been a benchmark of literary criticism. His debt to the detective fiction genre is clearly evident in much of his fiction. However, what remains to be investigated are the specific connections between Nabokov's work and the English literary heritage of the crime novel, which is often credited with its genesis in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories of the nineteenth century, through to Agatha Christie's drawing-room dramas of the twentieth century. The significant increase in crime and the rapid technological advances of the nineteenth century contributed to the rise of the detective story, whose success to a large degree depended on its capacity to provide a reassuring rational framework at a time when society was growing increasingly turbulent. This article focuses on how Nabokov drew upon and inverted what had become well-known archetypes of the genre, and also the ways in which he exploded formulaic narrative patterns in order to destabilize the reader's relationship with the text.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Bram Stoker (4)

1. "The New Annotated Dracula." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 34 (2008): 48-48.

The article reviews the book "The New Annotated Dracula," by Bram Stoker and edited by Leslie S. Klinger. Norton, $39.95 (624p) ISBN 978-0-393-06450-6. "Klinger brings the same impressive breadth of knowledge that distinguished The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes to this definitive examination of one of the classic horror novels of all time. Adopting the conceit that Stoker's narrative is based on fact, Klinger elucidates the plot and historical context for both Stoker devotees and those more familiar with Count Dracula from countless popular culture versions. Because he had privileged access to the typescript Stoker delivered to his publisher, Klinger is able to note changes between it and the first edition and comment on the reasons for them. Through close reading, Klinger raises questions about such matters as the role of lead vampire-hunter Van Helsing and whether the villainous count is actually dispatched at book's end. An introduction by Neil Gaiman, numerous illustrations, essays on topics ranging from Dracula in the movies to the academic response, and much more enhance the package. 8-city author tour."

2. Chapman, Paul M. "A Study in Friendship: Conan Doyle and Bram Stoker." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 71-81.

3. Hoffert, Barbara. "Prepub Alert." Library Journal 133, no. 10 (2008): 72-76.

The article reviews several books including Stoker, Bram. The New Annotated Dracula. Norton. Dct. 2008.464p. ISBN 978-0-393-06450-6. $39.95. "Leslie S. Klinger (The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) digs through myth, culture, and graveyards in Transylvania to illuminate Stoker's dark and creepy tale. With an eight-city tour."

4. Schaffer, Talia. "'A Wilde Desire Took Me': the Homoerotic History of Dracula." ELH 61, no. 2 (1994): 381-425.

Reference in footnote 1 to Doyle: Anne Cranny-Francis, "Sexual Politics and Political Repression in Bram Stoker's Dracula," Nineteenth-Century Suspense: From Poe to Conan Doyle, ed. Clive Bloom, Brian Docherty, Jane Gibb, Keith Shand (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988), 64-79.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Charles Dickens (5)

1. "Dickens on the Metropolitan Police." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 24-26.

2. "Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle." Victorian Studies 47, no. 4 (2005): 609-611.

Review of book by Lawrence Frank, with remark "Applying methods of close reading to both scientific and literary texts, Frank argues that Edgar Allen Poe, Charles Dickens, and Arthur Conan Doyle 'promoted a new, emerging worldview that was secular and naturalistic.'"

3. Matus, Jill L. "Trauma, Memory, and Railway Disaster: The Dickensian Connection." Victorian Studies 43, no. 3 (2001): 413-436.

Reference to Doyle in "Works Cited." Day, Gary. "Figuring Out 'The Signalman': Dickens and the Ghost Story." Eds. Clive Bloom, et al. Nineteenth-Century Suspense: From Poe to Conan Doyle. London: Macmillan, 1988. 26-45.

4. Pope, Norris. "Dickens's "The Signalman" and Information Problems in the Railway Age." Technology and Culture 42, no. 3 (2001): 436-461.

Note 5 contains a reference to Doyle: Recent articles on "The Signalman" include John Stahl, "The Source and Significance of the Revenant in Dickens's 'The Signalman,'" Dickens Studies Newsletter 11 (December 1980): 98-101; David Seed, "Mystery in Everyday Things: Charles Dickens's Signalman," Criticism 23 (winter 1981): 42-57; Ewald Mengel, "The Structure and Meaning of Dickens's 'The Signalman,'" Studies in Short Fiction 20 (fall 1983): 271-80; Gary Day, "Figuring Out 'The Signalman,'" in Nineteenth-Century Suspense: From Poe to Conan Doyle, ed. Clive Bloom et al. (New York, 1988); Daniel J. Greenman, "Dickens's Ultimate Achievement in the Ghost Story," Dickensian 85 (spring 1989): 40-48; and Graeme Tytler, "Dickens's 'The Signalman,'" Explicator 53 (fall 1994): 26-29. None of these provides any substantial discussion of railway signaling practices or railway safety.

5. Thompson, Kenneth. "Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle (review)." Victorian Studies 47, no. 4 (2006): 609-611.

Review of Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle, by Lawrence Frank; pp. x + 249. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003, GBP47.50, $90.00. Contains multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Dorothy L. Sayers (3)

1. May, Radmila. "Murder most Oxford." Contemporary Review 277, no. 1617 (2000): 232.

Examines why Oxford, England becomes the setting for several fictitious detective and mystery stories. Characteristics of various categories of Oxford writing; Depiction of Oxford in the novel 'Gaudy Night,' by Dorothy Sayers; Reasons behind the mystique of Oxford; Faults of the Oxford tradition in 'Skeleton at the Feast,' by Patricia Hall. Includes references to Holmes. "...Sayer's Gaudy Night was not the first crime novel to be set in Oxford; there were several predecessors as well as two Sherlock Holmes short stories....These early titles also have a tendency to a rather contrived literariness: Fen, when on the track of a murderer, takes on the mannerisms of Sherlock Holmes..."

2. Oakes, Edward T. "Wimsey surpassed." Commonweal 121, no. 2 (1994): 28.

Reviews the book 'A Mind in Love,' by Barbara Reynolds. Biography on Dorothy L. Sayers; Sayers as writer of detective stories; Reasons for Sayers' achievements; Author as a friend and collaborator of Sayers. Includes a reference to Doyle. "Nowadays Dorothy L. Sayers is known by the reading public mostly for her detective fiction; but after reading this fascinating account of her life by a close friend and collaborator in her later years, I wonder how pleased she would be by her posthumous fate: 'She had come to the conclusion,' says Reynolds, 'that detective stories tended to have a bad effect on people, making them believe that there was one neat solution for all human ills, and she would have no more part in encouraging such an attitude.' And like Conan Doyle before her, she grew rather tired of letters from fans (not to mention her publisher) pleading with her to continue to pump more life into her detective, Lord Peter Wimsey, especially now that he had married Harriet Vane, a suspect in one of the earlier novels...."

3. Strout, Cushing. "Romance and the Literary Detective the Legacy of Dorothy Sayers." Sewanee Review 109, no. 3 (2001): 423.

Discusses the literary style of detective fiction author Dorothy L. Sayers and how it influenced other authors. Importance of the element of romance in detective stories; Use of the literary detective story that was popularized by Dorothy Sayers by Jill Paton Walsh, S.T. Haymon and Batya Gur. Includes references to Doyle and Holmes.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Edgar Allen Poe (7)

1. "American Literature." Reference & Research Book News 22, no. 3 (2007): 273-278.

The article reviews several books including The Beautiful Cigar Girl; Edgar Allan Poe, Mary Rogers, and the invention of murder. Stashower, Daniel. Dutton Books, 326 p. $25.95 "Stashower (mystery writer and Edgar Award-winning biographer of Arthur Conan Doyle) tells the sensational real-life story of the 1841 murder of Mary Rogers, New York City's 'beautiful cigar girl'--along with the real-life story of how Edgar Allen Poe transformed the crime into the short story that would invent modern detective fiction and that he hoped would turn his failing career around. During the decline of his wife's health and particular personal hardship, Poe expanded his character C. Auguste Dupin's passion and talent for deductive reasoning to compose the longer-than-usual 'The Mystery of Mary Roget,' debuting the formula that would find its literary legacy in Sherlock Holmes and others."

2. "Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle." Victorian Studies 47, no. 4 (2005): 609-611.

Review of book by Lawrence Frank, with remark "Applying methods of close reading to both scientific and literary texts, Frank argues that Edgar Allen Poe, Charles Dickens, and Arthur Conan Doyle 'promoted a new, emerging worldview that was secular and naturalistic.'"

3. Freeland, Natalka. "'One of an infinite series of mistakes': Mystery, influence, and Edgar Allan Poe." Atq 10, no. 2 (1996): 123.

Examines mystery and influence in Edgar Allan Poe's detective fiction. Emphasis on originality; Anxiety of influence in 'The Tell-tale Heart'; Characterization of protagonists in Poe's works. Includes a reference to Doyle. "There is no doubt that Edgar Allan Poe plays a singular role in the history of detective fiction. Few would argue with Arthur Conan Doyle's description of Poe as 'the father of the detective tale'; yet, pronouncements, such as that of Jorge Luis Borges, that 'Poe exhausted the genre' are almost as common...."

4. Hogarth, Dennis. "Edgar Allan Poe: The Father of the Modern Detective Story and His Influence Upon Arthur Conan Doyle." Baker Street West 1 4, no. 2 (1998): 7-11, 13.

5. Stashower, Daniel. "100 Years Ago: Is "S.S.T." the Love-child of Bigfoot?" Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 2, 8.

Comments and observations on the article "Is Doyle a Plagiarist?" in a 1901 issue of The University of Virginia Magazine by an anonymous author, S. S. T., that "presents his readers with the assertion that Conan Doyle has plagiarized the essential elements of the character of Sherlock Holmes from Poe’s fictional sleuth, C. Auguste Dupin."

6. Thompson, Kenneth. "Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle (review)." Victorian Studies 47, no. 4 (2006): 609-611.

Review of Victorian Detective Fiction and the Nature of Evidence: The Scientific Investigations of Poe, Dickens, and Doyle, by Lawrence Frank; pp. x + 249. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003, GBP47.50, $90.00. Contains multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

7. White, Ed. "The Ourang-Outang Situation." College Literature 30, no. 3 (2003): 88.

Analyzes two critical positions on the relationship between literature and history in the novel 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue,' by Edgar Allan Poe. Theoretical framework of the story; Distinct narrative segments of the story; Importance of the parallels between orangutan and insurrectionary slave manifested in the novel. Includes a passing reference to Holmes (p. 98). "... This passage at first seems a clever demonstration of Dupin's amazing analytical powers, akin to those thrilling moments when Sherlock Holmes figures out what Dr. Watson had for dinner three nights ago...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- G. K. Chesterton (6)

1. "In His Own Words: G.K.'s silly and serious sides." Christian History 21, no. 3 (2002): 16.

Presents an excerpt from the book 'The Autobiography of G.K. Chesterton.' Includes the following: "I used to say that my autobiography ought to consist of a series of short stories like those about Sherlock Holmes; only that his were astonishing examples of observation, and mine astonishing examples of lack of observation. In short, they were to be 'Adventures' concerned with my absence of mind, instead of his presence of mind."

2. Merla, Patrick. "The Club of Queer Trades." James White Review 20, no. 4 (2003): 11-13.

Profiles British Christian writer Gilbert Keith Chesterton. Overview of Chesterton's literary works; Personal background; Role of Chesterton in publishing the journal "The New Witness"; Excerpts from his short story "The Tremendous Adventures of Major Brown." Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...The six tales that comprise the slim volume are narrated by Charles Swinburne (Gardner says it is 'a mystery' why GKC named him after the poet). The second character who figures in most of the tales (although not the one reprinted here) is Rupert Grant, a detective by profession and a parody of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes...."

3. Miller, Steve. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 2, 6.

A brief profile of G. K. Chesterton and his thoughts on Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes as contained in an essay published in 1901.

4. Peterson, John. "The Mystery Deepens." Christian History 21, no. 3 (2002): 31.

Explores the mystery crime stories of the late Roman Catholic writer G.K. Chesterton on his fictional Father Brown character. Description of the detective or mystery crime genre by the late author Edgar Allan Poe; Concept of a detective story by Chesterton; Influence of Chesterton on mystery crime writers. Includes multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

5. Rampton, David. "Nabokov and Chesterton." Nabokov Studies 8, no. (2004): 43-57.

Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...Nabokov always discouraged source- and influence-hunting, routinely insisting that his predecessors and contemporaries had had little in the way of discernible effect on him. He even went out of his way to forestall precisely the sort of investigation that I am proposing here. In a 1965 interview, he spoke of his youthful admiration for a range of writers he characterizes as romantic-- Conan Doyle, Conrad, Kipling, Wilde, and Chesterton--but described his interest in them as a juvenile phase he quickly outgrew, noting that they are 'essentially writers for very young people' (Strong Opinions 57)...."

6. Schmitz, Sandy. "The Club of Queer Trades/Wings." School Library Journal 54, no. 3 (2008): 232-232.

The article reviews the books "The Club of Queer Trades," by G. K. Chesterton and "Wings," by Mikhail Kuzmin. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "The first book, originally published in Britain in 1905, is a set of six interconnected detective stories in which seemingly ordinary people find themselves in extraordinary and baffling situations, all of which are tied to the secretive Club of Queer Trades and its mysterious president. Only retired judge Basil Grant can separate illusion from reality to solve the mysteries. Teens who have read the Sherlock Holmes stories avidly will enjoy Basil Grant's adventures...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- George Bernard Shaw (3)

1. Crawford, MaryAnn Krajnik. "Introduction: Shaw Scholarship: "Here and Now" and at the 2004 International Shaw Society (ISS) Conference." SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies 25, no. (2005): 1-8.

Includes conference paper with reference to Doyle. "Papers were given by Lagretta Lenker ("Shaw's Best Play?")...Alan Andrews ("Shaw and Conan Doyle"), Rodelle Weintraub ("What Makes Johnny Run? Man and Superman as Pre-Freudian Dream Play")..."

2. Weintraub, Rodelle. "What Makes Johnny Run? Shaw's Man and Superman as a Pre-Freudian Dream Play." SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies 24, no. (2004): 119-127.

Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...A second volume is suggested in the Preface to the play, where Shaw writes, 'The theft of the brigand-poetaster [Mendoza] from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is deliberate' (518). Reading Conan Doyle in either The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1894) or in The Strand Magazine, Tanner would have found, in the story "Silver Blazes," [sic] a retired jockey named John Straker, who may have metamorphosed into John Tanner's chauffeur, Henry Straker. Hector Malone calls Ann 'a regular Sherlock Holmes.' Perhaps the very literary John Tanner, just prior to the opening of Shaw's play, has taken both Kipling and Conan Doyle to bed--and fallen asleep...."

3. Weintraub, Stanley. "Shaw's Goddess: Lady Colin Campbell." SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies 25, no. (2005): 241-256.

Includes a reference to Doyle. "...Actors and acting often surfaced in her columns, and she also risked writing plays and fiction. When the Charringtons (with Janet Achurch in each work) presented a quintuple bill at Terry's Theatre in June 1893, along with short plays by James Barrie, Conan Doyle, Thomas Hardy, and the forgotten Walter Pollock, they included a farce by Lady Colin, Bud and Blossom...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- H. P. Lovecraft (2)

1. Nelson, Victoria. "H.P. Lovecraft and the great heresies." Raritan 15, no. 3 (1996): 92.

Examines the imagination of horror writer H.P. Lovecraft. Lovecraft's family background and life; Lovecraft's dreams and obsessions as inspirations for his stories; Daniel Paul Schreber's paranoia as matched in Lovecraft's vision of intentions of his horror creatures. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...We know things, he said, only through our five senses or our religious convictions; wherefore it is quite impossible to refer to any object or spectacle which cannot be clearly depicted by the solid definitions of fact or the correct doctrines of theology--preferably those of the Congregationalist, with whatever modifications tradition and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle can supply...."

2. Wood, Peter H. "Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle and H. P. Lovecraft: Three Attitudes to the Spiritual World." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 1 (2005): 14-23.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Ian Fleming (3)

1. Dirda, Michael. "James Bond as Archetype (and Incredibly Cool Dude)." Chronicle of Higher Education 54, no. 41 (2008): B20-B21.

An essay is presented on the fictional character James Bond. The author examines the character in books such as "Devil May Care" by Sebastian Faulks writing as the novelist Ian Fleming and in motion pictures such as "Casino Royale." The heroic attributed of Bond are explored and the psychology of men wishing to be heroes is discussed. The popularity of James Bond is also analyzed. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Still, James Bond lives on, for he has outgrown the books, and even the movies can scarcely contain him. A half-dozen actors have played him, and there will be more in the future: Bond has become as archetypal as Hamlet or Sherlock Holmes, a hero with a thousand faces -- and among them are yours and mine."

2. Kerr, Philip, and Frances Stonor Saunders. "Licensed to print money." New Statesman 131, no. 4575 (2002): 38.

Reports on the location where Ian Fleming wrote his series of novels that gave birth to the popular James Bond films. Information on 'Casino Royale,' the first novel about James Bond written by Fleming; Description of the house of Fleming in Jamaica where he wrote his books; Success of the James Bond films; Number of James Bond novels written by Fleming before he died; James Bond movies that were made after Fleming died. Contains a passing reference to Holmes. "...Ever since Sean Connery put away his quartermaster-issue hairpiece, the Bond films have been grotesque parodies of the novels and the character who, as Anthony Burgess argued in his introduction to the Coronet paperback editions of the Bond novels in 1985, is very nearly the equal of Sherlock Holmes. 'I know there are some who would deny that Fleming practised the literary art,' Burgess wrote. 'They are the aesthetic snobs who will not grant that the Sherlock Holmes stories are literature either... Both, as Shakespeare did, believed that fiction (drama or narrative) should be about well-defined characters in interesting situations.'...The Bond brand is owned by MGM/UA. So it is hardly surprising that other studios such as Paramount have tried, and failed, to create in Ethan Hunt (Mission: Impossible) and Jack Ryan (from the novels by Tom Clancy) own-brand characters to rival Bond. You might as well ask Inspector Lestrade to try to rival Sherlock Holmes...."

3. Mackay, Jordan. "Bond plays on." Texas Monthly 26, no. 6 (1998): 84.

Profiles Raymond Benson, a Texas writer who wrote a James Bond novel. Books written by Benson about James Bond; Production outfit that developed the films of James Bond; Brief biography of Benson. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...After all, Fleming's Bond, who served in World War II, would be in his seventies today, and chances are he wouldn't resemble Pierce Brosnan. 'Sherlock Holmes stayed a Victorian-age character,' says Benson, 'and I think there's a lot to be said for that with Bond.'"

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Rudyard Kipling (2)

1. Blau, Peter E. "About Golf, and Rudyard Kipling, and Vermont, and Other Things." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 8-13.

2. Wollen, Peter. "Kim: The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same." Emergences: Journal for the Study of Media & Composite Cultures 12, no. 1 (2002): 157-170.

Argues that an analysis of Rudyard Kipling's novel 'Kim,' is a metonym for processess of repetitive historical destruction. Relational nature of discipline; Joining of imagination and politics to enforce the discipline of futility; Overlapping of Kipling's story with the larger processes of destruction; Kipling's take on imperialism. Includes multiple references to Holmes.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Spock (Star Trek) (1)

1. Harada, Kakuko. "Holmes and Spock, how are they related?" Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 30-32.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Umberto Eco (4)

1. Levenson, Michael. "The critic as novelist." Wilson Quarterly 18, no. 1 (1994): 116.

Analyzes the works of literary critic and novelists Umberto Eco, Terry Eagleton, Susan Sontag and Julia Kristeva. Novel writing among literary critics; Idea of criticism as a science; Writes' ability to overcome the constraints of their theoretical past and the traditional division between creation and analysis. Includes references to Holmes. "...Once The Name of the Rose (1980) had become an international publishing sensation, nothing seemed more natural than that Eco the theorist should have found a home as a novelist. As a journalist for daily and weekly papers and as a distinguished professor, Eco wrote criticism that carried him into many disciplines across many centuries. He wrote about Thomas Aquinas and Superman; he studied the history of monsters and devised a theory of lists. When he began to put his novel together, he had the many resources of his large and eccentric knowledge. The history of the church, medieval philosophy, the Sherlock Holmes canons--all this, among much else could come into romping play in the form of a historical/detective/Biblical/philosophical mystery plot, where each murder shimmers across the centuries, from the Apocalypse to Dr. Watson....Eco says that when he writes his fiction, he leaves his critical self back in' the closet; let others play at explanation. But at least one of Eco's critical preoccupations--or their very nemesis--is clear. In both of his big novels, the signal event is the overreaching of interpretation. William of Baskerville--Eco's Holmes as philosophic Churchman--devises the most cunning explanation, based on his reading of the Apocalypse, to solve the murders of The Name of the Rose. But William fails. This, says Eco, is 'a mystery in which very little is discovered and the detective is defeated.'"

2. Rice, Thomas J. "Mapping Complexity in the Fiction of Umberto Eco." Critique 44, no. 4 (2003): 349-368.

Examines the challenge posed by mapping complexity in Umberto Eco's novels, each of which is centrally concerned with map-making. Background on a growth in the complexity consciousness of industrialized societies; Discussion on the use of the Lynch-Jameson model of cognitive mapping to map the transition from the postmodern novel to the novel of complexity; Significance of an increased awareness of the arbitrary nature of physical and cognitive maps to the culturally emergent complexity consciousness. Includes passing references to Holmes. "...The central character of Adso's narrative, the Franciscan monk William of Baskerville, a fourteenth-century Sherlock Holmes, attempts to solve the mystery of a series of murders in an abbey by using his uncanny powers of deduction and an open-mindedness to the nascent wonders of modern science....Casaubon, who styles himself less as William of Baskerville's Sherlock Holmes and more as the 'Sam Spade of culture' in Eco's stunning conflation of Dashiel Hammett, film noir, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and the history of pseudo-intellectualism, ultimately leads the crew of modern-day Templars to assume that he and his associates possess the final clue, a 'message' that contains 'instructions, elaborately coded, on where to find the right map, which may have been specially drawn for the occasion'..."

3. Rushing, Robert A. "From Monk to Monks: the End of Enjoyment in Umberto Eco's the Name of the Rose." Symposium 59, no. 2 (2005): 116-128.

Presents an article about the content of the detective fiction "The Name of the Rose," by Umberto Eco. Comments on the setting of the fiction; Emphasis of the story on the lives of monks in a monastery; Implications of the book for several social events in the Western Europe such as cultural upheavals in 1968. Contains multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

4. Vladiv-Glover, Slobodanka. "The Poetics of Pastiche in Eco's Postmodern Detective Novel." European Legacy 13, no. 1 (2008): 59-81.

Includes passing references to Doyle and Holmes.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Vladimir Nabokov (2)

1. Oakley, Helen. "Disturbing Design: Nabokov's Manipulation of the Detective Fiction Genre in Pale Fire and Despair." Journal of Popular Culture 36, no. 3 (2003): 480.

Vladimir Nabokov's role as a self-conscious and even postmodernist innovator has long been a benchmark of literary criticism. His debt to the detective fiction genre is clearly evident in much of his fiction. However, what remains to be investigated are the specific connections between Nabokov's work and the English literary heritage of the crime novel, which is often credited with its genesis in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories of the nineteenth century, through to Agatha Christie's drawing-room dramas of the twentieth century. The significant increase in crime and the rapid technological advances of the nineteenth century contributed to the rise of the detective story, whose success to a large degree depended on its capacity to provide a reassuring rational framework at a time when society was growing increasingly turbulent. This article focuses on how Nabokov drew upon and inverted what had become well-known archetypes of the genre, and also the ways in which he exploded formulaic narrative patterns in order to destabilize the reader's relationship with the text.

2. Rampton, David. "Nabokov and Chesterton." Nabokov Studies 8, no. (2004): 43-57.

Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...Nabokov always discouraged source- and influence-hunting, routinely insisting that his predecessors and contemporaries had had little in the way of discernible effect on him. He even went out of his way to forestall precisely the sort of investigation that I am proposing here. In a 1965 interview, he spoke of his youthful admiration for a range of writers he characterizes as romantic-- Conan Doyle, Conrad, Kipling, Wilde, and Chesterton--but described his interest in them as a juvenile phase he quickly outgrew, noting that they are 'essentially writers for very young people' (Strong Opinions 57)...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Literary Parallels and Comparisons -- Wilkie Collins (3)

1. The moonstone. 1997. Visual Material.

Mobil masterpiece theatre. From the novel by Wilkie Collins. Copyright notice on videocassette: c1996 by BBC and 1997 by WGBH Educational Fund. Participants: Greg Wise (Franklin Blake); Antony Sher (Sgt. Cuff); Patricia Hodge, Peter Vaughan, Peter Jeffrey, Lesley Sharp, Paul Brooke, Scott Handy, Anton Lesser, Keeley Hawes (Rachel); Terrence Hardimann, Mellan Mitchell, Rachel Lumberg, Nicholas Lane, Surinder Duhra, Kacey Ainsworth, Roger Walker, Janet Henfrey, Elizabeth Berrington, Bobby Bernard, Anthony Cumber, Carl Forgione, Andy Devine. Host: Russell Baker. Produced: United States ; Great Britain. Version: U.S. PBS broadcast version. BBC Television and WGBH Boston in association with CTE (Carlton Ltd.) ; executive producers, George Faber, Rebecca Eaton ; producer, Chris Parr ; director, Robert Bierman ; writer, Kevin Elyot. Editor, Frances Parker; photography, John Daly; music, Rick Wentworth.; "A faithful adaptation of Wilkie Collins' 1868 novel, characterized by host Russell Baker as a 'literary landmark' that introduced elements of the classic mystery story as well as a brilliant and eccentric sleuth--20 years before Arthur Conan Doyle created Sherlock Holmes. As the story opens, Franklin Blake delivers to his cousin Rachel the precious diamond she's inherited from an uncle (who stole the stone from a Hindu shrine). But the morning after she receives it, the gem vanishes--and its disappearance triggers a strange chain of events that seems to confirm its reputation for being cursed. Enter the venerable detective, Sgt. Cuff"--TV guide, November 2, 1997.

2. Cavallaro, Rosanna. "Solution to Dissolution: Detective Fiction from Wilkie Collins to Gabriel García Márquez." Texas Journal of Women & the Law 15, no. 1 (2005): 1-41.

The article examines the detective fiction written by Wilkie Collins and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Includes multiple references to Doyle and Holmes.

3. Liebman, Arthur, and David H. Galerstein. "The Sign of the Moonstone." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 71-74.

Some observations on the influence of Wilkie Collins on Doyle and the parallels between Collins' The Moonstone and Doyle's The Sign of Four.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Mormons and Mormonism (3)

1. Bergem, Phillip G. "Arthur Conan Doyle: Connections to the Latter-Day Saints and Other Matters." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 54, no. 1 (2004): 39-42.

2. Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A fine sprit [sic] of tolerance". Spokane, Wash.: Arthur H. Clark Co., 2006.

Introduced by Michael W. Homer.; "This keepsake containing the accounts of Arthur Conan Doyle on the Mormons has been produced to accompany the collector's edition of On the way to somewhere else: European sojourners in the Mormon West, 1834-1930, volume 8 of the Kingdom in the West series, published by the Arthur H. Clark Company. Only 55 copies have been printed, signed and numbered..."--P. [23]. Includes bibliographical references.

3. Weisberger, Bernard A. "What makes a marriage?" American Heritage 47, no. 7 (1996): 14.

Looks at the rise and extinction of polygamy among the Mormons, or the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints. Formal assertion of plural marriage as church doctrine in 1852; Polygamy as the symbolic focus of the struggle between Mormons and their enemies in the West; Biblical teachings about marriage and concubinage; Practices of polygamous husbands. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "...Anti-Mormon writers found that polygamy perfectly fitted a propaganda that painted Mormonism as a malign anti-Gentile conspiracy with secret armies and dastardly crimes. (See the first Sherlock Holmes novel, A Study in Scarlet, for an example.)..."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Music (7)

1. Boyd, Martin. "Fictional fiddlers." Strad 107, no. 1273 (1996): 514.

Discusses the portrayal of violinists and violins in literature, with multiple references to Holmes and Doyle.

2. Bradway, Jeffry Alan. "Upon the True Provenance of Sherlock Holmes's Stradivarius." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 46, no. 3 (1996): 30-33.

3. Maycock, Roger, and David Rubin. "Web Page." Electronic Musician 17, no. 1 (2001): 32.

Features Web sites and other information technology developments relating to electronic sound recording in the United States as of January 2001. The web site of the month relates to Holmes. "As any fan of Sherlock Holmes knows, the great detective was an avid music enthusiast. Throughout Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's 60 Holmesian mysteries (referred to by the cognoscenti as the Canon), you'll find numerous references to composers and performers that the eccentric and erudite Victorian sleuth found appealing. For example, we learn in Bruce-Partington Plans that Holmes was a noted expert on the polyphonic motels of Orlando di Lasso. In The Red-Headed League, Holmes and Dr. Watson rush to hear Spanish composer and violin virtuoso Pablo de Sarasate. The grandiloquent gumshoe himself was no slouch when it came to playing the violin. On several occasions he played pieces by Mendelssohn and Offenbach while in the midst of his crime-solving escapades. If you'd like to learn more about Sherlock Holmes and his musical tastes, check out David Soucek's St. James's Hall Web page (www.bakerstreet221b.de/midi.htm). The site offers quotes from the Holmesian stories that include musical references. The text is followed by downloadable General MIDI files of the specific pieces mentioned in the stories or works by the composers whose names are sprinkled throughout the adventures."

4. Olding, Alan C. "Holmes and the Violin." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 69.

5. Solito, Enrico. "A Study in Violin -- The Paneveggio Connection." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 18-28.

6. Spiegl, Fritz. Fritz Spiegl's Book of musical blunders and other musical curiosities. Parkwest, N.Y: Robson Books, 1998.

LC Control Number: 97066448; Scuttlebutt Jun 1997; "Includes a 8-page discussion titled 'Sherlock Holmes mistreats his mahogany violin' in which Spiegl concludes that Holmes was far less a musician than Watson made him out to be. Spiegl also notes that Holmes' violin must have been the most remarkable instrument ever to come out of the Cremona workshops: when (in 'The Norwood Builder'), 'during a fit of exasperation, Holmes 'flung down the instrument' into a corner, it came to no harm. It was 'made of mahogany'. Solid, no doubt.' But there's no mention of a mahogany violin in my copy of the Canon."

7. Sprague, David. "Nothin' like the reel thing." Billboard 108, no. 26 (1996): 68.

Reports on developments in the soundtrack and film score segment of the sound recording industry in the United States as of June 29, 1996. Included is release of the album 'The Film Music of Miklos Rosza' with a Holmesian reference. "...Rosza is also showcased on Varese Sarabande's 'Sherlock Holmes: Classic Themes From 221B Baker Street,' which compiles new recordings of themes from six decades in the lensed life of the world's best-known detective. The label will target devotees of Holmesiana through fan magazines like Scarlet Street (editor Richard Valley wrote the liner notes), direct mailings, and Internet solicitations...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Newspapers (2)

1. Collins, Charles, John Nieminski, and Ely Liebow. Sherlock in the Trib being references to Sherlock Holmes and things Sherlockian as originally recorded by Chicago tribune staffer Charles Collins in his column A line o' type or two (1939-1951). New York: Magico Magazine, 2000.

Scuttlebutt Jun 2001.; "While it's true that The Baker Street Irregulars were born and nourished in the pages of the Saturday Review of Literature, it's also a fact that the pages of the Chicago Tribune offered its readers a splendid opportunity to discover just how much fun Sherlockians have. Vincent Starrett wrote for the paper for many years, of course, but there was another stalwart Sherlockian on its staff: Charles Collins, who for more than two decades edited and wrote a daily column called 'A Line o' Type or Two' and provided a forum for his fellow enthusiasts. And you can now see just how much they all had, thanks to the late John Nieminski, who discovered more than 300 separate items of interest in the Collins' column, and assembled and annotated them for a book that was not published while he lived; and thanks to Ely Liebow, who has contributed two informative and enthusiastic introductions, about John Nieminski and Charles Collins, and who presided over publication."

2. Murdock, Karen. Good for the cause: Sherlockians in the newspaper, (Bootmaker Occasional Paper). Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wisc: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2004.

Includes bibliographical references; The author comments on newspaper reports about Sherlockians and their Holmes-related activities, based on her analysis of the clippings files collected by John Bennett Shaw. The files are now curated at the University of Minnesota, Special Collections and Rare Books

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Noncanonical Cases -- Jack the Ripper (20)

1. Faye, Lyndsay. Dust and shadow : an account of the Ripper killings by Dr. John H. Watson. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2009.

map ; 24 cm.;

2. Gowers, Rebecca. "What the cats' meat woman witnessed ; Rebecca Gowers on the fine art of murder and the rise of Ripperology; [FINAL Edition]." The Independent (London), Dec 31, 1994: 28.

The internal contradictions in [Melvin Harris]'s work are glaring. All that can be confidently deduced from this book is that [D'Onston Stephenson] was obsessed with the murders, and wished to thrill a few people with the possibility of his being the Ripper. Whether D'Onston believed it himself is unclear. Any of his actions tending to exonerate him are presented by Harris as devious smokescreens. His central argument is that D'Onston "was adamant that the killings were the sexually inspired deeds of a sophisticated man, never the work of a madman. Only the killer himself could speak with such authority." Not only is this thesis alarmingly circular, but one is left hankering keenly for a definition of "mad".; The picture Harris builds up of a fetid Victorian underworld is fascinating, if patchy. This is typical of Ripper books. The best moments in [Philip Sugden]'s tome are occasional background details. He notes at one point the 17 people living in a house overlooking one of; the murder sites, including two girls employed in a cigar shop, two carmen, a little old lady maintained out of charity, a tennis boot maker, his mentally retarded son, and a woman running a "cats' meat shop". He catalogues one victim's many pockets, her two clay pipes, little tin of sugar and metal teaspoon. He produces records of the sometimes indifferent reactions of those who discovered the corpses, and the angry response of a watchman who slept through one killing: "thirteen long hours for3 shillings and find your own coke". These pathetic particulars have an immediacy that nothing else in the book achieves. When Sugden tries to evoke "the old, half-fed, impoverished drabs [left] to crawl about from lamp to lamp until the first signs of dawn", he achieves none of the forlorn force of the "drab" allowed her own voice: "The people speak so kind and sympathisin' about the women he has killed and I'd not object to being ripped up by him to be talked about so nice after I'm dead."; In an interview five years after the Ripper murders he talked about the "Dear Boss" letter: "It may have been a hoax, but there were reasons to think it genuine. . . Holmes' plan would have been to reproduce the letters in fac-simile, and on each plate indicate briefly the peculiarities of the handwriting. Then publish these fac- similes in the leading newspapers . . . and offer a reward to any one who could show a letter or any specimen of the same handwriting. Such a course would have enlisted millionsof people as detectives in the case." It is depressing to picture Sherlock Holmes attacking the problem in this way. The police had in fact published copies of the letter, but it merely inspired several hundred cranks to send them new disgusting variants. Nevertheless, as Sugden and Harris demonstrate, people are still enlisting to attempt to solve these murders.

3. Hanna, Edward B. Howaitochaperu no kyofu [Sharokku Homuzu saidai no jiken] = The Whitechapel horrors, (Fusosha misuteri). Tokyo: Fusosha, 1996.

4. Joyce, Simon. "Sexual Politics and the Aesthetics of Crime: Oscar Wilde in the Nineties." ELH 69, no. 2 (2002): 501-523.

Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. "...Late Victorian readers could of course look to popular fiction--to Gothic novels, sensation fiction, and the Sherlock Holmes detective stories--for a more elevated style of criminality, or to newspaper accounts of Jack the Ripper: indeed, it became a commonplace of contemporary commentary to highlight how strikingly literary these murders appeared, with noticeable parallels to Poe, Sade, and especially to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)....Such speculations about the Ripper's identity--and his presumed resemblance to other literary figures--suggest a renewed interest in crime as not only imaginative and aesthetic, but as the province of the privileged classes: by the turn of the century, for example, we get the first appearance of Raffles, E. W. Hornung's aristocratic cat burglar, to place alongside Dr. Jekyll, Dorian Gray, and all those hard-up minor aristocrats who usually turn out to be the culprits in Conan Doyle...." Note 7 includes a Holmes reference: In his Atlas of the European Novel, 1880-1900 (London: Verso, 1998), Franco Moretti points out the astonishing fact that Holmes only once ventures into the East End, and even this is presumably in the doppleganger story, "The Man with the Twisted Lip," in which the culprit turns out to be a bourgeois journalist disguised as a beggar (Moretti, 34).

5. Kaplan, Robert. "Searching the Silver trail: Charles van Onselen, Joe Silver and Jack the Ripper." Australasian Psychiatry 15, no. 3 (2007): 217-221.

"South African historian Charles van Onselen's discovery of the identity of Jack the Ripper is described. The author was consulted by van Onselen during the writing of the latter's book, “The Fox and the Flies: Joe Silver, Racketeer and Psychopath”, which suggested the identity of Jack the Ripper and was first published earlier this year." Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...The Ripper Murders, as they became known, represented not only a hitherto unique form of gynaecide, seeming to epitomize the social prejudices of the era....The effect of the murders on public perception cannot be understated. They coincided with two significant literary events: the theatrical launching of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and the publishing debut of the greatest detective in history, Sherlock Holmes, in The Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle, both perfect metaphors for the event...."

6. Klett, Rex E., and Barbara Hoffert. "Book reviews: Fiction." Library Journal 122, no. 13 (1997): 139.

Reviews the book Bloodguilty, by Raymond Thor (Danger. Aug. 1997. c.256p. ISBN 0-9658727-7-7. $23.95.) "Cryptic prose, wide-roving action, and breathless sensationalism characterize this first novel. California publisher Harry Chrysler returns from a trip to London with a previously unknown diary of one Dr. John Watson, which proves not only that Watson and Sherlock Holmes really existed but also that they solved the Jack-the-Ripper case. Present-day evil forces related to the case now seek to acquire and destroy the diary, so Chrysler and investigative writer Dave Conway combine wits. Of possible interest to fans of Conan Doyle and followers of Jack the Ripper, but mostly derivative and superficial."

7. Lawton, Lindl. "Ripper Snorter." Meanjin 61, no. 2 (2002): 85.

Reviews the motion picture 'From Hell,' directed by Alan Moore and starring Heather Graham and Johnny Depp. Unknown reference to Doyle or Holmes.

8. Lithner, Klas. "How Jack the Ripper Was Caught--A Sherlockian Apocrypha in Swedish." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 12-14.

9. Rawlins, Sharon. "Grades 5 & Up." School Library Journal 51, no. 12 (2005): 148.

Includes a review with a reference to Holmes. Jubert, Herve. Dance of the Assassins. tr. from French by Anthea Bell. 396p. (The Devil's Dances Trilogy, Bk. #1). CIP. HarperCollins/Eos. 2005. Tr $16.99, ISBN 0-06-077717-6; PLB $17.89. ISBN 0-06-077718-4. LC 2004028084. Gr 9 Up "Have Jack the Ripper, Montezuma, and other famous villains come alive to commit grisly murders? That's the question that Roberta, a sorceress in her 40s, and her 20-same thing assistant must determine in this futuristic fantasy/mystery novel. This first book in a projected trilogy takes place in a world in which virtual-reality theme parks have been created in London, Paris, Versailles, and Venice, Each city is set in a time from the 17th to the 19th century. Tourists wear period costumes and totally immerse themselves in that city's milieu, A wealthy man named Count Palladio has financed these re-creations and is suspected of being the mastermind behind a series of murderers committed by a group called the Killers' Quadrille, They are famous villains come buck to life to do the Devil's bidding. The plotting is quite convoluted and involves, among other things, astral twins, telepathic hedgehogs, and babies comprised of organs taken from murdered women. The transitions from scene to scene are often abrupt. At times, the translation is awkward, resulting in melodramatic and laughable prose--'she let the warmth envelop her, savoring it like warm tangerine sauce,' Although there are no teen characters, the plot will appeal to fans of historical mysteries, fantasy, and forensic science. A few brief sexual situations and some graphic violence make the story more suitable for older teens. The author's pairing of elements from Sherlock Holmes and Harry Potter is unique but not completely successful."

10. Rubinstein, William D. "The Hunt For Jack the Ripper." History Today 50, no. 5 (2000): 10.

Reviews the research and theories on the identity of the serial killer called Jack the Ripper who murdered five prostitutes in Whitechapel, London, England in 1888. Social and economic conditions in Whitechapel in 1888; Candidates for the true identity of the killer; Arguments about the 1992 discovery of the killer's alleged diaries. Includes passing references to Doyle and Holmes. "...The association of the Ripper with the London of Sherlock Holmes, with fogs, riverside opium dens, the haunts of prostitutes and criminals, virtually adjacent to great wealth and the aristocracy, is enticing to many....The notion that 'Jack' was actually 'Jill' surfaced early during the spate of killings themselves, and had an advocate of sorts in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who argued that the male killer was able to pass through Whitechapel disguised as a bloodstained midwife...."

11. Sinclair, Iain. White Chappell: Paladin, 1988.

12. ———. White Chappell - Trazos Rojos: Sudamericana, 2005.

13. ———. White Chappell : scarlet tracings. London: Granta Books, 1998.

ill. ; 20 cm. First published in Great Britain by Goldmark in 1987.;

14. ———. White Chappell : scarlet tracings. Uppingham: Goldmark, 1987.

ill. ; 24 cm. Scuttlebutt Sept 2001.; "A complex novel about antiquarian-book dealers, Jack the Ripper, and a hitherto-unknown first issue of A Study in Scarlet."

15. ———. White Chappell, scarlet tracings. London: Penguin, 2004.

Originally published: Uppingham: Goldmark, 1987.;

16. ———. White Chappell, scarlet tracings. London: Vintage, 1995.

20 cm. ;

17. Swartz, Mim. "Trailing the path of London's infamous murderer | Steady nerves needed for Jack the Ripper tour." The San Diego Union - Tribune 1994.

18. Trow, M. J. Lestrade and the Ripper, (Gateway mystery: Sholto Lestrade mystery series). Washington, DC: Regnery Pub, 1999.

LC Control Number: 99015926; "The year is 1888, and Jack the Ripper terrorizes London. All of the brutal killer's victims are discovered in the same district, Whitechapel, and all are prostitutes. But theirs aren't the only murders to perplex the brains of Scotland Yard. In Brighton, the body of one Edmund Gurney is also found dead."--Book jacket. "Foremost amongst the Yard's top men is the young Inspector Sholto Lestrade. It is to his lot that the unsolved cases of a deceased colleague fall - cases that include the murder of Martha Tabram, formerly a prostitute from Whitechapel, and that of Gurney."--Book jacket. "Leaving no stone unturned, Lestrade investigates with his customary expertise and follows the trail to the public school Rhadegund Hall. What he finds is murder."--Book jacket. "As the Whitechapel murders increase in number, so do those at Rhadegund Hall. What is the connection between them all? As if it weren't confusing enough, Lestrade is hampered by the parallel investigations of the great detective, Sherlock Holmes, aided by Dr. Watson. Who is the murderer of Rhadegund Hall, and are he and the man they call "Jack the Ripper" one and the same?"--Book jacket

19. ———. Lestrade und Jack the Ripper: Rowohlt, 1993.

20. Zelazny, Roger. A night in the lonesome October. New York: William Morrow and Co, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93018414; "After years of unprepossessing folderol--the wearisome Nine Princes in Amber retreads are depressingly typical--Zelazny bursts forth with, well, 'Victorian light supernatural fantasy' just about covers it. Narrator Snuff, a guard dog who performs complex thaumaturgical calculations in his head, has many duties: to keep various Things firmly trapped in mirrors, wardrobes, and steamer trunks; to accompany his master, Jack--he of the magical blade--on weird collecting expeditions into the graveyards and slums of Victorian London; and--for a single hour each night--discuss the day's goings-on in human speech. Snuff's neighbors include: Jill the witch and her familiar, Graymalk the cat, with whom Snuff forms a friendly alliance; Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Frankenstein, Dracula, a werewolf, and a satanic vicar. The witches, detectives, doctors, vampires, etc., along with their equally industrious familiars, trade information and scheme for advantage as the full moon of Halloween approaches; at that time, a magical showdown to decide the fate of the Earth will occur. Some of the characters are 'openers,' determined to open a magical doorway allowing the Old Gods to reoccupy the Earth; others are 'closers,' equally resolved to keep the magical door nailed shut; and a few are involved yet stand outside the Game altogether. Snuff's problem is to discover who is which. Sparkling, witty, delightful: Zelazny's best for ages, perhaps his best ever."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Periodicals (38)

1. The Beeman's Christmas annual : a publication of The Occupants of the Empty House, a scion of the Baker Street Irregulars. 1986- vols. DuQuoin, IL: Camden House & Co., 1986-.

Annual. ill. ; 22 cm. Geology in the canon (1999) -- Flora and fauna in the canon (2000) -- Geography in the canon (2001);

2. The Holmes & Watson report. Peoria, IL: B. Keefauver, 1997-.

3. The Jezail bulletin: a publication of the Maiwand Jezails, a scion society of the Baker Street Irregulars. Lincoln, NE: Maiwand Jezail Press, 1997-.

4. Mandatory sentence. London, Ont: M. Duncanson, 1995-.

5. Parish magazine (Chester, England): The Parish magazine the newsletter of the Arthur Conan Doyle Society. Chester England: The Society, 1989.

Citations: De Waal C12587;

6. Scarlet Street: the magazine of mystery and horror. Glen Rock, N.J.: R. H. Enterprises, 1991-.

7. Sherlock Holmes Gazette. Wargrave, England: (various), 1991-.

8. Sherlock Holmes the detective magazine. Wargrave: P. Harkness, 1997-.

9. The Strand magazine (Birmingham, Mich.). Birmingham, Mich: Strand Magazine, 1998-.

LC Control Number: sn 99003524;

10. The Wipers Times a facsimile reprint of the trench magazines:--the Wipers times--the New Church times--the Kemmel times--the Somme times--the B. E. F. times. London: H. Jenkins limited, 1918.

LC Control Number: 18001180; Scuttlebutt 1994; "The newspaper (which eventually became The B.E.F. Times) was published by British soldiers at the front during World War I, and it contained three parodies featuring Herlock Shomes. Brian Pugh notes that the 24th Division List of Staff Officers 28 September 1915 (on p. 375) includes Lt.-Col. J.F.I.H. Doyle (Arthur Conan Doyle's brother Innes); his full name was John Francis Innes Hay Doyle."

11. The Wipers Times including for the first time in one volume a facsimile reproduction of the complete series of the famous wartime trench magazines. London: E. Nash & Grayson limited, 1930.

LC Control Number: 31024185; Scuttlebutt 1994; "The newspaper (which eventually became The B.E.F. Times) was published by British soldiers at the front during World War I, and it contained three parodies featuring Herlock Shomes. Brian Pugh notes that the 24th Division List of Staff Officers 28 September 1915 (on p. 375) includes Lt.-Col. J.F.I.H. Doyle (Arthur Conan Doyle's brother Innes); his full name was John Francis Innes Hay Doyle."

12. The Wipers Times: The Complete Series of the Famous Wartime Trench Newspaper. London: Little Books, 2006.

Scuttlebutt 1994; "The newspaper (which eventually became The B.E.F. Times) was published by British soldiers at the front during World War I, and it contained three parodies featuring Herlock Shomes. Brian Pugh notes that the 24th Division List of Staff Officers 28 September 1915 (on p. 375) includes Lt.-Col. J.F.I.H. Doyle (Arthur Conan Doyle's brother Innes); his full name was John Francis Innes Hay Doyle."

13. Adey, Robert. As it might have been: a collection of Sherlockian parodies from unlikely sources. Ashcroft, B.C.: Calabash Press, 1998.

Scuttlebutt Dec 1999; The thirty-eight short stories in this collection originally appeared in various, mostly obscure, papers and magazines dating back to 1893. "His research in humor magazines from the 1890s onward has uncovered many previously unreprinted examples of what writers have done with and to Sherlock Holmes."

14. Beare, Geraldine, and Sherlock Holmes Society of London. Index to the Sherlock Holmes journal, 1952-2002. Shelburne, Ont: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2003.

15. Beaver, Patrick. The Wipers Times a complete facsimile of the famous World War One trench newspaper, incorporating the New Church Times, the Kemmel Times, the Somme Times, the B.E.F. Times, and the Better Times. London: P. Davies, 1973.

LC Control Number: 74154717; Scuttlebutt 1994; "The newspaper (which eventually became The B.E.F. Times) was published by British soldiers at the front during World War I, and it contained three parodies featuring Herlock Shomes. Brian Pugh notes that the 24th Division List of Staff Officers 28 September 1915 (on p. 375) includes Lt.-Col. J.F.I.H. Doyle (Arthur Conan Doyle's brother Innes); his full name was John Francis Innes Hay Doyle."

16. Boote, Henry, ed. Cliff Notes on Mrs. Hudson's Cliffdwellers. Old Tappan, NJ: Mrs. Hudson's Cliffdwellers, 2000-2001.

17. Clarkson, Stephen. First magazine appearances of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Berkeley Springs, WV: Kennington Press, 2004.

All but one of the Sherlock Holmes stories first appeared in magazines, chiefly in the Strand Magazines. Titles often appeared on both sides of the Atlantic within days of each other. This index tracks which magazine edition, English or American, was the "first first" appearance of each Holmes story

18. Cochran, William R. The Camden House journal, 1979-2003 an index to the monthly musings between the doors of The Camden House Journal, celebrating over 25 years of publication. S.l.: Occupants of the Empty House, 2004.

19. Collins, Charles, John Nieminski, and Ely Liebow. Sherlock in the Trib being references to Sherlock Holmes and things Sherlockian as originally recorded by Chicago tribune staffer Charles Collins in his column A line o' type or two (1939-1951). New York: Magico Magazine, 2000.

Scuttlebutt Jun 2001.; "While it's true that The Baker Street Irregulars were born and nourished in the pages of the Saturday Review of Literature, it's also a fact that the pages of the Chicago Tribune offered its readers a splendid opportunity to discover just how much fun Sherlockians have. Vincent Starrett wrote for the paper for many years, of course, but there was another stalwart Sherlockian on its staff: Charles Collins, who for more than two decades edited and wrote a daily column called 'A Line o' Type or Two' and provided a forum for his fellow enthusiasts. And you can now see just how much they all had, thanks to the late John Nieminski, who discovered more than 300 separate items of interest in the Collins' column, and assembled and annotated them for a book that was not published while he lived; and thanks to Ely Liebow, who has contributed two informative and enthusiastic introductions, about John Nieminski and Charles Collins, and who presided over publication."

20. Curious Collectors of Baker Street, and Tigers of San Pedro. Baker Street West 1. Los Angeles: Curious Tiger Press, 1995.

21. Dangling Prussian Amateur Press Association. The daily dangler official news organ of the Dangling Prussian Amateur Press Association. Peoria, Ill.?: B. Keefauver, 1994.

Citations: De Waal C12495;

22. ———. The dangling Prussian files. Peoria, Ill.?: B. Keefauver.

Citations: De Waal C12495;

23. Davies, David Stuart, ed. Musgrave Papers. Huddersfield, England: The Northern Musgraves, 1987-.

24. Doyle, Steven T., ed. Sherlock Holmes Review. Zionsville, IN, 1986-1996.

Scuttlebutt Jan. 1995; http://www.sherlockpeoria.net/Periodicals/SherlockHolmesReview.html;

25. Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections (University of Minnesota). Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections newsletter. Minneapolis: The Friends, 1997.

26. Johns, Ray. "Review--'The Sherlock Holmes Review' edited by Steven T. Doyle." The Ritual, no. 18 (1996): 72-73.

27. Lellenberg, Jon L. "The Origins of the Baker Street Journal Part I: Prehistory." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 46, no. 1 (1996): 20-30.

28. ———. "The Origins of the Baker Street Journal Part II: The Game Is Afoot." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 46, no. 2 (1996): 7-21.

29. Levin, Alfred A. "Author and Title Indices to Issues Vol. 1-13." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 162-197.

30. McClure, Michael, and Susan McClure, eds. The Baker Street News. Chester, IL: Michael McClure, 1995-.

Only one issue published; http://www.sherlockpeoria.net/Periodicals/BakerStNews.html;

31. Northeastern Illinois University, and Advisory Committee on Popular Culture. Baker Street miscellanea. Chicago: Sciolist Press, 1975.

LC Control Number: sn 80008147. Citations: De Waal C12454;

32. Redmond, Christopher, ed. Canadian Holmes, the first twenty-five years: an anthology. Ashcroft, British Columbia: Calabash Press, 1997.

Includes bibliographical references. Contents: The Red-Headed Conspiracy and the Universal Prejudice Against Nice Plain Folks / Marlene Aig; Holmes and the Hope of Newfoundland / Fred Aldrich; The Veiled Lodger: A Song Paraphrase / Jim Ballinger; The Elsinore Squires; or, A Study in Danish or, The Castle of Fear / Wendy Bamford; Excursion to Aldershot: Watson's Bootless Errand / E. J. Barnes; The Indian Elements in the Holmes Tales: Jewels and Tigers / Paul Beam; The Hysteria of Godfrey Emsworth / Thelma Beam; Death Be Not Proud: The Myth Behind Moriarty / Karen Campbell; The Adventure of the Reichenplaque / Patrick Campbell; Boxes Within Boxes / Patrick Campbell; The Gentle Art of Disguise / Desiree Campin; Good Old Watson: A Sherlockian Fixed Point / Bob Coghill; Holmes's Missing Years: Science Fiction in Reverse / Montague Cohen; 'The One Fixed Point in a Changing Age': Faith, Disillusion, and Certitude in the World of Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle / Don Richard Cox; La Belle Dame Sans Merci / Michael Doyle; Sherlock Holmes as a Conjurer / Doug Elliott; There's Dogs / Doug Elliott; Thus, Month After Month His Papers Accumulated / Victoria Gill; I Could Concoct a Better Plot and More / L. B. Greenwood; A Psychological Study of Mr. Sherlock Holmes in the Year 1891 / David L. Hammer; Almost a Zen Master: Reading the Canon as Moral Education / James L. Heap; Doyle and Burns / Cameron Hollyer; How Many Wives Did Watson Wed? A Study in Computation / Cameron Hollyer; Quintessential Quadrangle / Bruce Holmes; Wisteria Lodge: Curiouser and Curiouser / Stephen Kahnert; Six of the Finest Pearls I Had Ever Seen / Katherine Karlson; The Strange Truth About Mary Watson / Joel Lima; Literary Detective Work: Colours in the Hound / Wendy Machen; Dr. Watson Takes a Chair...and Another...and Another / Don MacLachlan; Sherlock Holmes as a Figure of Romance / Jay Macpherson; Evolution of a Repast / McCausland, Dayna Nuhn; What's So Great About Irene Adler and What's She Got That I Haven't Got? / Dayna Nuhn McCausland; Human Documents : A Magazine Tangle / Janice McNabb; "Trevor Raymond recalls in his afterword that the first constitution of the Bootmakers of Toronto stated that 'The purpose of this Society shall be to keep Sherlock Holmes alive and well in Canada, and to assist police in locating missing boots and other footwear,' and the Bootmakers have done that (well, part of that) splendidly in the journal Canadian Holmes, as this anthology demonstrates."

33. Redmond, Donald A. The index to Canadian Holmes Volumes 1-25 (1973-2002). Toronto, Ont., Shelburne, Ont: The Bootmakers of Toronto. The Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2003.

34. Sherlock Holmes Around the World (Organization). Sherlock Holmes Around the World S.H.A.W. : [newsletter]. S.l.: Sherlock Holmes Around the World, 1996.

35. Sydney Passengers (Organization). The passengers' log the journal of the Sydney Sherlock Holmes Society, 'The Sydney Passengers.'. Sydney N.S.W.: The Passengers, 1997.

36. Taylor, Troy, ed. Whitechapel Gazette. Decatur, IL, 1994.

37. Toronto Reference Library, and Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection. The magic door. Toronto, Ont., Canada: Friends of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Toronto Reference Library, 1998.

38. Utechin, Nicholas, and Anthony D. Howlett. The best of The Sherlock Holmes Journal : selections from the first 8 volumes. 1st ed. [London]: Sherlock Holmes Society of London, Printed by Antony Rowe, 2006.

24 cm. V. 1: Selections from issues, 1952-1968. Volume I: Limited edition of 300 copies; nos. 1-25 are signed by Alfreda D. Howlett, Nicholas Utechin, and Philip Porter. Includes bibliographical references. Edited by Nicholas Utechin; foreword by Anthony Howlett.;

06F Writings about the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Philately (9)

1. Dodson, Larry. The philatelic adventures of Sherlock Holmes, (ATA handbook). Albuquerque, NM: American Topical Association, 2000.

Includes bibliographical references;

2. Doyle, Arthur Conan, and Bruce Holmes. The return of Sherlock Holmes. Halifax, N.S: Bruce Holmes, [2003].

Includes bibliographical references (leaf 22); Reprints selected passages from the thirteen stories which comprise The Return, each illustrated with a stamp from the illustrator's collection

3. Holmes, Bruce. Mr. Sherlock Holmes, [Bootmakers' monographs. [S.l.]: B. Holmes, 1997.

ill. ; 28 cm. 'Each stamp or envelope... is accompanied by one or more quotations from the Sherlock Holmes stories"-- (introduction). Includes bibliography.;

4. ———. Sherlockian dogs. [S.l.]: B. Holmes, 1997.

ill. ; 28 cm. Each stamp is accompanied by one or more quotations from the Sherlock Holmes stories. Includes bibliography.;

5. Key, Jack D., Marc A. Shampo, and Robert A. Kyle. "Doyle, Holmes, and Watson--a 'Special' Trinity." Mayo Clinic proceedings 80, no. 6 (2005): 722-722.

"This article focuses on physicians Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, John Watson and William Sherlock Holmes. Arthur Conan Doyle was both a physician and a versatile author of historical novels, short stories, volumes of poems, plays, histories, science fiction, and publications on occult science. Holmes and Watson are 2 of the most immediately recognizable figures in popular culture. Their images have been adapted countless times for innumerable purposes. Biographical data concerning them can be drawn from the research efforts of Holmesian authorities. Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, and John Watson were honored on a set of 4 stamps showing scenes from the adventures of Sherlock Holmes."

6. Moss, Robert A. "Sherlock Holmes on Stamps." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 51, no. 1 (2001): 28-34.

7. Small, Jonathan. Sherlock Holmes auf Briefmarken. S.l: s.n, 1995.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 19);

8. Wood, Benton. Philatelic and numismatic Holmes a handy reference guide to Sherlockian stamps & coins. New ed. Holmes Beach, Fla: Pleasant Places of Florida, 1995.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 33);

9. ———. "Philatelic Philandering (or Stamping Around with Sherlock Holmes)." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 12-14.

06F Writings about the writings -- Other Subjects -- Poetry and Limericks (32)

1. Dorn, William S. The limericks of Sherlock Holmes. Denver: Pencil Productions Ltd, 2005.

Includes 64 new limericks about A. Conan Doyle's creations: 1 for Sherlock Holmes, 1 for Dr. Watson, 1 for each of the original stories, 1 of each of the two apocryphal stories

2. Gorman, LeRoy, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Paul Churchill. The poems of Sherlock Holmes. Shelburne, Ont, Sauk City, Wis: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2000.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 73);

3. Knight, Henry. Suspicions. 2nd rev ed. Toronto: Childe Thursday, 1994.

4. Ruber, Peter. "A Newly Discovered Sherlockian Poem by Vincent Starrett." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 46, no. 2 (1996): 23-26.

5. Ruyle, John. The agent's last bow the Case-book re-cased. Berkeley: Brickfall & Amberley, 1994.

6. ———. Arrivals & departures jiggery- pokery. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1996.

7. ———. Baker Street antics observations. Berkeley: The Speckled Bandicott, 1999.

8. ———. Baker Street Bazaar demonstrations. Berkeley: Ash-Tray Press, 1999.

9. ———. Baker Street Galore! preoccupations. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1999.

10. ———. Beeing there impressions. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1997.

11. ———. Bees in my bonnet obsessions. Berkeley: The Bees' Knees Press, 1997.

12. ———. Bells, butlers, & others frolics. Berkeley: Brunton & Howells, 1998.

13. ———. Bottom of the barrel canonical capers. Berkeley: Slipshod Press, 1998.

14. ———. Bricks without clay Processions / by John Ruyle. Berkely: White Mason, 1998.

Scuttlebutt Mar 1998; "'Leans heavily on the untold adventures and other Holmesian topics on which we have little data,' John Ruyle reports."

15. ———. Bye bye birdy fear quartets. Berkeley: Iron Duke Company, 1992.

Citations: De Waal C8324;

16. ———. Chimney-child divagations & variations. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1999.

17. ———. Difficult oysters seven men in the same boat (to say nothing of the dog!) curious verse. Berkeley: Hangdog Press, 1994.

18. ———. Effable twaddle digressions. Berkeley: Owls' Hoot Press, 1998.

19. ———. Exits & entrances hocus-pocus. Berkeley, CA: Crow's Foot Press, 1996.

20. ———. Loose canons verse grim and gentle. Berkeley: Pontoon Press, 1995.

21. ———. Mitigated bleat: observations on his last bow. Berkeley: Printer's Devil's Feet, 1994.

22. ———. Mongoose & mendicants celebrations & tribulations. Berkeley: Wood & Devoy, 1999.

23. ———. Sherlock unbound new poems. Berkeley: The Crow's Foot Press, 1997.

24. ———. Sir Arthur Agonistes whims & fancies. Berkeley, CA: Firedog Press, 1996.

25. ———. Splintered Parts. Berkeley, CA: The Pequod Press, 1995.

Scuttlebutt Apr 1995;

26. ———. Springtime for Sherlock and other verses. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 2001.

27. ———. Stix & stones hallucinations. Berkeley: Calaboose Press, 1999.

28. ———. Teddy & Arthur paradigmatic constructs. Berkeley: Amateur Mendicant Society, 1988.

29. ———. Tidewaiters & yeggmen occupations. Berkeley: Crow's Foot Press, 1999.

30. ———. Watson furioso progressions. Berkeley: Iron Dyke Company, 1998.

31. ———. Wiggins & Company irregular verse. Berkeley: The imbecile Rodent, 1996.

32. Starrett, Vincent, Peter Ruber, A, and Christopher Morley. Collected poems, (Vincent Starrett memorial library series). Shelburne, Ont: Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library, 1995.

Includes bibliographical references;

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Pornography (1)

1. Klinger, Leslie S. "'Maybe you collect yourself, sir. . .': 'The Collection Mania in its Most Acute Form': A Checklist of Sherlockian Pornography." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 56, no. 4 (2006): 41-47.

06F Writings about the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Quotations (7)

1. Emery, Vince, ed. Sherlock Holmes' Guide to Life. San Francisco: Vince Emery Productions, 2006.

2. Narasimhan, Balaji. The partial art of detection. Tokyo: Shoso-in Press, 2003.

21 cm. Includes index. ;

3. Parris, Matthew, David Prosser, and Simon Christmas. Scorn with added vitriol : a bucketful of discourtesy, disparagement, invective, ridicule, impudence, contumely, derision, hate, affront, disdain, bile, taunts, curses and jibes. New ed. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1995.

LC Control Number: gb 96039884;

4. ———. Scorn: a bucketful of discourtesy, disparagement, invective, ridicule, impudence, contumely, derision, hate, affront, disdain, bile, taunts, curses and jibes. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1994.

LC Control Number: gb 94088947;

5. Petersen, Svend, Arthur Conan Doyle, Carl William Thiel, Karen Murdock, Frank Darlington, Edwin Christenson, and George A. Vanderburgh. Sherlock Holmes almanac. Shelburne, Ont: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2002.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 371-374) and index;

6. Redmond, Christopher. Quotations from Baker Street : a selection of memorable, striking, familiar, historic, and funny sentences from the literature and folklore of Sherlock Holmes. 2nd ed. Waterloo: Chris Redmond, 2009.

23 cm.;

7. Redmond, Christopher, and George A. Vanderburgh. Quotations from Baker Street a selection of memorable, striking, familier and historic sentences from the literature and folklore of Sherlock Holmes. Toronto: Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library, 1994.

Availability: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, P.O. Box 204, 420 Owen Sound St., Shelburne, Ont. L0N 1S0;

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Restaurants (1)

1. Miles, Gary. "In Small-Market Edmonton, NHL Players Take a Hit in Western Canada, Life without Hockey is no Joke. And the Players are the Reason no One is Laughing." The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 19, 1994: D01.

"...The Sherlock Holmes, a popular bar in this quaint downtown, has lost about $4,000 in business since the NHL shut down on Oct. 1....The Oilers were scheduled to host the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim tonight at the Northlands Coliseum. Instead, the fans at the Sherlock Holmes will be treated to bowling tournaments and dog shows on TV....The Sherlock Holmes is the kind of bar hockey players love. It is cozy, dark, friendly and within walking distance of their hotels. Indeed, the bar is within a weak slapshot of the Westin and the Hilton, the hotels where visiting teams and officials usually stay. The Sherlock Holmes also is strategically placed between two subway stops. So it is usually jammed with thirsty fans on their way to the games at the Coliseum, which just happens to be a short walk at the end of the line. In the back hall at the Sherlock Holmes, behind the grimy Oilers pennant, seven huge photo collages hang on the wall. Pictured there, among the hockey legends, are Wayne Gretzky and Michel Goulet at New Year's Eve and Halloween parties during happier times. This month, however, there have been no parties, and bartender Vanessa Bellamy couldn't decide whether she was more angry than troubled as a result of the lockout...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Scotland -- Edinburgh (9)

1. "Literary city." Writer 118, no. 2 (2005): 8-8.

Reports that the United Nations named the city of Edinburgh, Scotland as the world's first city of literature in late 2004. Writers who participated in the campaign for the city's designation; Expected impact of the award on the city. "The campaign was based not only on the city's contemporary authors, but on the fact that Edinburgh was also the home of such literary notables as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson and Robert Burns."

2. "Value deal: Holmes defeats an arch-villain." York Daily Record, Dec 29, 1999: D.01.

"An 18th-century Scottish mansion where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once lived was saved from a Big Mac attack when the city of Edinburgh slapped a preservation order on it. Fans of the Sherlock Holmes creator, alarmed to discover that McDonald's planned to build a burger restaurant on the site, appealed to city hall and won. 'This is wonderful news,' said Richard Lancelyn Green, a Conan Doyle expert and former chairman of the London-based Sherlock Holmes Society. 'Sherlock Holmes still has his magic, it seems.' So does good, old red meat. Agricultural officials say consumers are returning to meat counters, buying more pork and beef to put on their tables as a strong economy puts more money in their pockets to spend at the grocery store."

3. "When Visiting." British Heritage 23, no. 3 (2002): 39.

Presents information on Edinburgh, Scotland. Location of the Conan Doyle Pub; Hotels and restaurants; Landmarks.

4. Brown, Allan. "The curious case of old Conan Doyle." Sunday Times (London), August 22, 2004: 4.

Observations on Doyle, Edinburgh, the fate of various Doyle papers, the Christie's auction, Richard Lancelyn Green, Owen Dudley Edwards, and Charles Foley.

5. Cameron, Lucinda. "Sherlock Holmes and Amazing Case of the Doctor Who Inspired Him; Conan Doyle Archive Material to Go on show for First Time." Daily Mail (London), April 17, 2006: 28.

Discusses new exhibit in Edinburgh. "'A fantastically observant man' , he was a doctor rather than a detective, though he did wear a deerstalker hat and cloak. Dr Joseph Bell even used a magnifying glass, although it is not clear whether he ever smoked a pipe. Now, fascinating archive material about to go on public display for the first time has revealed just how much of an inspiration he was for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective...."

6. Chalmers, John. "You write the festival reviews." The Independent (London), August 7, 2006: 20.

Review of the exhibit in Edinburgh, "Conan Doyle and Joseph Bell: The Real Sherlock Holmes," Surgeons' Hall Museums. "This is a small but fascinating exhibition on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his teacher, the surgeon Joseph Bell, who was his inspiration for Sherlock Holmes. Bell's ability to learn much about his patients simply from his powers of observation is legendary, and several examples are given in this show...."

7. Donnelly, Brian. "Doors open free for St Andrew's Day." The Herald (Glasgow), November 14, 2007: 7.

"More than 60 of Scotland's top visitor attractions will open their doors free of charge on St Andrew's Day, it was announced yesterday. Castles, museums, gardens and abbeys from Orkney to Dumfries and Galloway will all take part in the initiative designed to encourage Scots and tourists to celebrate Scotland's heritage and culture. Culture Minister Linda Fabiani, announcing the joint initiative by the National Trust for Scotland, Historic Scotland and the Association of Visitor Attractions, said: 'St Andrews Day is a day to celebrate Scotland.'...Ms. Fabiani made the announcement at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh which is hosting the Real Sherlock Holmes exhibition, one of the free attractions on St Andrew's Day....

8. Huntington, Tom. "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Edinburgh." British Heritage 23, no. 3 (2002): 33.

Presents the life and works of writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in Edinburgh, Scotland. Full name of Doyle; Alma mater of Doyle; Family background; Problems with alcoholism.

9. Jamieson, Teddy. "Return to the Lost World of Conan Doyle; If you want to retrace the footsteps of Sherlock Holmes's creator in his native Edinburgh, you'll need to do a little detective work." The Herald (Glasgow), January 31, 2009: 12.

"...Me, I'm trying to get my head round Conan Doyle's Edinburgh and [Allan] Foster, who's hugely knowledgeable and entertaining company, is the man to help me. Sherlock Holmes's creator was born in the city (in 1859, making this the 150th anniversary of his birth) and studied medicine here before leaving Scotland. Foster knows where Conan Doyle bought his books and where he took a drink. And this bright blue Monday morning he's agreed to show me around the Edinburgh that the author knew...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Scotland Yard (5)

1. "Fingering the Culprit: Scotland Yard's Fingerprint Bureau." Baker Street West 1 7, no. 2 (2001): 23.

2. "The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 51 (2008): 49-49.

Kate Summerscale, read by Simon Vance. HighBridge Audio, unabridged, eight CDs, 10 hrs., $34.95 iSBN 978-1-59887-849-3. "Simon Vance does a fine job reading this unusually detailed and thoughtful true crime investigation into a notorious child murder case in I860 London. At the time, there were only eight detectives working in England. Scotland Yard's top man was Insp. Jonathan Whicher, and he headed the investigation. Intertwined with the tale of detection in its infancy is a fascinating examination of the role played by this case and its inspector in the creation of the detective novel genre by the likes of Wilkie Collins, Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Dickens and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle...."

3. Crelling, Jack. "Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard -- A Friend of Sherlock Holmes." The Camden House Journal 24, no. 2 (2002): 2-7.

4. ———. "Inspectors Gregson, Bradstreet and Hopkins of Scotland Yard." The Camden House Journal 26, no. 4 (2004): 2-5.

5. Ranger, Terence. "Scotland Yard in the Bush: Medicine Murders, Child Witches and the Construction of the Occult: a Literature Review." Africa 77, no. 2 (2007): 272-283.

The article discusses the techniques employed by detective agency Scotland Yard in interpreting data related to occultism, child witchcraft, and exorcism in Africa. According to the author, Scotland Yard had previously adopted the attitudes of ignorance, skepticism, and credulity in investigating African occult. He asserts that the agency lacked scientific measures in identifying the causes of the criminal case. Includes references to Holmes. "In the Sherlock Holmes stories Scotland Yard famously does not deploy science or make use of all those studies of blood and ash and bone which Holmes himself had pioneered. But the Yard is never so clumsy as when the occult seems to be involved--with suspected vampires, spectral dogs, tribal fetishes....A forensic squad disinterred skeletons from a cemetery in Benin City to find a match for Adam's bones. Sherlock Holmes would have been impressed....A particularly telling example, which in many ways brings together everything I have been arguing, is David Pratten's The Man-Leopard Murders: history and society in colonial Nigeria (Pratten 2007). Pratten's wonderful title might well be that of a Sherlock Holmes murder mystery...."

06F Writings about the writings -- Other Subjects -- Smoking and Tobacco (6)

1. Cabrera Infante, G. Holy smoke. Woodstock, New York: Overlook Press, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96049493; Scuttlebutt June 1998; "A fascinating, expert, and humorous discussion of the history of cigars (and cigarettes and pipes) with occasional references to the Canon."

2. ———. Puro humo. Madrid: Alfaguara, 2000.

LC Control Number: 2001378236. Includes filmography (p. 495-503); "A fascinating, expert, and humorous discussion of the history of cigars (and cigarettes and pipes) with occasional references to the Canon."

3. Cirone, Nino. Upon the distinction between the ashes of the various tobaccos. Romford, Essex: I. Henry, 2000.

Scuttlebutt Jul 2000; "Is not Sherlock Holmes' long-lost monograph, but rather an interesting collection of interesting descriptions of 60 tobaccos, one for each of the Canonical tales, accompanied by appropriate period artwork."

4. Hacker, Richard Carleton. The adventures of the singular pipes of Sherlock Holmes. S.l: s.n, 2004.

5. ———. Rare Smoke : the ultimate guide to pipe collecting. 1st ed. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Autumngold Pub., 1999.

ill. ; 22 cm. "Volume 1, a limited edition of which this is one of 2500 copies." Scuttlebutt Sep 1999; "Rick reports that he includes information on commemorative Sherlock Holmes pipes, and some previously untold stories about his adventures with the late Jeremy Brett."

6. McKuras, Julie. "Pipes, Matches and Tobacco." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 1, 6.

Discusses John Bennett Shaw's notebook of tobacco-related ephemera and his collection of matchbooks. Includes a photograph of Doyle on a cigarette card and two other photos of items from the collection.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Switzerland (11)

1. "Been there." The Daily Telegraph (London), December 1, 2001: 17.

"Skiing in Meiringen, Switzerland. The Bernese Oberland and the Alps looked like meringues and whipped cream as we flew over them, but Meiringen, we were assured, has every reason to look like a meringue - they were invented here. Our genial host at the Park Hotel du Sauvage extolled the virtues of this pretty little town. Everyone from the Kaiser downwards paid a visit here in the last century and it was from here that Sherlock Holmes set out to meet Moriarty at the nearby Reichenbach Falls. There is even a Sherlock Holmes museum, a bronze statue and a hotel bearing his name...."

2. "Into the falls." Economist 319, no. 7706 (1991): 88-88.

Reports on the re-enactment by the London Sherlock Holmes Society of the tragic struggle between the literary detective Holmes and his arch-rival, Professor Moriarty, at Reichenbach Falls on May 4, 1991, exactly 100 years after the event. Description of the centenary pilgrimage; Familiarity with the canon of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's work; Details.

3. "Travel: Grand Tour; Holmes falls for Moriarty (literally)." Independent on Sunday (London), May 5, 2002: 24.

Great writers and their adventures in Literature. This week, Arthur Conan Doyle kills off his hero....Arthur Conan Doyle, below, later resurrected his most famous character after protests from fans. Includes a brief biographical sketch of Doyle, an excerpt from "The Final Problem" and tourist information on London and tours to Switzerland.

4. Bergquist, John. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 2.

Discusses a letter in the December, 1901 issue of The Strand magazine (#132, Vol. 22, labeled "Grand Christmas Double Number") contained in the "Curiosities" section titled "Where Sherlock Holmes Died" dealing with the Reichenbach Falls (along with additional comment on Dr. Philip Hench's later interest in the Falls).

5. David, Daniela. "Making tracks in the snow." The Evening Post (Wellington), March 4, 2002: 15.

"A winter train journey through Switzerland catches the alpine towns at their snowy best and avoids the crowds....Near the expanse of Lake Brienz is Meiringen, the next stop on the rail tour. British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who created Sherlock Holmes, stayed many times at the old Parkhotel du Sauvage. He used the residence as the backdrop for his book The Final Problem. The death of Sherlock Holmes' arch enemy, Moriarty, takes place at the Reichenbach Waterfalls...."

6. Gore-Langton, Robert. "Holmes and away!" Daily Mail (London), September 4, 2004: 56-57.

"Switzerland was where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle plotted the death of Sherlock Holmes. Sick of writing stories about the sleuth, the author, who was a keen hiker, travelled around Switzerland and decided to make the spectacular Reichenbach Falls, near the village of Meiringen, the place to bump off his great detective. And, so, on May 4, 1891, Holmes and his arch- enemy Professor Moriarty ('the Napoleon of crime') did battle on a tiny ledge at the top of the falls. They supposedly vanished into the raging torrent whose noise was like a 'half-human shout which came booming up with the spray out of the abyss'. The Reichenbach Falls are these days a shrine for fans of literature's famous character. A star marks the chilling spot from where Holmes fell...."

7. Hanlon, Michael. "Sleuthing the case of statue in the square." The Toronto Star, October 4, 2003: no page citation.

"Here I am in my room at the Parkhotel du Sauvage, indulging myself in Meiringen's two major pursuits. I'm munching on a meringue while at the same time gazing at Reichenbach Falls cascading down the mountain beyond my window. And, though I've been here only 24 hours, I've already solved both The Case of the Statue in the Square and The Mystery of the Bakery Window. My brilliant powers of observation and deduction of the statue's deerstalker cap, meerschaum pipe, and the astonishing likeness to the many Sherlock Holmeses we've seen on film, led me to conclude that the statue depicted none other than the Great Detective...."

8. Hart, Jennifer. "Never Say Die: Sherlock Holmes and the Reichenbach Falls." The Washington Post, March 3, 2002: G12.

Letter to the editor. "To the Editor: Paul Richard's excellent story on J.M.W. Turner [Sunday Arts, Feb. 17] notes: 'In 1810 -- more than half a century before Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Moriarty plunged to their deaths there -- Turner sketched in Switzerland the dread Reichenbach Falls.' As nitpicky Holmesians know, in 'The Final Problem' (1893), Holmes and Moriarty do struggle in hand-to-hand combat on the edge of the falls and supposedly die there. Arthur Conan Doyle was tired of cranking out detective stories and had decided to use this epic battle between good and evil to kill off Holmes in a heroic way...."

9. Hofmann, Paul. "Sherlock Holmes Inc." New York Times, May 1, 1994: A35.

Article concerning Meiringen, Switzerland, which built an industry around the detective's plunge into the Reichenbach Falls. The Anglican church which became the Sherlock Holmes Museum; Conan Doyle's Swiss home, an old castle in the town of Lucens; Museum exhibits.

10. Kovacic, Chuck. "A Journey to Reichenbach." Baker Street West 1 3, no. 1 (1997): 16-22.

11. Scott, Alistair. "On the trail of a super sleuth." Sunday Times (London), October 4, 1998: 5.

"Although not widely known among British skiers, the region of Meiringen-Hasliberg is beginning to gather a loyal following....A rather more arcane attraction of Meiringen is that it was the location Sir Arthur Conan Doyle chose for the death of his hero Sherlock Holmes. The old Anglican church here has now been turned into a Sherlock Holmes museum and an excursion can be made to the Reichenbach Falls, to see exactly where the famous sleuth died at the hands of his archenemy Moriarty...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- The Apocrypha (4)

1. Addy, John. "Two Lost Sherlockian Tales? An Examination of The Lost Special and The Man With the Watches." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 39-43.

2. Jones, Philip K. "Codes for the Apocrypha and The Untold Tales." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 103-104.

3. Lithner, Klas. "How Jack the Ripper Was Caught--A Sherlockian Apocrypha in Swedish." Shoso-In Bulletin 3, no. (1993): 12-14.

4. Scheetz, George H. "Sherlock Holmes (Book)." Library Journal 106, no. 3 (1981): 354.

Reviews the book 'Sherlock Holmes: The Published Apocrypha,' by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and others.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- The Strand Magazine (7)

1. "The case of the immortal detective." Economist 333, no. 7895 (1994): 107-108.

Tells of the 'Strand,' a magazine published in Britain from 1891 to 1950. Some of the authors who appeared in it, including Arthur Conan Doyle; Some of the illustrators, including Sidney Paget; Obsequious treatment accorded to royalty; Lack of coverage of current affairs, except for politics.

2. Beare, Geraldine. "The Strand Magazine - 1891-1950." Imaginative Book Illustration Society Newsletter, no.9, suppl, no. 9 (1998): 31-33.

A history of 'The Strand Magazine', a literary and general interest magazine published by George Newnes which made its first appearance in January 1891 and ran for nearly sixty years, being absorbed into 'Men Only' in 1950. The author discusses the writers and illustrators whose work was published in the magazine. Authors who wrote for 'The Strand' included Conan Doyle, E.W. Raffles, P.G. Wodehouse, H.G. Wells, John Buchan and Agatha Christie. Among the many illustrators whose work featured in the pages of the magazine were Charles Pears, Frank Reynolds, W.H., Charles and T.H. Robinson, E.H. Shepard, Gordon Browne, Dudley Hardy, Edward Ardizzone, Mervyn Peake, Robin Jacques, Ronald Searle and John Farleigh.

3. Bergquist, John. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 2.

Discusses a letter in the December, 1901 issue of The Strand magazine (#132, Vol. 22, labeled "Grand Christmas Double Number") contained in the "Curiosities" section titled "Where Sherlock Holmes Died" dealing with the Reichenbach Falls (along with additional comment on Dr. Philip Hench's later interest in the Falls).

4. Jackson, Kate. "George Newnes and the new journalism in Britain, 1880-1910 : culture and profit." Aldershot; Burlington: Ashgate, 2001.

ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [279]-283) and index.; Machine generated contents note: Part I The New Journalism: A Liberal Profession or a Branch of -- Business? -- Introduction to Part I -- 1 Securing the Suffrage of the Crowd: Tit-Bitites and Millionaires: -- Tit-Bits (1881) and The Million (1892) -- 2 A National Institution: The Strand Magazine (1891) -- Part II Liberalism and Imperialism: Developing Formats -- and Expanding Horizons -- Introduction to Part II -- 3 A Bold Stroke of Mingled Business and Benevolence' -- The Westminster Gazette (1893) -- 4 Expanding Human ConsciousnessAcross the G0be: -- The Wide World Magazifne( - -898) -- Part III Speeialisation and Diversification: Targeting Niche -- Audiences and Exploiting a Segmented Market -- Introduction to Part III -- 5 Femininity, Consumption, Class and Culture in the Ladies' Paper: -- The Ladies' Field (1898) -- 6 Respectable Anxieties, Role-Models and Readers: -- The Captain (1899) -- Conclusion -- George Newnes: Biographical Summary -- Select Bibliography -- Index.

5. Jackson, Kate Helen. Culture and profit : George Newnes and the new journalism in Britain, 1880-1910, 1997.

ports. Bibliography: leaves 373-384.; Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Sydney, 1998.

6. Regan, Jim. "On the trail of the world's greatest consulting detective." Christian Science Monitor, December 28, 2005: 25.

"Stanford University has a New Year's gift for you - and not just some virtual keepsake that disappears as soon as you move on to the next website, but a real, physical collection that can, if you so desire, be delivered to your mailbox and enjoyed in the relaxed solitude of your offline time. The Discovering Sherlock Holmes project wants to acquaint (or reacquaint) you with the life and times of world's greatest consulting detective, and it's making that introduction with the help of a few century-old stories - online and on paper...."

7. Rose, Jonathan. "Was Capitalism Good for Victorian Literature?" Victorian Studies 46, no. 3 (2004): 489-501.

Reviews Literature, Money and the Market from Trollope to Amis, by Paul Delany; pp. iii + 243. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002, GBP44.00, $49.95; The House of Blackwood: Author-Publisher Relations in the Victorian Era, by David Finkelstein; pp. viii + 198. University Park: Penn State University Press, 2002, $55.00; Oscar Wilde's Profession: Writing and the Culture Industry in the Late Nineteenth Century, by Josephine M. Guy and Ian Small; pp. x + 314. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, GBP55.00, $85.00; George Newnes and the New Journalism in Britain, 1880-1910: Culture and Profit, by Kate Jackson; pp. xi + 293. Aldershot and Burlington: Ashgate, 2001, GBP47.50, $84.95; Macmillan: A Publishing Tradition, edited by Elizabeth James; pp. xxvii + 273. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002, GBP50.00, $69.95. Includes references to Doyle and Holmes. "...That last statistic should have been a warning to Blackwood's: it was relying too much on its backlist rather than actively seeking new talent. The firm passed up the chance to sign on Shaw, Thomas Hardy, Arthur Conan Doyle, H. G. Wells, and Robert Louis Stevenson--one of the most impressive streaks of missed opportunities in publishing history....Strand Magazine, Newnes's most famous periodical, has been written off as quintessentially middlebrow, and so it was. But middlebrow journals, far from marginalizing avant-garde culture, can serve the vital role of broadcasting that culture to a mass audience. As early as 1913, the Strand was explaining Sigmund Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) to suburbanites. The magazine pioneered innovative black-and-white illustration techniques, publishing artists such as Sidney Paget (the Sherlock Holmes mysteries) and H. R. Millar (Edith Nesbit's stories)...."

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Toasts (23)

1. Axford, W. Scott. "Toast for 'The Six Napoleons'." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 2 (2000): 8.

2. Beiman, Nancy. "Toast to Mrs. Hudson." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 2 (2000): 9.

3. Brown, Lloyd W., Jr. "A Toast Given at the Hansom Wheels." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 3 (2000): 30-31.

4. Bryan, Caroline, and David H Galerstein. A singular sense of humor a compilation of stuff and nonsense by and for Sherlockians. New York: Magico, 2002.

Contents: To Modern Men Be, Vinnie Starrett -- A gustatory frolic, Dorothy Belle Pollack -- A letter, Sherlock Holmes -- A quiz on the titles, John Bennett Shaw; A collection of toasts, papers, poems, and other items presented at various scion meetings, together with a few documents not generally available to the public, including correspondence between two U.S. Presidents and Edgar Smith, "Buttons" Secretary of the Baker Street Irregulars

5. Cavalluzzi, Carol. "Toast to Irene Adler." The Serpentine Muse 25, no. 4 (2009): 14.

6. Crelling, Jack. "A Canonical Toast." The Camden House Journal 15, no. 5 (1993): 2.

7. Dale, Doris. "Toast to Irene Adler." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 5 (1996): 2.

8. Dale, Richard. "Toast -- William Stuart Baring-Gould." The Camden House Journal 15, no. 10 (1993): 3.

9. Fish, Ronald E. "Toast to Mycroft Holmes." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 4 (2001): 20.

10. Heifetz, Carl L. "Toast to Dr. Watson." The Holmes & Watson Report 6, no. 4 (2002): 24-25.

11. ———. "A Toast to Murray, Watson's Courageous and Faithful Orderly." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 3 (2001): 20-21.

12. Izban, Donald B. "A Toast to Mrs. Hudson, or Mrs. Turner, or Both." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 37.

13. ———. "A Toast to The Maiwand Mule." Shoso-In Bulletin 7, no. (1997): 75.

14. ———. "A Toast to 'The Woman'." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 35.

15. Keefauver, Brad. "A Toast to William S. Baring-Gould." The Camden House Journal 17, no. 6 (1995): 2-3.

16. MacLachlan, Donald, Elliott M. Black, George A. Vanderburgh, Doug Elliott, Mark Hacksley, Rachel Alkally, and Rose Wilkins. "A Clinking of Toasts." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 6-10.

Presentation of "the third annual sampling of toasts from recent Sherlockian dinners from Montreal to Vancouver--and points south."

17. Risley, Randall. "Toast -- Arthur Conan Doyle." The Camden House Journal 15, no. 10 (1993): 2.

18. Skinion, Cathrine. "A Companionable Toast." The Camden House Journal 15, no. 5 (1993): 2.

19. ———. "A Toast to Mrs. Hudson." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 5 (1996): 3.

20. Skinion, Signe. "A Toast to Miss Irene Adler." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 5 (1996): 2.

21. Tinsley, Stan. "A Breakfast Toast: Mrs. Hudson." The Camden House Journal 15, no. 5 (1993): 3.

22. Vizoskie, Susan E. B. Teas and Toasts with the Three Garridebs. White Plains, NY: The Three Garridebs, 2001.

Scuttlebutt Feb 2002.; "With 65 pages of toasts and recipes, all nicely done, by members of The Three Garridebs, celebrating last years' 10th anniversary of the society's annual picnic and afternoon tea."

23. Zahray, Luci, Mary Erickson, and South Downers (Organization). Sherlockian toast: a compilation of toasts given by members and guests of The South Downers of Chicago. 1st ed. Crete, Ill: Homestead Press, 1994.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Transportation (1)

1. Brousch, John. "Ships Ahoy!--Vessels Within the Canon." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 1 (2001): 11-15.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Untold Tales (1)

1. Jones, Philip K. "Codes for the Apocrypha and The Untold Tales." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 103-104.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Untold Tales and Dr. Watson’s Tin Dispatch-Box (1)

1. Owen, Morris. "A Safe Affair: One of the cases of Sherlock Holmes Not hitherto related." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 69-76.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Untold Tales and Dr. Watson’s Tin Dispatch-Box -- Alicia (2)

1. Hall, John. "The disappearance of the Cutter Alicia." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 43-53.

2. ———. "The loss of the cutter 'Alicia'." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 19-22.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Untold Tales and Dr. Watson’s Tin Dispatch-Box -- James Phillimore (1)

1. Hall, John. "The disappearance of Mr. James Phillimore." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 19-28.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Weapons (Guns, Firearms, Knives, etc.) (5)

1. Bensley, D. F. "A Question of Ballistics?" Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 173-78.

Presents some observations on Holmes' interest in firearms, munitions, and marksmanship as related in a number of the tales and during the time of the Great Hiatus.

2. McGinley, E. W. An illustrated monograph on the use of firearms in the adventures of Sherlock Holmes: being a treatise on the development of firearms and their application in the canon. New York: Mycroft Holmes Society, 1994.

3. ———. An illustrated monograph on the use of firearms in the adventures of Sherlock Holmes: being a treatise on the development of firearms and their application in the canon. 2nd rev ed. New York: Mycroft Holmes Society Press, 2002.

4. Murphy Jr, John F. "For 60 years the dependable Webley revolver was the British officer's strong right arm." Military History 20, no. 3 (2003): 24.

Focuses on revolvers from Webley Co. used by British armed servicemen since 1854. Story about former Prime Minister Winston Churchill's experiences with the revolver in the Indian frontier; Design of the Webley RIC model in 1883; Information on Webley automatic pistols. Includes a passing reference to Doyle and Holmes. "...In 1883, Webley brought out an even shorter variant of the RIC model, with a 2 1/2-inch barrel. This was issued to London's Metropolitan Police, headquartered at Scotland Yard, in .45 and later in .32 and .38 calibers. Called the Bulldog, the Metropolitan Police Webley gained immortality in detective fiction as the gun of choice of Arthur Conan Doyle's heroes, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson, as well as their police ally, Inspector Lestrade...."

5. Petkus, Donald A. "Bull Pups, Bulldogs and Annie Oakley: a re-examination of dogs and firearms in the Canon." Baker Street West 1 9, no. 1 (2003): 26-35.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Weddings (1)

1. Chapman, Paul M. "'I Really Cannot Congratulate You': Weddings in the Canon." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 8-14.

06F Writings About the Writings -- Other Subjects -- Wine (1)

1. Klinger, Leslie S. "Some Canonical Observations on Wine." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 109-113.

The author throws some additional light on the subject of wine, as found in two tales: The Abbey Grange and A Case of Identity.

06F Writings About the Writings –- Other Subjects -- Food and Drink (1)

1. Sonnenschmidt, Frederic H. Tastes and tales of a chef : stories and recipes. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2004.

ill. ; 24 cm. One roast beef...how Sherlock Holmes and a roast beef sandwich were responsible for me becoming an American -- Sherlock Holmes, Mrs. Hudson, and the Hudson Valley. Includes index. Scuttlebutt Oct 2003.; "Fritz presided over all of the delightful Sherlockian dinners at the Culinary Institute of America, and is shown on the cover as a Sherlockian chef, and does not neglect Sherlock Holmes in his stories."



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson

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