07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians (40)

1. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 7.

Highlights recent acquisitions from David Hammer, Ted Friedman, J. Randolph Cox, John and Inez Bergquist, and Hugo Koch. Includes photographs of Richard Sveum with Ted Friedman, John Bergquist with Tim Johnson and Michael Meer, and Ted Friedman's stamp moulage.

2. "ALA conference preview. (Cover story)." American Libraries 29, no. 4 (1998): 106.

Presents information on the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference in Washington, D.C. from June 25 to July 1, 1998. Includes "Sherlock Holmes In Washington." Peter E. Blau of The Red Circle of Washington and the infamous "Black Peter" of the Baker Street Irregulars, will be our host for Sherlockian presentation toasts, and canonical discussion at the National Press Club on the 13th floor of the National Press Building. Speakers: Gayle T. Harris, past-pres., libn., Lib. of Congress, "Skeletons in the Stacks"; Peter E. Blau, "Insights and Revelations on the World of Sherlockian Scholarship and Conviviality"; Francine Morris Swift, sr. surviving member of Sublibns., member, Baker Street Irregulars, Sherlock Holmes Society of London, "The Good Old Days of the Sublibrarians Scion."

3. "Foth revisited (2) Who Was Who at Footprints of the Hound." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 4 (2002): 28-30.

4. "From the Editor's Commonplace Book." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 127.

Peter Blau's report on Doyle manuscripts offered at Sotheby's, The Scowrers and Molly Maguires Third International Seminar, the passing of Patsy Dalton, and The Watsonian Weekend III.

5. "Meet the Editorial Board." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 6.

Presents short biographical profiles of the editorial board of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections newsletter: Julie McKuras, Bruce E. Southworth, and Richard J. Sveum.

6. "Photomontage I. Birthday 2001." The Serpentine Muse 17, no. 2 (2001): 6-7.

7. "Photomontage II. Bash 2001." The Serpentine Muse 17, no. 2 (2001): 10.

8. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 12.

List of donors who made contributions in memory or honor of a special individual. Includes a photograph of Peter Blau, E. W. McDiarmid and Mike Whelan and another of three of the founders of the Norwegian Explorers: E. W. Ziebarth, Mac McDiarmid, and Bryce Crawford.

9. "Top 100 Sherlockian Writers of All Time." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 7 (1998): 3-5.

10. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 8.

Notes work by Courtney Andersen and tours of the Collections during the opening festivities. Includes a photograph of Tim Johnson, Phil Bergem, John Bergquist, and Pj Doyle.

11. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 5.

Notes recent visits to the Collections by Catherine Cooke, Susan Dahlinger, and Randall Stock

12. "Who Was Who at ACD@35." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 3 (2007): 50-51.

13. Aiken, Bruce. "Letter to the Editor: Hono(u)r Among Sherlockians." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 5.

14. Blau, Peter E. "Letter to the Editor, 'Where were Edmonton Sherlockians?'." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 4 (1997): 33.

15. Campbell, Mary, and Bob Coghill. "Footprints of FOTH, A Reminiscence." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 2 (2001): 4-12.

16. Cochran, William R. "The Editor's Gas-lamp." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 5-6.

Comments on Sherlockians "of the first order--one who was fond of socializing with literary types," "of the second order--one who exhibits total devotion to the cause," and "of the third order" of "often think of themselves as non-Sherlockians" who were all present in New York for the 60th anniversary gathering.

17. ———. "From the Editor's Commonplace Book." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 62-63.

On the demise of the periodical Baker Street Miscellanea, Julie and Al Rosenblatt's 4-day mini-course on Holmes at Vassar College, an article in MHQ by Thaddeus Holt, the Folio Society's version of the Canon, the 25th anniversary of the Noble Bachelors of St. Louis, the Sherlock Holmes Society of London's "Back to Baker Street" festival, and the Books of Michael Harrison.

18. Coghill, Bob. "Remembering Mary in Manhattan." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 3 (2006): 32-33.

19. De Waal, Ronald B. "Acceptance Speech in Absentia." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 3 (1995): 31.

20. Doyle, Arthur Conan, Christopher Roden, and Barbara Roden. The captain of the 'Pole-Star' : weird and imaginative fiction. Ashcroft, B.C.: Ash-Tree Press, 2004.

port. ; 24 cm. The haunted grange of Goresthorpe -- The American's tale -- The captain of the 'Pole-Star' -- The winning shot -- The silver hatchet -- Selecting a ghost -- J. Habakuk Jephson's statement -- The blood-stone tragedy -- John Barrington Cowles -- The Great Keinplatz experiment -- Cyprian Overbeck Wells -- The ring of Thoth -- A pastoral horror -- The speckled band -- 'De Profundis' -- Lot No. 249 -- The Los Amigos fiasco -- The case of lady Sannox -- The lord of Chateau Noir -- The parasite -- The striped chest -- The fiend of the cooperage -- The new catacomb -- The sealed room -- The retirement of Signor Lambert -- The Brazilian cat -- The brown hand -- Playing with fire -- The legent of the hound of the Baskervilles -- The leather funnel -- The silver mirror -- The terror of Blue John Gap -- The blighting of Sharkey -- Through the veil -- How it happened -- The horror of the Heights -- The bully of Brocas Court -- The lift. Includes bibliographical references (p. 459-460). Edited, with an introduction by Christopher Roden and Barbara Roden ; and with a preface by Michael Dirda.;

21. Doyle, Dame Jean Conan et al. "Anniversary greetings, Messages of congratulation from an array of Sherlockians." The Musgrave Papers, no. 10 (1997): 7-15.

22. Doyle, Pj. "Joe Connors' Crowded Box Room." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 7.

Observations on Joe Connors, member of the Norwegian Explorers, and his recollections of Gillette's performance of "Sherlock Holmes" in 1932 at the Metropolitan Theater in Minneapolis.

23. Fitzgerald, Penelope. The Knox brothers : Edmund 1881-1971, Dillwyn 1884-1943, Wilfred 1886-1950, Ronald 1888-1957. London: Flamingo, 2002.

20 cm. Previous ed.: London: Harvill, 1991. Includes bibliographical references and index. With an introduction by Richard Holmes.; Penelope Fitzgerald "was the daughter and niece of two greats in the Sherlockian world: her father was E. V. Knox, who used the pen-name 'Evoe' when he edited Punch in the years when it published much excellent Sherlockian material, and one of her uncles was Ronald Knox, who invented the grand game so many Sherlockians play (her other uncles were Dillwyn, a classical scholar and a noted code-breaker in both World Wars, and Wilfred, an Anglo-Catholic priest and teacher)."

24. ———. The Knox brothers : Edmund, 1881-1971, Dillwyn, 1884-1943, Wilfred, 1886-1950, Ronald, 1888-1957. New , corr. and reset. ed. Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 2000.

24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [271]-273) and index.; Penelope Fitzgerald "was the daughter and niece of two greats in the Sherlockian world: her father was E. V. Knox, who used the pen-name 'Evoe' when he edited Punch in the years when it published much excellent Sherlockian material, and one of her uncles was Ronald Knox, who invented the grand game so many Sherlockians play (her other uncles were Dillwyn, a classical scholar and a noted code-breaker in both World Wars, and Wilfred, an Anglo-Catholic priest and teacher)."

25. Halewood, Michael H. "The Adventures of a Maniac Collector." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 54-59.

26. Higashiyama, Akane. "Japanese Sherlockians in 2000." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 217-218.

27. Hirayama, Yuichi. "Tom, the 'Tai-jin' Sherlockian." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 240-242.

28. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Good for the Cause: Sherlockians in the Newspapers by Karen Murdock." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 1 (2004): 32.

29. Johnson, Timothy J. "Meet the new Curator of Special Collections: Timothy Johnson." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 1-2-4.

Introductory essay by the new curator of the Sherlock Holmes Collections. Includes a photograph of Tim Johnson and Mike Whelan, head of the Baker Street Irregulars.

30. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 5.

A report from the curator on a non-Sherlockian matter: his appointment to the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress (which will also provide opportunities to meet with Sherlockians in the Washington, DC area).

31. Kolodrubec, Alex. "My First encounter with Mr. Holmes." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 7-10.

32. Lesh, Richard D. "Basil Rathbone's 3-Day Visit to the Wayne Campus." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 40-42.

33. Pelle-Douel, Christilla, and Jean-Pierre Cagnat. "French Sherlockians Visit Japan." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 99-100.

34. Redmond, Christopher. "Letter to the Editor, 'Canuck Sherlockians circa 1939'." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 3 (2001): 44.

35. ———. "Tiptoes! Tiptoes." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 25-26.

The author's trans-Canada trip continues.

36. ———. "Tiptoes! Tiptoes!" Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 28-29.

Musings and Sherlockian observations during a trip on the Trans-Canada highway.

37. Sawisch, Bill, and Sally Behary. "2003 Baskerville Bash -- A Rousing Success?" The Serpentine Muse 19, no. 2 (2003): 8-10.

38. Silverstein, Albert. "Sherlock Holmes, Jews and Rhode Island." Rhode Island Jewish Historical Notes 14, no. 2 (2004): 336-352.

The author, a psychologist and professor at the University of Rhode Island, describes his own and others' 20th-century studies of Sherlock Holmes, the detective character created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The article considers Rhode Island's Sherlock Holmes societies and examines both specific references to Jews in the Holmes canon and evidence of Doyle's attitudes toward victims of persecution.

39. Vizoskie, Susan E. B., and Ben Vizoskie. Sherlockians Abroad: Their Adventures at and Memoirs of the Return of Sherlock Holmes Statue Festival. White Plains, NY: The Three Garridebs, 2000.

Scuttlebutt Feb 2000; "Collected and edited by Susan E. B. Vizoskie, with photographs by Ben Vizoskie. Offers 71 pages of reminiscences by 32 of the participants."

40. Webb, Keith E. Sherlock Holmes in Japan. 1st ed. Bellvue, WA: Keith E. Weeb, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 50-51); "Keith E. Webb has lived in Japan since 1991, and he is one of the founders of The Japanese Cabinet and editor of The Dispatch Box (the only English-language newsletter about Sherlockians in Japan). The 52-page pamphlet has thirteen interesting articles on Japanese Sherlockians and Sherlockiana."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- A (2)

1. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Bruce D. Aikin." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 1 (1993): 30-31.

2. ———. "Strictly Personal: Mark Alberstat." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 1 (1994): 34.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Asimov, Isaac (3)

1. DeAngelo, Carol. "Adult books for young adults: Fiction." School Library Journal 44, no. 6 (1998): 175.

Reviews the book 'Time Machines: The Best Time Travel Stories Ever Written,' edited by Bill Adler. Includes a passing reference to Holmes. "Even readers who generally avoid science fiction can find something enjoyable in this anthology. The 22 stories represent a wide range of authors and time periods. Edgar Allan Poe, Rudyard Kipling, Issac Asimov, Rod Serling, Ray Bradbury, Connie Willis, and Robert Sawyer are among the writers included. The quality of the stories is exceptional; each tale is a thought-provoking experience. From the transportation of Sherlock Holmes to the 21st century to solve an enigma, to a time traveler who refuses to die, to a graduate history student doing his practicum in World War II London, all of the stories are readable, enjoyable, and stimulating...."

2. LaBounty, David. "The Origins of Inspiration: Winwood Reade's Role in the Foundation of Isaac Asimov's Psychohistory." Extrapolation (Kent State University Press) 39, no. 4 (1998): 364-372.

Traces the origins of Isaac Asimov's invented science of psychohistory in his science fiction series about the Galactic Empire. Possibility of mathematician Winwood Reade's influence through the writings of H.G. Wells and Arthur Conan Doyle; Reade's ideas in his book 'The Martyrdom of Man'; Asimov's interest in the works of Doyle and Wells.

3. McCallister, David R. "Sherlock Holmes and Hari Seldon: Canonical Antecedents of Asimov's Theory of Psychohistory." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 45, no. 3 (1995): 162-166.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- B (11)

1. "Passings Syd Goldberg, John J. Brousch, Donald O'Connor." Baker Street West 1 9, no. 2 (2003): 46.

2. De Waal, Ronald B. "Pages from the Journal of Ronald B. De Waal. Peter E. Blau in Town for Geology and Sherlock Holmes Meetings May 12-14, 2003." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 98-99, 118.

3. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Carol Ball." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 1 (2006): 43-44.

4. ———. "Strictly Personal: Craig Brtnik." Canadian Holmes 28, no. 2 (2004): 27.

5. ———. "Strictly Personal: Joanne Bamford." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 2 (1993): 29-30.

6. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "Lionel William Bailey (1913-2003)." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 26, no. 3 (2003): 102.

7. McKuras, Julie. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 4.

Notes the arrival of the Eve Titus manuscript archive, her current illness, and her contributions to the article about this acquisition. Also noted are other articles in the newsletter relating to Theodore Blegen, the Reichenbach Falls, and the passing of Sherlockian Wayne Swift.

8. Southworth, Bruce E. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 4.

Highlights articles in the present issue and also notes Peter Blau's discovery that Tsar Nicholas II, while in captivity with his family in Tsarkoe Selo, read The Valley of Fear.

9. Sveum, Richard J. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 3.

Discusses the 1951 book The Crowded Box-Room; the author, Theodore Blegen; and the printer, Emerson Wulling. "In 1951 there appeared a small book in blue wrapper with a silhouette of Sherlock Holmes on the cover. It was titled The Crowded Box-Room, Sherlock Holmes as Poet by Theodore C. Blegen, Charter Member of the Norwegian Explorers: Minneapolis and Saint Paul Chapter of the Baker Street Irregulars....This book was the first of many fine press publications written by the members of the Norwegian Explorers and printed by Emerson G. Wulling and his Sumac Press...." Includes a photograph of Blegen, Harry Truman, and Hubert Humphrey.

10. Thomalen, Robert E., Howard Brody, and William Hyder. "'Stand with me here upon the terrace...'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 188-189.

Obituaries for Robert N. Brodie, Ralph F. Turner, and R. Irving Paxton.

11. Utecht, Thom. "Stand With Me Here Upon the Terrace, Robert N. Brodie." The Serpentine Muse 12, no. 3 (1993): 8.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Baring-Gould, William S. (6)

1. Dalrymple, Theodore. "Holmes and his commentators." The New Criterion 24, no. 3 (2005): 4-8.

Avid Sherlock Holmes fan Theodore Dalrymple takes issue with the annotations in three canonical editions of Arthur Conan Doyle's work. The three are William S. Baring-Gould's of 1967; the Oxford Sherlock Holmes of 1993; and the just published The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels, edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

2. Fuller, Graham. "The Game's Afoot: Dr. Watson gives his verdict on a must-have Sherlock Holmes edition." Daily News (New York), January 9, 2005: 19.

Review of Les Klinger's The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes. "...That quibble aside, I am led to believe this is the most important edition dedicated to our collaboration since William S. Baring-Gould's 'The Annotated Sherlock Holmes' of 1967. Reading the stories again, I conclude that, above and beyond their enormous criminological value, they paint an extraordinarily rich picture of the Victorian and Edwardian eras, a notion enhanced by the copious photographs and amusing illustrations by Mr. Paget and others. (The cinematic 'stills' will indubitably annoy you.)..."

3. Hall, John. "Review--'From Baltimore to Baker Street' by William Hyder." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 72-79.

"A past Gasogene of The Six Napoleons of Baltimore offers Sherlockian essays and dramatic readings that combine erudition with humour - and occasionally challenge such revered scholars as Vincent Starrett, Michael Harrison, and William S. Baring-Gould."

4. Hickling, Alfred. "Saturday Review: A four-pipe poseur: Alfred Hickling on the definitive guide to Holmes: The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes edited by Leslie S Klinger 1,878pp, Norton, GBP35." The Guardian (London), December 4, 2004: 9.

"Ever since Holmes made his debut in Arthur Conan Doyle's novel A Study in Scarlet in 1887, there has been no shortage of bizarre theories to explain the perplexing inconsistencies of the detective's career. Did he tumble to his death at the Reichenbach Falls? Where was he educated? Did he know Freud? And just how many wives had Dr Watson? These are questions that have tickled the imaginations of Holmes addicts since approximately 1911, when the the first piece of Sherlockian scholarship was published by Father Ronald Knox, who proposed to apply the detective's own methods of deduction to the narrative....A small army of narrative sleuths has been sifting through the canon ever since, on the basis that there is nothing scholars love more than a giant, contradictory codex in which nothing adds up. The first notable attempt to present an overall digest of Sherlockian suppositions came with the publication of William S Baring-Gould's monumental Annotated Sherlock Holmes in 1967, which is still considered to be the standard work of reference. A more recent milestone was reached with the 1993 publication of the Oxford Sherlock Holmes , the most authoritative modern edition of the texts, though its editor, Owen Dudley Edwards, insists on regarding the stories as fictions created by Conan Doyle, a position that makes him, in the eyes of certain Sherlockians, a bit of a killjoy. Leslie S Klinger's enormous New Annotated Sherlock Holmes now arrives to remedy that position.

5. Keefauver, Brad. "A Toast to William S. Baring-Gould." The Camden House Journal 17, no. 6 (1995): 2-3.

6. Whittington-Egan, Richard. "Living with and Annotating Sherlock Holmes." Contemporary Review 286, no. 1669 (2005): 95-101.

This article focuses on a fictitious character [sic], Sherlock Homes, with reference to the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," edited with a foreword and notes by Leslie S. Klinger. The book consists of two volumes and it is a collection of 56 short stories. The original edition of this books was edited by William S. Baring-Gould. In the original (1968) edition, Baring-Gould elected to go nap on his own personal and controversial concept of the chronology of the stories, Klinger decided to relegate all such data to a most useful Chronological Table at the end of Volume One. Something in the region of two thousand annotations are scattered broadcast throughout the book, lifting the curtain on the modes, manners and events of Victorian England, and ventilating, and where necessary explaining, Sherlockian theoretical constructs past and present.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Briggs, Gray Chandler (1)

1. Starrett, Vincent, John Nieminski, Jon L. Lellenberg, Gray Chandler Briggs, and Baker Street Irregulars. "Dear Starrett--", "Dear Briggs--" a compendium of correspondence between Vincent Starrett and Gray Chandler Briggs (1930-1934) together with various appendices, notes, and embellishments. 1st. ed, (BSI archival series). New York: The Baker Street Irregulars. distributed by Fordham University Press, 1989.

LC Control Number: 89085491. Includes bibliographical references and index. Citations: De Waal C14941;

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- C (9)

1. "Obituaries Richard Lancelyn Green and Steve Clarkson." Baker Street West 1 10, no. 2 (2004): inside rear cover.

2. "Professor Richard Chorley." The Times (London), July 19, 2002: 32.

"Bill Bailey writes: As a loyal Fellow, and former Vice Master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, Professor Richard Chorley (obituary, June 24) achieved further distinction by exploring the possible undergraduate career of Sherlock Holmes at Cambridge. The results of his study are published in his pamphlet, Sherlock Holmes at Sidney Sussex College 1871-1873. An Imaginative Reconstruction. This research extended the original proposition by Dorothy L. Sayers that 'of all the Cambridge colleges, Sidney Sussex perhaps offered the greatest number of advantages to a man in Holmes's position and, in default of more exact information, we may tentatively place him there'. The improbable project to which you refer, whereby Professor Chorley dispatched a housebrick (known affectionately as 'Dick's Brick') to Japan, is embedded in college folklore. This eccentric act of generosity arose from a request from the World Brick Museum in Maizuru, Japan, for an artefact for a special theme on 'The Bricks of Great Britain and Sherlock Holmes'. Professor Chorley responded by sending the housebrick by special delivery. It was subsequently included in an exhibition where Holmes featured as an eminent Victorian...."

3. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Cheryl Madeline Conway." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 1 (1995): 48-49.

4. ———. "Strictly Personal: Joseph A. Coppola." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 2 (1998): 40-41.

5. Gil, Olga et al. "In Memoriam: Anne Skene Melvin, Mary Campbell, Stephen R. Tolins, Robin W. Links, Kathleen Morrison, and Frank Darlington." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 20-27.

6. Green, Maureen, and Kate Karlson. "In Memoriam: Mary E. Campbell and Ann Skene Melvin." The Serpentine Muse 19, no. 3 (2003): 7-9.

7. McKuras, Julie. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 3.

Provides some background and information on Jay Finley Christ and his 1950 publication "The Missing Three." It was printed in a small 4-page pamphlet titled Christmas 1950, and published by Christ’s own Fanlight Press. Includes a photograh of Jay Finley Christ.

8. ———. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 8.

Reports on the tour given to Paul Smedegaard and Ed Christenson, from Wisconsin, during their attendance at the annual meeting of the Friends. Includes a photograph.

9. Seil, William. "Will Crakes--Sherlockian Collector." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 7.

A tribute to Will Crakes of Seattle.

07A Sherlockians and The Societies -- Sherlockians -- Carr, John Dickson (1)

1. Greene, Douglas G. John Dickson Carr the man who explained miracles. New York: Otto Penzler, 1995.

LC Control Number: 94023283. Includes bibliographical references (p. [494]-523) and index; "A delightful biography of a splendid writer. "The Man Who Explained Miracles" was the title chosen by Fred Dannay for one of Carr's short stories, but it's also an apt description of the master of the "impossible mystery" genre. Carr is possibly most familiar to Sherlockians for his excellent biography of Conan Doyle, and his work with Adrian Conan Doyle on some of the pastiches that were published as The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes, but he also wrote radio adaptations of "The Lost World" and "The Speckled Band" for the BBC, and two amusing Sherlockian parody-playlets performed at the annual dinners of the Mystery Writers of America. He succeeded in creating four successful series detectives, and Greene has done a fine job of describing the man who could perform that sort of miracle."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Crawford, Bryce (1)

1. The pipe dream continues-- Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota. Edina, MN: Salamander Co., 1998. Visual Material 1 videocassette (59 min.).

sd., col. ; 1/2 in. VHS format. "An irregular look at Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota"--Container. Written and directed by Rolf J. Canton.; "Salutes the 50th anniversary of the Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota ... Interviews of the four living founders [E.W. McDiarmid, Bryce Crawford, E.W. Ziebarth, and Ray Shove] and several other members are intercut with a dramatization of an older Holmes and Watson preparing to visit Minneapolis, Minnesota, for the anniversary conference"--Container.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- D (5)

1. "In Memoriam Dr. Tom Draisey." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 1 (2006): 44.

2. Charnock, Ian A. "Concerning Mr. D. Martin Dakin: Being a Reprint from the Reminiscences of Ian A. Charnock, B.A., etc." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 21-23.

3. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: David Patrick Drennan." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 34-35.

Brief biographical sketch of Dave Dunn.

4. ———. "Strictly Personal: Gordon Dawe." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 4 (1995): 40-41.

5. Gil, Olga et al. "In Memoriam: Anne Skene Melvin, Mary Campbell, Stephen R. Tolins, Robin W. Links, Kathleen Morrison, and Frank Darlington." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 20-27.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Dalton, Patsy (4)

1. "From the Editor's Commonplace Book." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 127.

Peter Blau's report on Doyle manuscripts offered at Sotheby's, The Scowrers and Molly Maguires Third International Seminar, the passing of Patsy Dalton, and The Watsonian Weekend III.

2. "Obituary of Patsy Dalton." The Daily Telegraph (London), May 3, 1994: 23.

"...The most celebrated recreation was at the Reichenbach Falls in 1968, when, watched by a large crowd of bemused Swiss, the society staged the desperate struggle between Holmes and Moriarty (played by Lord Gore-Booth and Charles Scholefield, QC, respectively). Her editor, Barbi Boxall, recognised her qualities, and Dalton quickly became an associate editor, deputising for Boxall, who appreciated her eye for detail. Dalton stayed on for more than a decade and continued to work part-time until her retirement. Dalton was infuriated when rheumatoid arthritis confined her to a wheelchair. She hated to be thought an invalid and was as active as her painful debility permitted. At the time of her death she was planning a trip to Madeira...."

3. Bruxner, Pamela. "Obituary: Patsy Dalton." The Guardian (London), May 10, 1994: 19.

"Patsy Dalton, first woman to chair the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, has died aged 75. She was a journalist and writer of short stories who began her working life as a film continuity girl before joining the Daily Sketch and eventually becoming associate editor of Woman. Although her professional life was successful and satisfying, much of her energy in later years was devoted to the Sherlock Holmes Society of London which she joined with her husband Pip in 1952 shortly after its formation. They were in their element...."

4. Porter, Philip. "Obituary: Patsy Dalton." The Independent (London), Jun 4, 1994: 1; Gazzette p. 45.

Patricia Louise Brougham, journalist: born London 25 January 1919; chairman, Sherlock Holmes Society of London 1981-84; married 1948 Pip Dalton (died 1981); died 6 April 1994. The unique atmosphere of the society had much to do with the Daltons, who successively held a number of posts in it. When the society made its pilgrimages to Switzerland, which it did on five occasions, the first being in 1968, members traditionally took a Holmesian role and spent the entire trip in costume. With her splendid Victorian dresses and wonderful hats, Patsy Dalton set high standards of style and period accuracy. She was at home either as Holmes's faithful housekeeper Mrs Hudson, or more latterly as the graceful, aristocratic Duchess of Holderness. When the Duchess donned her Victorian swimming costume to take the waters at Leukerbad, she still wore her tiara. Like most members, she never took herself too seriously.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Dannay, Frederic (1)

1. Queen, Ellery. The Tragedy of Errors and Others : with essays and tributes to recognize Ellery Queen's seventieth anniversary. 1st ed. Norfolk, Va.: Crippen & Landru Publishers, 1999.

ill. ; 24 cm. "Accompanying each copy is a separately printed pamphlet, reproducing original manuscript and typescript pages, in reduced size, of The Tragedy of Errors [17 p. ; 23 cm.]"--P. [1]. Scuttlebutt Nov 1999; "The first new Ellery Queen book in almost 30 years, Doug Greene has reported, offering a long and detailed plot outline for the last (and unpublished) Ellery Queen novel, six hitherto uncollected EQ short stories, and a section of reminiscences written by family, friends, and others (one of whom is Bill Vande Water, who has contributed an essay on 'Frederic Dannay, BSI')."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Davies, David Stuart (16)

1. "Classic Returns." Library Journal 132, no. 17 (2007): 104-104.

Short review of Davies, David Stuart. Starring Sherlock Holmes. 208p. ISBN 978-1-84576-537-8. Hearn, Marcus & Alan Barnes. The Hammer Story: The Authorised History of Hammer Films. 192p. ISBN 978-1-84576-185-1. ea. vol: Titan. Oct. 2007. illus. filmog. $35.

2. "The First Shoso-in Bulletin Award is Presented to Starring Sherlock Holmes by David Stuart Davies." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 8.

3. "The Inaugural Shoso-in Bulletin Award 2002 to David Stuart Davies for Starring Sherlock Holmes." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 6.

4. "The most complex case for Sherlock; coffee break Preview Sherlock Holmes Torch Theatre, Milford Haven." The Western Mail, October 1, 2008: 26.

"One of the world's greatest fictional detectives confronts the most complex case of all - his own psyche - in a new Sherlock Holmes production which comes to Wales this week. In this staged fantasy based on fiction, Arthur Conan Doyle tires of his famous sleuth and creates arch-villain Professor Moriarty to dispose of him....Funny, engaging and dark, this tale of murder, mystery and the occult is a play which is packed with ideas - and it's also the perfect form of entertainment....The play features Roger Llewellyn as Holmes....Following his international success in Sherlock Holmes...The Last Act, the new play has been created and directed by the renowned author David Stuart Davies, directed by Gareth Armstrong and it features original music from the Royal Shakespeare Company's composer Simon Slater."

5. "Spooky tale of supersleuth Sherlock." Daily Post (Liverpool), January 23, 2009: 21.

"The character of Sherlock Holmes is the main talking point in a spinetingling new drama about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great detective. The man in the deerstalker is played by Roger Llewellyn in Sherlock Holmes...the Death and Life. In this story at Theatr Colwyn, the supersleuth is becoming somewhat arrogant and so malevolent Moriarty is brought in to take him on. But Doyle's dangerous strategy, combined with his passion for raising the spirits of the dead, has rather more surreal and dramatic consequences than he bargains for....The new play, written by David Stuart Davies and directed by Gareth Armstrong, is billed as a fantasy based on a fiction. Davies, a playwright and author, specialises in adaptations of the Conan Doyle canon. And there's original music by Simon Slater. Sherlock Holmes...the Death and Life, Theatr Colwyn, Colwyn Bay, Wednesday, February 4, 7.30pm."

6. Booth, Matthew. "Review--The Scroll of the Dead: A Sherlock Holmes Adventure by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 64-65.

7. ———. "Review--The Shadow of the Rat by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 62-64.

8. Chadwick, Peter. "Review--'Sherlock Holmes: The Last Act' by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 56-58.

9. Clarke, Roger. "Reviews: Llewellyn's excellent role is elementary; Sherlock Holmes...The Death and Life, Lichfield Garrick Theatre." Birmingham Evening Mail, February 13, 2009: 83.

"Roger Llewellyn produces an acting masterclass in this sequel to his first venture into Holmes' world. Sherlock Holmes ... the last act, written like the new production by David Stuart Davies, has been touring the world since 1999 and with Holmes killed off and resurrected the new production could be following in its footsteps. Llewellyn, on stage alone for the best part of an hour-and-a-half, plays ten characters living a conflict between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the creation he has come to hate, Sherlock Holmes. Into the mix comes Prof James Moriarty, arch villain of his age destined to kill the finest detective of his generation - until the characters develop a mind of their own. The play examines Doyle's frustration at the lack of success of his historical novels, his passion for spiritualism, his letters to his mother, his father's incarceration in an asylum and his relationship with Holmes. It is a test of the actor's art which Llewellyn passes with distinction."

10. Donnelly, Pat. "Sherlock Holmes's finest hour." The Gazette (Montreal), June 5, 2000: B4.

"You don't have to be a card-carrying member of a Sherlock Holmes club to enjoy Sherlock Holmes...the Last Act!, a one-man show starring Roger Llewellyn, which has just dropped into Centaur Theatre...."

11. Hall, John. "Review--'Bending the Willow: Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes' by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 18 (1996): 65-70.

12. Key, Philip. "The return of . . . The Return of Sherlock Holmes ; 08 Culture Diary." Daily Post (Liverpool), September 23, 2008: 16.

"One-man play The Death and Life of Sherlock Holmes comes to the region tomorrow night as part of the Sefton Celebrates Writing Festival. Renowned actor Roger Llewellyn reprises the role of the famous detective - and several more roles besides - after the first outing proved so successful...."

13. Leland, Mary. "Review." The Irish Times, March 23, 2006: 2.

Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act! at the Everyman Palace in Cork. "An actor completely in charge of his material, his stage and his own artistry, Roger Llewellyn invests his performance in Sherlock Holmes - The Last Act! with all the tension achieved by Conan Doyle at his best. Written by David Stuart Davies and unfolding in the measured sequences of classic detective fiction, the play is, of course, a brilliant opportunity for any actor with the intelligence to grasp its rhythms and to peel away the sometimes pompous layers of the eponymous hero and reveal the passionate, lonely personality underneath....Presented by Jay Productions in association with the Salisbury Playhouse, the piece is, in fact, something of an exercise in detection in itself, but one of great style and subtlety. This is Holmes in 1916, mourning his colleague Watson whom he is at last able to acknowledge as a dear friend, and re-working through his tribute a series of plots and characters with which both have been memorably associated. It is a fiction upon a fiction, and held its audience captivated through two acts of 45 minutes each....Music by Simon Slater and lighting by Peter Hunter are threaded through Gareth Armstrong's direction in a presentation in which the few props are employed so skilfully that the bravura touches here and there are accents rather than declarations, commas rather than exclamation marks. This is a production which has been touring in England, Europe and America, yet there is nothing stale about it. The playwright - a Conan Doyle enthusiast - seasons his script with implied acknowledgements of contemporary approaches, but both the writing and the performance achieve an almost old-fashioned - and certainly rare - symmetry of excellence and entertainment."

14. Masters, Rosalind. "Review--'The Annals of Skelington Bones: the Case of the Phantom Paperhanger of Bug Hare Hall' by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 16 (1995): 60.

15. Michael, Patrick. "Review--'Starring Sherlock Holmes' by David Stuart Davies." The Ritual, no. 28 (2001): 57-58.

16. Sampson, Benjamin W. "Season preview 2002-03. (Cover story)." American Theatre 19, no. 8 (2002): 43.

Presents a list of theatrical productions at Theatre Communications Group theaters across the U.S. for the 2002-03 season. Includes Holmes and Doyle listings. Apple Tree Theater, Highland Park, Illinois: The Sign of Four, adapt: D. Shanghai Low from Arthur Conan Doyle; dir: Steve Pickering. Jun 18-Jul 20.; The Kavinoky Theatre, Buffalo, New York: Sherlock Holmes...the last act, adapt: David Stuart Davies from Arthur Conan Doyle; dir: Gareth Armstrong. Jan 9-Feb 9.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- De Waal, Ronald B. (8)

1. "Book Review--Ron de Waal's TUSH." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 76 (1994): 51.

Review of The Universal Sherlock Holmes bibliography.

2. "Ronald De Waal signing galley proofs [photograph]." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 35.

Photograph of Ronald De Waal signing galley proofs for The Universal Sherlock Holmes, in New York City, with many other Sherlockians looking on.

3. De Waal, Ronald B. "Days and Thoughts in the Life of Mr. Ron. A Bibliography of Published and Unpublished Writings." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 35-43.

4. ———. "Days and Thoughts in the Life of Mr. Ron. A Weekend With the Baker Street Irregulars January 13-16, 2000." Shoso-In Bulletin 10, no. (2000): 191-195.

5. ———. "Pages From the Journal of Ron De Waal Holmes, Watson and de Waal." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 54-55.

6. ———. "Pages From the Journal of Ron De Waal. Collecting and Writing About Sherlock Holmes." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 19-20.

7. ———. "Pages from the Journal of Ronald B. De Waal. Peter E. Blau in Town for Geology and Sherlock Holmes Meetings May 12-14, 2003." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 98-99, 118.

8. Johnson, Roger. "Review--'The Universal Sherlock Holmes' by Ronald B. De Waal, edited by George Vanderburgh." The Ritual, no. 14 (1994): 58-59.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Dirda, Michael (29)

1. "Classics for Pleasure." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 33 (2007): 57-57.

The article reviews the book 'Classics for Pleasure,' by Michael Dirda. Includes a reference to Holmes. "In this casually brilliant collection of 'great book' recommendations, Dirda, a Pulitzer Prize-winning critic for the Washington Post Book World, discusses titles ranging from well-known favorites such as Sherlock Holmes and Beowulf to more obscure writers such as Jaroslav Hasek and John Masefield...."

2. Auerbach, Erich. Dante, poet of the secular world, (New York Review Books classics). New York: New York Review Books, 2007.

21 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 181-191) and index. National bibliography no: GBA698927 Translated by Ralph Manheim ; introduction by Michael Dirda. Uniform Title: Dante als Dichter der irdischen Welt.;

3. Babel, Isaac, Nathalie Babel, and Peter Constantine. Red Cavalry. New York: W.W. Norton, 2003.

ill., map ; 21 cm. The Red Cavalry stories -- The Red Cavalry cycle : additional stories -- A letter to the editor -- Diary -- Sketches for the Red Cavalry stories. Includes bibliographical references. Edited by Nathalie Babel ; translated with notes by Peter Constantine ; introduction by Michael Dirda. Uniform Title: Konarmiia. English.;

4. Carrigan, Henry L. "Arts & Humanities." Library Journal 131, no. 6 (2006): 90, 92-4, 96-100, 102.

An annotated bibliography of arts and humanities titles, published or soon to be published, is provided. Includes an entry of note. Dirda, Michael. Book by Book: Notes on Reading and Life. Holt. May 2006. c.192p. ISBN 0-8050-7877-0. pap. $17. "Once we're finished reading all those books our teachers required us to read, where do we turn for counsel on reading and life? Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Dirda (An Open Book) affectionately offers up this bouquet of thoughts and quotations from novels, poems, and essays as a guide to discovering the meaning of our experiences. Dirda's thoughtful little meditations conduct us through all aspects of life from work, leisure, and love to art, spiritual matters, and death and grief He imagines the ideal guest room library filled with "familiar, cozy, browsable, and soothing" books, ranging from the mysteries of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and G.K. Chesterton to the humor of P.G. Wodehouse and James Thurber and the maxims of Franqois de La Rochefoucauld. In the section on love, Dirda provides a minicourse on the subject in the Western world, beginning with Sappho's poetry and coursing through Ovid and Horace, Tristan and Isolde, Dante's The Divine Comedy, Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Philip Roth's The Dying Animal, and Zadie Smith's On Beauty. Finally, Dirda sums up the value of a life lived book by book: "The beauty of words, the sound and fall of sentences, a writer's distinctive voice rising from the page--these, in the end, provide the greatest and most lasting pleasures of a reading life." A lovingly crafted volume, this is recommended for all libraries."

5. Davies, Robertson. The manticore, (Penguin classics). New York: Penguin Books, 2006.

20 cm. Sequel to: Fifth business. Sequel: World of wonders. Includes bibliographical references (p. xxi-xxii). Introduction by Michael Dirda.;

6. Dirda, Michael. Book by book : notes on reading and life. 1st Owl Books ed. New York: Owl Books/Henry Holt, 2007.

Preface : at home in the world -- 1. Life lines -- 2. The pleasures of learning -- 3. Work and leisure -- 4. The books of love -- 5. Bringing it all back home -- 6. Living in the world -- 7. Sights and sounds -- 8. The interior library -- 9. Matters of the spirit -- 10. Last things -- A selective and idiosyncratic who's who. "Originally published in hardcover in 2006 by Henry Holt and Company."--T.p. verso.;

7. ———. Book by book : notes on reading and life. New York: Henry Holt, 2006.

20 cm. Preface : at home in the world -- 1. Life lines -- 2. The pleasures of learning -- 3. Work and leisure -- 4. The books of love -- 5. Bringing it all back home -- 6. Living in the world -- 7. Sights and sounds -- 8. The interior library -- 9. Matters of the spirit -- 10. Last things -- A selective and idiosyncratic who's who.;

8. ———. Book by book: notes on the reading life. 1st ed. New York: Henry Holt, 2005.

9. ———. Bound to please : an extraordinary one-volume literary education : essays on great writers and their books. 1st Norton pbk. ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007.

24 cm. Includes bibliographical references.; Surveying the whole world of books, literary essayist Michael Dirda opens with an impassioned critique of modern reading habits, then presents many of the great, and idiosyncratic, writers he loves the most. He starts with ancient classics and ends with groundbreaking science fiction; in between, he writes about everything from Renaissance intellectual history and Russian literary theory to spaghetti westerns and neglected modern masters.--From publisher description.

10. ———. Bound to please : an extraordinary one-volume literary education : essays on great writers and their books. 1st ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2005.

25 cm. Includes bibliographical references.; Surveying the whole world of books, literary essayist Dirda opens with an impassioned critique of modern reading habits, then presents many of the great, and idiosyncratic, writers he loves the most. He starts with ancient classics and ends with groundbreaking science fiction; in between, he writes about everything from Renaissance intellectual history and Russian literary theory to spaghetti westerns and neglected modern masters.--From publisher description.

11. ———. Caring for your books. New York: Book-of-the-Month Club, 1990.

ill. ; 18 cm. Bibliography: p. 63-64.; Offers suggestions on how to maintain and preserve one's collection of the printed word, with hints on the proper care and feeding of new and not-so-new books and other related materials.

12. ———. Classics for Pleasure. s.l.: Harvest Books, 2008.

13. ———. Looking for a good time : reading, libraries, and the world of books : an address at the annual dinner of the Friends of the Oberlin College Library, September 28, 2002. [Oberlin, Ohio]: Friends of the Oberlin College Library, 2003.

28 cm.;

14. ———. An open book : coming of age in the heartland. 1st [pbk.] ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2004.

ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-326) and index.;

15. ———. "An open book : coming of age in the heartland." New York: W.W. Norton, 2003.

1st ed. ill. ; 25 cm. Learning to read -- Turning the pages -- Adult material -- A liberal education -- Epilogue -- Michael Dirda's book list. Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-326) and index.; "All that kid wants to do is stick his nose in a book," Michael Dirda's steelworker father used to complain, worried about his son's passion for reading. In this memoir, acclaimed literary journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Dirda re-creates his boyhood in rust-belt Ohio, first in the working-class town of Lorain, then at Oberlin College. In addition to his colorful family and friends, An Open Book also features the great writers and fictional characters who fueled Dirda's imagination: from Green Lantern to Sherlock Holmes, from Candy to Proust. The result is an affectionate homage to small-town America in the 1950s and 1960s--Slavic wedding feasts, catechism classes, summer jobs in the steel mill, school fights, sweepstakes contests, first dates, and a canary-yellow Mustang--as well as to what could arguably be called the last great age of reading.--From publisher description.

16. ———. Readings : essays & literary entertainments. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2003.

24 cm.;

17. ———. Readings : essays and literary entertainments. New York, London: W.W. Norton, 2004.

21 cm.;

18. ———. Readings : essays and literary entertainments. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2000.

24 cm. The crime of his life -- The quest for Scrivener -- Talismans -- Maxims, etc. -- Heart of the matter -- Bookman's Saturday -- Supplementary materials -- Listening to my father -- Romantic scholarship -- Weekend with Wodehouse -- An abecedary -- Mr. Wright -- Heian holiday -- Childhood's end -- The one and the many -- Commencement advice -- Four novels and a memoir -- The October country -- Bookish fantasies -- Pages on life's way -- A garland for Max -- Read at whim! -- Comedy tonight -- Light of other days -- Data daze -- Four-leaf clovers -- Sez who? -- Lament for a maker -- Clubland -- The learning channels -- Guy Davenport -- Eros by any other name -- Frank confessions -- Mememormee -- Tomes for tots -- Three classics -- Vacation reading -- One more modest proposal -- Shake scenes -- After strange books -- Awful bits -- Turning 50 -- Blame it on books -- On the road not taken -- Excursion -- Millennial readings.;

19. Dirda, Michael Damian. On Beyle's strand : a study in autobiography. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University Microfilms International, 1980.

21cm. "78-9797.";

20. ———. "On Beyle's strand : a study in autobiography." v, 203 leaves ; 29 cm. Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D.)--Cornell University, Aug., 1977.

Photocopy of typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 198-203).;

21. Genco, Barbara A. "Great Reads For Grown-Ups." School Library Journal 49, no. 12 (2003): 58-61.

An annotated bibliography of the best nonfiction books for adults published in 2003 is provided. Includes an entry with a reference to Holmes by a well-known member of the Sherlockian community. An Open Book: Coming of Age in the Heartland by Michael Dirda. Norton. $24.95. ISBN 0-393-05756-9. "As Michael Dirda, senior editor of The Washington Post Book World and a distinguished literary critic, observes early on in this beautifully written memoir: 'To be an indiscriminate reader--as the luckiest young often are--means the right books are all around you.' Dirda's portrait of the writer as a young reader is an irresistible choice for librarians. Dirda began life as a chubby, nearsighted kid, growing up in the 1950s in the gritty factory town of Lorrain, OH. An omnivorous reader, he gradually sharpened his literary taste (and enlarged his world) on an eclectic mix of books and comics that included Tarzan, Sherlock Holmes, the Green Lantern, the Count of Monte Cristo, and Raskolnikov. Dirda takes the reader along on his journey to Oberlin College (which he attended in the '60s on a scholarship), and concludes with an account of a romantic summer spent in Paris, at the impressionable age of 19. The future Pulitzer Prize winner for criticism seemed to emanate 'an invisible tractor beam for printed matter.' SLJ readers will relish Dirda's candid, sometimes bittersweet account of his early life with books and his assertion that 'childhood reading possesses an almost holy power.' Dirda's boyhood reading list--consisting of weighty titles he managed to read in high school--is not to be missed: it offers some stiff competition to the American Library Association's list of 'Outstanding Books for the College Bound.'"

22. Huxley, Aldous. Crome yellow. 1st Dalkey Archive ed, (Coleman Dowell British literature series). Chicago: Dalkey Archive Press, 2001.

21 cm. Introduction by Michael Dirda.; On vacation from school, Denis goes to stay at Crome, an English country house inhabitated by several of Huxley's most outlandish characters--from Mr. Barbecue-Smith, who writes 1,500 publishable words an hour by "getting in touch" with his "subconscious," to Henry Wimbush, who is obsessed with writing the definitive history of chrome. Denis's stay proves to be a disaster amid his weak attempts to attract the girl of his dreams and the ridicule he endures regarding his plan to write a novel about love and art. Lambasting the post-Victorian standards of morality, Chrome yello is a witty masterpiece that, in F. Scott Fitzgerald's words, "is too ironic to be called satire and too scornful to be called irony."

23. Kierkegaard, Søren, and Gerd Aage Gillhoff. Diary of a seducer. New York: Continuum, 2006.

20 cm. Translated from the Danish, with an introduction, by Gerd Gillhoff ; with a foreword by Michael Dirda. Uniform Title: Forførenens dagbog. English.;

24. Nabokov, Vladimir Vladimirovich. The real life of Sebastian Knight, (New Directions paperbook). New York: New Directions, 2008.

21 cm. Introduction by Michael Dirda.;

25. Ondaatje, Michael, Linda Spalding, Michael Redhill, and Esta Spalding. Brick, a literary journal. Toronto: Transcontinental Printing, 2000.

ill. ; 21 x 22 cm. On location with Paul Bowles / Jennifer Baichwal -- Excerpts from The page-turner's sister / Jean McKay -- Reading William Maxwell / Alice Munro -- From film to page / Tissa Abeysekara -- One month with Genji / Michael Dirda -- A wartime remembrance / Michael David Kwan -- Cows / Yves Berger -- On depression / Russell Banks -- In search of Kafka's castle / Mary Morris -- A Haida poem in translation / Robert Bringhurst -- On Al Purdy / Michael Ondaatje -- Becoming a photographer / Man Ray -- A visit to the spa / Helen Garner -- Shrimp étouffée / Harold Weber -- Simonides / Anne Carson -- A remembrance of Victor Anant / John Berger -- In conversation with Edwidge Danticat / Eleanor Wachtel -- A lost classic / Michael Ondaatje -- Celebrating John Hawkes / Jeffrey Eugenides -- Sound and film / Walter Murch -- Rereading Rashomon / Akira Kurosawa -- Sergei Eisenstein and Upton Sinclair / Jeff Biggers -- A new story / Barry Lopez -- Words and pictures / Nathalie Robertson -- Almost at home in France / Isabel Huggan. Number 65/66. Fall 2000. editor, Linda Spalding ; contributing and managing editor, Michael Redhill ; contributing editors, Michael Ondaatje, Esta Spalding ; assistant editor, Emmet Mellow ; ombudsperson, Cecily Moos.;

26. Raffel, Burton. Das Nibelungenlied = Song of the Nibelungs. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

25 cm. Includes bibliographical references. National bibliography no: GBA685493 Nibelungenlied. English.; Song of the Nibelungs. Translated from the Middle High German by Burton Raffel ; foreword by Michael Dirda ; introduction by Edward R. Haymes.;

27. Smith, Clark Ashton, Scott Connors, Ron Hilger, and Michael Dirda. A vintage from Atlantis : volume three of the collected fantasies of Clark Ashton Smith, (The collected fantasies of Clark Ashton Smith). San Francisco: Night Shade Books, 2007.

24 cm. A note on the texts -- The holiness of Azédarac -- The maker of gargoyles -- Beyond the singing flame -- Seedling of mars -- The vaults of Yoh-vombis -- The eternal world -- The demon of the flower -- The nameless offspring -- A vintage from Atlantis -- The weird of Avoosl Wuthoqquan -- The invisible city -- The immortals of mercury -- The empire of the necromancers -- The seed from the sepulcher -- The second interment -- Ubbo-sathla -- The double shadow -- The plutonian drug -- The supernumerary corpse -- The colossus of Ylourgne -- The god of the asteroid -- Story notes -- The flower-devil (Poem that "The Demon of the flower" was based upon). Includes bibliographical references (p. 335-336). Edited by Scott Connors and Ron Hilger with an introduction by Michael Dirda.;

28. Thomas, Mary Augusta, Michael Dirda, and Storrs L. Olson. An odyssey in print : adventures in the Smithsonian Libraries. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2002.

ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 27 cm. Catalog of an exhibition held at the Grolier Club, New York, May 16-Aug. 4, 2001, and at the Smithsonian Institution Libraries Gallery, Washington, May 2002-May 2003. Includes index. With a foreword by Nancy E. Gwinn ; and essays by Michael Dirda and Storrs L. Olson.;

29. Wilson, Robert. A certain somewhere : writers on the places they remember. New York: Random House, 2002.

1st ed. 22 cm. Preface / Robert Wilson -- Introduction / Sudip Bose -- Paradise regained / Thomas Mallon -- Museum of who we were / Suzanne Freeman -- Peaceable kingdom / Edward Hoagland -- Hiding out in Mañanaland / Ann Beattie -- Doorway to heaven / Brian Doyle -- Rooms to grow in / Morris Halle -- Spirit of Maui / Reeve Lindbergh -- Fire this time / Madison Smartt Bell -- On the dock of the bay / Roy Hoffman -- Something there is that loves a wall / Noel Perrin -- On loan from the Sundance Sea / Scott Russell Sanders -- Fine madness / Jan Morris -- Building for the ages / Stephen Goodwin -- Vagaries of memory / Maurice Isserman -- Something fishy in small town X / Wayne Curtis -- Sensation of infinity / Anita Desai -- Best big room / Malcolm Jones -- Other upstate / Frederick Busch -- Glory of McKinney, Texas / Kate Lehrer -- How a house restored a family / James Conaway -- Water under the bridge / Paul Mariani -- Song of Sonoma / Stanley Abercrombie -- Grand entrances / Edith Pearlman -- Anthology in clapboard / Jay Parini -- Hamlet in the hills / David Huddle -- Views from a bench above the sea / Anthony Walton -- History in concrete / Blaine Harden -- Swearing by the sandlot / John Hough, Jr. -- Metropolitan hideaways / Phyllis Rose -- Sweet Lorain / Michael Dirda. Edited by Robert Wilson.;

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Doyle, Adrian Conan (2)

1. Doyle, Adrian Conan. "Thoughts From A. Conan Doyle -- the other one." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 3 (1998): 27-29.

2. Travis, Alan. "G-men rallied to aid Sherlock Holmes : Scotland Yard turned to FBI to find Conan Doyle collection." The Guardian (London), February 15, 2001: 8.

"J. Edgar Hoover called in his special network of 'G-men' when Scotland Yard turned to the FBI for help in solving the case of the disappearance of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's crime library from his house at Crowborough in Sussex. The Metropolitan police case file released yesterday at the public record office shows that Conan Doyle's two sons and heirs, Denis and Adrian, appealed for Scotland Yard's help in 1945 when an American magazine led them to suspect that the collection of real crime stories their father had used to create the plots and character of Sherlock Holmes stories had been stolen...."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Doyle, Denis Conan (2)

1. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "Tilting at Windmills: Denis Conan Doyle and the Baker Street Irregulars." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana, no. (2002): 5-64.

2. Travis, Alan. "G-men rallied to aid Sherlock Holmes : Scotland Yard turned to FBI to find Conan Doyle collection." The Guardian (London), February 15, 2001: 8.

"J. Edgar Hoover called in his special network of 'G-men' when Scotland Yard turned to the FBI for help in solving the case of the disappearance of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's crime library from his house at Crowborough in Sussex. The Metropolitan police case file released yesterday at the public record office shows that Conan Doyle's two sons and heirs, Denis and Adrian, appealed for Scotland Yard's help in 1945 when an American magazine led them to suspect that the collection of real crime stories their father had used to create the plots and character of Sherlock Holmes stories had been stolen...."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- E (2)

1. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Edward Geoffrey Ewing." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 2 (1995): 32-33.

2. ———. "Strictly Personal: John Philip Balcom Elliott." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 2 (1996): 40-41.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Edwards, Owen Dudley (2)

1. Brown, Allan. "The curious case of old Conan Doyle." Sunday Times (London), August 22, 2004: 4.

Observations on Doyle, Edinburgh, the fate of various Doyle papers, the Christie's auction, Richard Lancelyn Green, Owen Dudley Edwards, and Charles Foley.

2. Cornwell, Tim. "Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Writer's Vanishing Treasures." The Scotsman, May 14, 2004: 7.

"Scotland's foremost expert on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has launched a last-minute campaign to ensure that recently-discovered papers by the Sherlock Holmes author, which are due to be auctioned by Christie's, are saved for the British nation. Owen Dudley Edwards, a historian at Edinburgh University and editor of The Oxford Sherlock Holmes, is calling on the government to step in to ensure that a key part of the Edinburgh-born author's legacy is saved for researchers and the public. 'When this sale was announced there was tremendous surprise and anger,' he said. 'I am thinking about posterity - for the next 100 to 200 years.' The Edinburgh South MP, Nigel Griffiths, has taken up Professor Edwards' cause, calling on Estelle Morris, the UK culture minister, to block the auction and explore ways of saving the Doyle archive...."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- F (2)

1. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Margot French." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 3 (1998): 39.

2. Levin, Alfred A. "On the Terrace: Dennis France." Shoso-In Bulletin 11, no. (2001): 218.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- G (9)

1. "In Memoriam Marian Grudeff." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 2 (2006): 49.

2. "Passings Syd Goldberg, John J. Brousch, Donald O'Connor." Baker Street West 1 9, no. 2 (2003): 46.

3. Cannon, Peter. "The Magic of Martin Gardner." Publishers Weekly 253, no. 38 (2006): 39-40.

The article features author Martin Gardner. To his fans, Gardner, a 91-year-old widower, is revered as a genius. He has written or edited more than 70 books. A lover of Sherlock Holmes, the Oz books and other literary classics, he does not care for poetry that lacks rhyme or meter. He has used a literary agent only once on his first book, In the Name of Science. His book, The New Ambidextrous Universe, is an example of how Gardner has challenged mainstream as well as fringe science.

4. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Brian 'Neil' Gibson." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 2 (1997): 30-31.

5. ———. "Strictly Personal: Edward (Ted) Gurr." Canadian Holmes 23, no. 1 (1999): 36-37.

6. ———. "Strictly Personal: Olga Joan Gil." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 36.

7. Redmond, Christopher. "In Memoriam Ronald P. Graham." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 2 (1995): 34.

8. Stajic, Marina et al. "In Memoriam Maureen Green." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 2 (2006): 17-23.

9. Wrigglesworth, Doug. "In Memoriam Ted Gurr." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 2 (2006): 16-17.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Gaiman, Neil (1)

1. "Hot Deals." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 43 (2002): 14.

Presents updates on several deals between authors and publishers, as of October 28, 2002. Neil Gaiman at HarperCollins and Bloomsbury. Also note on Michael Capuzzo's The Arms of Angels. "The new book is a true tale about a mysterious group of skilled detectives who use their skills to solve only the most despicable of crimes, led by a figure who seems to be a contemporary Sherlock Holmes."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Green, Richard Lancelyn (65)

1. "The case of the Conan Doyle papers." The Hindu, May 20, 2004: 1.

"The [Arthur Conan Doyle] archive, including his unpublished first novel, a rich cache of family letters and handwritten notebooks full of research and musings about works in progress, was expected to bring in about GBP1 million to 1.5 million, according to Christie's, which is handling the sale. But even as the auction house has attracted a stream of Conan Doyle enthusiasts thrilled at the newly released material, it has also been sharply criticised by some scholars and Members of Parliament for allowing the sale because they say crucial legal questions remain unresolved. They also say the material is too important to be sold off piecemeal. Adding to the sense of unease is the mysterious death of Richard Lancelyn Green, a leading Conan Doyle scholar, private collector and a vociferous opponent of the sale."

2. "City Gets Conan Doyle Collection; Portsmouth, England, receives Sherlock Holmes memorabilia worth $3.6 million." Los Angeles Times, Aug 8, 2004: A.9.

"'[Richard Lancelyn Green] was the foremost [Arthur Conan Doyle] scholar and a leading Sherlock Holmes specialist. His collection was acknowledged to be the finest in private hands,' said Nicholas Utechin, Lancelyn Green's friend and editor of the 'Sherlock Holmes Journal.' Lancelyn Green, a prominent figure in the Sherlock Holmes Society, spent more than 40 years collecting material related to Conan Doyle and Holmes. His will stipulated that the collection should be housed together and that he wanted it offered first to Portsmouth's library service."

3. "Correction." The Sunday Telegraph (London), Dec 19, 2004: 02.

"Last Sunday we published a picture, stating that it was Richard Lancelyn Green, who died in March this year. It was, in fact, a picture of his brother, Scirard Lancelyn Green, who is very much alive. We apologise for this error."

4. "Death a case for Sherlock." The Gold Coast Bulletin, Dec 14, 2004: 6.

"According to friends of Richard Lancelyn Green, he appears to have dressed up his suicide as murder in an attempt to get at an enemy from beyond the grave,..."

5. "Death still a mystery." Journal (Newcastle-upon-Tyne), Apr 24, 2004: 14.

"Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, who co-edited a book about Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was found garrotted in his bed surrounded by cuddly toys and a bottle of gin. The tin was created for Berkshire biscuit manufacturers Huntley and Palmers in the 1970s by a mischievous artist."

6. "Expert's death linked to Holmes story: Suicide plot." National Post, Dec 13, 2004: A.11.

"According to friends of Richard Lancelyn Green, he appears to have dressed up his suicide as murder in an attempt to get at an enemy from beyond the grave, a notion lifted from one of [Holmes]'s adventures, the Sunday Times said. According to the report, Mr. Lancelyn Green had become bitterly depressed after learning that a collection of papers belonging to the creator of Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was to be broken up and sold at auction."

7. "Global Reach." American Libraries 35, no. 8 (2004): 23-23.

Presents world news briefs on libraries as of September 2004. "What may be the world's largest collection of Arthur Conan Doyle memorabilia was donated August 6 to the Portsmouth Library' by the estate of writer Richard Lancelyn Green. The collection includes a full-size recreation of Sherlock Holmes's Baker Street study, and first editions of all Conan Doyle's works."

8. "Holmes collection left to library in southern England." Xinhua News Agency - CEIS, Aug 6, 2004: 1.

"[Arthur Conan Doyle] was born in Edinburgh. He moved later to Portsmouth and then London. While in Portsmouth, he wrote 'A Study in Scarlet' ( 1887), which introduced [Holmes] and his sidekick, Dr. Watson. '[Richard Lancelyn Green] was the foremost Arthur Conan Doyle scholar and a leading Sherlock Holmes specialist. His collection was acknowledged to be the finest in private hands,' said Nicholas Utechin, editor of the 'Sherlock Holmes Journal.'"

9. "Holmes man's death riddle." The Sun (London), Apr 24, 2004: 28.

"Mr [Richard Lancelyn Green], of Kensington, West London, was upset about an auction of items belonging to [Holmes]' creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and wanted it stopped. He also feared he was going to be smeared."

10. "Library gets Sherlock trove ; Conan Doyle collection includes first editions, full-size replica of detective's study." San Antonio Express-News, Aug 7, 2004: 16A.

"One of the world's greatest collections of memorabilia from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was handed over Friday to a library in the port city where the author once had a medical practice and wrote the first two Sherlock Holmes adventures. When he died in March, writer and collector Richard Lancelyn Green, left the 20,000-item collection worth more than $3.6 million to the Portsmouth library service. The collection includes a full size recreation by Lancelyn Green of the study at 221B Baker Street, Holmes' fictional London address...."

11. "Mystery surrounds 'murder' of Sherlock Holmes fan." Liverpool Echo, Dec 13, 2004: 3.

"Wirral-born Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, a biographer of author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was discovered garrotted with a shoelace tightened around his neck with a wooden spoon. John Gibson, who co-edited a Conan Doyle bibliography with Mr Lancelyn Green in 1983, believes his colleague set up a false trail of clues to make his death look like foul play."

12. "A new home for Sherlock Holmes." Daily Mail (London), August 6, 2004: 19.

"A collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle memorabilia, including a hint of how Sherlock Holmes got his name, is moving. Writer Richard Lancelyn Green, who died in March, has left the 20,000 items, worth more than Pounds 2million, to Portsmouth library...."

13. "Obituaries Richard Lancelyn Green and Steve Clarkson." Baker Street West 1 10, no. 2 (2004): inside rear cover.

14. "Obituary: Richard Gordon Lancelyn Green." Daily Post, Apr 12, 2004: 11.

"Green was an honorary member of the [Arthur Conan Doyle] Society and, from 1996 to1999, was chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London. In 2001, his Christmas cards were based on a cover of The Strand Magazine which serialised Doyle stories. [Holmes] was his passion. He worked with another enthusiast, John Michael Gibson, on producing the Doyle Bibliography, and he compiled a volume by other writers of parodies and imitations of Doyle,The Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes."

15. "Papers of Sherlock Holmes creator sell for half of what auction house expected." National Post (Canada), May 20, 2004: A15.

"A collection of long-lost papers giving a rare glimpse into the private life of Sherlock Holmes' creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was sold at auction in London for almost (ps)1-million ($2.3- million) yesterday, about half of what had been estimated. The 3,000 letters, notes and manuscripts fetched (ps)948,546, auction house Christie's said....The auction has ignited a furor among politicians and Holmes enthusiasts, with some saying the collection should have been bequeathed to the nation rather than sold off piecemeal. It took place against the backdrop of the bizarre death of a leading Holmes expert...."

16. "Richard Lancelyn Green." The Times (London), April 14, 2004: 27.

Obituary of RLG. "... As the foremost expert on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional detective, Lancelyn Green travelled widely, giving lectures to Sherlock Holmes societies around the world. While his knowledge of the [Holmes] canon was encyclopaedic, he never failed to treat the subject with a light and entertaining touch. If difficult to approach at first, he was a brilliant raconteur and showed flashes of theatrical inspiration, whether he was playing the role of a Victorian music hall master of ceremonies for a Sherlock Holmes Society event or dressing up in period costume for a pilgrimage to the Reichenbach Falls, where Sherlock Holmes, temporarily, met his end...."

17. "Suicide plot based on Holmes story, report says." National Post (Canada), December 13, 2004: A14.

"The mysterious death of Britain's leading Sherlock Holmes expert appears to have been a bizarre suicide plot deliberately based on one of the cases tackled by the fictional detective himself, a report said yesterday. According to friends of Richard Lancelyn Green, he appears to have dressed up his suicide as murder in an attempt to get at an enemy from beyond the grave, a notion lifted from one of Holmes's adventures, the Sunday Times said...."

18. "A tangled skein." Economist 371, no. 8376 (2004): 77-78.

The author reports on a controversial auction of private papers of author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle at Christie's in London this week. The long unseen collection shows that Conan Doyle was not only one of the most popular writers of the 20th century--he has still outsold J.K. Rowling and J.R.R. Tolkien put together--but a public figure who took an active interest in politics and war, championed many private causes and gave GBP250,000 (millions in today's money) to further the interests of spiritualism. Befittingly, the auction has not been without controversy, not least thanks to the mysterious death of Richard Lancelyn Green, a former chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, who was found garrotted in his locked bedroom in March. There was not enough evidence for the coroner to rule it was suicide, but enough for believers in the" Conan Doyle curse" to suspect foul play worthy of Holmes's attention. Lancelyn Green believed that some of the papers in the auction had rightfully been left to the British Library, and he told the Times newspaper that he had written to Christie's asking them not to go ahead with the sale, which Christie's denies. Would-be Conan Doyle biographers, as well as the British Library, have expressed disappointment that the material in the auction has now been dispersed.

19. "Teddies and gin death of Holmes expert." Coventry Evening Telegraph, Apr 24, 2004: 5.

"Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, who co-edited a book about Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was found garrotted in his bed surrounded by cuddly toys and a bottle of gin."

20. "The World." The Augusta Chronicle, Aug 7, 2004: A.02.

"One of the greatest collections of memorabilia from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was given Friday to a library in Portsmouth, England, where he wrote the first Sherlock Holmes adventures. The 20,000- item collection of Richard Lancelyn Green includes a full-size model of the study at 221B Baker St., Holmes' fictional address."

21. "Writer leaves pounds 2m Conan Doyle collection to library." Daily Post, Aug 7, 2004: 7.

"[Richard Lancelyn Green], who died in March this year, was a prominent figure in the Sherlock Holmes Society and spent more than 40 years collecting everything he could find that related to [Arthur Conan Doyle] and Sherlock Holmes."

22. Adrian, Jack. "Obituary: Richard Lancelyn Green; Collector and Bibliographer of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." The Independent (London), April 8, 2004: 34.

"Richard Lancelyn Green devoted his life to one of the great icons of popular culture of the 20th century, the most celebrated fictional detective of all, Sherlock Holmes. Over a period of nearly 40 years he accumulated not just the bedrock of any collection, the books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, but masses of material relating to both Holmes and Doyle - from examples of the author's personal correspondence to items such as the cigarette case inscribed 'From Sherlock Holmes' and presented by Doyle to Sidney Paget, the illustrator of the Holmes stories. At the same time he turned his hobby into a full- time occupation by producing books and articles on Holmes, and co-authoring one of the most comprehensive bibliographies of any writer...."

23. Alberge, Dalya. "Holmes archive row ends in GBP2m bequest." The Times (London), August 6, 2004: 11.

"The world's leading authority on Sherlock Holmes, who was found garotted on his bed three months ago, has bequeathed his Pounds 2 million collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's papers to the nation. Richard Lancelyn Green was found dead at 50 after trying in vain to stop the sale of another Pounds 2 million collection of Doyle papers, some of which he felt should have been left to the British Library. An open verdict on his death was recorded. Mr Lancelyn Green left more than 20,000 Doyle manuscripts and memorabilia, amassed over more than 40 years, to Portsmouth, where Dr Conan Doyle had his medical practice and where he created his legendary detective...."

24. ———. "Holmes archive row ends in Pounds 2m bequest." The Times (London), Aug 6, 2004: 11.

"Mr [Richard Lancelyn Green] left more than 20,000 [Arthur Conan Doyle] manuscripts and memorabilia, amassed over more than 40 years, to Portsmouth, where Dr Conan Doyle had his medical practice and where he created his legendary detective. Doyle's daughter, Dame Jean, died in 1997 at the age of 84. She stipulated in her will that Sherlock Holmes manuscripts were to go to the British Library and museums in Edinburgh, Doyle's birthplace, and Southsea or Portsmouth, where he worked as a doctor and where he created [Holmes]. Mr Lancelyn Green's brother, Scirard, said yesterday: 'It's truly fitting that Richard's life work should go to Portsmouth. Conan Doyle wrote the first two Sherlock Holmes stories there, so in some way his work is going home.'"

25. Brown, Allan. "The curious case of old Conan Doyle." Sunday Times (London), August 22, 2004: 4.

Observations on Doyle, Edinburgh, the fate of various Doyle papers, the Christie's auction, Richard Lancelyn Green, Owen Dudley Edwards, and Charles Foley.

26. Caswell, Jonathan. "Death of Writer; Body of Conan Doyle expert discovered at home by sister." Liverpool Echo, Apr 9, 2004: 17.

"A Wirral man regarded as a world authority on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, has been found dead at his London home. Richard Lancelyn Green, 51, was discovered by his sister Cilla in his South Kensington flat last week. An inquest has been opened...."

27. Chittenden, Maurice. "Holmes solves death of a fan." Sunday Times (London), December 12, 2004: 6.

"The mystery of how Britain's leading expert on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle came to be lying garrotted to death on his own bed may have been solved by the author's greatest creation, Sherlock Holmes. Amateur sleuths probing the unsolved death of Richard Lancelyn Green believe he took a leaf out of one of the Victorian detective's adventures. In one inquiry Holmes deduces that a woman arranged her suicide to look like murder. Friends of Lancelyn Green now believe he might have tried the same tactic in an attempt to get revenge from beyond the grave for an imagined deception...."

28. Churcher, Sharon, and Adam Luck. "Solved the Last Sherlock Holmes Mystery." Mail on Sunday, Dec 12, 2004: 47.

"On March 26, [Richard Lancelyn Green] dined with a former lover, Lawrence Keen. It was then, according to Keen, that Green confided that 'an American was trying to bring him down'. After they left the restaurant in Kensington High Street, Green agitatedly told his friend they were being followed...."

29. Davies, Catriona. "Mysterious death of Holmes expert." The Daily Telegraph (London), Apr 24, 2004: 13.

"Mr [Richard Lancelyn Green]'s friend Nicholas Rathbone Utechin, a relative of the Sherlock Holmes actor Basil Rathbone, said his death had revived rumours of 'the curse of [Arthur Conan Doyle]', that several people associated with the late author have suffered breakdowns or untimely deaths."

30. Day, Elizabeth. "Case of the Sherlock Holmes fanatic 'who killed himself but made it look like murder'." Sunday Telegraph (London), December 12, 2004: 05.

"A leading authority on Sherlock Holmes took his own life in a way meant to suggest that a rival had murdered him, it is claimed. Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, a prolific author and collector of memorabilia relating to the fictional detective, was found garotted on his bed by police in March after trying to stop a pounds 2million auction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's papers. Although the coroner returned an open verdict, friends and relatives of Mr Lancelyn Green now claim that the evidence suggests he took his own life in a manner that would implicate an American rival...."

31. ———. "Case of the Sherlock Holmes fanatic 'who killed himself but made it look like murder'." The Sunday Telegraph (London), Dec 12, 2004: 05.

"In an interview with The New Yorker magazine, James Gibson, who co-edited the first comprehensive Conan Doyle bibliography with Mr [Richard Lancelyn Green] in 1983, concludes that his colleague had 'wanted [his death] to look like murder', and that he had set up a trail of 'false clues'. Mr Lancelyn Green's body was found in his flat in Kensington, west London, on March 27 with a shoelace tied round his neck and a wooden spoon, which had been used to tighten the noose, still entangled in the cord. In the weeks leading up to his death, Mr Lancelyn Green had expressed concern that a forthcoming auction of Conan Doyle's papers at Christie's, consisted mostly of items that the author's daughter, Dame Jean Conan Doyle, had left as a bequest to the British Library. Mr Lancelyn Green, a former chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society, wanted access to the papers to research a biography of Conan Doyle. The puzzle of the answering machine message was solved by Mr Lancelyn Green's sister, who said that the machine had been made in America and had a built-in automated message. When her brother took off his message, a pre-recorded American voice answered all calls. The three telephone numbers proved to be unimportant. Two of them were reporters Mr Lancelyn Green spoke to and the other was someone at Christie's. If the theory is proved correct, Mr Lancelyn Green's death would echo the plot of one of the last Sherlock Holmes mysteries, The Problem of Thor Bridge (1922), in which a wife is found lying dead on a bridge, shot in the head at point-blank range. All the evidence points to the governess with whom the husband had been flirting but [Holmes] shows that she had killed herself to frame her rival."

32. Disley, Jan. "Sherlock Holmes Expert Garrotted." The Mirror, April 24, 2004: 28.

"The world's leading expert on fictional detective Sherlock Holmes and his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was found garrotted in bed, an inquest heard yesterday...."

33. ———. "Sherlock Holmes Expert Garrotted." The Daily Mirror, Apr 24, 2004: 28.

"The world's leading expert on fictional detective Sherlock Holmes and his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was found garrotted in bed, an inquest heard yesterday. A shoelace had been tightened around Richard Lancelyn Green's neck using a wooden spoon. In the days before his death, Mr Green, 50, was paranoid and thought a member of the American Sherlock Holmes Society was trying to discredit him, the inquest heard. Close friend Lawrence Keen said: 'He felt that his flat was bugged. He wasn't his normal self.' Mr Green, who wrote up to 10 books on Conan Doyle, was also upset to learn an archive of the author's private papers was to be auctioned. He had wanted to use them to write a definitive biography. Mr Green, from Kensington, London, died from asphyxia. Westminster coroner Dr Paul Knapman said he could not rule out suicide, murder or a deviant sexual act taken too far. Verdict: Open."

34. Gilbert, Gerard. "Television: Pick of the day." The Independent (London), Dec 26, 2005: 42.

"BBC4's Arthur Conan Doyle season continues with the story of Richard Lancelyn Green (right), a Sherlock Holmes fan whose dreams of writing a biography of Conan Doyle were cut short by his mysterious death in 2004."

35. Gilchrist, Jim. "Not so elementary." The Scotsman, no. (2007): 22.

"'I think when I started out, inevitably, I had a fairly naive view of him,' says [Andrew Lycett], 'based on the available evidence, which tended to present this rather upright English gentleman, forever taking up causes and, of course, his life dominated by writing Sherlock Homes.' We're talking in London, at the Primrose Hill flat of his partner, the literary photographer Sue Greenhill, and he has just obliged our own photographer by donning a T-shirt emblazoned with the single word 'Elementary'. Doyle (whose immortal detective never actually use the phrase 'elementary my dear [John H Watson]', until an 1899 stage dramatisation by the American actor William Gillette) would turn out to be rather more complicated than Lycett expected. 'Now, after looking into his life in some detail, I suppose I'm more aware of the warts-and-all aspect of his character, and that there were these contradictions. I'm much more aware of his sheer complexity and, in a way, I look to Edinburgh as a metaphor for that. It was Robert Louis Stevenson who alighted on the 'divided city' aspect of Edinburgh and you get that in Conan Doyle's character - the fascination with the supernatural alongside that strong belief in reason and science.' But even the field of Conan Doyle scholarship turned out not to be without its dark side: during Lycett's period of research, a leading Doyle scholar and archivist, Richard Lancelyn Green, was found dead amid strange circumstances. Amid the conspiracy theories, Lancelyn Green's own massive collection, as he had bequeathed, went to the City of Portsmouth, where Doyle practised as a doctor and where Lycett was eventually able to access it - though not without some help from the actor and broadcaster Stephen Fry, who is patron of the collection. Among so much fresh documentary material the biographer was able to 'flesh out the details' of the author's close relationship with his second wife while his first, Louise, was dying of tuberculosis. The established picture was one of Doyle, although fond of [Jean Leckie], doing the honourable thing of the day. Lycett refers to Leckie as Doyle's 'mistress', but how certain is he that, prior to Louise's death and his marriage to Leckie in 1907, theirs was a physical affair? 'I think he was in this awful dilemma. He had this wife who was ill, who I don't think he was very passionate about but who he respected and liked. He did his best for her in many ways, taking her abroad to try and ensure she'd live longer. However, during this period he met and fell in love with this younger, attractive and in many ways more suitable woman.'"

36. Grann, David. "Mysterious Circumstances." New Yorker 80, no. 39 (2004): 58-73.

Details the mystery associated with the death of Richard Lancelyn Green, a biographer of author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in London, England.

37. Hirst, Christopher. "The case of the wooden spoon ; A kitchen implement is just one of the clues surrounding the mysterious death of a leading Sherlock Holmes expert. Christopher Hirst dons his deerstalker and takes up the trail." The Independent (London), Dec 21, 2004: 5.

"The Edinburgh-based [Arthur Conan Doyle] specialist Owen Dudley Edwards told [David Grann] he believed [Richard Lancelyn Green] had been murdered. Edwards said that the wine-lover Green would never have drunk gin after dinner. He noted that Green was garrotted with a shoelace, but wore slip-on shoes. Garrotting, Edwards suggested, was 'a method a skilled professional would use'. Warning Grann: 'Please be careful. I don't want to see you garrotted,' he named the American, a defence specialist he described as 'one of Donald Rumsfeld's pals'. Though Grann says the American's job 'has given him a slightly menacing air - at least in the mind of Green's friends', [Jon L Lellenberg] (as we can surely call him) emerges as an admirer of Green. He says a lecture Green gave on The Hound of the Baskervilles was 'dazzling'. Grann writes: 'As he sat up in his chair and his eyes brightened, I realised I was talking not to Green's Moriarty but to his soulmate.' Professor Moriarty was, of course, Holmes's greatest enemy. Green and Lellenberg were collaborators until they fell out in the early Nineties. Lellenberg stressed that he had not seen or spoken to Green for more than a year. He was in London on the night Green died, but he had an alibi: 'He revealed with some embarrassment [that] he was walking through London on a group tour of Jack the Ripper's crime scenes.'"

38. Jackson, James. "Multichannel Choice." The Times (London), Dec 24, 2005: 66.

"An evening dedicated to the sleuth begins with The Man Who Loved Sherlock Holmes, a curious, far-from-elementary investigation into the demise of Richard Lancelyn Green, a leading Holmes expert. Having been embroiled in wrangles over the Conan Doyle archive, his death under strange circumstances in March 2004 revived talk of a 'Sir Arthur Conan Doyle curse', and in exploring his fate the programme reveals the obsessive world of Holmes aficionados. Also tonight, last Christmas's BBC One special, with Rupert Everett making a youthful Holmes."

39. Lister, Sam. "Mystery death of Sherlock scholar." Daily Post, Apr 24, 2004: 7.

"Richard Lancelyn Green, a biographer of the sleuth's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was discovered strangled with a shoelace tightened around his neck with a wooden spoon. In the days leading up to his death, Mr Green had grown increasingly concerned about the imminent auction of Sir Arthur's books and letters at Christie's. Mr Lancelyn Green's family home was Poulton Hall at Poulton Lancelyn."

40. ———. "'Perfect mystery' of writer's death plot ; Claim on Sherlock Holmes expert." Daily Post, Dec 13, 2004: 9.

"Richard Lancelyn Green, a biographer of author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was discovered garrotted with a shoelace tightened around his neck with a wooden spoon. John Gibson, who co-edited a Conan Doyle bibliography with Mr Lancelyn Green in 1983, has told how he believes his former colleague set up a false trail of clues to make the death look like foul play. He read English at Oxford University after attending Bradfield school in Berkshire and dedicated his life to researching and writing about Conan Doyle, eventually becoming chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London."

41. Lyall, Sarah. "A Tussle Over a Cache of Conan Doyle's Artifacts Ends With an Auction." New York Times, May 19, 2004: E.1.

Similar to her article in the International Herald Tribune. "...The unavailability of the material has frustrated and tantalized Conan Doyle scholars for years. A 1949 biography by the American mystery writer John Dickson Carr drew on the papers and included a list without going into detail about their contents, and a French biographer read them in the 1960's, but no researchers have been allowed to see them since. 'Having access to these papers will really open things up,' Miss Cooke said. But like some other Conan Doyle scholars, she is troubled by the sale, she said. There is the fear that the collection would be broken up and sold to anonymous collectors uninterested in making them available to academics. And there is a concern about the murky disposition of what remains of Conan Doyle's prodigious estate...."

42. McNeil, Robert. "TV Review: A mystery Holmes would have loved." The Scotsman, Dec 27, 2005: 26.

"In March 2004, Richard Lancelyn Green died in mysterious circumstances. The wealthy Sherlock Holmes expert had been garrotted with a bootlace tightened by a wooden spoon. It was a great story for the press but, obviously, a tragedy for his family and friends. The Holmes angle trivialised the awful fact of his death, but it had also been the obsession of his life. The Man Who Loved Sherlock Holmes, narrated by Stephen Fry, traced Green's life while worrying away at his death. The coroner recorded an open verdict, though suicide was thought likely. Or was it murder? It's trite to suggest Holmes would have loved this mystery but, as my old gran never said, there's truth in trite...."

43. Ng, U. En. "The King Street mystery." New Straits Times, Jun 10, 2004: 05.

"Investigating the possibility that [Richard Lancelyn Green] might have been attempting to re-enact a scene from [Holmes], [Paul Knapman] sought references to garrotting in the stories and found one: there was a garrotter in the pay of Professor Moriarty, Holmes's nemesis. [Jon Lellenberg] contributed to the Christie's sale catalogue and met members of the Sherlock Holmes Society. Lellenberg told the Observer from Washington: 'I have no knowledge of why he was paranoid about it. It would be silly and delusional to be concerned about me because the work I do has nothing to do with intelligence and surveillance at any level.' While speculation continues to surround Lancelyn Green's death, the Christie's auction proceeded without further complication...."

44. O'Briant, Don. "The Newsstand." The Atlanta Journal - Constitution, Dec 7, 2004: D.5.

"...Not elementary: The New Yorker (Dec. 13) reports on a death that would have intrigued Arthur Conan Doyle. Richard Lancelyn Green, the world's leading Sherlock Holmes scholar, was found garroted in his London flat last March. Was he murdered or did he commit suicide? The evidence seems to point both ways. Green reportedly was upset that Doyle's papers were being offered for sale by Christie's, rather than going to the British Library. He hinted to family members that he was in danger because of his opposition to the auction and that a high-ranking Pentagon official was involved...."

45. Parry, Rosemary C. "Review--'The Oxford Sherlock Holmes: The Return of Sherlock Holmes' edited with an introduction by Richard Lancelyn Green." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 57-59.

46. Podgurski, David. "Dust Jacket Required." Advocate, May 23, 2004: D.5.

"Many scholars were baffled by news of the auction, none more so than Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, a leading [Arthur Conan Doyle] scholar, collector and fiercely outspoken opponent of the sale, who was found dead in his bed on March 27, strangled by an apparently makeshift garrot comprised of a shoelace and a wooden spoon. Lancelyn Green, according to friends and family, had said prior that his house was being bugged and that he was worried for his safety, though the coroner recently was cautious of stressing 'conspiracy theories' and ruled an open death, neither confirming nor denying murder. This, plus the fears over losing a superb resource for future Conan Doyle research, has lent the sale an air of foggy Victorian mystery and foul play. If so, it wouldn't be the first, according to those believing in 'The Curse of Conan Doyle' - several people in the past 70 years working closely on the beloved author's works have suffered peculiar fates."

47. Probert, Sarah. "Writer's Death Link to Curse of Conan Doyle." Birmingham Post, April 24, 2004: 5.

"A leading expert on fictional sleuth Sherlock Holmes grew paranoid that people were plotting against him and trying to smear his name before dying in mysterious circumstances, an inquest heard yesterday. Richard Lancelyn Green, aged 50, who co-edited a book about Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was found garrotted in his bed surrounded by cuddly toys and a bottle of gin...."

48. Ramsey, Terry. "Pick of the Day." Evening Standard (London), Dec 23, 2005: 38.

"The Man Who Loved Sherlock Holmes 9pm, BBC4 The world's biggest Sherlock Holmes fan, Richard Lancelyn Green, was found dead in his flat in March 2004, garotted by a bootlace tightened by a wooden spoon. Did the 50-year-old millionaire bachelor commit suicide or was he murdered? This Stephen Fry-narrated documentary digs deep into the origin of a borderline barking obsession with the fictional detective before outlining some very strange conspiracy theories."

49. Roden, Barbara. "In Memoriam Richard Lancelyn Green." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 4 (2004): 32-34.

50. Rosser, Nigel. "Sherlock Holmes Expert Garrotted." The Evening Standard (London), April 23, 2004: 20.

"An expert on Sherlock Holmes was found garrotted in bed surrounded by cuddly toys and a bottle of gin at his London home, an inquest heard today. Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, from Kensington, had grown paranoid that people were plotting against him. He coedited a book about Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Mr Green died after a shoelace was tightened around his neck using a wooden spoon, but it was unclear if he killed himself, Westminster Coroner's Court was told. An open verdict was recorded."

51. ———. "Sherlock Holmes Expert Garrotted." Evening Standard (London), Apr 23, 2004: 20.

"Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, from Kensington, had grown paranoid that people were plotting against him. He coedited a book about Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle...."

52. Rothman, Steve, and Nicholas Utechin. To keep the memory green: reflections on the life of Richard Lancelyn Green, 1953-2004. 1st ed. London, New York: Quartering Press, 2007.

53. Sapsted, David. "Conan Doyle fan leaves pounds 2m hoard to library." The Daily Telegraph (London), Aug 6, 2004: 11.

Mr [Richard Lancelyn Green] had collected 20,000 items, including a recreation of 221b Baker Street....His will, published today, leaves them to the library service in Portsmouth, where Conan Doyle lived and worked between 1882-1890 and where he helped to found Portsmouth Football Club, becoming its first goalkeeper. The collection will be catalogued before going on display in 2006."

54. Smith, David. "One last riddle for the Baker St sleuth." The Observer, May 23, 2004: 12.

"Lancelyn Green was a loner. He was gay and never had a live-in partner. His last known lover was Lawrence Keen, around 20 years his junior. They had known each for eight years, the last six as platonic friends. Keen, a carer for elderly people, was the last person to see him alive...."

55. Smith, Lewis. "'Curse of Conan Doyle' strikes Holmes expert in Pounds 2m challenge." The Times (London), Apr 13, 2004: 8.

The body of Richard Lancelyn Green was discovered when police broke into his home in Kensington, London. He was one of the foremost authorities on Conan Doyle and had concerns about the eventual destination of a Pounds 2 million collection of the author's papers that he felt should go to the British Library but which are instead due for auction...."

56. ———. "The mysterious death of the Conan Doyle expert." The Ottawa Citizen, Apr 24, 2004: A.12.

"The world's foremost authority on the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes was found strangled on his bed after trying to stop a $5-million auction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle papers. In a mystery that would have had [Holmes] reaching for his violin, Richard Lancelyn Green was discovered in his locked millionaire's apartment surrounded by his own Conan Doyle collection...."

57. ———. "Plot thickens with new clue to death of Sherlock's greatest fan." The Times (London), Jan 9, 2006: 14.

"Richard Lancelyn Green, recognised as the leading expert on the work of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was found garrotted in his bedroom in March 2004 aged 50. His death has intrigued fans of Sherlock Holmes the world over. An inquest was unable to establish if he killed himself, died accidentally attempting a sexual practice, or was murdered as he attempted to prevent a Pounds 1 million auction of Conan Doyle's papers from going ahead...."

58. ———. "Puzzle of Holmes expert's death by garotte unsolved." The Times (London), Apr 24, 2004: 7.

The world's foremost authority on the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes was found garotted on his bed after trying to stop a Pounds 2 million auction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle papers....'There was to be a sale of certain books and documents belonging to the late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,' Dr [Paul Knapman] said. 'There's no doubt Mr Green thought it shouldn't go ahead. He was very anxious these documents should go to the British Library. I'm going to record an open verdict but in doing so I would not wish to stress the importance of any conspiracy theories.'..."

59. Upton, Jean. "Review--'The Oxford Sherlock Holmes: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' edited with an introduction by Richard Lancelyn Green." The Ritual, no. 12 (1993): 49-52.

60. Ventura, Steven. "Sherlock Riddle; Holmes expert found garotted." Daily Record, Apr 24, 2004: 6.

"Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, biographer of the fictional detective's Scottish creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was discovered with a shoelace tightened around his neck with a wooden spoon. Mr Green was believed to have grown increasingly concerned about an auction of Sir Arthur's diaries. The papers also reveal that Doyle clubbed seals to death while working as a surgeon on a ship in the Arctic in 1880."

61. Wilson, Jamie. "Mystery death of Holmes expert." The Guardian (London), April 24, 2004: 5.

"The world's foremost expert on Sherlock Holmes was found garrotted in his bed surrounded by cuddly toys and a bottle of gin, an inquest heard yesterday. Richard Lancelyn Green, 50, had become paranoid in the days before his death, telling friends and relatives that his home was bugged and that a mysterious American was out to besmirch his reputation. He died from asphyxiation after a garrotte was tightened around his neck. Yesterday coroner Paul Knapman called it a "very unusual death" and recorded an open verdict. He said there was insufficient evidence to rule whether it was suicide, murder or a deviant sexual act taken too far that had caused the death of the former chair man of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London...."

62. Woods, Audrey. "Conan Doyle's archive wrapped up in mystery; Author's 'lost' papers on display before sale Auction follows bizarre death of Holmes scholar." Toronto Star, May 15, 2004: A.08.

"Family and friends said [Richard Lancelyn Green] had become fixated on the Conan Doyle archive, believing it should be available to students and scholars, not sold and dispersed. 'He might have been in the prime position to write the definitive biography of Conan Doyle,' said his friend, Nicholas Utechin, editor of The Sherlock Holmes Journal. At Christie's, [Tom Lamb] said the auction house had consulted Lancelyn Green - co-author of an important bibliography of Conan Doyle - as an expert and 'he was very happy to help us.' In fact, eight of the photographs that illustrate the sale catalogue are 'by courtesy of Richard Lancelyn Green.' The auctioneer expects the sale will earn about $3.5 million (U.S.) for the beneficiaries of the author's daughter-in-law, Anna Conan Doyle. In the 1940s and 1960s, two Conan Doyle scholars had access to the papers, but after the death in 1970 of the author's son Adrian, court battles broke out over the estate, and the collection was locked up in a lawyer's office for about 25 years."

63. ———. "Mystery Attends Conan Doyle Auction; Sale Follows Strange Death of Sherlock Holmes Scholar." St. Louis Post-Dispatch (St. Louis, MO), May 16, 2004: A.15.

"Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts got a rare glimpse into the private world of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as thousands of personal papers - from his passport to his jotted-down story ideas - went on display Friday. At the same time, the archive has become entwined in a mystery worthy of Conan Doyle's celebrated fictional detective: the bizarre death of a Holmes scholar. The papers are to be auctioned Wednesday, perhaps to disappear again into the obscurity of private ownership, a fate that had obsessed Richard Lancelyn Green, a former chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London...."

64. Wordsworth, Araminta. "Conan Doyle auction opens amid mystery: Sherlock Holmes expert who opposed sale found dead." National Post, May 18, 2004: A.3.

"A treasure-trove of material on the life and works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is to be auctioned off at Christie's in London tomorrow against the backdrop of a mysterious death that might have fascinated the man who created Sherlock Holmes. Mr. [Richard Lancelyn Green], a former chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society and author of a biography of Conan Doyle, was discovered dead in his bed on March 27. He was surrounded by fluffy toys . Nearby was a bottle of gin. Friends and relatives of Mr. Lancelyn Green said the biographer was upset that the Conan Doyle papers were going to be sold off at auction piecemeal. He wanted them to be given to the British Library so they could be used by scholars, rather than disappear into private hands."

65. Wright, Jonathan. "The Guide: Television and Radio: Television: Boxing Day: Watch this: The Man Who Loved Sherlock Holmes 9pm, BBC4." The Guardian (London), Dec 24, 2005: 71.

"In March 2004, Richard Lancelyn Green was found dead, garrotted by a bootlace tightened with a wooden spoon. Millionaire Green was the world's foremost Sherlock Holmes expert, a man whose collection of Conan Doyle memorabilia was valued at pounds 2m when it was bequeathed to Portsmouth Library Service. But was Green's death a case of suicide or was it, as some have speculated, somehow related to an auction of Conan Doyle's so-called 'lost papers' at Christie's? A portrait of the kind of mystery that Holmes himself might have investigated, and a glimpse into the obsessive world of Sherlockians."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- H (23)

1. "50 Years Ago: Howard Haycraft and Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 5.

Highlights Howard Haycraft's contributions to Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and reprints part of a 1947 column by Haycraft in EQMM. Includes a reproduction of a cover of EQMM from the John Bennett Shaw Collection and the first page of an article by Haycraft in the November 1947 EQMM (from the Haycraft Collection).

2. "Peter Haining Writer and anthologist whose industrious output included horror, crime, cricket and history." The Daily Telegraph (London), December 28, 2007: 31.

Peter Haining, who has died aged 67, was a prolific writer and editor of more than 130 anthologies on subjects ranging from crime to horror, witchcraft and fantasy. In all, Haining produced more than 200 books, including what one critic acclaimed as 'some of the best anthologies of fantasy and horror of our time'....As well as his collections of other people's writing, Haining wrote history and biographies of fictional historical characters such as Sweeney Todd and Spring-Heeled Jack. He wrote an early novel under his own name and produced several crime anthologies using the pseudonyms Ric Alexander and Richard Peyton....Haining also published several reference books about the television series Doctor Who, notably Doctor Who: a Celebration; Two Decades in Time and Space (1983) and Doctor Who: the Key To Time, a Year-by-Year Record (1984). Another area of Haining's expertise was the Sherlock Holmes oeuvre, of which he had an encyclopaedic knowledge; he edited A Sherlock Holmes Compendium (1980) and several further books on the detective. Other film and television tie-ins featuring characters from literature included books on Maigret, Poirot and James Bond. Eccentrically given to outrageous shirts and silly hats, Haining habitually clipped and tore items out of newspapers and magazines and filed them away, a magpie habit that yielded ideas for many of his books....While working on his horror collections, Haining was told by a book dealer about four boxes of cuttings and scrapbooks on Sherlock Holmes, the lifetime collection of a solicitor who had started it in about 1910. This became The Sherlock Holmes Scrapbook (1975), a pull- together of articles, clippings and illustrations supporting the myth of Conan Doyle's character. The book prompted interest from Granada Television, which was making a series starring Jeremy Brett as Holmes, and Haining was invited to produce a book on the making of it, The Television Sherlock Holmes (1991)....Haining assembled 28 pieces on cricket by, among others, Trollope, Travers, Conan Doyle and John Arlott in LBW - Laughter Before Wicket (1986)...."

3. "Rogue's Gallery, Potted Biographies of Noted Sherlockians, Robert W. Hahn, BSI; The Five Hundred Year Old Sherlockian: An Interview by Mike Malice, CBS*." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 51-54.

4. "Rogue's Gallery, Potted Biographies of Noted Sherlockians, William Hyder." The Ritual, no. 20 (1997): 48-50.

5. "Sherlock Holmes: Victorian Sleuth to Modern Hero [advertisement]." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 48.

Announcement of a conference held at Bennington College in Vermont, June 23-26, 1994. Featured speakers include Nicholas Meyer and Edward Hanna.

6. Bergquist, John. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 2.

Discusses a letter in the December, 1901 issue of The Strand magazine (#132, Vol. 22, labeled "Grand Christmas Double Number") contained in the "Curiosities" section titled "Where Sherlock Holmes Died" dealing with the Reichenbach Falls (along with additional comment on Dr. Philip Hench's later interest in the Falls).

7. Cochran, William R. "From the Editor's Commonplace Book." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 62-63.

On the demise of the periodical Baker Street Miscellanea, Julie and Al Rosenblatt's 4-day mini-course on Holmes at Vassar College, an article in MHQ by Thaddeus Holt, the Folio Society's version of the Canon, the 25th anniversary of the Noble Bachelors of St. Louis, the Sherlock Holmes Society of London's "Back to Baker Street" festival, and the Books of Michael Harrison.

8. Darlington, Frank, George A. Vanderburgh, Thelma Beam, Doug Wrigglesworth, Bob Coghill, and Trevor S. Raymond. "'Bookshelf' Reviews of Oxford's The Sign of the Four, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, The Valley of Fear, His Last Bow and The Books of Michael Harrison." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 30-36.

9. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--'The Worth of the Game' by David L. Hammer." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 108.

10. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Edmund Bruce Holmes." Canadian Holmes 23, no. 2 (1999): 37-38.

11. ———. "Strictly Personal: Evelyn Herzog." Canadian Holmes 23, no. 3 (2000): 44-45.

12. ———. "Strictly Personal: Mark Hacksley." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 3 (1999): 38-39.

13. Farrell, John. "On the Terrace (Don Hardenbrook, BSI)." Shoso-In Bulletin 12, no. (2002): 205-206.

14. ———. "Passings -- Don Hardenbrook." Baker Street West 1 7, no. 1 (2001): 57.

15. Hall, John. "Review--'From Baltimore to Baker Street' by William Hyder." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 72-79.

"A past Gasogene of The Six Napoleons of Baltimore offers Sherlockian essays and dramatic readings that combine erudition with humour - and occasionally challenge such revered scholars as Vincent Starrett, Michael Harrison, and William S. Baring-Gould."

16. ———. "Robert W. Hahn." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 47.

17. Levin, Alfred A. "Remembrances of Bob Hahn." Shoso-In Bulletin 9, no. (1999): 1-3.

18. Raymond, Trevor S. "Michael Harrison." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 36.

Notes the work of Tina Rhea in assembling a bibliography of the works of Michael Harrison, now in a monograph, The Books of Michael Harrison, and available from the compiler.

19. Sveum, Richard J. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 3.

Focuses on Charles Honce and his work. "In 1950, the latest of Charles Honce’s fine press Christmas books was published by the Golden Eagle Press in Mount Vernon. The 58-page To Talk of Many Things was limited to 88 copies. It was designed and printed by S. A. Jacobs, who attended the 1950 BSI Dinner with Honce. The Sherlock Holmes Collections has John Bennett Shaw’s copy of this book, whose cover page indicates it is "A Book Lovers Opinion on a Lot of Other Subjects Including Eating, Drinking, Traveling, Decorating, Entertaining, and Dressing and Undressing...."

20. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 4.

Words of thanks to Jamie Hubbs, Collections Specialist, who leaves to go back to school and Bruce Southworth, who concludes his work as editor of the newsletter. Also a word on the upcoming Friends membership meeting and on the donation of collections.

21. ———. "The Hubbs Family Gift." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 1, 5.

Reports on the gift of the Hubbs family for the cataloging of the book and serial portions of the Collections. The project gift, which will take three years, was matched by the University Libraries. Additional information is provided on members of the Hubbs family who have played such an important role with the collections. Includes a photograph.

22. ———. "The View from Laurel Cottage." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 1-4.

Profile of lawyer, scholar, writer, publisher, philanthropist, and Sherlockian David L. Hammer.

23. Vande Water, Bill. "Howard Haycraft and the Detective Story." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 1, 6.

Observations on Howard Haycraft, a graduate of the University of Minnesota and later president of the H. W. Wilson Company, and his connections with the Sherlockian world.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Hammer, David L. (5)

1. Diamond, Susan Z. "Review - A Distinct Touch, Watson by David L. Hammer." The Serpentine Muse 21, no. 4 (2005): 24.

2. Hammer, David L. The game is underfoot! : the memoir of a Sherlockian publisher. Shelburne, Ont.: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 2001.

22 cm. Scuttlebutt Feb 2002.; "David is far more than a travel writer: he's a grand story-teller, and some of his best stories are about (and on) himself, and the people he has known. The Game is Underfoot! is a fine collection of stories about Jack Tracy, and Michael Harrison (who included a chapter about 'The Night I Raped the Succubus' in his unfinished sexual biography), and Sam Gringras, and Michael and Mollie Hardwick, and Tom Stix (his 'only known joke' noted in the index), and others; David has a splendid gift with language, and it's nice to be able to read stories well told."

3. Pollock, Donald K. "Book Review--'The Worth of the Game, Being a Final Guide to the England of Sherlock Holmes' by David L. Hammer." Baker Street Miscellanea, no. 74 (1994): 52.

4. Sveum, Richard J. "A Word from our President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 3.

Notes his visit with David and Audrey Hammer and the many donations of correspondence with John Bennett Shaw and back issues of periodicals that have been received by the Collections.

5. White, Kathryn. "Review--'The Before-Breakfast Pipe' by David Hammer." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 118-119.

07A Sherlockians and The Societies -- Sherlockians -- Harrison, Michael (1)

1. Rhea, Tina. The books of Michael Harrison (1907-1991). United States: Firecat Press, 1994.

LC Control Number: 95116576;

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Hollyer, Cameron (3)

1. Doyle, Michael et al. "Letters to the Editor concerning Cameron Hollyer." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 2 (2000): 45.

2. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Cameron Hollyer." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 4 (1997): 28-29.

3. McCausland, Dayna et al. "His Last Bow: Cameron Hollyer, 1926-2000." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 1 (2000): 14-29.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Howlett, Anthony D. (4)

1. "Anthony Howlett." The Times (London), September 16, 2003: 31.

"Barrister who started the Sherlock Holmes Society but had a soft spot for the detective's nemesis, Moriarty. Anthony Howlett, Remembrancer of the City of London and founder of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, was born on December 30, 1924. He died on August 21, 2003, aged 78....He revived the society under its present name after the Second World War, and acted for more than 30 years as secretary, chairman and, finally, president. Under his management, its membership grew from 130 to more than 1,000 members, acquiring in the process a long waiting list...."

2. "Barrister was Sherlock Holmes fanatic: 'I've spent my life being pompous,' he said. He relaxed with the great detective." The Gazette (Montreal), August 30, 2003: E5.

Obituary of Anthony Howlett. "'I've spent my life being pompous,' he said. He relaxed with the great detective. Anthony Howlett, who died on Aug. 21 aged 78, was a barrister at the Board of Trade and Remembrancer of the City of London; but he was more widely known as founder and presiding inspiration of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London. The original Sherlock Holmes Society, founded by A.G. Macdonell in 1934, had been a casualty of the war (and of the founder's indiscretion with the wife of the president). The origins of the new society were laid in 1951 at the time of the Sherlock Holmes Exhibition, which was mounted by Marylebone Public Library as its contribution to the Festival of Britain. Tony Howlett, then a newly fledged barrister with too much time on his hands, had haunted the Marylebone library to lend what help he could; the frequency of his visits was not uninfluenced by the presence of Freda Pearce, the assistant librarian who, a year later, became his wife...."

3. "In Memorial Anthony Howlett." Baker Street West 1 9, no. 2 (2003): 28-30.

4. "Obituary of Anthony Howlett Barrister who restarted the Sherlock Holmes Society and re-enacted the encounter at Reichenbach Falls." The Daily Telegraph (London), August 27, 2003.

"Anthony Howlett, who died on August 21 aged 78, was a barrister at the Board of Trade and Remembrancer of the City of London; but he was more widely known as founder and presiding inspiration of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London. The original Sherlock Holmes Society, founded by A G Macdonell in 1934, had been a casualty of the war (and of the founder's indiscretion with the wife of the president). The origins of the new society were laid in 1951 at the time of the Sherlock Holmes Exhibition, which was mounted by Marylebone Public Library as its contribution to the Festival of Britain. Tony Howlett, then a newly-fledged barrister with too much spare time on his hands, had haunted the Marylebone library to lend what help he could; the frequency of his visits was not uninfluenced by the presence of Miss Freda Pearce, the assistant librarian who, a year later, became his wife...."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- J (2)

1. Raymond, Trevor S. "In memoriam Owen C. Jones." Canadian Holmes 28, no. 3 (2005): 47.

2. Tinsley, Debbie. "Nan James obituary." The Camden House Journal 18, no. 6 (1996): insert.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- K (5)

1. "Letters to Baker Street." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 118-119.

Letters from Jon Lellenberg, Tina Rhea, and Brad Keefauver.

2. Baker, Jody. "In the Beginning Was Ronald Knox." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 7-9.

3. Cotner, Robert, C. Frederick Kittle, Eli Liebow, and Vincent Starrett. Caxtonian. vol. 5, no. 3, March 1997, [Holmesiana periodical articles. Chicago, Ill.: Caxton Club, 1997.

ill., ports. ; 28 cm. Dr. Kittle and Dr. Doyle : kinsmen through medicine and belle letters / RC [Robert Cotner] -- There's more to Doyle than Holmes / by C. Frederick Kittle -- Doyle influenced by English and American literature / [Eli] Liebow -- A chronology of books by Arthur Conan Doyle 1859-1930 / C. Frederick Kittle -- Caxtonian's classic poem salutes Holmes and Watson : Sonnet 221B / Vincent Starrett.;

4. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Joseph Theodore Kessel." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 4 (1999): 39-40.

5. Sexton, David. "Spoofs and dupes Radio." Sunday Telegraph (London), April 28, 2002: 11.

All the Knoxes loved jokes and spoofs, as Penelope Fitzgerald shows in her wonderful joint biography of them, The Knox Brothers, just republished. As boys, for example, they wrote a letter to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, denouncing inconsistencies in the Sherlock Holmes stories and including five dried orange pips, in allusion to the threatening letter in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Later, Ronald Knox expanded the joke into an essay called "Studies in the Literature of Sherlock Holmes", a parody of Biblical scholarship in which he pretended to detect, from careful study of the text, that some of the stories must be fictitious inventions by a drunken Watson. Conan Doyle was delighted by the spoof and wrote to Ronald Knox to thank him. Nowadays we're rather more sensitive. Or so it would seem from the first programme, called Panic in the Streets, in a new series, The History of Fear (Radio 4, Monday), presented by the feminist historian, Joanna Bourke. On January 16, 1926, Father Ronald Knox (as he was by then) went into a studio in Edinburgh and delivered a talk over the air called 'Broadcasting from the Barricades'. An introductory statement explained that the talk was a work of humour and imagination and would be illustrated with 'sound effects', then a novelty. Knox proceeded to describe a riot of the unemployed in central London as though it were happening in real time. Parliament and the Savoy Hotel were blown up and the Minister of Traffic was hanged from a lamp-post. Meanwhile, an assistant in the studio produced crashes and bangs and even the sound of breaking glass. The broadcast took in many listeners, and Father Knox was much reprimanded in the press...."

07a Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Kittle, C. Frederick (1)

1. Terras, Donald J., and C. Frederick Kittle. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes : Essays and Art on the Doctor and the Detective. [Chicago]: Northeastern Illinois University Press, 2003.

C. Frederick Kittle Collection of Doyleana (Newberry Library) ; ill., ports. ; 26 cm. Dr. Kittle and Dr. Doyle : kinsmen through medicine and belle letters / by Robert Cotner -- Have you a 'reminiscences' in your attic / by Raymond L. Betzner -- A doctor's unjaundiced look at the Victorian medical scene (or, Eschewing the syringe for the pen) / by Ely M. Liebow -- Down the slopes with Conan Doyle at Davos (the birth of skiing) / by C. Frederick Kittle -- The magic doors / by Julie McKuras -- Sir Arthur Conan Doyle on stamps / by Marshall Blankenship -- Military intelligence? Jumbo shrimp? What about amateur mendicant? / by Susan Rice -- The romance of medicine for doctors Doyle and Kittle / by Richard J. Sveum -- Arthur Conan Doyle visits Chicago, 1894 / by C. Frederick Kittle -- Kittle collection of Doyleana, Newberry Library Chicago. Core collection -- Appendix. A chronology of books by Arthur Conan Doyle: 1859-1930. "Commemorating the Kittle Collection of Doyleana, Newberry Library, April 11, 2003."/ Laid in: Program for Doyle exhibit dinner, April 11, 2003./ Includes bibliographical references. Compiled and edited by Donald J. Terras.;

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Klinger, Leslie S. (43)

1. "Columnist's Choice." Booklist 102, no. 9/10 (2006): 78-78.

This article presents the author's top ten list of series, sets, and multivolume works from 2005 and earlier. Topping the list are "The Complete Calvin and Hobbes," by Bill Watterson, "The Complete Peanuts," by Charles Schulz, "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," edited by Leslie S. Klinger, "Oxford Illustrated Dickens," and the "Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen."

2. "The New Annotated Dracula." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 34 (2008): 48-48.

The article reviews the book "The New Annotated Dracula," by Bram Stoker and edited by Leslie S. Klinger. Norton, $39.95 (624p) ISBN 978-0-393-06450-6. "Klinger brings the same impressive breadth of knowledge that distinguished The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes to this definitive examination of one of the classic horror novels of all time. Adopting the conceit that Stoker's narrative is based on fact, Klinger elucidates the plot and historical context for both Stoker devotees and those more familiar with Count Dracula from countless popular culture versions. Because he had privileged access to the typescript Stoker delivered to his publisher, Klinger is able to note changes between it and the first edition and comment on the reasons for them. Through close reading, Klinger raises questions about such matters as the role of lead vampire-hunter Van Helsing and whether the villainous count is actually dispatched at book's end. An introduction by Neil Gaiman, numerous illustrations, essays on topics ranging from Dracula in the movies to the academic response, and much more enhance the package. 8-city author tour."

3. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes (Book)." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 36 (2004): 48-48.

Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, compiled by Leslie S. Klinger.

4. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 35 (2005): 37.

Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Homes: The Novels," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

5. Albrecht, Bob, and Paul Davis. "Elemental, my dear Holmes, elemental." Learning and Leading with Technology 27, no. 8 (2000): 22-27.

Web sites and activities that invite students to examine some of the mysteries of Mars and the human body are presented. The Web sites offer information on the percentages by mass of the elements of the human body, the atmospheres of the Earth and some other planets, and the structures of Earth and Mars. The activities encourage students to make a table and bar chart showing the masses in kilograms of the elements in their bodies and create a table and bar chart showing the percent by mass of water, fats, carbohydrates, proteins, and bone in the human body of their choice. The introduction and concluding sections of the article contain multiple references to Holmes and Doyle. The last section includes information on the first appearance of the phrase "elementary, my dear Watson, elementary." There are additional references to the timeline created by Les Klinger as part of his research.

6. Baker, Simon. "The Character Who Refused to Die." Spectator 299, no. 9254/9255 (2005): 64-64.

The article reviews books "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, Volume III: The Novels," by Arthur Conan Doyle and "Sherlock Holmes: The Unauthorized Biography," by Nick Rennison.

7. Bollen, Rebecca. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes. 2 vols. (Book)." Library Journal 129, no. 19 (2004): 60-60.

Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

8. Brown, Craig. "Clued up; Avast tome that pores over every detail of Sherlock Holmes's life means you'll always be." Mail on Sunday (London), January 1, 2006: 59.

Review of The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, edited with notes by Leslie S. Klinger. "...The Annotated Sherlock Holmes is a mad and magnificent undertaking: 3,500 beautiful pages, spread across three weighty volumes, containing every Sherlock Holmes story ever written, hundreds of apposite pictures, ranging from film stills to maps to contemporary illustrations, plus acres of witty and scholarly (and how rarely those two adjectives go together!) notes...."

9. Chapman, Paul M. "Review--'The Sherlock Holmes Reference Library: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' by Leslie S. Klinger." The Ritual, no. 22 (1998): 71-72.

10. ———. "Review--'The Sherlock Holmes Reference Library: The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes' by Leslie S. Klinger." The Ritual, no. 25 (2000): 63-64.

11. Cochran, William R. "A Review of The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels by Leslie Klinger." The Camden House Journal 27, no. 10 (2005): insert.

12. Dahlin, Robert, Natalie Danford, Charles Hix, Karole Riippa, and Laurele Riippa. "Fall 2004 Hardcovers: Fiction/Mystery & Suspense." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 32 (2004): 161-164.

Features several mystery and suspense books including a Holmes citation: "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes (Nov., $75, boxed), Edited by Leslie S. Klinger, is an illustrated two-volume edition that reassembles 56 classic stories in chronological order, and includes biographies, historical and cultural details."

13. Dalrymple, Theodore. "Holmes and his commentators." The New Criterion 24, no. 3 (2005): 4-8.

Avid Sherlock Holmes fan Theodore Dalrymple takes issue with the annotations in three canonical editions of Arthur Conan Doyle's work. The three are William S. Baring-Gould's of 1967; the Oxford Sherlock Holmes of 1993; and the just published The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels, edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

14. Fisher, Benjamin Franklin. "The Poets of the Nineties." Victorian Poetry 40, no. 3 (2002): 328-332.

Includes reference to Doyle and Holmes. "Several recent books merit attention as important contributions to 1890s studies....Two books that might not immediately suggest '1890s,' but that nevertheless relate to our concerns, merit notice in the anniversary year of the primary text, Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, one of the most poetic pieces of fiction during the era, and certainly his most poetic piece of prose. First, a new edition, edited and annotated by Leslie S. Klinger (Gasogene Books), a title in the 'Sherlock Holmes Reference Library' series, offers a useful text of the novel, with explanations for variant readings (most from published texts, as only a small part of Doyle's novel survives in manuscript form), with helpful explanatory notes and an extensive, equally valuable, bibliography of secondary works. Despite the admittedly zany nature of some of the secondary items, sufficient meat and potatoes for the more serious make this a book not to be overlooked by students of the era. Dovetail reading appears in The Hound of the Baskervilles, Chapter XI (Baker Street Irregulars in cooperation with the New York Public Library--Berg Collection [2001]), which offers a facsimile of the one entire chapter extant in manuscript form, along with essays by eminent Doyle scholars concerning the nature of the novel. Reiterated comments about the importance of sense of place and landscape reveal just how linked The Hound is to other Nineties texts, such as Housman's, and how poetic is its technique, with, for example, Watson as 'chorus' (p. 68). One critic also compares this revival of legend and myth (Victorian poets' repeated practices), folk hero (Holmes) and all, to Beowulf (pp. 64-65)."

15. Fuller, Graham. "The Game's Afoot: Dr. Watson gives his verdict on a must-have Sherlock Holmes edition." Daily News (New York), January 9, 2005: 19.

Review of Les Klinger's The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes. "...That quibble aside, I am led to believe this is the most important edition dedicated to our collaboration since William S. Baring-Gould's 'The Annotated Sherlock Holmes' of 1967. Reading the stories again, I conclude that, above and beyond their enormous criminological value, they paint an extraordinarily rich picture of the Victorian and Edwardian eras, a notion enhanced by the copious photographs and amusing illustrations by Mr. Paget and others. (The cinematic 'stills' will indubitably annoy you.)..."

16. Glenn, Joshua. "Posner V. Sherlock." The Boston Globe, October 10, 2004: D2.

"Richard Posner's scathing reviews of everything from feminist legal theory to the 9/11 commission report have earned him a reputation as a kind of literary hanging judge. Now, the eminent jurist and legal scholar has taken aim at a new target - Sherlock Holmes. In a review of 'The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories' (Norton) in the Oct. 11 issue of The New Republic, Posner heaps scorn upon the forensic methods of Conan Doyle's fictional sleuth...."

17. Goldfarb, Clifford S. "Holmes: The game is truly afoot." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), December 18, 2004: D6.

Review of Les Klinger's The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes. "...Les Klinger is a Los Angeles tax lawyer and a highly respected Sherlockian scholar. He set out to produce The Sherlock Holmes Reference Library , a nine-volume work intended for serious devotees, summarizing the literature on each of the stories. Partway through this process, which still has three volumes to go, Klinger undertook to produce a more popular work, intended to appeal to the general reader. The result is the very attractive, massive two-volume (1,945 pages) The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes , containing all 56 short stories, in the order in which they were published in The Strand Magazine between 1891 and 1927. A third volume, containing the four novels, will be published in late 2005...."

18. Gray, Patrick. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes." Touchstone: A Journal of Mere Christianity 19, no. 1 (2006): 51-52.

Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," written by Arthur Conan Doyle and edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

19. Herbert, Paul. "'Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts': a response to Leslie S. Klinger's 'From Prussia with Love'." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 36-38.

20. Hickling, Alfred. "Saturday Review: A four-pipe poseur: Alfred Hickling on the definitive guide to Holmes: The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes edited by Leslie S Klinger 1,878pp, Norton, GBP35." The Guardian (London), December 4, 2004: 9.

"Ever since Holmes made his debut in Arthur Conan Doyle's novel A Study in Scarlet in 1887, there has been no shortage of bizarre theories to explain the perplexing inconsistencies of the detective's career. Did he tumble to his death at the Reichenbach Falls? Where was he educated? Did he know Freud? And just how many wives had Dr Watson? These are questions that have tickled the imaginations of Holmes addicts since approximately 1911, when the the first piece of Sherlockian scholarship was published by Father Ronald Knox, who proposed to apply the detective's own methods of deduction to the narrative....A small army of narrative sleuths has been sifting through the canon ever since, on the basis that there is nothing scholars love more than a giant, contradictory codex in which nothing adds up. The first notable attempt to present an overall digest of Sherlockian suppositions came with the publication of William S Baring-Gould's monumental Annotated Sherlock Holmes in 1967, which is still considered to be the standard work of reference. A more recent milestone was reached with the 1993 publication of the Oxford Sherlock Holmes , the most authoritative modern edition of the texts, though its editor, Owen Dudley Edwards, insists on regarding the stories as fictions created by Conan Doyle, a position that makes him, in the eyes of certain Sherlockians, a bit of a killjoy. Leslie S Klinger's enormous New Annotated Sherlock Holmes now arrives to remedy that position.

21. Hobbs, Don. "Review--A Study in Scarlet edited by Leslie Klinger." The Holmes & Watson Report 8, no. 3 (2004): 21.

22. Hoffert, Barbara. "Prepub Alert." Library Journal 133, no. 10 (2008): 72-76.

The article reviews several books including Stoker, Bram. The New Annotated Dracula. Norton. Dct. 2008.464p. ISBN 978-0-393-06450-6. $39.95. "Leslie S. Klinger (The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) digs through myth, culture, and graveyards in Transylvania to illuminate Stoker's dark and creepy tale. With an eight-city tour."

23. Jackson, Lorne. "Homing in on Holmes; Books, Leslie S. Klinger, The Annotated Sherlock Holmes - Volume III (Norton, pounds 30)." Sunday Mercury, January 15, 2006: 6.

"That famously obsessive-compulsive detective, Sherlock Holmes, has always attracted his fair share of obsessive-compulsive fans....But even the most ardent Sherlockian is likely to be overpowered by the Annotated Sherlock Holmes, which wallows in the minutiae surrounding the master detective. The third and final volume contains all the novels that Conan Doyle wrote about the pipe-puffing sleuth (*2). Of course, the books are available elsewhere, and at a cheaper price. What makes this edition, and two previous ones, indispensable is the addition of maps, film images, contemporary illustrations and a free-for-all of fabulous footnotes (*3) (*4). Leslie S Klinger, the editor of the voluptuous volume, is the pedant's pedant, having pored over the Holmes canon with a pin-prick passion for painstaking detail...."

24. ———. "How trail of The Hound led to Brum; Unmasked: the Baskerville who inspired Sherlock Holmes classic." Sunday Mercury, February 26, 2006: 14.

"A leading Sherlock Holmes expert claims The Hound Of The Baskervilles might never have been written if Arthur Conan Doyle had not lived in Birmingham. Leslie Klinger says the creator of the famous Baker Street sleuth copied the name from the influential 18th century Birmingham printer, John Baskerville. Although studying for his medical degree in Edinburgh, Doyle spent several months working in the West Midlands from 1879 until 1882. Based in Aston, he took up a temporary medical assistantship with a local general practitioner. And while living in the area, he is believed to have come across the name of Baskerville...."

25. Keefauver, Brad. "Review--'The Date Being---? A Compendium of Chronological Data Expanded and Revised' by Andrew Jay Peck and Leslie S. Klinger." The Holmes & Watson Report 1, no. 1 (1997): 20.

26. Klinger, Leslie S. "Review: The Broker, by John Grisham." Los Angeles Times, January 9, 2005: 4.

In Books section. Review of The Broker by John Grisham.

27. Leitch, Thomas. "The Long & the Short." Kirkus Reviews 73, no. 17 (2005): 928-928.

Offers observation on the disparity between achievement in short mystery fiction and long. Praise for Leslie S. Klinger's editing of the book "New Annotated Sherlock Holmes"; Critique of the novels included in the book; Strength of Agatha Christie's anthology "Masterpieces in Miniature."

28. Leith, Sam. "A man of many dressing-gowns." Spectator 296, no. 9200 (2004): 36.

Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," edited by Leslie Klinger.

29. Levin, Martin. "Holmes eternal." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), April 23, 2005: D17.

"Arthur Conan Doyle believed in fairies, ectoplasmic emanations and spirits beyond the grave. Still, this credulous man also gave us a rationalist immortal in Sherlock Holmes. The Sherlockian canon, 56 stories and four novels, is, despite more internal contradictions than Marx's capitalism, still read and revered by millions, has spawned countless films and television series, and numberless imitations, homages and pastiches. The unabated fascination with the great consulting detective since his first appearance in A Study in Scarlet in Beeton's Christmas Annual of 1887 shows a staying power unmatched among his sleuthing rivals...." A number of currents works, e.g. Klinger's annotated, Chabon's Final Solution, are noted.

30. McGrath, Charles. "Sherlock Holmes's eternal appeal." The International Herald Tribune, May 24, 2005: 10.

Mention of recent works on Holmes including Klinger's Annotated and Carr's Italian Secretary, among others. "Sherlock Holmes, the subject of a spate of recent books, has enjoyed what must surely be the most extensive afterlife of any character in fiction. To begin with, he survived the attempt of his own creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, to kill him off in the 1893 story 'The Final Problem,' the one that begins with Watson writing, 'It is with a heavy heart that I take up my pen'..."

31. Miller, Laura. "Zelig on Baker Street." New York Times Book Review 154, no. 52998 (2004): 31-31.

Presents an essay on Sherlock Holmes and his many resurrections since his invention some 150 years ago. Contention that the book "Curious Incident of the Dog in The Night-Time," by Mark Haddon, not only gets its title from author Arthur Conan Doyle but also parallels the way that trusty Watson could notice facts without grasping their meaning; "The Hamilton Case," by Michelle de Kretser which also makes mention of Holmes; "Final Solution," by Michael Chabon where an elderly unnamed man (suggested to be Holmes) is brought out of retirement to solve a case; Criticism of "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes edited by Leslie S. Klinger who is a confirmed Sherlockian; How the campiness of the stories remains a winning feature after all this time.

32. Nawotka, Edward. "Sherlock Holmes stories, and much more." The Gazette (Montreal), January 22, 2005: H6.

Review of The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories, Edited by Leslie Klinger, Norton, 1,878 pages.

33. Olding, Alan C. "Wigmore Street Postbag: Klinger's Annotated." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 27, no. 2 (2005): 88.

34. Picker, Leonard. "Not So elementary." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 36 (2004): 49-49.

Interviews author Leslie S. Klinger about his book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes." Comparison between his book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes" and the original "Annotated Sherlock Holmes"; His method of researching and choosing his sources; Reason behind his decision to give hints to the mysteries' solutions in each story introduction.

35. Posner, Richard A. "CSI: Baker Street." New Republic 231, no. 15 (2004): 47-49.

Reviews the book The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories, by Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

36. Ross, Oscar, Nicholas Utechin, M. J. Elliott, Catherine Cooke, William Nadel, and Roger Johnson. "'I Am an Omnivorous Reader': reviews of On the Trail of Arthur Conan Doyle: An Illustrated Devon Tour by Brian W. Pugh and Paul Spiring, A Remarkable Mixture: Award-Winning Articles from The Baker Street Journal by Steve Rothman, Anthony Boucher: A Bibliography by Jeffery Marks, The Science of Sherlock Holmes--from Baskerville Hall to The Valley of Fear: The Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective's Greatest Cases by E. J. Wagner, Rathbone Returns! A Misadventure Called Sherlock Holmes by S. E. Dahlinger and Glen S. Miranker, The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes 2 by Arthur Conan Doyle, The Speckled Band and The Beryl Coronet by The Sherlock Holmes Society of London, You Know My Methods, Watson by David Hammer, Baker Street Rambles by Leslie S. Klinger, From the Archives of Sherlock, A Study in Celluloid, The Quintessential Sherlock Holmes by Richard L. Boyer, and The Game's Afoot edited by David Stuart Davies." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 29, no. 4 (2008): 157-161.

37. Sullivan, Greg. "Review--The Sherlock Holmes Reference Library: A Study in Scarlet edited by Leslie Klinger." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 4 (2001): 21, 30.

38. Tardiff, Jill A., Randy Kato, Shannon Maughan, John Niernberger, Diane Patrick, Karole Riippa, Laurele Riippa, and Mary Ann Tennenhouse. "Working the Floor." Publishers Weekly 251, no. 18 (2004): 59-165.

Presents information on several exhibitors at the 2004 BookExpo America. Empire Publishing Service lists The Ultimate Sherlock Holmes Encyclopedia by Jack Tracy. W.W. Norton & Co. lists the New Annotated Sherlock Holmes by Leslie Klinger.

39. Weingarten, Marc. "Case of the Lawyer With a Sherlock Holmes Bent." The New York Times, December 30, 2004: E1.

Portrait of Klinger and review of his "New Annotated Sherlock Holmes." "Leslie S. Klinger is not one of those Sherlock Holmes obsessives who feel compelled to actually live as if they were distant relatives of the fictional detective. He doesn't greet visitors wearing a deerstalker hat and an Inverness cape, and his cheerful contemporary home in Malibu, Calif., is a far cry from the Victorian lodging house at 221B Baker Street where Holmes and his trusty sidekick, Dr. John Watson, lived in London. But as Holmes himself could attest, first impressions can be deceiving. Step into Mr. Klinger's home office and you will find the evidence of his abiding passion: Thousands of books about one of the world's most famous crime busters. This is the raw material for Mr. Klinger's project 'The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes,' a two-volume, 10-pound collection of all 56 Holmes short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, complete with Mr. Klinger's exhaustive footnotes...."

40. ———. "A lawyer's Sherlockian pursuit." The International Herald Tribune, January 14, 2005: 9.

"Leslie Klinger is not one of those Sherlock Holmes obsessives who feel compelled to actually live as if they were distant relatives of the fictional detective. He doesn't greet visitors wearing a deerstalker hat and an Inverness cape, and his cheerful contemporary home in Malibu, California, is a far cry from the Victorian lodging house at 221B Baker St. where Holmes and his trusty sidekick, Dr. John Watson, lived in London. But as Holmes himself could attest, first impressions can be deceiving. Step into Klinger's home office and you will find the evidence of his abiding passion: Thousands of books about one of the world's most famous crime busters. This is the raw material for Klinger's project 'The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes,' a hefty two- volume collection of all 56 Holmes short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, complete with Klinger's exhaustive footnotes...."

41. ———. "Sinking his critical teeth into 'Dracula'; After investigating and annotating Doyle's Sherlock Holmes tales, Leslie Klinger focuses on Stoker's novel." Los Angeles Times, October 31, 2008: E14.

"After writing nearly 2,000 footnotes for Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes corpus, one might think Leslie Klinger would take a respite. After all, he has a thriving tax law practice in Los Angeles. But when the three volumes of 'The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes' received glowing reviews upon their publication beginning in 2004 and wound up selling more than 50,000 copies, Klinger felt emboldened to ask his publisher, W.W. Norton, what his next project might be...."

42. Wheatcroft, Geoffrey. "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition 2005: P10.

Reviews the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," edited by Leslie S. Klinger.

43. Whittington-Egan, Richard. "Living with and Annotating Sherlock Holmes." Contemporary Review 286, no. 1669 (2005): 95-101.

This article focuses on a fictitious character [sic], Sherlock Homes, with reference to the book "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes," edited with a foreword and notes by Leslie S. Klinger. The book consists of two volumes and it is a collection of 56 short stories. The original edition of this books was edited by William S. Baring-Gould. In the original (1968) edition, Baring-Gould elected to go nap on his own personal and controversial concept of the chronology of the stories, Klinger decided to relegate all such data to a most useful Chronological Table at the end of Volume One. Something in the region of two thousand annotations are scattered broadcast throughout the book, lifting the curtain on the modes, manners and events of Victorian England, and ventilating, and where necessary explaining, Sherlockian theoretical constructs past and present.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- L (5)

1. "In Memoriam Brant Lopez and Ronald Weyman." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 4 (2007): 41-42.

2. "Rogue's Gallery, Potted Biographies of Noted Sherlockians, Alfred A. Levin, BSI." The Ritual, no. 19 (1997): 50-52.

3. "Sherlock Holmes in many languages." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 1 (1998): 1-3, 5.

Profile of Fred Levin's interest in Yiddish language versions of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Includes photograph of Bruce Southworth, Fred Levin, and Dr. Richard Sveum.

4. Gil, Olga et al. "In Memoriam: Anne Skene Melvin, Mary Campbell, Stephen R. Tolins, Robin W. Links, Kathleen Morrison, and Frank Darlington." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 20-27.

5. Sveum, Richard J. "Library Receives Maiwand Jezails Artifacts." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 1, 4.

Notes the donation by Richard D. Lesh, BSI, of souvenirs of the June 2, 2001 Maiwand Jezail dinner in Omaha, Nebraska to the Holmes Collections. Also provides additional information on Professor Lesh and the Maiwand Jezail scion society. Includes a photograph of Lesh and the author at the dinner.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Lellenberg, Jon L. (23)

1. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 32 (2007): 52-52.

The article reviews the book Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

2. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 18 (2007): 973-973.

The article reviews the book "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg and edited by Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

3. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Library Journal 132, no. 20 (2007): 114.

Review of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters. Penguin Pr: Penguin Group (USA). 2007. c.608p. ed. by Jon Lellenberg & others, index. ISBN 978-1-59420-135-6. $37.95.

4. "The Ghosts of Baker Street." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 47 (2005): 26-26.

Review of The Ghosts of Baker Street. Edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower (Carrol & Graf), $16.95 paper (240p) ISBN 0-7867-1400-X

5. "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 14 (2005): 44.

Reviews the book "The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes," by Caleb Carr, with an afterword by Jon Lellenberg.

6. "Letters to Baker Street." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 118-119.

Letters from Jon Lellenberg, Tina Rhea, and Brad Keefauver.

7. "A man divided." Economist 385, no. 8549 (2007): 98-99.

This article reviews the books "Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg.

8. "The Mythmaker." New Republic 238, no. 4 (2008): 46-50.

The article reviews the book "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

9. "Trade Paperbacks." Publishers Weekly 248, no. 33 (2001): 233.

Presents a list of paperbacks including Sound & Vision (dist. by Firefly) Quotable Alice and Quotable Sherlock (Dec., $14.95 each), edited by David W. Barber, "collect quotes from the works of Lewis Carroll and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle." Berkley Prime Crime's More Holmes for the Holidays (Oct., $13), edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg and Carol-Lynn Waugh, "features the famous detective."

10. "The World of Paperbacks." Contemporary Review 290, no. 1691 (2008): 521-524.

Lists a few titles related to Doyle and Holmes. "Also from Phoenix we have...Andrew Lycett's Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes (GBP10.99) whose hardback edition was hailed in this journal as 'the best and . . . certainly the fullest' biography of the writer...Vintage Classics have brought out Arthur Conan Doyle's famous novel. The Hound of the Baskervilles and have included with it not only the short story, The Adventure of the Speckled Band, which Doyle judged his best story, but an introduction by Ruth Rendell and all for GBP5.99....The life of Arthur Conan Doyle is arguably best seen in his correspondence and Harper Perennial has brought out Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters (GBP12.99), edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley. The review of the hardback edition praised this 'valuable collection', based on Doyle's letters to his mother, letters which were 'frank and revealing'and which showed his 'many and varied interests'...."

11. Birch, Dinah. "Elementary love." TLS, no. 5458 (2007): 3-5.

The article reviews the books "Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower, and Charles Foley.

12. Carey, John. "Outwitted by his own creation." The Sunday Times (London), August 26, 2007: 39.

Review of Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes by Andrew Lycett and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters edited by Daniel Stashower, Jon Lellenberg and Charles Foley.

13. Foden, Giles. "Review: Book of the week: The case of the mysterious author: Giles Foden is glad that a new biography of Conan Doyle focuses on work rather than wacky beliefs." The Guardian (London), September 22, 2007: 7.

Review of Andrew Lycett's biography, Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes by Andrew Lycett: 525pp, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, GBP20. "...Conan Doyle has found a biographer of distinction in Andrew Lycett, who has previously written lives of Rudyard Kipling, Ian Fleming and Dylan Thomas. Lycett's brilliant piece of detective work on the author of the Sherlock Holmes stories now allows us to judge his literary worth against that of his peers and properly to set him in the context of his times...." Mention also made of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower "and Conan Doyle's great-nephew Charles Foley (HarperCollins, pounds 25)."

14. Hirst, Christopher. "The case of the wooden spoon ; A kitchen implement is just one of the clues surrounding the mysterious death of a leading Sherlock Holmes expert. Christopher Hirst dons his deerstalker and takes up the trail." The Independent (London), Dec 21, 2004: 5.

"The Edinburgh-based [Arthur Conan Doyle] specialist Owen Dudley Edwards told [David Grann] he believed [Richard Lancelyn Green] had been murdered. Edwards said that the wine-lover Green would never have drunk gin after dinner. He noted that Green was garrotted with a shoelace, but wore slip-on shoes. Garrotting, Edwards suggested, was 'a method a skilled professional would use'. Warning Grann: 'Please be careful. I don't want to see you garrotted,' he named the American, a defence specialist he described as 'one of Donald Rumsfeld's pals'. Though Grann says the American's job 'has given him a slightly menacing air - at least in the mind of Green's friends', [Jon L Lellenberg] (as we can surely call him) emerges as an admirer of Green. He says a lecture Green gave on The Hound of the Baskervilles was 'dazzling'. Grann writes: 'As he sat up in his chair and his eyes brightened, I realised I was talking not to Green's Moriarty but to his soulmate.' Professor Moriarty was, of course, Holmes's greatest enemy. Green and Lellenberg were collaborators until they fell out in the early Nineties. Lellenberg stressed that he had not seen or spoken to Green for more than a year. He was in London on the night Green died, but he had an alibi: 'He revealed with some embarrassment [that] he was walking through London on a group tour of Jack the Ripper's crime scenes.'"

15. Hobbs, Don. "Review--More Holmes for the Holidays edited by Martin Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg and Carol-Lynn Waugh and The Vital Essence by David L. Hammer." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 6 (2000): 14.

16. ———. "Review--Murder in Baker Street edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 5 (2003): 23.

17. McCarter, Jeremy. "One-Hit Wonder." New York Times Book Review 157, no. 54174 (2007): 15-15.

The article reviews the books "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

18. McKuras, Julie. "'The Historian of This Bunch'." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 7.

A welcome and brief biographical sketch of Jon Lellenberg, a new member to the newsletter editorial board.

19. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 4.

Some observations on the arrival of the Paton Collection, other articles in the newsletter, the identity of "A.M." as Arthur Mee, and a correction to include Jon Lellenberg on the editorial board.

20. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 2.

Observations on some of the changes that have affected the Collections: the move into the new library, the contributions of new writers for the newsletter, and the addition of Jon Lellenberg to the editorial board.

21. Muller, Alexandra. "Sleuthing Conan Doyle." New Criterion 26, no. 10 (2008): 25-29.

The article reviews two books related to surgeon and writer Arthur Conan Doyle including "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

22. Ng, U. En. "The King Street mystery." New Straits Times, Jun 10, 2004: 05.

"Investigating the possibility that [Richard Lancelyn Green] might have been attempting to re-enact a scene from [Holmes], [Paul Knapman] sought references to garrotting in the stories and found one: there was a garrotter in the pay of Professor Moriarty, Holmes's nemesis. [Jon Lellenberg] contributed to the Christie's sale catalogue and met members of the Sherlock Holmes Society. Lellenberg told the Observer from Washington: 'I have no knowledge of why he was paranoid about it. It would be silly and delusional to be concerned about me because the work I do has nothing to do with intelligence and surveillance at any level.' While speculation continues to surround Lancelyn Green's death, the Christie's auction proceeded without further complication...."

23. Propson, David. "Sir Arthur Conundrum Doyle." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 12/08, 2007: W12.

The article reviews the books "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Liebow, Ely M. (3)

1. Berry, John. "Program picks & pans." Library Journal 120, no. 10 (1995): 46.

Previews the American Library Association's 114th Annual Conference in Chicago, June 22-28, 1995, with reference to Doyle and Holmes. Ely M. Liebow (Dr. Joe Bell: Model for Sherlock Holmes); Let a Woman in Your Life: The Women in Conan Doyle's Life and Fiction. Sublibrarians Scion of the Baker Street Irregulars.

2. Cohen, George. "Dr. Joe Bell: Model for Sherlock Holmes." Booklist 103, no. 16 (2007): 17.

Reviews the book 'Dr. Joe Bell: Model for Sherlock Holmes,' by Ely M. Liebow.

3. Herguth, Bob. "Ely Liebow." Chicago Sun-Times, Dec 19, 1994: 16.

"He's a Sherlockian. He's an author and a Northeastern Illinois U. English prof who's an expert on Sherlock Holmes. He's a member of the fictional detective's fan club, the Baker Street Irregulars. In 1991, the Irregulars gave him the rare Two-Shilling Award. And a Derlethian. He just edited and produced a book of essays about the late August Derleth, a cult figure who lived in Sauk City, Wis. Derleth wrote more than 150 books, ranging from horror tales to children's classics. Liebow's book is titled August Harvest...." (excerpt)

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- M (20)

1. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 2.

Highlights Sherlockian James Montgomery (b. 1898) and his writings.

2. "In Memoriam Mary McMahon." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 3 (2007): 56-57.

3. "In Memory of Richard Moore." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 46.

4. "Letters to Baker Street." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 56-57.

Letters from Donald K. Pollock, Wayne and Francine Swift, Robert A. Moss

5. "News Notes." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 44-47.

News of various events. Includes an obituary notice for Richard Moore of Oak Park, Illinois.

6. "Sherlock Holmes: Victorian Sleuth to Modern Hero [advertisement]." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 48.

Announcement of a conference held at Bennington College in Vermont, June 23-26, 1994. Featured speakers include Nicholas Meyer and Edward Hanna.

7. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Ann Melvin." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 4 (1998): 36-37.

8. ———. "Strictly Personal: Dayna McCausland." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 2 (1994): 35-36.

9. ———. "Strictly Personal: Ihor Mayba." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 3 (2002): 32-32.

10. ———. "Strictly Personal: Kae MacKenzie." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 1 (2002): 26-27.

11. ———. "Strictly Personal: Kae MacKenzie." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 2 (2000): 29-30.

12. ———. "Strictly Personal: Margaret Murray." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 1 (1996): 27-28.

13. ———. "Strictly Personal: Peter Knox Mutchler." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 2 (2003): 18-19.

14. Gassner, C. Bryan, and Morrow Hall. "The Haunted Bookplate: Six Decades from Crosswords to Shilling." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 141-148.

Presents a biographical sketch of Katherine McMahon, one of the very first who qualified for membership in the BSI, but who was denied that pleasure for nearly sixty years because of her gender.

15. Gil, Olga et al. "In Memoriam: Anne Skene Melvin, Mary Campbell, Stephen R. Tolins, Robin W. Links, Kathleen Morrison, and Frank Darlington." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 20-27.

16. Green, Maureen, and Kate Karlson. "In Memoriam: Mary E. Campbell and Ann Skene Melvin." The Serpentine Muse 19, no. 3 (2003): 7-9.

17. Shelby, Joyce. "Brooklyn People in Profile." Daily News (New York), January 11, 1999: 2.

"Pam McAllister says she isn't that big a fan of mysteries, but she has loved Sherlock Holmes since she was a teen. 'He's a real free spirit. When he wants to sleep, he sleeps. When he gets engrossed in a mystery, he throws himself into it. But in the middle of it, if he wants to go to the opera, he goes to the opera.' With Dick Riley, McAllister recently co-wrote 'The Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Sherlock Holmes.' While researching the book, McAllister said, she uncovered a world of facts and fans...."

18. ———. "Metro People in Profile." Daily News (New York), January 12, 1999: 3.

"Pam McAllister says she isn't that big a fan of mysteries, but she has loved Sherlock Holmes since she was a teen. 'He's a real free spirit. When he wants to sleep, he sleeps. When he gets engrossed in a mystery, he throws himself into it. But in the middle of it, if he wants to go to the opera, he goes to the opera.' With Dick Riley, McAllister recently co-wrote 'The Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Sherlock Holmes.' While researching the book, McAllister said, she uncovered a world of facts and fans...."

19. Stix, Thomas L., Jr. "Stand With Me Here Upon the Terrace. . . Edith Meiser, BSI." The Serpentine Muse 12, no. 2 (1993): 5.

20. Sveum, Richard J. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 4.

Notes the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Annual Meeting scheduled for Friday, June 29, 2001, at the Elmer L. Andersen Library and that the membership meeting will be held in conjunction with the Norwegian Explorers conference -- 2001: A Sherlockian Odyssey, A Journey Among the Shaw 100, scheduled for June 29 to July 1, 2001. Also notes the University's sesquicentennial year fundraising campaign (and support for the Collections), the fifth year of this newsletter, and the 2001 Baker Street Irregular's investiture of the newsletter editor, Julie McKuras.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Mackenzie, Stanley (9)

1. "GBP148,000 is paid by fans of the great detective." The Times (London), July 25, 1995: 1.

"Addition, not deduction, is clue to Sherlock Holmes sale. A Twitch of a deerstalker or the tap of a Meerschaum pipe was enough to catch the auctioneer's eye at Sotheby's yesterday as an outstanding Sherlock Holmes collection was sold for Pounds 148,000. Magazines, books, papers and memorabilia collected by Stanley MacKenzie, a renowned Sherlockian and Basil Rathbone-lookalike who died aged 82 in February, fetched more than double the estimated value...."

2. "Sherlock Holmes collection sold." The Toronto Star, July 25, 1995: C7.

"American bidders pushed up prices yesterday at an auction of Sherlock Holmes memorabilia from the late British Holmes expert, Stanley MacKenzie, which sold for nearly $236,000 at Sotheby's. That figure was nearly double pre-auction estimates."

3. "Sherlock Holmes items to be sold." The Gazette (Montreal), July 11, 1995: C7.

"One of the finest collections of Sherlock Holmes material ever offered for sale is expected to fetch $150,000 Canadian at auction in London this month, Sotheby's said yesterday. The July 24 auction will feature first editions, papers and memorabilia relating to one of the world's most famous fictional detectives and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The collection was amassed by Stanley Mackenzie, a former custodian of London's Sherlock Holmes Society, who died this year. The items for sale include the pipe used by Peter Cushing in his film portrayal of the Victorian detective and a gold cigarette case inscribed, by Conan Doyle, 'Sherlock Holmes.'"

4. "Two pipes, a pile of earth." USA Today, July 12, 1995: 09A.

"Two pipes, a pile of earth . . . and a cigarette case? What can it all mean? Elementary: one of the most comprehensive collections of Sherlock Holmesia is going on sale later this month, Sotheby's auction house announced. The collection, from the estate of Stanley MacKenzie, a senior member of the Sherlock Holmes Society, includes a rare edition of Beeton's 1887 Christmas Annual."

5. Davies, David Stuart. "Review--Sotheby's Auction, The Stanley MacKenzie Collection." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 212.

6. Davies, David Stuart, and Roger Johnson. "Stanley Mackenzie 1913-1995." The Musgrave Papers, no. 8 (1995): 125-126.

7. Shaw, John. "Last chapter in strange case of the literary detective." The Times (London), July 11, 1995: 1.

"A fascination with Sherlock Holmes, which turned a schoolboy into a literary detective, will lead to a Pounds 70,000 book sale in London this month. Stanley MacKenzie became a world authority on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional detective and his collection of first editions, reference books and papers is regarded as the finest in Europe. As an honorary member of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, Mr MacKenzie, who lived in west London and died aged 82 earlier this year, had been consulted frequently by playwrights and film-makers. The material he collected will now be sold at Sotheby's on July 24...."

8. Watson, Peter. "For Sale all the Evidence of a Great Detective." The Guardian (London), June 11, 1995: 6.

"Baker Street Irregulars will this week be invited to one of the greatest gatherings Sherlock Holmes buffs have known. The jamboree is not at 221B Baker Street, mythical home of the great pipe-smoking detective, but round the corner in Bond Street, where the world's largest and most important collection of Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes memorabilia is about to go under the hammer at Sotheby's. The collection of Stanley MacKenzie, actor and deputy stage manager of the Royal Shakespeare Company -- who died in February, aged 82 -- probably contains not just everything Arthur Conan Doyle wrote on Holmes, but everything written about Holmes, together with memorabilia from every play, film and TV adaptation...."

9. ———. "Sherlock Holmes collection on London auction block." The Ottawa Citizen, June 15, 1995: F16.

"Baker Street Irregulars will this week receive invitations to one of the greatest gatherings Sherlock Holmes buffs have known. The jamboree is not at 221B Baker Street, mythical home of the great pipe-smoking detective, but round the corner in Bond Street, where the world's largest and most important collection of Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes memorabilia is about to go under the hammer at Sotheby's. The collection of Stanley MacKenzie, actor and deputy stage manager of the Royal Shakespeare Company -- who died in February, aged 82 -- probably contains not just everything Arthur Conan Doyle wrote on Holmes, but everything written about Holmes, together with memorabilia from every play, film and television adaptation...."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- McDiarmid, E. W. (1)

1. The pipe dream continues-- Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota. Edina, MN: Salamander Co., 1998. Visual Material 1 videocassette (59 min.).

sd., col. ; 1/2 in. VHS format. "An irregular look at Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota"--Container. Written and directed by Rolf J. Canton.; "Salutes the 50th anniversary of the Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota ... Interviews of the four living founders [E.W. McDiarmid, Bryce Crawford, E.W. Ziebarth, and Ray Shove] and several other members are intercut with a dramatization of an older Holmes and Watson preparing to visit Minneapolis, Minnesota, for the anniversary conference"--Container.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- McDiarmid, Erret W. (15)

1. "The Best and Wisest Man." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 1.

Notes the passing of Erret W. "Mac" McDiarmid on April 27, 2000. Includes a photograph of McDiarmid and Bryce Crawford.

2. "Remembrances." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 12.

List of donors who made contributions in memory or honor of a special individual. Includes a photograph of Peter Blau, E. W. McDiarmid and Mike Whelan and another of three of the founders of the Norwegian Explorers: E. W. Ziebarth, Mac McDiarmid, and Bryce Crawford.

3. "You may have read of the remarkable explorations of a Norwegian named Sigerson..."." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 1-3.

Biographical profile of E.W. "Mac" McDiarmid. Includes photograph of McDiarmid and Dorothy Rowe Shaw, reproduction of McDiarmid bookplate for the University of Minnesota Libraries Sherlock Holmes Collections

4. Bergquist, John. "E. W. McDiarmid: A Friend to All Who Knew Him." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 9.

Based on a spoken appreciation delivered at the Annual Meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota on August 2, 2000.

5. Johnson, Timothy J. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 5.

Notes recent activities including recent class visits, preparations for the summer conference and exhibit, work with the Weisman Museum on their "Cabinet of Curiosities" exhibit, and an article on the Collections in the St. Paul Pioneer Press. Also noted is progress on fund-raising for McDiarmid curatorship, work with the Law Library on a conference tie-in with the exhibit, and the passing of Wayne Swift.

6. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 5, 8.

Comments on the final move into and grand opening of the Elmer L. Andersen Library. work on the Hubbs cataloging project, the latest exhibit, "Better Holmes and Gardens: Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Architectural Design 'Down Under' and the passing of E. W. McDiarmid.

7. ———. "An Update From the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 6-7.

An abbreviated version of the 'State of the Collections' address given at the annual membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections. Includes a photograph of Richard Sveum and Anne McDiarmid and another photograph of Jim Deleo, Mary McDiarmid, and the author.

8. ———. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 4.

Reports on the status of the cataloging project funded by the Hubbs family and on a gift by Mary McDiarmid towards the endowed curator position.

9. Malec, Andrew. "Some Personal Recollections of the Early Days of the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 1, 10-11.

A reminiscence from an Irregular who played a role in the early days of the collections. Includes a picture of the author with E. W. McDiarmid and another photograph from the July 1983 "Adventures on the Air" with John Bennett Shaw, Austin McLean, Edith Meiser, and McDiarmid.

10. McKuras, Julie. "A McDiarmid Bibliography." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 10.

A list of E. W. McDiarmid's Sherlockian writings.

11. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 7.

Comments on the writings in this issue; the newest contributor/writer for the newsletter, John Bergquist; and the passing of E. W. McDiarmid. Includes a photograph of "the Man behind Mrs. Hudson."

12. ———. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 5.

Some reflections on E. W. McDiarmid and friends of the collections. Includes a photograph of Paul Smedegaard, Tim Johnson, Fred and Sunnie Levin.

13. Sveum, Richard J. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 4.

Notes the upcoming August Friends annual meeting, the opening of the Elmer L. Andersen Library, and the passing of E. W. McDiarmid.

14. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 3 (2000): 4.

Highlights events at the annual membership meeting of the Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections including meeting in the new Andersen Library, awarding Lucy Brusic the volunteer of the year, the establishment of an endowment named in honor and memory of E. W. McDiarmid for the curator's position, and tributes to McDiarmid. Includes a photograph of Lucy Brusic and Tim Johnson.

15. ———. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 4.

Notice of the next Friends annual meeting in conjunction with the 2001 conference co-sponsored with the Norwegian Explorers. Also information on the University's capital campaign and the desire to raise funds for the McDiarmid endowed curator position.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Morley, Christopher (2)

1. McKuras, Julie. "Morley and Company." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 1, 6.

Reports on the visit of Anthony J. Morley, son of the late Felix Morley, to the Collections, information on the Morley family, and the donation of materials to the Collections. Includes a photograph of Jamie Hubbs, Collections Specialist, and Anthony Morley.

2. McKuras, Julie, and Steven Rothman. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 3.

Reports on the publication of two books by Christopher Morley in 1949: The Ironing Board, a collection of essays, and The Man Who Made Friends With Himself, a novel. Additional information on the editions and copies held by the Collections.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- N (1)

1. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Hartley Ronald Nathan." Canadian Holmes 23, no. 4 (2000): 26-27.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- O (4)

1. "Passings Syd Goldberg, John J. Brousch, Donald O'Connor." Baker Street West 1 9, no. 2 (2003): 46.

2. "The Second Shoso-In Bulletin Award Is Presented to Alan C. Olding." Shoso-In Bulletin 13, no. (2003): 3.

3. Barnes, Bill. "Interview with Alan Olding BSI." Shoso-In Bulletin 14, no. (2004): 10-13.

4. Raymond, Trevor S. "Obituary, Gerry O'Hara." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 2 (1998): 28.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- P (7)

1. "Bimetallic Question, Obituary for Charles Purdon." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 1 (2002): 27.

2. "Letters to Baker Street." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 56-57.

Letters from Donald K. Pollock, Wayne and Francine Swift, Robert A. Moss

3. Bergquist, John. "The Paton Collection Comes to Minnesota." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 1, 6.

Highlights the arrival of Jennie Paton's audio-visual collection to Minnesota.

4. Cleveland, Ceil. "Murder and Mirth at 'Ghoul School'." Chronicle of Higher Education 49, no. 41 (2003): B5.

Talks about the experience of attending a mystery writing seminar attended by members of the Mystery Writers of America and other academics, held in the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park South in New York City. Includes a reference to Holmes and Judge Andrew Peck. "...Among the classmates with whom I've shared the corpse of a Cornish hen and a bottle of Chianti are an epidemiologist, an international lawyer, and a judge -- Andrew J. Peck, who wrote an important reference work on Sherlock Holmes, The Date Being ... ? (Magico Press, 1996)."

5. Howlett, Tony. "His Last Bow: Michael E. Pointer, A Personal Reminiscence." The Ritual, no. 23 (1999): 44-45.

6. McKuras, Julie. "100 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 2.

Sherlock Holmes Baffled was made in 1900, and marked the premier of the Master Detective in the new entertainment medium of the motion picture. Although the film lasts less than one minute, the impact of Holmes on the screen is still felt 100 years later. Jennie Paton has donated a copy of this film to the Sherlock Holmes Collections.

7. Thomalen, Robert E., Howard Brody, and William Hyder. "'Stand with me here upon the terrace...'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 188-189.

Obituaries for Robert N. Brodie, Ralph F. Turner, and R. Irving Paxton.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Paton, Jennie (1)

1. McKuras, Julie. "The Paton Collection." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 7.

Provides additional information on the newly acquired Paton collection of audio-visual materials.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Penzler, Otto (5)

1. "Notes on current books: Fiction." Virginia Quarterly Review 74, no. 2 (1998): 59.

Reviews the book 'The Best American Mystery Stories, 1997,' edited by Robert B. Parker. Reference to Doyle and Holmes. "Series editor Otto Penzler reminds us that the short story, not the novel, is the natural form of the traditional mystery and, when Parker observes that Conan Doyle's invention of Sherlock Holmes created the very category of the mystery, he validates Penzler's claim, since the best Holmes fiction comes in the form of the short story."

2. Dahlin, Robert. "Publishers Are Getting Really Series-ous." Publishers Weekly 249, no. 16 (2002): 38.

Presents remarks from several editors of mystery books regarding the popularity and the challenges in launching mystery books. Includes reference to Holmes from Otto Penzler (Otto Penzler Books, Carroll & Graf). "...I believe that we all have a sense of extended family in our lives--this includes our friends, the colleagues we work with, all of the people we look forward to seeing on a regular basis. That sense of family applies to mystery characters as well. When writers create characters that we really enjoy being with, we're happy to go back and visit them again and again in a series. This is especially true when there is a coterie of others surrounding that character. They become family too. It's like visiting Sherlock Holmes at 221B Baker Street or Nero Wolfe in his New York apartment...."

3. Spake, Amanda. "It's no mystery." U.S.News & World Report 124, no. 3 (1998): 58.

Looks at the history of crime fiction. The booming sales in mystery fiction; The popularity of P.D. James, and others; How the success of crime fiction threatens its future; Editors and writers suggesting that publishers tried to cash in on crime; The glut on the market; The mystery bookstores that have a tradition of making the reputations of local writers; What mystery writing provides the reader. Includes a reference to Doyle and Holmes as well as Otto Penzler. "...A few of mystery's grandmasters: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle; a gentleman and his sidekick...."

4. Steinberg, Sybil, and Jonathan Bing. "Forecasts: Fiction." Publishers Weekly 245, no. 10 (1998): 51.

Reviews the book 'Murder for Revenge,' edited by Otto Penzler.

5. Zipp, Yvonne. "Lots of crime, not much 'whodunit' in 1997's best American mysteries." Christian Science Monitor, Jan 14, 1998: 12.

Reviews the book 'The Best American Mystery Stories 1997,' edited by Robert B. Parker and series editor Otto Penzler.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- R (14)

1. "Antiques & Collecting: Collecting Dates." Birmingham Post, December 12, 1998: 47.

"...Next Thursday at Sotheby's sale rooms in New Bond Street, London, letters, photographs and other documents are being sold which show that this literary giant of extraordinary intellect and maturity was completely and utterly fooled by two small schoolgirls. The documents are among a magnificent collection of Sherlockiana which is being dispersed at an auction, efforts having failed to keep the entire collection - hundreds of books and thousands of other documents together. The collection was formed by Mr Norman L Rosenbaum who began when he was a student at London University, scouring the bookshops of Charing Cross Road and Cecil Court for the author's works...."

2. "Bill Rabe material comes to Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 1-3, 5.

Discusses acquisition and contents of the Bill Rabe Collection acquired by the University of Minnesota Libraries.

3. "Gaslight Grimoire: Fantastic Tale of Sherlock Holmes." Publishers Weekly 255, no. 36 (2008): 39-39.

The article reviews the book "Gaslight Grimoire: Fantastic Tale of Sherlock Holmes," edited by J. R. Campbell and Charles Prepolec. Edge (www.edgewebsite.com), $16.95 paper (336p) ISBN 978-1494063-17-3. "In his foreword, David Stuart Davies asserts that the authors of these 11 stories pitting Holmes against the supernatural 'are very well-versed in the world of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson.' Unfortunately, this authority fails to come through. The eloquence of the one standout, Barbara Roden's 'The Things That Shall Come Upon Them,' only emphasizes what the others lack. Roden effortlessly involves Holmes in a mystery derived from M.R. James's classic tale of terror, 'Casting the Runes,' featuring psychic sleuth Flaxman Low. By contrast, Martin Powell's 'Sherlock Holmes in the Lost World' sees Holmes battling ape-men and dinosaurs without any display of his remarkable intellect, and M.J. Elliott's 'The Finishing Stroke' pays so much homage as to neglect originality. As a whole, this mixed bag fails to differentiate itself from other similar anthologies."

4. "In Memoriam William E. (Bill) Ricker." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 2 (2001): 38.

5. "Letters to Baker Street." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 2 (1994): 118-119.

Letters from Jon Lellenberg, Tina Rhea, and Brad Keefauver.

6. "Strictly Personal: Trevor Scott Raymond." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 3 (2007): 34-35.

7. Blau, Peter E. "About Bill Rabe." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 4 (1997): 3.

Biographical information and personal reflections and insights about Bill Rabe.

8. Cochran, William R. "From the Editor's Commonplace Book." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 62-63.

On the demise of the periodical Baker Street Miscellanea, Julie and Al Rosenblatt's 4-day mini-course on Holmes at Vassar College, an article in MHQ by Thaddeus Holt, the Folio Society's version of the Canon, the 25th anniversary of the Noble Bachelors of St. Louis, the Sherlock Holmes Society of London's "Back to Baker Street" festival, and the Books of Michael Harrison.

9. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Barbara Rusch." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 4 (1996): 30-31.

10. ———. "Strictly Personal: Christopher Roden." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 4 (2002): 18-19.

11. ———. "Strictly Personal: Warren Randall." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 3 (2001): 40-41.

12. Elliott, Doug. "In Memoriam: Dr. Al Rodin." Canadian Holmes 28, no. 1 (2004): 13.

13. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "Obituary: Samuel Rosenberg." The Independent (London), Jan 19, 1996: 16.

"The presence of Friedrich Nietzsche at the Reichenbach Falls in 1877 was the premiss for Rosenberg's theory that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle based the character of Professor Moriarty on the German philosopher and that Doyle's detective stories were the 'pre-Freudian psycho-dramatic confessions' of a 'self-revealing allegorist'. His findings were published in 1974 by Bobbs Merrill (or Boobs Merrill as he referred to them). The book, Naked is the Best Disguise: the death and resurrection of Sherlock Holmes, enjoyed great success in America (where it sold over 25,000 copies in hardback and was on the 'Book-of- the-Month' list for several months), and there was success of a different sort in England where Desmond Elliott of Arlington Books was forced to remainder many thousand copies to the delight of bemused Sherlockians, who were able to purchase them for as little as 50p a copy."

14. Thomas, Robert McG, Jr. "Samuel Rosenberg, 85, Explorer Of Secrets of Sherlock Holmes." The New York Times, January 12, 1996: 25.

"Samuel Rosenberg, a photographer, author and raconteur who turned his voracious reading habits, prodigious memory and hyperactive imagination into a subsidiary career as a literary psychosleuth, died last Friday at the New York Hospital Medical Center in Queens. He was best known for 'Naked Is the Best Disguise,' his 1974 study of the literary and libidinous wellsprings of the Sherlock Holmes canon...."

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Roberts, S. C. (Sydney Castle) (1)

1. Roberts, S. C. Adventures With Authors. Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

22 cm. Undergraduate -- Publishing and soldiering -- Post-war Cambridge -- Secretary to the Syndics -- Pembroke in the Nineteen-Twenties -- Johnsoniana -- Science a best seller -- Histories and historians -- Poets and critics -- Play-acting -- A miscellany of authors -- Light and shade in the Nineteen-Thirties -- Varieties of war-time experience -- Vice-Chancellor -- At home and abroad -- More Johnsoniana -- Sherlock Holmes -- Max -- Films and libraries -- Emeritus. "First published 1966. This digitally printed version 2010"--T.p. verso./ "Paperback re-issue"--P. [4] of cover./ Includes index.; "'S.C.' was known as a vivid raconteur and mimic; more formally he was recognized as a publisher of skill and distinction, who graduated to become Master of his college and Vice-Chancellor of his university and to receive a knighthood. ... [H]e joined Cambridge University Press as 'assistant secretary' in 1911, served four war years as a lieutenant in the Suffolk Regiment, with a wound at Ypres, and three years after his return was appointed Secretary (or director) of the Press. His adventures and achievements in that capacity are the subject of the main part of this book. ... His 'Adventures' contain, first, a rich collection of his 'stories'. ... [T]hey offer a series of insights into human nature, especially in the notoriously delicate relationship between author and publisher. Roberts' 'Authors' include Jeans and Rutherford, Dover Wilson and Granville Barker, Housman and de la Mare and many others. Secondly, the book is a record ... of the way of life of a major university as it evolved from the Victorian to the modern mode"--P. [4] of cover.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- S (16)

1. "Letters to Baker Street." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 1 (1994): 56-57.

Letters from Donald K. Pollock, Wayne and Francine Swift, Robert A. Moss

2. Dahlinger, Susan E. "A Remembrance: Paul Smedegaard, BSI, 1941-2007." The Serpentine Muse 24, no. 3 (2008): 7.

3. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: David J. Sanders." Canadian Holmes 20, no. 3 (1997): 36-37.

4. ———. "Strictly Personal: Dolores (Dee) Rossi Script." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 3 (2004): 31-32.

5. ———. "Strictly Personal: Gary Wayne Shorney." Canadian Holmes 24, no. 4 (2001): 20-21.

6. ———. "Strictly Personal: Lewis David St. Columb Skene-Melvin." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 3 (1995): 30-31.

7. ———. "Strictly Personal: Rabbi Steven Saltzman." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 1 (2001): 40, 48.

8. Dunning, William. "Dorothy Shaw Draws a Full House." Baker Street West 1 2, no. 1 (1996): 25-27.

9. Ewing, Geoff. "In Memoriam: Harry Sutherland." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 4 (2006): 47.

10. ———. "In Memoriam: Trudy Schuurman." Canadian Holmes 28, no. 1 (2004): 11-13.

11. Lellenberg, Jon L. "'A Certain Gracious Lady'." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 7.

A remembrance of Dorothy Rowe Shaw who died on November 24, 1999.

12. ———. "Norman Schatell." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 2 (1998): 1-2-5.

Portrait of Norman Schatell.

13. McKuras, Julie. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 3 (1999): 8.

Reports on the tour given to Paul Smedegaard and Ed Christenson, from Wisconsin, during their attendance at the annual meeting of the Friends. Includes a photograph.

14. Raymond, Trevor S. et al. "In Memoriam Eric Silk M.Bt B.S.I." Canadian Holmes 28, no. 1 (2004): 14-23.

15. Stix, Dorothy K. "Dorothy Rowe Shaw, April 29, 1924 - November 24, 1999." The Serpentine Muse 16, no. 2 (2000): 7.

16. Sveum, Richard J. "From the President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 2 (1999): 4.

Words of thanks to Jamie Hubbs, Collections Specialist, who leaves to go back to school and Bruce Southworth, who concludes his work as editor of the newsletter. Also a word on the upcoming Friends membership meeting and on the donation of collections.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Sarjeant, William A. S. (11)

1. "Obituary for W. A. S. (Bill) Sarjeant." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 1 (2002): 47.

2. "The Record." Report / Newsmagazine (National Edition) 29, no. 17 (2002): 50.

Presents a number of obituaries for notable Canadians as of September 2, 2002. Included is paleontologist, geologist and naturalist William A.S. (Bill) Sarjeant, 66; of liver cancer, in Saskatoon, July 8, who "once co-authored a book arguing that Sherlock Holmes was actually a woman."

3. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 8.

Notes the visit of Dr. William A. S. Sarjeant to the Collections in April, along with a photograph from his visit.

4. Bradley, Alan et al. "Remembering W. A. S. (Bill) Sarjeant." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 2 (2002): 14-20.

5. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: William Anthony Swithin Sarjeant." Canadian Holmes 19, no. 3 (1996): 22-23.

6. Klinger, Leslie S. "Letter to the Editor, 'W. A. S. Sarjeant'." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 3 (2003): 4.

7. Lynch, Bohun. Menace from the moon. Shelburne, Ont.: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1999.

ill. ; 22 cm. Scuttlebutt Dec. 2000.; "William A. S. Sarjeant continues to pursue his varied interests in geology and science fantasy, contributing an introduction to a first-ever reprint..."

8. Pemberton, S. George, Richard T. McCrea, and Martin G. Lockley. "William Antony Swithin Sarjeant (1935-2002)." Ichnos 10, no. 2-4 (2003): 55-56.

Points out that William Anthony Swithin Sarjeant, ichnologist, palynologist, philosopher, science fiction writer, historian, cultural heritage patron, poet, educator, folk singer and Sherlock Holmes scholar, was a man for all seasons. Outstanding attributes of a research scientist; Well-rounded fusion of dynamic researcher, an inspired teacher, and a dedicated worker for the discipline.

9. ———. "William Antony Swithin Sarjeant (1935-2002): A Celebration of His Life and Ichnological Contributions." Ichnos 11, no. 3/4 (2004): 181-181.

Focuses on the life and works of William Antony Swithin Sarjeant, ichnologist, palynologist, philosopher, science fiction writer, historian, cultural heritage patron, poet, educator, folk singer, and Sherlock Holmes scholar. Causal factor for the death of Sarjeant; Career highlights; Work achievements.

10. Spalding, David A. E., S. George Pemberton, Richard T. McCrea, and Martin G. Lockley. "William Antony Swithin Sarjeant (1935-2002)." Ichnos 10, no. 2-4 (2003): 57-68.

Presents a short biography of ichnologist William Antony Swithin Sarjeant. Education at the University of Sheffield; Teaching and marriage; Transatlantic visits; Nottingham; Saskatoon; Honors; Ichnological contributions.

11. Tokaryk, Tim. "Obituary: William Anthony Swinton Sarjeant, 1935-2002." Geology Today 18, no. 6 (2002): 210.

Pays tribute to geologist William Sarjeant of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Contributions in the field of geology; Awards received; Personality.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Shaw, John Bennett (21)

1. "The Charm of Variety." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 5.

Call for letters written by John Bennett Shaw for addition to the Holmes Collections.

2. "It was in a city in Russia..." (Golden Pince-Nez)." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 3 (1997): 1-2, 4.

Discusses John Bennett Shaw's acquisition of the Czarina's Tauschnitz editions of The Hound of the Baskervilles, A Study in Scarlet, and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Includes photographs of the Tauschnitz editions and the Czarina.

3. "Libraries around the country." Civilization 2, no. 5 (1995): 92.

Presents a calendar of events for libraries in the United States. Includes "University of Minnesota--Sherlock Holmes and John Bennett Shaw: The Detective and the Collector. Celebrates the university's establishment of Shaw's personal library as a source for Holmes research. October 13 through November 30 at the Wilson Library..."

4. Sherlock Holmes. [Minneapolis]: [WCCO Television], 1996. Visual Material 1 videocassettes (15 min.).

WCCO-TV (Television station : Minneapolis, Minn.) sd., col. ; 1/2 in. Beta and VHS formats. Broadcast Jan. 21, 1996 on KTCA-TV, St. Paul, Minn. [program narrated by Dave Moore].; In an episode of Moore on Sunday, James Hubbs reveals the extent of the Holmes materials, donated in part by John Bennett Shaw, in the Special Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries.

5. Bergquist, John. "50 Years Ago." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 3.

Discusses John Bennett Shaw’s 1950 notebook that contains a political cartoon that appeared that year in the January 27 Chicago Tribune. "The White House Sleuth" depicts President Harry S. Truman in Sherlockian garb peering through a magnifying glass. Truman is standing in a coal field atop a lit stick of dynamite labeled "miners’ revolt" while saying in effect "What coal crisis?" Additional information is given on the coal crisis and President Truman. Also includes a photo of the cartoon.

6. Blau, Peter E. "'Stand with me here upon the terrace...': John Bennett Shaw." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 4 (1994): 243.

Brief obituary of the pre-eminent Sherlockian, John Bennett Shaw who died on Oct. 2 of a heart attack.

7. Brusic, Lucy McTeer, ed. Sherlock Holmes the detective & the collector : essays on the John Bennett Shaw Library. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Library, Special Collections and Rare Books, 1995.

Contents: Preface / Austin J. McLean -- Editor's note / Lucy M. Brusic -- John Bennett Shaw : A remembrance / Thomas L. Stix Jr. -- Labryinths : the worlds of Sherlock Holmes / Lawrence Frank -- Holmes by any other name : translating the Sherlock Holmes stories / Nils Nordberg -- Holmes and Watson among the scholars : when the game is really afoot / J. Randolph Cox --The writings about the writings : being a requiem for the great game / David L. Hammer -- Turn the dial to Sherlock Holmes on radio / William Nadel -- I see Sherlock everwhere : Holmes on film / Jennie C. Paton -- If it sticks to the ceiling it must be done : the Holmes pastiche / Robert Brusic -- Elementary Holmes : Sherlockian children's literature / Ruth Berman -- Sherlock Holmes meets Batman : the great detective in American comic books / Charlotte A. L. Erickson (cont.) Contents: The Art and craft of Sherlock Holmes, and I don't mean detection / Derham Groves -- I never believed there was a society such as yours : Sherlockian Societies / Peter E. Blau -- Contributors. Includes bibliographical references. ;

8. De Waal, Ronald B. "Tribute to the Master Collector John Bennett Shaw, 1914-1994." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 6.

9. Decker, Jeff. "Tales from Dartmoor: John Bennett Shaw, 1913-1994." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 4 (1994): 245.

Memorial cartoon for John Bennett Shaw.

10. France, F. Dennis. "Sherlock Holmes and John Bennett Shaw, The Detective and the Collector." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 15-17.

11. Hollyer, Cameron et al. "'The Godfather of the Bootmakers': John Bennett Shaw, 1913-1994." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 2 (1994): 10-20.

12. Johnson, Roger. "Editorial: John Bennett Shaw 1914-1994." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 22, no. 1 (1994): 1-2.

13. Lovisi, Gary. "A Short Appreciation of John Bennett Shaw." Shoso-In Bulletin 6, no. (1996): 18.

14. McKuras, Julie. "The Basic Holmesian Library." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 3 (2001): 1, 5.

Some observations on John Bennett Shaw's "List of 100" and the exhibit based on Shaw's list that was displayed during the conference "2001: A Sherlockian Odyssey". Includes seven photographs from the exhibit and visitors during the conference including Les Klinger, Jon Lellenberg, Richard Lancelyn Green, and Dan Posnansky.

15. ———. "Pipes, Matches and Tobacco." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 2 (2000): 1, 6.

Discusses John Bennett Shaw's notebook of tobacco-related ephemera and his collection of matchbooks. Includes a photograph of Doyle on a cigarette card and two other photos of items from the collection.

16. Rice, Susan. "Holmes Thoughts From Abroad: John Bennett Shaw 1913-1994." The Ritual, no. 14 (1994): 32-34.

17. Sarjeant, William A. S. "'what we do is a great game': John Bennett Shaw as Correspondent." Canadian Holmes 18, no. 2 (1994): 21-30.

18. Shaw, John Bennett, and Catherine Cooke. Collecting Sherlockiana: John Bennett Shaw's basic Holmesian library, (Rupert Books monograph series). Cambridge: Rupert Books, 1998.

19. Stix, Thomas L., Jr. "Salute to Shaw." The Musgrave Papers, no. 6 (1993): 97.

20. Sveum, Richard J. "A Word from our President." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 4 (1998): 3.

Notes his visit with David and Audrey Hammer and the many donations of correspondence with John Bennett Shaw and back issues of periodicals that have been received by the Collections.

21. Thiel, Carl William. The Basic 100: the 100 most important critical studies and association items to the Sherlock Holmes canon as suggested by John Bennett Shaw. A Collector's Guide. Shelburne, ON: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Dec 1996; Foreword by Ray Betzner;

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Shove, Ray (1)

1. The pipe dream continues-- Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota. Edina, MN: Salamander Co., 1998. Visual Material 1 videocassette (59 min.).

sd., col. ; 1/2 in. VHS format. "An irregular look at Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota"--Container. Written and directed by Rolf J. Canton.; "Salutes the 50th anniversary of the Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota ... Interviews of the four living founders [E.W. McDiarmid, Bryce Crawford, E.W. Ziebarth, and Ray Shove] and several other members are intercut with a dramatization of an older Holmes and Watson preparing to visit Minneapolis, Minnesota, for the anniversary conference"--Container.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Starrett, Vincent (12)

1. "50 Years Ago: "you will send for a hansom"." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 1, no. 2 (1997): 5.

Discusses The Second Cab and other "Cab" publications of the Speckled Band of Boston. Also discusses Vincent Starrett's short story, "A Picture for Ronald Colman."

2. "Review--'The Somnambulist and the Detective' by Susan Rice." The Holmes & Watson Report 4, no. 6 (2001): 45.

3. Ashworth, Peter. "Review--The Somnambulist and the Detective, Vincent Starrett and Sherlock Holmes Musgrave Monograph Number Ten by Susan Rice." The Ritual, no. 27 (2001): 56-57.

4. Blau, Peter E. "The Adventure of the Acephalous Agronomist." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 1 (2000): 1.

Provides some background on Vincent Starrett's parody, first published in 1944, in a limited edition of the three copies.

5. Dahlinger, Susan E. "Sherlock Holmes, a centenary essay." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 4 (1999): 1, 6, 8.

An essay on the life and work of the actor, William Gillette, on the centennial of his first performance of the play "Sherlock Holmes," the art of Frederic Dorr Steele (who fixed Gillette's image of Holmes in the minds of many), Vincent Starrett's work with Gillette on the publication of the script, and the materials related to all three of these men in the Holmes Collections.

6. Hall, John. "Review--'From Baltimore to Baker Street' by William Hyder." The Ritual, no. 17 (1996): 72-79.

"A past Gasogene of The Six Napoleons of Baltimore offers Sherlockian essays and dramatic readings that combine erudition with humour - and occasionally challenge such revered scholars as Vincent Starrett, Michael Harrison, and William S. Baring-Gould."

7. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Sherlock Holmes Visits a Cemetery by Don Izban." The Holmes & Watson Report 3, no. 5 (1999): 10, 40.

8. Rice, Susan. "Vincent Starrett: The Chicago Columns." The Serpentine Muse 18, no. 2 (2002): 16-24.

9. Rice, Susan, and John Addy. The somnambulist and the detective : Vincent Starrett and Sherlock Holmes, (Musgrave monograph). [England]: Northern Musgraves Sherlock Holmes Society, 2000.

ill., ports. ; 21 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Scuttlebutt Dec. 2000.; "A delightful reminder for those who knew him of how talented he was, and (far more important) a welcome introduction to Starrett and his work for those who have come more recently to the Sherlockian world."

10. Ruber, Peter. "A Newly Discovered Sherlockian Poem by Vincent Starrett." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 46, no. 2 (1996): 23-26.

11. Starrett, Vincent, John Nieminski, Jon L. Lellenberg, Gray Chandler Briggs, and Baker Street Irregulars. "Dear Starrett--", "Dear Briggs--" a compendium of correspondence between Vincent Starrett and Gray Chandler Briggs (1930-1934) together with various appendices, notes, and embellishments. 1st. ed, (BSI archival series). New York: The Baker Street Irregulars. distributed by Fordham University Press, 1989.

LC Control Number: 89085491. Includes bibliographical references and index. Citations: De Waal C14941;

12. Starrett, Vincent, and George A. Vanderburgh. The literary classics number 2. Hypertext ed, (Vincent Starrett's electronic library). Shelburne, Ontario, Canada: Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, 1996.

Contents: The private life of Sherlock Holmes -- Books alive -- Bookman's holiday; This disk contains read-only text files of stories, commentary, criticism and interpretation written by Vincent Starrett about Sherlock Holmes, detective fiction and literature in general and book collecting

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Stashower, Daniel (31)

1. "American Literature." Reference & Research Book News 22, no. 3 (2007): 273-278.

The article reviews several books including The Beautiful Cigar Girl; Edgar Allan Poe, Mary Rogers, and the invention of murder. Stashower, Daniel. Dutton Books, 326 p. $25.95 "Stashower (mystery writer and Edgar Award-winning biographer of Arthur Conan Doyle) tells the sensational real-life story of the 1841 murder of Mary Rogers, New York City's 'beautiful cigar girl'--along with the real-life story of how Edgar Allen Poe transformed the crime into the short story that would invent modern detective fiction and that he hoped would turn his failing career around. During the decline of his wife's health and particular personal hardship, Poe expanded his character C. Auguste Dupin's passion and talent for deductive reasoning to compose the longer-than-usual 'The Mystery of Mary Roget,' debuting the formula that would find its literary legacy in Sherlock Holmes and others."

2. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Publishers Weekly 254, no. 32 (2007): 52-52.

The article reviews the book Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

3. "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters." Kirkus Reviews 75, no. 18 (2007): 973-973.

The article reviews the book "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg and edited by Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

4. "The Ghosts of Baker Street." Publishers Weekly 252, no. 47 (2005): 26-26.

Review of The Ghosts of Baker Street. Edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower (Carrol & Graf), $16.95 paper (240p) ISBN 0-7867-1400-X

5. "The Gullible Creator of Sherlock Holmes." The Toronto Star, May 16, 1999: 1.

Review of Daniel Stashower's Teller of Tales. "...As a London bookseller told American Daniel Stashower, author of Teller Of Tales: The Life Of Arthur Conan Doyle, 'Doyle went a bit potty at the end, didn't he?' Certainly it's intriguing, to say the least, that the creator of the world's ultra-rational detective and thinking machine ended up seeing fairies at the bottom of his garden. Not at all elementary, you might say (which Holmes wouldn't, since it turns out he never used that much abused phrase). Yet there must surely be something in the connection between Sherlock Holmes and his incongruous author. After all, both are spun from the same ectoplasm (Doyle, I mean). So it was in anticipation of a daring and maybe even creepy ride that I turned to Teller Of Tales, which spends about a quarter of its bulk on the issue. Only to be disappointed...."

6. "The Mythmaker." New Republic 238, no. 4 (2008): 46-50.

The article reviews the book "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

7. "Reviewed Elsewhere." Biography 23, no. 3 (2000): 583-638.

Includes Doyle reference. Doyle, Arthur Conan. Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. Daniel Stashower. London: Allen Lane/Penguin, 1999. 472 pp. GBP18.99. "Stashower is wonderfully gentle and quite sympathetic to Doyle. . . ." He is "particularly good at describing the way in which Conan Doyle . . . entered into the weird world of the paranormal. . . . [T]his is a good, solid and above all sympathetic introduction" to the life. A. N. Wilson. TLS, Feb. 25, 2000: 36

8. "Reviewed Elsewhere." Biography 23, no. 1 (1999): 264-301.

Includes Doyle reference. Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. Daniel Stashower. New York: Holt, 1999. 472 pp. $32.50. "Daniel Stashower's rather jaunty biography returns us to the days of George Gissing and New Grub Street, the age of an awakening mass literacy and of popular fiction magazines like The Strand, the perhaps latent connection between Victorian optimism and the stirrings of science fiction." Christopher Hitchens. NYRB, Nov. 4, 1999: 25

9. "Teller of Tales (Book)." Publishers Weekly 246, no. 11 (1999): 41.

Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

10. "The World of Paperbacks." Contemporary Review 290, no. 1691 (2008): 521-524.

Lists a few titles related to Doyle and Holmes. "Also from Phoenix we have...Andrew Lycett's Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes (GBP10.99) whose hardback edition was hailed in this journal as 'the best and . . . certainly the fullest' biography of the writer...Vintage Classics have brought out Arthur Conan Doyle's famous novel. The Hound of the Baskervilles and have included with it not only the short story, The Adventure of the Speckled Band, which Doyle judged his best story, but an introduction by Ruth Rendell and all for GBP5.99....The life of Arthur Conan Doyle is arguably best seen in his correspondence and Harper Perennial has brought out Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters (GBP12.99), edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley. The review of the hardback edition praised this 'valuable collection', based on Doyle's letters to his mother, letters which were 'frank and revealing'and which showed his 'many and varied interests'...."

11. Baker, John F. "Hot Deals." Publishers Weekly 247, no. 30 (2000): 16.

Reports on some book rights deals as of July 24, 2000 with a reference to Doyle. "...That's the next book project for Daniel Stashower, who won both the Edgar and the Agatha awards for last year's Holt biography of Arthur Conan Doyle, Teller of Tales. His agent, Donald Maass, has just sold his proposal for A Gleaning of Light for a six-figure bid (including bonuses) for world rights to Charles Conrad at Broadway.... Stashower's tale centers on Philo T. Farnsworth, a 15-year-old technological genius who built the first prototype of a TV set in his San Francisco garage some 80 years ago, and on the long patent battle with RCA's David Sarnoff that eventually followed."

12. Binyon, Tj. "If only he'd listened to Holmes." The Evening Standard (London), February 21, 2000: 56.

Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower (Allen Lane/The Penguin Press, 18.99). "...Stashower's book is certainly a worthy addition to the long shelf of Conan Doyle biographies. Elegant and scholarly, it is, perhaps, the sanest and most balanced of all...."

13. Birch, Dinah. "Elementary love." TLS, no. 5458 (2007): 3-5.

The article reviews the books "Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower, and Charles Foley.

14. Bliss, Laurel M. "Book Reviews: Arts & Humanities." Library Journal 124, no. 3 (1999): 152.

Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

15. Carey, John. "Outwitted by his own creation." The Sunday Times (London), August 26, 2007: 39.

Review of Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes by Andrew Lycett and Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters edited by Daniel Stashower, Jon Lellenberg and Charles Foley.

16. Cohen, Edward H. "Victorian Bibliography for 1999." Victorian Studies 43, no. 4 (2001): 699-839.

Includes Doyle references. --Baccolini, Raffaella, Carla Comellini, & Vita Fortunati, eds. Culture di lingua inglese a confronto. Bologna: CLUEB, 1998. 256 pp. Includes Barrie, Doyle, and Stevenson; --Baxter, Kent B. "Identity in Crisis: Modernism and the Texts of Adolescence." DAIA 59:2972. Includes Doyle and Kipling; --Calanchi, Alessandra. Quattro studi in rosso: I confini del privato maxchile nella narrativa vittoriana. Cesena: Societa Editrice "Il Ponte Vecchio," 1997. 216 pp. Includes Collins, Doyle, and Stevenson; --Cockerell, Hugh. "Tobacco and Victorian Literature," in IIIsc, Lock, Reynolds, & Tansey, pp. 89-99. Includes Dickens, Doyle, and A. Trollope; --Drever, Tiffany E. "Medical Mysteries: Dragging the Victorian Hysteria into the Machine Age." DAIA 59:3827. Includes Collins, Dickens, and Doyle; --Fraser, Robert W. Victorian Quest Romance: Stevenson, Haggard, Kipling, and Conan Doyle. Plymouth: Northcote, 1998. 93 pp.; --Hendershot, Cyndy. The Animal Within: Masculinity and the Gothic. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 1998. 281 pp. Includes C. Bronte, Conrad, Doyle, Stevenson, and Stoker; --Hennessey, Rosemary, & Chrys Ingraham, eds. Materialist Feminism: A Reader in Class, Difference, and Women's Lives. London: Routledge, 1997. 430 pp. Includes Doyle; --Krebs, Paula M. Gender, Race, and the Writing of Empire: Public Discourse and the Boer War. Cambridge UP. 205 pp. Includes Doyle, Haggard, Kipling, and Schreiner; --Otis, Laura. Membranes: Metaphors of Invasion in Nineteenth-Century Literature, Science, and Politics. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP. 210 pp. Includes Doyle; --Ramirez, Luz E. "Empire and Americanism: British Representations of Latin America." DAIA 59: 3468. Includes Conrad and Doyle; --Reitz, Caroline W. "The Necessary Detective: Police, Empire and Victorian National Identity." DAIA 60:1576. Includes Burton, Collins, Dickens, Doyle, and Kipling; --Baker Street Inventory." BSJ Mar:59-63; Jun:53- 55; Sep:58-61; Dec:59-61. --Calanchi, Alessandra. "'Others Will Follow': Lo strano caso di Jekyll, Hyde e Sherlock Holmes." RdSV 3, 5(1998):133-43. --Calanchi, Alessandra. "Rovinare le sacre simbiosi: Rosencrantz, Guildenstern e Sherlock Holmes." Poetiche: Letteratura ed Altro 4/5(1996):145-55. --Edwards, Owen Dudley. "Arthur Conan Doyle," in V, Winks & Corrigan, pp. 301-30. --Frank, Lawrence. "The Hound of the Baskervilles, the Man on the Tor, and a Metaphor for the Mind." NCL 54:336-72. --Genis, Aleksandr. "Zakon i poriadok: Moi Sherlock Holmes." Znamia Dec:195-201. --Goldfarb, Clifford. The Great Shadow: Arthur Conan Doyle, Brigadier Gerard and Napoleon. Ashcroft, BC: Calabash, 1997. 232 pp. Rev. by N. Dames in VPR 32:181-82. --Hennessy, Rosemary, & Rajeswri Mohan. "The Construction of Women in Three Popular Texts of Empire: Toward a Critique of Materialist Feminism," in V, Hennessey & Ingraham, pp. 186-206. Includes "The Speckled Band." --Holland-Toll, Linda J. "Holmes the Prole: Or, a Marxist, Definitely Manque." Clues 20, 1:37-48. --Jenkins, William D. The Adventure of the Detected Detective: Sherlock Holmes in James Joyce's "Finnegan's Wake". Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1998. 149 pp. --Jurkowska-Krupa, Beata. "Modes of Storytelling: A Rhetorical Analysis of Film and Television Adaptations of Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina." DAIA 59:3265. --Keep, Christopher, & Don Randall. "Addiction, Empire, and Narrative in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four." Novel 32:207-21. --Kestner, J. Sherlock's Men. . . . See VB 1997, 794. Rev. by E. Lauterbach in ELT 42:212-16; by R. Jann in VS 42:314-16. --McConchie, R. W. "Privileged and Displaced Persons: Henry Lawson in Sherlock Holmes's England." CE&S 21, 2:83-100. --Otis, Laura. Membranes: Metaphors of Invasion in Nineteenth-Century Literature, Science, and Politics. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP. 210 pp. Includes Doyle. --Schumacher, Hans. "Sherlock Holmes und der Höllenhund: Mythologie der Detektivgeschichte," in V, Chiarini, Kruse, & Todini, pp. 265-84. --Stashower, Daniel. Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Pan; NY: Holt. 512 pp. Rev. by A. Lejeune in NRev 31 May:68-69.

17. Cox, Jim. "Book Review Teller of Tales by Daniel Stashower." Baker Street West 1 6, no. 2 (2000): 35-40.

18. Foden, Giles. "Review: Book of the week: The case of the mysterious author: Giles Foden is glad that a new biography of Conan Doyle focuses on work rather than wacky beliefs." The Guardian (London), September 22, 2007: 7.

Review of Andrew Lycett's biography, Conan Doyle: The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes by Andrew Lycett: 525pp, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, GBP20. "...Conan Doyle has found a biographer of distinction in Andrew Lycett, who has previously written lives of Rudyard Kipling, Ian Fleming and Dylan Thomas. Lycett's brilliant piece of detective work on the author of the Sherlock Holmes stories now allows us to judge his literary worth against that of his peers and properly to set him in the context of his times...." Mention also made of Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters, edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower "and Conan Doyle's great-nephew Charles Foley (HarperCollins, pounds 25)."

19. Hobbs, Don. "Review--Murder in Baker Street edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Jon L. Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower." The Holmes & Watson Report 7, no. 5 (2003): 23.

20. Hodgkinson, Thomas. "Books: Sherlock Holmes the Aesthete; Teller of Tales: the Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower Allen Lane Pounds 18.99." The Independent (London), February 27, 2000: 51.

Review of Stashower's biography of Doyle.

21. Hughes, David. "More than meets the eye, Watson." Spectator 284, no. 8953 (2000): 41.

Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

22. Lewis, Peter. "It's elementary my dear Watson, I've been misunderstood." Daily Mail (London), March 24, 2000: 60.

Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower (Penguin Press, 18.99). "Everyone knows the standard portrait of the creator of Sherlock Holmes: he was the bluff Scottish doctor with no patients who based his immortal detective on his onetime teacher, Dr Joseph Bell of Edinburgh. He killed off Holmes because he was tired of him, reluctantly brought him back to make a fortune and spent the rest of his life writing unread historical novels and going barmy about spirits and fairies. So a book about the other side of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is overdue. This well-told tale by an American crime writer is constantly surprising and shrewdly entertaining. It left me viewing Conan Doyle with enhanced respect as an honourable and quixotic man...."

23. McCarter, Jeremy. "One-Hit Wonder." New York Times Book Review 157, no. 54174 (2007): 15-15.

The article reviews the books "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

24. McDermid, Val. "Crime and the literary solution;Scotland is the spiritual home of the crime thriller but, after Wilkie Collins, the genre's greatest exponent remains an enigma." The Sunday Herald, February 20, 2000: 11.

Review of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle by Daniel Stashower (Penguin, 18.99). "Sherlock Holmes, like Coca Cola, is a brand name recognised across the globe. There are societies dedicated to studying the canon; a monthly magazine devoted to all matters Sherlockian; websites and newsgroups on the internet that discuss the great detective; and hundreds of novels and short stories picking up the character where his creator left off. Since the death of Conan Doyle, Holmes has been resurrected to meet Freud, to solve the Jack the Ripper murders, even to marry a young heiress 40 years his junior. And the house where Conan Doyle grew up in Edinburgh is marked not by a statue to the man himself, but by one of Holmes. But who is the man behind the myth? That is the question Daniel Stashower attempts to answer in this new biography...."

25. Muller, Alexandra. "Sleuthing Conan Doyle." New Criterion 26, no. 10 (2008): 25-29.

The article reviews two books related to surgeon and writer Arthur Conan Doyle including "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes: The Life and Times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

26. Pfeiffer, John R. "A Continuing Checklist of Shaviana." SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies 20, no. (2001): 265-289.

Two entries with reference to Doyle. The first: Stashower, Daniel. Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1999. "There was substantial connection between Doyle, and Shaw, and Stashower presents it here, drawing upon the Holroyd Bernard Shaw and the Laurence Collected Letters as well as the Doyle archive. The most extensive example is in 'The Ruthless Vegetarian,' an even-handed chapter detailing the Shaw/Doyle newspaper duel over the report of the Titanic disaster. Shaw's posture was that the newspapers had lied in their descriptions of the acts of heroism, especially by the captain of the ship. Doyle's view was sentimental, rationalizing that glossing the brutal facts (if such facts were present) was salutary since there was already immense shock and pain from the tragedy. He believed, in addition, that Shaw's attack was not sincere, but a typical Shavian ploy of self-advertisement. The exchange was bitter but did not change their 'kindly personal relations.' Doyle wrote, 'Shaw is a genial creature to meet, and I am prepared to believe that there is a human kindly side to his nature though it has not been presented to the public. It took a good man to write Saint Joan.'..." The second entry: Hampton, Aubrey. GBS & Company: A Biographical Celebration in Two Acts Presided Over by Bernard Shaw. Tampa: Organica Press, 1989 (1988). "Copies may be ordered from Organica Press, 4419 North Manhattan Avenue, Tampa Florida 33614. World premiere production at Gorilla Theatre (Tampa, Florida), 5 February 1999. From the playbill: 'Where else can you spend the evening with Ellen Terry, Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Albert Einstein, Houdini, Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, Henry George, Bo [sic] & Sidney Webb, H.G. Wells, Gene Tunney, Bertrand Russell, Beerbohm Tree, Richard Mansfield, Harley Granville-Barker, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Madame Blavatsky, Annie Besant, Florence Farr, and, of course, George Bernard Shaw.'"

27. Propson, David. "Sir Arthur Conundrum Doyle." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, 12/08, 2007: W12.

The article reviews the books "The Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes," by Andrew Lycett and "Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters," edited by Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley.

28. Randolph, Justus J. "Angela Thody. Writing and Presenting Research . London: Sage Publications, 2006. Pp. xvi, 264. Paper: ISBN-13 978-1-4129-0293-9, UKGBP19.99." Journal of Scholarly Publishing 38, no. 3 (2007): 174-182.

The article reviews the book "Writing and Presenting Research," by Angela Thody. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...My red pen is more important to me than a spell checker, and I think more clearly away from a computer screen. I wonder if this approach is plausible only for those of us who regularly travel by public transport or otherwise have regular chunks of time to kill (shades of the writing habits of the young Arthur Conan Doyle)?..." Footnote to this part of article is from Daniel Stashower, Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle (London: Penguin 2000), 63-5.

29. Ripley, Mike. "Books: the Return of the Hound; One of English Fiction's most Celebrated Books Celebrates its Centenary this Month. Post Crime Book Mike Ripley Looks at the Publications Surrounding the Event." Birmingham Post, August 4, 2001: 53.

"...To celebrate the centenary of The Hound of the Baskervilles, Penguin books have produced attractive (and reasonably priced) re- issues of the entire Holmes canon and in addition, Doyle's science fiction adventure The Lost World, to which homage is paid in the continuing Jurassic Park saga. There is also a new biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Teller of Tales by Daniel Stashower (Penguin, pounds 8.99). But for the real Holmes fan - and there are dedicated 'Holmesians' in virtually every country on earth - the truly unmissable commemorative volume must be Starring Sherlock Holmes by David Stuart Davies (Titan Books, pounds 29.99), a leading authority on all things Sherlockian and the editor of the Sherlock Holmes Detective Magazine...."

30. Tonkin, Boyd. "Books: Summer Crime: Not quite so Elementary, Dear Readers; Win a Stash of Sherlock Holmes Books in our Penguin Summer Quiz." The Independent (London), July 28, 2001: 10.

"In August 1901, Arthur Conan Doyle brought his creation Sherlock Holmes back from the dead when The Hound of the Baskervilles started its serialisation in the Strand magazine. To mark the centenary of this famous resurrection, Penguin has published a range of Conan Doyle's works as Penguin Classics for the first time. And 10 Independent readers can win the whole set, along with Daniel Stashower's much-praised new biography of Conan Doyle, in our Summer Crime quiz...."

31. Wilson, A. N. "In Holmes's shadow." TLS, no. (2000): 36.

Reviews the book 'Teller of Tales: The life of Arthur Conan Doyle,' by Daniel Stashower.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Stix, Thomas L., Jr. (4)

1. "His Last Bow: Thomas L. Stix, Jr." The Musgrave Papers, no. 11 (1998): 140.

2. "Thomas L. Stix, Jr, BSI." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 233.

3. Raymond, Trevor S. "Obituary, Thomas L. Stix." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 2 (1998): 51.

4. Southworth, Bruce E. "Stix-Shaw Bolo Tie Comes to Minnesota." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 3, no. 1 (1999): 1.

Highlights gift from Dorothy Stix of a bolo tie that had belonged to her husband, Tom, and John Bennett Shaw, given to the Collections during the Holmes birthday weekend in New York.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Stock, Randall (2)

1. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 8.

Notes the recent visit of Luci Zahray accompanied by her good friend who writes under the name Mary Monica Pulver. Mary Monica also has a current mystery series written under the name of Monica Ferris, which includes Crewel World, Framed in Lace, and A Stitch in Time, and features her character Betsy Devonshire. While touring the Collections, Mary Monica was inspired, and has planned a future book featuring the Elmer L. Andersen Library and Betsy Devonshire. Randall Stock's return research visit in December is also noted. Includes a photograph of Mary Monica Pulver, Luci Zahray, and Tim Johnson.

2. "Using the Sherlock Holmes Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2000): 8.

Notes the visits of Randall Stock and Adam Sveum, with photographs of both.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Stout, Rex (5)

1. McAleer, John J. Rex Stout : a biography. 1st Borgo ed, (Brownstone mystery guides, v. 6). San Bernardino, CA: Brownstone Books : Distributed by the Borgo Press, 1994.

ill. ; 21 cm. A Rex Stout checklist: p. [581]-591. Originally published: Boston : Little, Brown, c1977. Includes bibliographical references (p. [535]-578) and index. foreword by P.G. Wodehouse.;

2. ———. Rex Stout : a majesty's life. Millennial ed. Rockville, MD: James A. Rock, 2002.

ill. ; 21 cm. A Rex Stout checklist: p. 571-583. Includes bibliographical references (p. 525-568) and index. John McAleer ; with a foreword by P.G. Wodehouse.;

3. ———. Royal decree : conversations with Rex Stout. Ashton, MA: Pontes Press, 1983.

illus. Limited edition.;

4. McAleer, John J., and Ruth Stout. Queen's counsel : conversations with Ruth Stout on her brother Rex Stout. Ashton, Md.: Pontes Press, 1987.

21 cm. [cover illustration by Nick Hobart];

5. Townsend, Guy M., John J. McAleer, and Boden Clarke. The work of Rex Stout : an annotated bibliography & guide. 2nd , rev. and expand ed, (Bibliographies of modern authors, no. 30). San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press, 1995.

Rev. ed. of: Rex Stout, an annotated primary and secondary bibliography. 1980. Includes index. by Guy M. Townsend and John McAleer ; edited by Boden Clarke.;

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Swift, Wayne B. (3)

1. Calamai, Peter. "In Memoriam: Wayne Bradley Swift, May 9, 1927-January 15, 2001." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 2 (2001): 41-42.

2. Johnson, Timothy J. "An Update from the Collections." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 5.

Notes recent activities including recent class visits, preparations for the summer conference and exhibit, work with the Weisman Museum on their "Cabinet of Curiosities" exhibit, and an article on the Collections in the St. Paul Pioneer Press. Also noted is progress on fund-raising for McDiarmid curatorship, work with the Law Library on a conference tie-in with the exhibit, and the passing of Wayne Swift.

3. McKuras, Julie. "Musings." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 1 (2001): 4.

Notes the arrival of the Eve Titus manuscript archive, her current illness, and her contributions to the article about this acquisition. Also noted are other articles in the newsletter relating to Theodore Blegen, the Reichenbach Falls, and the passing of Sherlockian Wayne Swift.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- T (7)

1. "Eve Titus Update." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 5, no. 2 (2001): 7.

Notes Eve Titus's investiture in the Baker Street Irregulars in 1993 as "Young Master Rucastle" along with two photographs.

2. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Christine Thomas." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 3 (2003): 35.

3. ———. "Strictly Personal: Stephanie Thomas." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 2 (2002): 37-38.

4. Gil, Olga et al. "In Memoriam: Anne Skene Melvin, Mary Campbell, Stephen R. Tolins, Robin W. Links, Kathleen Morrison, and Frank Darlington." Canadian Holmes 26, no. 4 (2003): 20-27.

5. Mason, Bill. "Review--On the Shoulders of Giants: Jack Tracy and the Encyclopaedia Sherlockiana by Christopher and Barbara Roden." The Holmes & Watson Report 5, no. 6 (2002): 27-29.

6. Roden, Christopher. "On the Shoulders of Giants: Jack Tracy and The Encyclopaedia Sherlockiana." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana, no. (2001): 3-63.

7. Thomalen, Robert E., Howard Brody, and William Hyder. "'Stand with me here upon the terrace...'." Baker Street Journal: An Irregular Quarterly of Sherlockiana 44, no. 3 (1994): 188-189.

Obituaries for Robert N. Brodie, Ralph F. Turner, and R. Irving Paxton.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- U (1)

1. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Gerry Uba." Canadian Holmes 22, no. 1 (1998): 30-31.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- V (2)

1. Raymond, Trevor S. "In memoriam Tony Van Bridge." Canadian Holmes 28, no. 3 (2005): 46.

2. Vanderburgh, George A. "My African Adventure -- The Reminiscences of a Peripatetic Bootmaker." Shoso-In Bulletin 5, no. (1995): 51-65.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- W (8)

1. "In Memoriam Brant Lopez and Ronald Weyman." Canadian Holmes 30, no. 4 (2007): 41-42.

2. Dunn, Dave. "Strictly Personal: Doug Wrigglesworth." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 28-29.

Biographical sketch of Doug Wrigglesworth.

3. ———. "Strictly Personal: Larry Wagner." Canadian Holmes 21, no. 1 (1997): 42-43.

4. ———. "Strictly Personal: Peter H. Wood." Canadian Holmes 25, no. 2 (2001): 32.

5. ———. "Strictly Personal: Philip K. Wilson." Canadian Holmes 27, no. 4 (2004): 35-36.

6. Gurr, Ted. "In Memoriam: Pete Wysocki." Canadian Holmes 29, no. 4 (2006): 47.

7. McArthur, Douglas. "Hot on the trail of the master of deduction A white company? A scarlet study? Five orange pips? Look for these -- and Sherlock Holmes himself -- in the countryside that Arthur Conan Doyle once called home." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), June 5, 1999: F3.

Account of a tour with Philip Weller. "My friend Peter is a Sherlockian, North America's term for otherwise sane folk who go gaga over Sherlock Holmes. The guide he had prearranged for a day tour in southern England was a Holmesian -- the British name for people similarly obsessed...."

8. Stix, Dorothy K., and Susan Rice. "Margaret Walsh, July 28, 1921 - July 7, 2005." The Serpentine Muse 21, no. 4 (2005): 6.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Y (1)

1. "Rogue's Gallery Dr. Hirayama Yuichi, BSI." The Ritual, no. 26 (2000): 21-22.

07A Sherlockians and the Societies -- Sherlockians -- Ziebarth, E. W. (1)

1. The pipe dream continues-- Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota. Edina, MN: Salamander Co., 1998. Visual Material 1 videocassette (59 min.).

sd., col. ; 1/2 in. VHS format. "An irregular look at Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota"--Container. Written and directed by Rolf J. Canton.; "Salutes the 50th anniversary of the Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota ... Interviews of the four living founders [E.W. McDiarmid, Bryce Crawford, E.W. Ziebarth, and Ray Shove] and several other members are intercut with a dramatization of an older Holmes and Watson preparing to visit Minneapolis, Minnesota, for the anniversary conference"--Container.



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson