08 Memorials and Memorabilia (15)

1. "The best of Brickish; Japanese flock to admire our building blocks of history." Daily Mail (London), May 5, 1998: 25.

"Squat and solid, they are regarded with hushed awe by the visitors who file past every day. Treasured for their shape and texture and marvelled at for their lasting quality, these are the precious prize exhibits in a Japanese museum. British bricks, it seems, are building up a reputation for themselves. Back home, they can be found cluttering up back gardens, littering building sites or even propping open doors. But the Japanese believe our bricks deserve more respect. At the World Brick Museum in Maizuru, north-west of Kyoto, specimens are kept lovingly in glass cases and treated as works of art. More than 10,000 visitors a month go to look at them. The Japanese fascination with British bricks probably has something to do with the rarity of brick buildings in Japan. The high risk of earthquakes has made building with bricks a risky business. So when the museum hosted an exhibition of just 16 bricks, titled 'Sherlock Holmes and English Bricks', record numbers of visitors flocked through the doors. They feasted their eyes on a collection of clay from Covent Garden, Scotland Yard, the Royal Albert Hall, St Pancras Station and 221B Baker Street - the detective's home address. The museum curators enlisted the help of the city of Portsmouth to compile the exhibition after discovering that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created the character of Sherlock Holmes while living there in 1887...."

2. "The Game's Afoot! Hot on the Trail of a Deerstalker." The Toronto Star, July 10, 1999: 1.

In response to a reader query, some suggested places in London from which to buy (or order) a deerstalker hat.

3. "Sherlockian London." British Heritage 21, no. 1 (1999): 19.

Focuses on the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Co. shop in London, England. Showcase of the set from the Sherlock Holmes television series starring Jeremy Brett; Exhibition prices.

4. Gore-Langton, Robert. "Holmes and away!" Daily Mail (London), September 4, 2004: 56-57.

"Switzerland was where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle plotted the death of Sherlock Holmes. Sick of writing stories about the sleuth, the author, who was a keen hiker, travelled around Switzerland and decided to make the spectacular Reichenbach Falls, near the village of Meiringen, the place to bump off his great detective. And, so, on May 4, 1891, Holmes and his arch- enemy Professor Moriarty ('the Napoleon of crime') did battle on a tiny ledge at the top of the falls. They supposedly vanished into the raging torrent whose noise was like a 'half-human shout which came booming up with the spray out of the abyss'. The Reichenbach Falls are these days a shrine for fans of literature's famous character. A star marks the chilling spot from where Holmes fell...."

5. Groves, Derham. An Album of ephemera mostly from the Black Jack Press. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1997.

6. ———. Sherlock Homes just what you're looking for. Brunswick West, Vic: Black Jack Press, 1997.

7. ———. You bastard Moriarty being a consideration of the collectability of ephemera related to the greatest detective that never lived, Sherlock Holmes. Standard version ed. Melbourne, Australia: Littlewood Press, 1996.

8. Holmes Electric Protective Company. The case of the hep cat. New York: Holmes Electric Protective Company, 1919.

Citations: De Waal C15850;

9. Jenkins, Rebecca. "Detective work at Baker Street." The Times (London), September 25, 1999: 30.

"Looking for clues on a tour of Sherlock Holmes's fictional patch. We were on the trail of Sherlock Holmes. Nine of us, mostly American tourists and fellow sleuths, were scouring Marylebone for the haunts of a fictional character. It was a strange way to spend a Tuesday afternoon...."

10. MacNeille, Suzanne. "Q and A." The New York Times, June 11, 1995: 28.

Answers questions from readers, including one about Holmes. "Q. Do you know of any literary tours of Britain? I'd like to visit places where famous authors have lived and written. My husband likes mysteries like Sherlock Holmes. -- Barbara Frederickson, Great Neck, L.I. A. There are several companies in Britain that offer literary tours, including packages with Sherlock Holmes themes. Among them are the following....

11. McGrory, Daniel. "Conan Doyle's town detects its fortune." The Times (London), July 5, 1997: 8.

"A Sussex town with ambitions to be a big tourist attraction will double its population this weekend as 25,000 visitors descend to celebrate the creator of Sherlock Holmes. The great detective might have been puzzled at why Crowborough waited so long to cash in on its connections with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who lived there during his last 23 years. Julian Roup, who conceived the idea of the world's only annual Sherlock Holmes festival, said: 'Interest in England's greatest sleuth just gets bigger every year and we are sitting on a literary brand name worth millions that is worshipped the world over - and until recently have done nothing about it. For years Baker Street has cashed in and its links are purely fictitious. We are sitting on the real thing.'..."

12. Pool, Hannah. "This Week's Winners and Losers." The Guardian (London), June 30, 1997: T9.

Passing reference. "Sherlock Holmes fans should make their way to the Sherlock Holmes festival, Crowborough, Sussex from Friday to Sunday."

13. Sherwood, Claudia. "The Dreadful Fete of Conan Doyle." The Observer, July 6, 1997: 8.

"The great detective himself would no doubt have described it as a three-pipe problem. Why is the world dotted with statues of Sherlock Holmes while there is none to his creator? The anomaly may soon be corrected as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, general practitioner, spiritualist and the man behind the world's most famous detective, realises his final vocation - as a marketing opportunity. Just as Rochester has reclaimed Dickens, Chawton cherishes Jane Austen and the Brontes have put Howarth on the map, a town is now trying to harness the commercial potential of Holmes. But it is not Edinburgh, where he studied, or Southsea, where he practised, but the apparently unexceptional East Sussex town of Crowborough. A Sherlock Holmes Festival culminating this weekend in a Victorian street fair and crime-writing bonanza at his former home, Windlesham Manor, is forging ahead...."

14. Walker, Mark. Creative costumes for children (without sewing). Boca Raton, FL: Cool Hand Communications, 1993.

LC Control Number: 93071984; "Has a Sherlock Holmes costume on p. 141."

15. Wood, Benton. Philatelic and numismatic Holmes a handy reference guide to Sherlockian stamps & coins. New ed. Holmes Beach, Fla: Pleasant Places of Florida, 1995.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 33);

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Advertising and Advertisements (2)

1. Hall, Robert Lee, and Enrique Hegewicz. Adiós, Sherlock Holmes, (Colección los archivos de Baker Street). Madrid: Valdemar, 1994.

2. Ueda, Hirotaka. Homuzu to kokoku: Eq, (EQ Sherlockiana).

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Bookplates (1)

1. Johnson, Timothy J. "The Cover." Libraries & Culture 36, no. 2 (2001): 366.

Describes the bookplate for the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries in Minneapolis. Illustration of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; Background on the titles included in the collections; Significance of the collections.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Booksellers (2)

1. "The Merchant of Menace [Advertisement]." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 3 (1994): 33.

Advertisement for the Sleuth of Baker Street in Toronto.

2. "The Merchant of Menace [Advertisement]." Canadian Holmes 17, no. 4 (1994): 27.

Advertisement for the Sleuth of Baker Street in Toronto.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Business Establishments -- Conan Doyle Pub (Edinburgh) (1)

1. "When Visiting." British Heritage 23, no. 3 (2002): 39.

Presents information on Edinburgh, Scotland. Location of the Conan Doyle Pub; Hotels and restaurants; Landmarks.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Business Establishments -- Sherlock Holmes Hotel (London) (5)

1. "Excess Baggage." The Dominion Post (Wellington), December 24, 2002: A9.

"Sherlock Holmes fans can immerse themselves in the fictional detective's world, spending a weekend at the Sherlock Holmes Hotel in Baker St, London. The two-night break includes entry to Madame Tussaud's waxworks and a guided walk in the footsteps of Holmes with Historical Walks of London...."

2. "M2: Travel: It's Elementary!". Birmingham Evening Mail, August 20, 2002: 44.

"Finding a decent hotel in London is, to pinch a phrase from Sherlock Holmes, a three-pipe problem. Either you need to negotiate a second mortgage just to pay the bill or you arrive in an airless identi-kit concrete block with all the charm of a multistorey carpark. And you still get charged a small fortune. It was, then, with some trepidation that I headed for the Sherlock Holmes Hotel in Baker Street. The name alone conjured up visions of gullible American tourists being fleeced...."

3. "M2: Travel: the Holmes Trail." Birmingham Evening Mail, February 27, 2003: 21.

"'It is a hobby of mine to have an exact knowledge of London,' said world-famous sleuth Sherlock Holmes. Now 'Sherlock's Discovery' is the name given to a package offered by the new boutique-style Sherlock Holmes Hotel on Baker Street which involves history and culture, luxury, good food and a lie-in on Sunday...."

4. "On the Trail of Sherlock Holmes." British Heritage 24, no. 3 (2003): 10.

Focuses on a package tour 'Sherlock Discovery,' organized by the Sherlock Holmes Hotel in London. Places to be visited in the tour; Duration of the package; Contact information for the package tour.

5. Williams, Gill. "Between the Sheets; Inside our Hotel of the Week Sherlock Holmes Hotel, London." Sunday Mirror, June 10, 2007: 17.

Short review of the hotel.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Business Establishments -- Sherlock Holmes Inns (Melbourne, Australia) (1)

1. James, David. "Sherlock Holmes and the case of the profit share." Brw 17, no. 8 (1995): 52.

Focuses on the profit share system adopted by European Taverns with its employees in operating the Sherlock Holmes Inns in Melbourne, Australia. Comments from executive chairman John Webb; Staff's reaction to the profit sharing scheme; Establishment of the first Australian franchise of the English-based fish shop chain Harry Ramsden's.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Business Establishments -- Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Company (London) (2)

1. Dalby, Stewart. "Play dough: Hot on the trail of the man who never was: Sherlock Holmes was a fictional character but that doesn't stop people collecting anything to do with him." The Guardian (London), July 15, 2000: 24.

"Sherlock Holmes never existed, of course. Nor did his much-loved dwellings at 221b Baker Street in London. But try telling Kazie Kamaza, one of the thousands of visitors who flock to the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Company in Baker Street each year....Almost exactly opposite is the Sherlock Holmes Museum, housed in a former Victorian lodging house. A blue plaque on the wall claims that this is the original 221b Baker Street. Not so, says the Abbey National Bank. Its modern, 60s built former headquarters a few doors along is where numbers 205 to 229 Baker Street used to be. And Abbey National still gets mail, as does the museum, addressed to Sherlock Holmes and asking him to help with a problem. They are reluctant to tell you at the museum just how many visitors they receive. In fact, they are disinclined to tell you anything if they suspect you have been across the road talking to the Memorabilia Company. The two see themselves as strong competitors...."

2. Riley, Grace. "Holmes's City." The New York Times, June 11, 2000: 16.

"To the Editor: Reading ''Deducing Holmes's City'' (April 2) was enjoyable. Any Sherlock enthusiast may deduce that there is scarcely an area in London where one cannot recall some part of the great detective's adventures. I wish to comment, however, upon the reference to the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia shop, which credits its owner with having forged a new Baker Street identity a decade ago. As director of the Sherlock Holmes Museum, I must assert that the credit for changing the face of Upper Baker Street belongs to the museum. When we purchased the museum building in July 1989, we had to weather many storms before and after opening it to the public in March 1990. Two years later a small shop across the road became the Sherlock Memorabilia Company, in competition with our souvenir business. Grace Riley, London"

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Business Establishments -- Sherlock Holmes Pub (London) (2)

1. Cheap eats in London. 3rd ed. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1997.

LC Control Number: 96642563. Availability: Chronicle Books, 275 5th St., 3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94103; A picture of the Sherlock Holmes Pub on the cover.

2. Huntington, Tom. "Franklin's Last Home." American Heritage 57, no. 2 (2006): 49-52.

The article presents information about Benjamin Franklin, the inventor of electricity and the archaeological research on his residence home. Of the many houses Franklin lived in over his eight decades, only one survives, which has been restored just in time for his 300th birthday in London, England. The Benjamin Franklin House is ideally located in central London, close to Trafalgar Square, Charing Cross, and the Strand. The two nearest tube stops are Charing Cross and Embankment, at opposite ends of Craven Street. Information on the life of Franklin has also been offered in the article. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...There are a few good pubs nearby. Franklin probably frequented the Ship and Shovel, just down Craven Street and around the corner. If you turn onto Craven Passage, you'll find the Sherlock Holmes Pub. Franklin lived in a world without Sherlock Holmes, but that shouldn't keep you from stopping in, enjoying a pint, and surveying the pub's collection of Sherlockiana, including the re-creation of Holmes's famous sitting room that was originally built for the Festival of Britain in 1951."

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Business Establishments -- Sherlock Holmes Pub-Restaurant (2)

1. Alexander, Marlene. "While in London, Lunch with the Great Detective." The Toronto Star, November 4, 2000: 16.

"...The Sherlock Holmes Public House and Restaurant proves an irresistible lure for a long-time fan of the Great Detective. My husband and teenage daughter agree, in view of its being the noon hour, that the situation bears further investigation. Ha, the game is afoot! Inside, we find that the lower floor is devoted to the bar. It seems the typical English pub except for the memorabilia that adorns the walls, among them Dr. Watson's service revolver and the stuffed and mounted head of the Hound of the Baskervilles...."

2. Bennett, Suzy. "Scenes of the crime." The Daily Telegraph (London), May 12, 2007: 13.

"...For fans of Britain's original detective, the Sherlock Holmes Museum at 221b Baker Street, London, is an obvious place to visit...along with the Sherlock Holmes pub on nearby Northumberland Avenue, which exhibits props used in the films. Further afield, in Devon, mist-wreathed Dartmoor was the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, although most of the 2002 film version of the story took place in Glen Maye, Jurby and Druidale on the Isle of Man...."

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Business Establishments -- Sherlock Holmes Shoppe (1)

1. Walker, Maxton. "Holmes from Holmes: Websites reviewed." The Independent (London), October 3, 1998: 80.

Short review of www.sherlock-holmes.com (The Sherlock Holmes Shoppe). "I'm lucky enough to be endowed with a terrible memory. The main advantage of this is that I get to read all of the Sherlock Holmes short stories every five years and enjoy them thoroughly every time. And then, when they've been exhausted, I can only feed my addiction with what the Internet has to offer. An excellent starting point for anybody in the same boat is The Sherlock Holmes Shoppe, which exists primarily in order to sell Sherlock-related paraphernalia...."

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Calendars (12)

1. Baring-Gould, William Stuart. 2001 Sherlockian calendar featuring dates established by William S. Baring-Gould. S.l: s.n, 2000.

2. Baring-Gould, William Stuart, Mark Alberstat, Frank Wiles, Arthur Twidle, Sidney Paget, A Gilbert, and H. K Elcock. 2005 Sherlock Holmes calendar featuring dates established by William S. Baring-Gould. Dartmouth, NS, Canada: Mark Alberstat, 2004.

3. Cagnat, Jean-Pierre, and Société Sherlock Holmes de France. Calendrier 2009. [Paris]: [Société Sherlock Holmes de France], 2009.

ill. ; 30 x 21 cm. Illustrations de Jean-Pierre Cagnat (SSHF, BSI). Spiral bound at top edge, middle when opened. "Imprime a Paris en 50 exemplaires." Signed and dated on cover by illustrator.;

4. Dorn, William S., and Kathryn Elliott. The graven images of Sherlock Holmes 2006 calendar. S.l: s.n, 2005.

Includes bibliographical references. Contents: Calendar -- Alphabetical listing of the 60 cases with event dates -- Sources and acknowledgements; The calendar is illustrated with photographs of various Holmsian three-dimensional artifacts, including busts, steins, statues, etc., walking stick grips

5. ———. The many places of Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes calendar 2002. Denver, CO: The Sherlock Store, 2001.

Includes bibliographical references;

6. ———. Sherlock Holmes 2004 calendar. S.l, 2003.

Includes bibliographical references;

7. ———. Sherlock Holmes calendar 2000. Denver, CO: Elliottt/Dorn, 1999.

Includes bibliographical references;

8. Heifetz, Carl L., Wanda Dow, F. Dow Jeffery, and Pleasant Places of Florida (Organization). The Pleasant Places of Florida presents the Calendrical Canon with Holidays Holmesian. Holmes Beach, Fla: Pleasant Places of Florida, 1996.

9. Puhl, Gayle Lange. If Watson wrote for TV Sherlock Holmes calendar, 2006. S.l: Puhl, 2006.

Depicts how Holmes and Watson would look in North American television shows. January is titled "Sherlock Holmes: the next generation" with a back cover reference to Rex Stout's Stories of Nero Wolfe--e.g

10. Strand Magazine (Birmingham, Mich.), Sidney Paget, and Aldo Balding. Sherlock Holmes 2005 calendar. Birmingham, Mich: The Strand Magazine, 2004.

Includes bibliographical references (back cover);

11. Wood, Benton. Sherlockian calendar 2002 noting red-letter days. Holmes Beach, Fla.?: s.n, 2001.

12. ———. Sherlockian calendar noting red-letter days, Y2K. Holmes Beach, Fla.?: s.n, 1999.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Cards (4)

1. Groves, Derham. Even more Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1998.

2. ———. More Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1997.

3. ———. Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1997.

4. ———. Too many Sherlockian visiting cards. Brunswick West, Vic., Australia: Black Jack Press, 1998.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Commemorative Postage Stamps and Covers (1)

1. Wood, Benton. Philatelic and numismatic Holmes a handy reference guide to Sherlockian stamps & coins. Rev. & updated ed. Holmes Beach, Fla: Pleasant Places of Florida, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 36);

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Exhibitions (16)

1. "Consumptive." Economist 330, no. 7849 (1994): 91-91.

Reviews the exhibition 'The Davos Phenomenon,' at the Strauhof Museum, Zurich with a reference to Doyle. "...Arthur Conan Doyle was not ill but arrived with his sick wife in 1893. For the next two years the Doyle family lived in the Villa Am Stein once occupied by Symonds. Doyle wrote little in Davos. He was too busy with the English billiards club, sledging, attending masked balls and learning the newly imported art of skiing. He left it to Symonds's daughter, Katherine Furse, to write the pioneering treatise, "Ski-Running", in 1924...."

2. "Datebook." American Libraries 36, no. 7 (2005): 90-91.

Presents a calendar of conferences, exhibits and other events in library science scheduled for 2005. Under the "Exhibits" section, note is made of the ongoing online exhibit at the Indiana University Lilly Library, "Bloomington by Gaslight: Sherlock Holmes in the Lilly Library." http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/holmes/index.shtml

3. "Datebook." American Libraries 34, no. 3 (2003): 95.

Presents the calendar for events related to the American Library Association for March-April 2003. Reference and photo from Newberry Library exhibit, "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Sherlock Holmes."

4. "Photography of the Paranormal." USA Today Magazine 134, no. 2726 (2005): 64-68.

The article provides information on the exhibition "The Perfect Medium: Photography and the Occult." The exhibit brings together some 120 photographs culled from public and private archives throughout Europe and North America, focusing primarily on the period from the 1860s through World War II, when occult and paranormal phenomena were a hot topic of debate and supporters and skeptics summoned photographs as evidence. Approaching the material from a historical perspective, the exhibition presents the photographs on their own terms, without authoritative comment as to their veracity. Included in the exhibition will be Mumler's portrait of Fanny Conant, a well-known Boston medium, who appears in the photograph with her control spirit. The Perfect Medium is organized in three sections, emphasizing different roles photography has played in its encounters with the occult. The article notes that "As the Spiritualist movement gained momentum in the late 19th century, spirit photography became a hotly debated topic, attracting the attention of major intellectual figures, including psychologist William James, scientists Alfred Russell Wallace and Charles Richet, and author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the latter best known for his tales of Sherlock Holmes."

5. Sherlock Holmes exhibit at the Shaw Festival Theatre, June 1994. 1994. Visual Material 1 portfolio (4 items).

ill., map, photo. ; 41 x 33 cm. + 1 descriptive list ([3] leaves ; 28 x 22 cm.) Copies of a map and photograph from the Buffalo & Erie County Public Library (Buffalo, N.Y.) and a clipping and a photocopy of newspaper articles from a private collection, all originally part of an exhibit at the Shaw Festival Theatre, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, celebrating the premiere at Buffalo's Star Theatre on Oct. 23, 1899 of the play, "Sherlock Holmes," written by and starring William Gillette.;

6. "The Sherlock Holmes exhibition." Festival Times 1, no. 5 (1990): 10-12.

A report on the Festival of Britain 'Sherlock Holmes' exhibition, held at Abbey House, Baker Street, London, 22 May-22 September 1951.

7. Cameron, Lucinda. "Sherlock Holmes and Amazing Case of the Doctor Who Inspired Him; Conan Doyle Archive Material to Go on show for First Time." Daily Mail (London), April 17, 2006: 28.

Discusses new exhibit in Edinburgh. "'A fantastically observant man' , he was a doctor rather than a detective, though he did wear a deerstalker hat and cloak. Dr Joseph Bell even used a magnifying glass, although it is not clear whether he ever smoked a pipe. Now, fascinating archive material about to go on public display for the first time has revealed just how much of an inspiration he was for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective...."

8. Chalmers, John. "You write the festival reviews." The Independent (London), August 7, 2006: 20.

Review of the exhibit in Edinburgh, "Conan Doyle and Joseph Bell: The Real Sherlock Holmes," Surgeons' Hall Museums. "This is a small but fascinating exhibition on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his teacher, the surgeon Joseph Bell, who was his inspiration for Sherlock Holmes. Bell's ability to learn much about his patients simply from his powers of observation is legendary, and several examples are given in this show...."

9. Cooke, Catherine. "Vintage 1951 - a Festival, a Society and a Collection." Shoso-In Bulletin 8, no. (1998): 186-198.

10. Donnelly, Brian. "Doors open free for St Andrew's Day." The Herald (Glasgow), November 14, 2007: 7.

"More than 60 of Scotland's top visitor attractions will open their doors free of charge on St Andrew's Day, it was announced yesterday. Castles, museums, gardens and abbeys from Orkney to Dumfries and Galloway will all take part in the initiative designed to encourage Scots and tourists to celebrate Scotland's heritage and culture. Culture Minister Linda Fabiani, announcing the joint initiative by the National Trust for Scotland, Historic Scotland and the Association of Visitor Attractions, said: 'St Andrews Day is a day to celebrate Scotland.'...Ms. Fabiani made the announcement at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh which is hosting the Real Sherlock Holmes exhibition, one of the free attractions on St Andrew's Day....

11. Doyle, Richard, and Victoria and Albert Museum. Richard Doyle and his family an exhibition held at the Victoria and Albert Museum, 30th November 1983 to 26th February 1984. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1983.

LC Control Number: 84144298. Bibliography: p. 72. Citations: De Waal C4551;

12. Groves, Derham. Better Holmes and gardens : Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle and architectural design "down under" an exhibit of architectural design & practice based on stories and characters from the Doyle/Holmes canon. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Libraries, 2000.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 20-25);

13. Harris, David, and Derham Groves. In the privacy of their own Holmes. Melbourne: Blackbird Books, 2004.

Includes bibliographical references and a press bibliography, "Publications of the Sumac Press" (p. 44-45); Scuttlebutt May 2004; "'In the Privacy of Their Own Holmes: An Exhibition of Private Press and Limited Edition Sherlockiana' was arranged by Derham Groves for the Baillieu Library at the University of Melbourne from Apr. 5 to May 28, and there was an interesting assortment of Sherlockiana on view. Derham also edited and published this booklet to coincide with the exhibition; the 46-page booklet offers nicely-illustrated essays by Peter E. Blau, Vincent Brosnan, Derham Groves, David G. Harris, Michael Jorgensen, Robert C. Littlewood, Jerry Margolin, and C. Paul Martin about private presses and other matters."

14. Horne, Marc. "Letter makes real Holmes elementary." The Sunday Times (London), April 16, 2006: 13.

"He wore a deerstalker hat and cloak, frequently gazed through a magnifying glass and boasted a razor-sharp mind, but, as far as history can tell, he never smoked a pipe or uttered the immortal words: 'Elementary, my dear Watson.' A new archive to be displayed in Edinburgh this summer shows the remarkable extent to which Sir Arthur Conan Doyle drew inspiration for Sherlock Holmes from his cerebral university tutor...."

15. Macintyre, Ben. "The strange case of Monsieur Sherlock Holmes." The Times (London), May 16, 1996: 1.

"Was Sherlock Holmes really French? An exhibition exploring this unlikely question opened in Paris yesterday, bringing together clues to suggest that beneath the famous deerstalker of the world's most enduring fictional detective were the mind, heart and blood of a Frenchman. Holmes is a cult figure in France and, like every aspect of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's beloved sleuth, the mystery of his ancestry is hotly debated and the deductions anything but elementary...."

16. Stuttaford, Andrew. "Feywatch." National Review 50, no. 25 (1998): 52-52.

The article reviews the exhibition "Victorian Fairy Painting" at the Frick Collection in New York City in 1998. Includes a passing reference to Doyle. "...It is no coincidence that a number of the most striking works on display at the Frick are by painters who were outsiders. The greatest of them all, Richard Dadd, murdered his father. His obsessively detailed masterpiece, The Fairy Feller's Master Stroke, was the product of nine years' work in a lunatic asylum. That's also where Charles Doyle (father of the creator of Sherlock Holmes) ended up. His Self-Portrait, A Meditation, shows a man all too aware that the spirits surrounding him are the product of a troubled mind...."

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Miniature Books (6)

1. Doyle, Arthur Conan. The Adventure of Silver Blaze: a Sherlock Holmes adventure. Paisley: Gleniffer Press.

2. ———. The Adventure of the Empty House. Paisley: Gleniffer Press, 1994.

Limited edition of 200 copies;

3. ———. The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb. Paisley: Gleniffer Press, 1997.

Limited edition of 210 copies;

4. ———. The Five Orange Pips. Wigtown: Gleniffer Press.

Limited edition of 260 copies;

5. ———. Sherlock Holmes two complete adventures. Running Press miniature ed. Philadelphia, Pa.; London: Running Press, 1994.

LC Control Number: 89060273 //r933. Contents: Introduction -- The five orange pips -- The adventure of the blue carbuncle. Citations: De Waal C2141.2;

6. Lipari, Paul. The Baker Street Companion. Kansas City, MO: Andrews and McMeel, 1996.

Scuttlebutt Jan 1997; "With brief chapters on the Canon, and Sherlockians, and Basil Rathbone.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Miniatures -- 221B Baker Street (1)

1. "Product Briefs." Architectural Record 189, no. 11 (2001): 221.

Presents several architectural products including models of Timothy Richards, with a passing Holmes reference. "Richards has been commissioned by the Victoria & Albert Museum, Sir Terence Conran, and the Royal Ontario Museum. His repertoire in miniature includes precise replications of such famous architectural structures as 10 Downing Street, Twin Towers of Wembley, Kensington Palace, The Hoover Building, Charlotte Square, and the Temple of Four Winds, along with the homes of Sherlock Holmes, Jane Austen, and Charles Dickens."

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Museums (1)

1. Hirayama, Yuichi, and Hiroko Hirayama. "Revisit to the Sherlock Holmes Museum." Shoso-In Bulletin 4, no. (1994): 101-107.

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Museums -- Sherlock Holmes Museum (London) (15)

1. "Holmes loan fraud; [3 Edition]." The Independent (London), December 7, 1994: No page citation.

"John A---------, 37, a businessman, of Belgravia, central London, who was behind the Sherlock Holmes museum in Baker Street, was convicted at Southwark Crown Court of founding it with the proceeds from a pounds 1.2m mortgage fraud. He will be sentenced next month."

2. "Holmes Museum Owner is Accused of Mortgage Fraud." The Guardian (London), November 16, 1994: 5.

"A businessman turned to fraud to help develop a museum dedicated to fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, a court heard yesterday. John A--------- raised further mortgages on the building as part of a pounds 1.2 million fraud, Southwark crown court heard. A---------, who owns the three-storey museum at 239 Baker Street, is representing himself in the case. He is using a metal dustbin to store thousands of pages of documents served on him by the Crown Prosecution Service. The building is in Baker Street, where the fictional detective lived, and was one of three used by A---------, aged 37, to obtain eight mortgages, said Charles Miskin, prosecuting...."

3. "Superb Take Holmes Pay; Job Vacancy for Sherlock Holmes Lookalike at Museum." The Mirror, January 29, 1998: 34.

"Looking for a job with a difference? It's elementary, dear Watson. The Baker Street Museum has a vacancy for a Sherlock Holmes lookalike at its famous address in London. It is just one of a range of opportunities you'll find in Summer Jobs Britain '98 and Summer Jobs Abroad '98 (both GBP 8.99)...."

4. Bennett, Suzy. "Scenes of the crime." The Daily Telegraph (London), May 12, 2007: 13.

"...For fans of Britain's original detective, the Sherlock Holmes Museum at 221b Baker Street, London, is an obvious place to visit...along with the Sherlock Holmes pub on nearby Northumberland Avenue, which exhibits props used in the films. Further afield, in Devon, mist-wreathed Dartmoor was the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, although most of the 2002 film version of the story took place in Glen Maye, Jurby and Druidale on the Isle of Man...."

5. Berdan, Marshall S. "Sherlock Holmes 101." The Washington Post, January 11, 2004: 2.

"WHAT: Tracing the Victorian London of Sherlock Holmes; his colleague and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson; and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. WHY NOW: Because as devotees of Holmes -- 'the world's first and still most famous consulting detective' -- have collectively deduced, he was born Jan. 6, 1854, thus making 2004 his sesquicentennial celebration. SHERLOCKIAN SITES: The exact site of Holmes's 221B Baker St. residence remains a matter of debate. Because the entire Portman Square neighborhood in which it was located was reduced to rubble in World War II, the 'modern' world of Sherlock Holmes has been relocated to the northern end of the extended -- and renumbered -- Baker Street. Highlights include: "The Great Detective." Standing vigil outside the Marylebone Road exit of the Baker Street tube station is this statue, erected in 1999 by the Abbey National Bank (the residents of 221 Baker since 1932)....Sherlock Holmes Museum....Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Co...."

6. Dalby, Stewart. "Play dough: Hot on the trail of the man who never was: Sherlock Holmes was a fictional character but that doesn't stop people collecting anything to do with him." The Guardian (London), July 15, 2000: 24.

"Sherlock Holmes never existed, of course. Nor did his much-loved dwellings at 221b Baker Street in London. But try telling Kazie Kamaza, one of the thousands of visitors who flock to the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Company in Baker Street each year....Almost exactly opposite is the Sherlock Holmes Museum, housed in a former Victorian lodging house. A blue plaque on the wall claims that this is the original 221b Baker Street. Not so, says the Abbey National Bank. Its modern, 60s built former headquarters a few doors along is where numbers 205 to 229 Baker Street used to be. And Abbey National still gets mail, as does the museum, addressed to Sherlock Holmes and asking him to help with a problem. They are reluctant to tell you at the museum just how many visitors they receive. In fact, they are disinclined to tell you anything if they suspect you have been across the road talking to the Memorabilia Company. The two see themselves as strong competitors...."

7. Dorn, Jennifer. "Streetlights of London." British Heritage 27, no. 5 (2006): 11-12.

The article presents information on the Marylebone neighborhood in London, England. The address 221B was not there in Baker Street, Marylebone during the years of the Sherlock Holmes stories. But Baker Street was extended and renumbering of the buildings was done in 1930. 221B became a real address and the popular Sherlock Holmes Museum was made there. The beautiful Regent's Park is the famous residential area of Marylebone. Medical services are offered in Wimpole and Harley streets.

8. Fernz, Helena. "Probing the residence at 221b Baker Street, London." Business Times, December 7, 2001: 13.

"Let's play the sleuth on this occasion and investigate the famed residence at 221b Baker Street, London, by stopping at http:// www.sherlock- holmes.co.uk/ The notable occupants of this well-known abode at Baker Street are none other than Sherlock Holmes and his colleague John H. Watson, MD. Well, actually, this will probably be the easiest 'case' ever to be investigated, for 'The Sherlock Holmes Museum' that is online provides a colourful and in-depth tour to anyone who actually takes the time to visit and explore...."

9. Friedman, Kinky. "Mad Cowboy Disease." Texas Monthly 31, no. 5 (2003): 244.

Relates the experience of a cowboy when he visited London, England. Reaction of the city workers to the cowboy's outfit; Details of the cowboy's meeting with Mike Levy, former record producer and tennis partner of Great Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...On my last night in London, I walked through the fog until I came to the most famous address in the world, 221B Baker Street. On the door was a small bronze plaque that read 'Visitors for Mr. Sherlock Holmes or Doctor Watson please ring the bell.' I rang the bell, walked up one flight of seventeen steps, and suddenly I was standing in Sherlock Holmes's living room. There was a cheery fire in the fireplace. Holmes's violin stood poignantly nearby, along with the old Persian slipper where he kept his Turkish tobacco. And in the room were Japanese, Russians, Africans, people from seemingly every nation on earth, all bound together by a common, passionate belief that Sherlock Holmes was real. It was, I thought, a perfect United Nations...."

10. Jenkins, Lin. "Elementary Fraud at the Sherlock Holmes museum." The Times (London) 1994: 3.

"[John A---------], 38, of Belgravia, central London, used false details to obtain mortgages. Each time he applied for money he claimed falsely that he had no outstanding debts on other properties. He netted Pounds 890,000 on the Sherlock Holmes museum building and Pounds 228,000 from a house in Battersea, south London. A further Pounds 100,000 was obtained on a flat in Stockwell, south London, under the name Peter Neville. A--------- wrote references claiming that Neville worked for him at his free newspaper distribution firm, Rollerteam Ltd."[excerpt]

11. Laidlaw, Joanna. "The fun of museum shopping." Victoria 12, no. 3 (1998): 16.

Focuses on museum shops in London, England that sell souvenirs and other gift items. Henry VIII's Tudor palace; Tower of London; Victoria & Albert Museum; Pollock's Toy Museum; Museum of Garden History; Twinings Tea Museum. Includes passing references to Holmes. "...Come along with Londoner Joanna Laidlaw on an enlightening stroll that leads directly to artful and unusual souvenirs -- from a silk scarf to a Beefeater teddy bear and a Sherlock Holmes hat....Snoop around the real 221b Baker Street (011 44 171 935 8866), and see where Sherlock Holmes lived. The fictitious English sleuth still receives thousands of letters, birthday cards, and invitations to speak. The museum shop sells everything from Baker Street street signs and meerschaum pipes to capes, and handsome tweed deerstalker hats. You can even buy a real London Times from the last century and a chess set featuring characters from the tales (the pawns are London bobbies)...."

12. McAteer, Michael. "Holmes' legend lives." Toronto Star, January 3, 2002: L14.

"The small room with the two windows overlooking Baker Street is on the first floor of the Sherlock Holmes Museum. Here, shrouded in blue tobacco smoke, the great consulting detective pondered the criminal mind as gas lamps flickered in the fog outside and hansom cabs rattled over cobbles. A museum visitor- an American by his accent- glances over the room crammed with Holmes memorabilia before addressing a young woman decked out as a Victorian maid. 'Did Sherlock Holmes die in this house?' he asks...."

13. Muller, Lynne. "The case of the fictional flat: A quirky London museum pays tribute to Sherlock Holmes and Watson." The Globe and Mail (Toronto), May 16, 1998: F3.

"...I'll never know if she believed Sherlock Holmes had really lived, because I didn't pursue the conversation. But the obsession she and other Sherlockians share must be the ultimate tribute to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Holmes' creator. Fascination with the Holmes persona is so strong almost 70 years after Doyle's death that there are more than 300 Sherlockian organizations worldwide, 17 in Japan alone. And the fiction is complete in Baker Street's Sherlock Holmes Museum, which allows fans to visit the small flat, reproduced with style and good humour, that Holmes shared with Dr. Watson from 1881 to 1904. The museum contains no mention of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, no background on how he came to create his famous sleuth. A project of the Sherlock Holmes International Society, the museum simply reproduces Holmes' flat (and sells a few souvenirs along the way). Thankfully, there's not too much schlock amidst the Sherlockiana...."

14. Nurton, James. "The King and I." Managing Intellectual Property, no. (2000): 5p.

Focuses on the story Elvisly Yours owner Sid Shaw to illustrate the limits of trademark protection for the memorabilia and collectibles about Elvis Presley. Lawsuit filed by Elvis Presley Enterprises against the company; Details of how Shaw won various lawsuits against his business; Forecasts of how Shaw's legal troubles will end. Includes a reference to Holmes. "...If you're looking for celebrities, London's Baker Street would be a good place to start. On one side of the road is the famous Madame Tussauds waxworks, the country's biggest tourist attraction, and home to models of thousands of politicians, monarchs, sports stars, artists, entertainers and criminals. On the other side is number 221 B, the residence of Sherlock Holmes, probably the world's most famous detective. Now there is a new face in the neighbourhood. The King is in town. Next to the Sherlock Holmes museum, the greatest rock and roll star of all time has just moved in to number 233. Elvis the Pelvis, the Memphis Flash, is here...."

15. Riley, Grace. "Holmes's City." The New York Times, June 11, 2000: 16.

"To the Editor: Reading ''Deducing Holmes's City'' (April 2) was enjoyable. Any Sherlock enthusiast may deduce that there is scarcely an area in London where one cannot recall some part of the great detective's adventures. I wish to comment, however, upon the reference to the Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia shop, which credits its owner with having forged a new Baker Street identity a decade ago. As director of the Sherlock Holmes Museum, I must assert that the credit for changing the face of Upper Baker Street belongs to the museum. When we purchased the museum building in July 1989, we had to weather many storms before and after opening it to the public in March 1990. Two years later a small shop across the road became the Sherlock Memorabilia Company, in competition with our souvenir business. Grace Riley, London"

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Plaques (1)

1. Atchison, Marc. "A date with history." The Toronto Star, November 15, 2003: K22.

"Hotel du Louvre offers as many thrills as famous Paris museum. From room 131 in the historic Hotel du Louvre, I could see three semi-naked women staring stone-faced into the darkness of night....I was looking into the world famous Musee du Louvre- at a statue standing in a window directly across the street from my room...The next morning, I made it a priority to find out who the three women were. However, finding that particular sculpture among the thousands on display at the incredible Louvre would no doubt take the sleuthing skills of a Sherlock Holmes, who, by the way- according to his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle- preferred the Hotel du Louvre to all other Paris properties. There's even a plaque in the hotel's lobby from the Sherlock Holmes Society verifying that fact...."

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- Sculptures and statues (19)

1. "Abbey National Unveil Bronze of Sherlock Holmes." Birmingham Post, October 9, 1999: 32.

"In the detective's shadow: Abbey National has tried to dilute the image of banks as soulless organisations, whose only driving force is the creation of profit, by unveiling a three-metre high bronze of Sherlock Holmes as part of its 150th anniversary celebrations. The move commemorates the bank's 'association' with the detective, dating back to 1932, when Abbey's head offices moved to Baker Street and incorporated Holmes' fictional address of 211b. Abbey still receives letters addressed to the crime-buster, which are answered by his 'secretary' who works for the bank."

2. "Acquisitions." Friends of the Sherlock Holmes Collections Newsletter 2, no. 3 (1998): 4.

Highlights the acquisition of "On Grimpen Mire," a bronze sculpture donated by the sculptor Lynette Yencho and her husband Michael.

3. "Holmes' place." The Evening Standard (London), August 4, 1999: 12.

"Lord Tugendhat is hoping the cash registers of the Abbey National will be going ching! ching! over the Abbey's links with Sherlock Holmes. The bank, of which he is chairman, is sponsoring a statue of Conan Doyle's great detective as part of its 150th anniversary celebrations. 221b Baker Street, where Holmes and Watson were so capably looked after by Mrs Hudson, has been occupied by Abbey National since 1932, and the Sherlock Holmes Society has long pleaded for a statue there...."

4. "Holmes' Statue is on the Case!". Birmingham Evening Mail, September 24, 1999: 37.

"A bronze statue of the world's best-known fictional detective was unveiled in London. The statue of Sherlock Holmes stands outside Baker Street underground station, near to where the detective lived at the fictional number 221b. Abbey National, whose head office is located on the site of what would be 221b Baker Street, has sponsored the work to mark its 150th anniversary...."

5. "News in Brief." Nature 419, no. 6909 (2002): 770.

Presents international news briefs as of October 24, 2002. Presentation of a silver medal to the statue of Sherlock Holmes in London, England.

6. "Sherlock Holmes Statue to Appear in Moscow." 2006, no. (2006): 1.

"He never visited Russia over the course of his fictitious life, but Sherlock Holmes will soon grace Moscow in statue form, authorities are quoted by DPA news agency as saying. '(Moscow City Hall's) Monuments Committee has decided that there needs to be a monument of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson in Moscow,' Sergei Petrov, head of the committee, said in remarks carried by the Interfax news agency. The statue is to open near the British Embassy on the banks of the Moscow River under the auspices of the Moscow-based non-profit foundation Cultural Dialogue/One World. The organisation has said it wants to unveil the monument later this year or early 2007...."[excerpt]

7. "Sherlock homes in on London address." The Evening Standard (London), September 21, 1999: 19.

"The final touches are being put to a 9ft statue of the great sleuth Sherlock Holmes which will stand outside Baker Street Tube station - close to the fictional detective's London address. The bronze, by Essex sculptor John Doubleday, has been commissioned by the Sherlock Holmes Society whose chairman Lord Tugendhat will unveil it on Thursday...."

8. Barlay, Nick. "Statues of the London." The Times (London), May 15, 2004: 31.

Unveiled by Harold Wilson in 1966, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi's serene sculptural presence in Tavistock Square Gardens has become a focal point for peace memorials and events, just as his strategy of non-violent non-cooperation (satyagraha) has become a byword for peaceful resistance. Pandit Nehru, the former Prime Minister of India, planted a copper beech tree near by to commemorate his visit to London in 1953, and a cherry tree was planted in 1967 for the victims of Hiroshima. Each year on October 2, Gandhi's birth is celebrated with a huge display of flowers. To find Gandhi's statue, the great man's own instructions will help: "There is no way to peace. Peace is the way." The recent murder of Lancelyn Green, the renowned Sherlock Holmes expert, only fuels the transatlantic excitement of American and British fans: is there a Conan Doyle curse? What is true, of course, is that Holmes lived at 221b Baker Street, which is now a museum complete with very real souvenirs. Around the corner in front of Baker Street station is a statue of the famous detective by the sculptor John Doubleday, who is responsible for a number of London's more populist enterprises. The statue was unveiled in 1999 by Lord Tugendhat, the chairman of Abbey National Bank. The association with Holmes goes back to 1932, when the company built its headquarters at 200 Baker Street. Soon, a "secretary to Sherlock Holmes" had to be appointed to deal with the constant letters addressed to 221b. A permanent memorial to the world's most translated and performed playwright after Shakespeare was first proposed by the film director Derek Jarman, but it wasn't until 1998 that Oscar Wilde secured a place in Central London. Maggi Hambling's bronze in Adelaide Street near Trafalgar Square was unveiled by Stephen Fry and is less formal than the blue plaque at Wilde's residence in Tite Street in Chelsea. Entitled A Conversation with Oscar Wilde 1854-1900, the memorial consists of a sarcophagus, out of which pokes the writer's head. According to Hambling, the sculpture is "completed" when a member of the public sits down on the sarcophagus to have a chat with the author. In addition, the rebellious Wilde is depicted smoking, once a symbol of moral decay. Inscribed on the memorial is that wonderful quote by Wilde: "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."

9. Berdan, Marshall S. "Sherlock Holmes 101." The Washington Post, January 11, 2004: 2.

"WHAT: Tracing the Victorian London of Sherlock Holmes; his colleague and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson; and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. WHY NOW: Because as devotees of Holmes -- 'the world's first and still most famous consulting detective' -- have collectively deduced, he was born Jan. 6, 1854, thus making 2004 his sesquicentennial celebration. SHERLOCKIAN SITES: The exact site of Holmes's 221B Baker St. residence remains a matter of debate. Because the entire Portman Square neighborhood in which it was located was reduced to rubble in World War II, the 'modern' world of Sherlock Holmes has been relocated to the northern end of the extended -- and renumbered -- Baker Street. Highlights include: "The Great Detective." Standing vigil outside the Marylebone Road exit of the Baker Street tube station is this statue, erected in 1999 by the Abbey National Bank (the residents of 221 Baker since 1932)....Sherlock Holmes Museum....Sherlock Holmes Memorabilia Co...."

10. Green, Richard Lancelyn. "Editorial: A Sherlock Holmes Statue for Baker Street." The Sherlock Holmes Journal 23, no. 2 (1997): 41-42.

11. Hanlon, Michael. "Sleuthing the case of statue in the square." The Toronto Star, October 4, 2003: no page citation.

"Here I am in my room at the Parkhotel du Sauvage, indulging myself in Meiringen's two major pursuits. I'm munching on a meringue while at the same time gazing at Reichenbach Falls cascading down the mountain beyond my window. And, though I've been here only 24 hours, I've already solved both The Case of the Statue in the Square and The Mystery of the Bakery Window. My brilliant powers of observation and deduction of the statue's deerstalker cap, meerschaum pipe, and the astonishing likeness to the many Sherlock Holmeses we've seen on film, led me to conclude that the statue depicted none other than the Great Detective...."

12. Hirayama, Yuichi. "The Japanese Sherlock Holmes Statue Now." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 29-31.

13. Horrocks, Peter, and Richard Lancelyn Green. The return of Sherlock Holmes : the handbook of The Sherlock Holmes Statue Festival, 21-26 September 1999. [Tonbridge]: Sherlock Holmes Society of London, 1999.

Sherlock Holmes Statue Festival (1999 : London, England). ill., map, ports. ; 30 cm. Edited by Peter Horrocks and Richard Lancelyn Green ; with forewords by The Prince of Wales and The Prime Minister.;

14. Kegley, Jerry. "Immortalized in Bronze: The London Statue Dedication." Baker Street West 1 6, no. 1 (2000): 38-41.

15. Nosowicz, Dorota. "Comment: 10 Key Things About...Sherlock Holmes." The Observer, September 19, 1999: 27.

"Elementary, dear reader, and not before time. The esteemed sculptor, Mr John Doubleday, will unveil his latest statue outside Baker Street Underground railway station in London's district of Marylebone on Thursday. It is a likeness of the greatest detective ever, Mr Sherlock Holmes, whose lodgings were at 221B Baker Street, where now resides the Abbey National celebrating 150 years of financial ministration. 1. Nascence: In 1887, the legend of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Thomas Watson was born in Beeton's Christmas Annual...."

16. Owen, Richard. "Sherlock Holmes's Italian connection." The Times (London), April 19, 2002: 40.

"Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts in Italy have unveiled a bronze bust of the Great Detective at a Florence railway station to mark Holmes's -and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's -little-known Italian connection. Gianluca Salvatori, head of the Italian Sherlock Holmes society Uno Studio in Holmes (A Study in Holmes), said it was not widely known that Holmes had visited Florence after his struggle to the death with Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls. In 'The Adventure of the Empty House', the first story in The Return of Sherlock Holmes, the detective tells the astonished Dr Watson (who like everyone else thought that Holmes had perished) that after surviving the encounter with Moriarty thanks to a hidden ledge, 'I took to my heels, did ten miles over the mountains in the darkness, and a week later found myself in Florence, with the certainty that no one in the world knew what had become of me'...."

17. Reid, T. R. "For Sherlock Holmes, A Study in Bronze." The Washington Post, September 24, 1999: A23.

"In the bustling neighborhood that was home to the World's Greatest Detective, who pondered the mystery of the dog that didn't bark, London today finally resolved the riddle of the statue that wasn't there. Just around the corner from their hero's famous flat--at 221B Baker Street--a boisterous cluster of fans from around the world doffed their deerstalkers and waved their magnifying glasses in the air at the unveiling of London's first statue honoring Sherlock Holmes...."

18. Skoyles, Lesley. "The Edinburgh Sherlock Holmes Statue." The Ritual, no. 24 (1999): 24-25.

19. Watson-Smyth, Kate. "Sherlock Holmes and the mystery of the missing statue is solved." The Independent (London), February 21, 1999: 13.

It is more than 70 years since Sherlock Holmes solved his last case, but he is still sent more than 40 letters a month to his rooms in Baker Street. One of the most enduring mysteries, however, is how this most famous of detectives came to be commemorated in Japan, Switzerland and Edinburgh but never by his home at 221B. The answer, when it finally emerged, was elementary, my dear Watson -- nobody had ever got round to it. But now, more than 60 years after the death of author G K Chesterton, who was the first to suggest a statue of the sleuth, planning permission for one has been granted to the Sherlock Holmes Society...."

08 Memorials and Memorabilia -- The Silver Blaze Horse Races (2)

1. Diamond, Susan Z. 50th Running Chicago Silver Blaze, A History of the Race. Chicago: The Watsonians, 2009.

2. Lewis, Candace, ed. Two Celebrations: The 50th Annual Running of the Chicago Silver Blaze and The Triennial Silver Blaze of the Baker Street Irregulars. New York: The Baker Street Irregulars, 2009.

Contents include: Setting the Scene for 'Silver Blaze': Nineteenth-Century Art and Flat Racing / Candace Lewis; The Speculative Fun and Logical Games of 'Silver Blaze' / Roger Donway; The New York Silver Blazes / Art Levine ;



A Holmes and Doyle Bibliography © 2004-2012 Timothy J. Johnson